Archive for the ‘Gay Marriage’ Category

Documentary ‘The Freedom to Marry’ chronicles the long road for … – Los Angeles Times

When it first came together, the documentary “The Freedom to Marry” probably looked like something of a victory lap. A chance to celebrate the individuals whose decades of work on the fight for marriage equality led to the 2015 Supreme Court ruling making it legal for gay people to marry in all 50 states.

All that is still true today, but something else is as well. In a political climate in which all things progressive are at risk, the film is a reminder of the long and difficult work that victory took as well as a notification that no triumph can be taken for granted.

As directed by Eddie Rosenstein, “The Freedom to Marry” is hardly the first documentary to deal with that ongoing battle. Especially memorable was “The Case Against 8,” the detailed story of the intense legal maneuvering surrounding the Supreme Court’s earlier 2013 ruling against Proposition 8, the California ballot initiative that said only marriage between a man and a woman would be recognized in the state.

Though Rosenstein spends much of the film on the months leading up to and following the oral arguments on the landmark 2015 court decision, “The Freedom to Marry” is not as focused as “The Case Against 8” is on one specific case.

Rather, because director Rosenstein (whose previous work includes producing the Klezmer doc “A Tickle In the Heart”) was a childhood acquaintance of this film’s protagonist, “Freedom to Marry” focuses on the trajectory of his career.

That subject would be Evan Wolfson, founder and president of the advocacy group Freedom to Marry and a man who could truthfully say that “for 32 years I spent the most part of most days” driving the national narrative on that issue.

Though the documentary could do without encomiums from Wolfson’s parents about what a brilliant child he was, it is clear that as an adult he was smart, dynamic and far-seeing about this matter in a way that few others were.

Wolfson wrote his 1983 third-year Harvard Law thesis paper on gay marriage at a time when almost no one outside (or even inside) the gay community thought this was a viable idea.

But Wolfson, himself gay, understood that “by claiming this vocabulary of marriage,” the gay community would be “creating an engine of transformation that would help change non-gay people’s understanding” of their lives.

Before Wolfson’s vision became reality, several cultural changes took place. First came AIDS, which, he says “shattered the silence of gay people’s lives. The movement went from being about being left alone don’t harass me to a movement about being let in.”

After Wolfson and his legal partner Dan Foley had unexpected success in 1993 with gay marriage in Hawaii, he formed a strong professional relationship with Mary Bonauto, a civil rights attorney from GLAD (Gay and Lesbian Advocates and Defenders.)

Jumping forward to 2015, it was Bonauto who ended up handling oral arguments when the gay marriage case went to the Supreme Court. “The Freedom to Marry” also spends time with the marriage plaintiffs April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse, terrified by the notion that the foster kids they were parenting could be taken away from their family if they could not legally adopt them.

Whenever we see Wolfson, he is strategizing about his issue, and his ideas are a key part of why the American political landscape went from zero states allowing gay marriage to 37 a decade later.

When the Supreme Court decided in favor of marriage, President Obama called it “justice that arrives like a thunderbolt.” But Wolfson saw it slightly differently.

“That,” he says with a sigh, “only took 32 years.”

————–

The Freedom to Marry

Not rated

Running time: 1 hour, 26 minutes

Playing: Laemmle Monica Film Center, Santa Monica

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Twitter: @KennethTuran

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Documentary ‘The Freedom to Marry’ chronicles the long road for … – Los Angeles Times

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Assembly passes resolution to recognize same-sex marriage – Las Vegas Sun

By Cy Ryan (contact)

Thursday, March 9, 2017 | 4:22 p.m.

CARSON CITY Assembly Democrats today pushed through a proposed constitutional amendment and a bill recognizing the rights of gays and lesbians.

By a vote of 27-14, lawmakers approved a resolution to amend the Nevada Constitution to recognize same-sex marriages. The Assembly also approved 26-16 a bill to require state agencies and foster homes to be trained on issues regarding children who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender.

Assemblyman Nelson Araujo, D-Las Vegas, speaking in support of the constitutional change, said, It is time for Nevada to recognize all marriages. He said the U.S. Supreme Court has already ruled that states must recognize same-sex marriage.

The Nevada Constitution says a marriage can only be between a man and a woman. The measure was enacted by a vote of the people.

Assembly Minority Leader Paul Anderson, R-Las Vegas, said he opposes discrimination but added Nevadans had decided the issue. Its time to move on, he said in a floor speech.

But Assemblyman Elliott Anderson, D-Las Vegas, said Nevada has changed and any ban on gay marriage cannot be enforced.

The bill, meanwhile, says the state Division of Child and Family Services must provide training for those who work with foster homes, detention facilities and mental health facilities. Araujo said the bill is aimed at eliminating neglect and discrimination.

Both measures now go to the Senate. If the resolution is approved, it must be passed by the 2019 Legislature and ratified by the voters.

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Assembly passes resolution to recognize same-sex marriage – Las Vegas Sun

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Wyoming Judge Under Fire for Religious Beliefs on Gay Marriage – CBN News

Ruth Neely has been a small town judge in Pinedale for more than 20 years.

She has never been asked to perform a same-sex marriage, but was asked the hypothetical question of whether she would perform a same-sex ceremony if asked to do so.

Judge Neely publicly stated that if asked, she would refuse to perform same-sex marriage ceremonies because doing so would violate her religious beliefs.

On Tuesday, the state’s Supreme Court censured Neely for making that hypothetical statement, saying she violated the state’s code of judicial conduct.

“No judge can turn down a request to perform a marriage for reasons that undermine the integrity of the judiciary by demonstrating a lack of independence and impartiality.”

According to Fox News, in 2014, Neely stated her position on same-sex marriage during a interview about gay marriage in the local newspaper.

She restated her position under oath:

“If I ever were to receive a request to perform a same-sex marriage, which has never happened, I would ensure that the couple received the services that they requested by very kindly giving them the names and phone numbers of other magistrates who could perform their wedding.”

The court declined to remove Neely from her position because of how long she’s been in her role as judge “for which she is widely respected.” The court also said her statement was an isolated response “to a quickly changing legal landscape one in which many judges have experienced similar turmoil.”

The Alliance Defending Freedom represents Judge Neely. Senior Counsel Jim Campbell released the following statement to CBN News:

“By affirming that Judge Neely may remain in her judicial positions, the Wyoming Supreme Court has recognized that her honorable beliefs about marriage do not disqualify her from serving her community as a judge, which she has done with distinction for more than two decades. The court rejected the Wyoming Commission on Judicial Conduct and Ethics’ recommendation that Judge Neely be removed from office for expressing her belief that marriage is the union of one man and one woman. The court also stated that removing her would have ‘unnecessarily circumscribe protected expression’ and thus violated the Constitution. Judge Neely looks forward to serving her community for many years to come.”

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Domestic partners could lose Wisconsin health coverage now that same-sex marriage is legal – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Matt Schrek (left) and Jose Fernando Guitterez were the first couple to get married at the Milwaukee County Courthouse after the ban on same sex marriage was revoked in June 2014. The state would discontinue state health coverage and other benefits for thousands of domestic partners of state and local workers, arguing that such partnerships are no longer necessary because same-sex marriage is legal.(Photo: Gary Porter / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo

MADISON – The state would discontinue state health coverage and other benefits for thousands ofdomestic partners of state and local workers even thosewhose partners have already died, under Gov. Scott Walker’s budget bill.

But within hours of a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel report that the bill would affect a handful of survivors whose partner had died, Walkerspokesman Tom Evenson said that wasn’t the proposal’s intent.

“We’re willing to work with the Legislature on a potential fix for this,” he said.

Evenson said the thrust of the measure is to require all state and local workers to marry if they want to receive theirstate benefits a step made possible by the 2014legalization of same-sex marriage in Wisconsin. That makes domestic partner benefits unnecessary, he said

But marriage is no longer an option for the handful of people in Wisconsin whose domestic partner has already died.

The budget bill makes an exception for the domestic partners of police and firefighters who were harmed or died while on duty,according to an analysis by the Legislature’s nonpartisan budget office. But otherwise, health coverage for domestic partners would end on Jan. 1, 2018.

Dropping coverage for survivors particularly troubled Outagamie County Executive Tom Nelson, a Democrat and former state lawmaker who said that it would affect domestic partners of county employees.

“This is just really unconscionable. This has to be rectified,” Nelson said.

Rep. JoCasta Zamarippa (D-Milwaukee), who is bisexual, echoed Nelson’s words, calling it “unfair, unequal, and simply wrong” to drop benefits for domestic partners.

There are 4,100 couplesboth same-sex and opposite sex who have at least one of them in a state or local government job and who have registered for health, pension or other benefits, the Legislative Fiscal Bureau reports. There are at least seven participants who continue to buy state health insurance after the death of their domestic partner, according to a state official.

The change would only affect the benefits of these government employees. It does not affect the separate statewide domestic partner registry for same-sex only couples that was established by Democratic lawmakers and Gov. Jim Doyle in 2009.

Domestic partner benefits have dropped in prominence following the 2015 decision by the U.S. Supreme Courtthat legalized same-sex marriage nationwide and dealt the final blow toWisconsin’s gay marriage ban.

Currently, the domestic partners of a deceased state employee have access to state health coverage, though they have to pay the state’s full cost of the insurance.

If Walker’s bill is not amended, they would lose that access, according to the Fiscal Bureau.

Journal Sentinel reporter Patrick Marley contributed to this article.

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Domestic partners could lose Wisconsin health coverage now that same-sex marriage is legal – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

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Proposed bill would ban same-sex marriage in Arkansas – THV11.com

Brittany Breeding , KTHV 3:29 PM. CST March 08, 2017

CREDIT: Getty Images

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) A bill has been proposed to make marriage only between a man and a woman.

Twenty Representatives and one Senator introduced House Bill 2098. Representative Stephen Meeks (R-Greenbrier) is the lead sponsor of the bill.

HB2098 would not recognize marriages between two people of the same sex, even if the marriage happened in a different state or country.

The bill states Marriage shall be only between a man and a woman. A marriage between persons of the same sex is void.

No marriage licenses would be able to be issued to couples of the same sex. Same-sex couples would also not be entitled to the benefits of marriage.

However, the bill would not prohibit an employer from extending benefits to a person who is a domestic partner of an employee.

The bill goes on to state that in marriages between a man and a woman, the woman has to be at least 16-years-old and the man has to be 17-years-old. In marriages that happen before the age of 18, written consent of a parent or guardian has to be given before the marriage can happen.

The bill joins at least fifteen other bills designed to limit the freedoms of Arkansas LGBT community.

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Kim Davis avoids legal fees in gay marriage suit – The Courier-Journal

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The Associated Press Published 1:21 p.m. ET March 7, 2017 | Updated 9 hours ago

But Davis’ lawyers say the pope told her to ‘stay strong.’

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Kentucky Gov. Steven Beshear, urging a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed against him by Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, says her legal claims “demonstrate the absurdity” of her position. In court

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Pope Francis waited until his historic U.S. visit was over to make his most direct comments on the nation’s debate over gay marriage, saying government officials should have the right to refrain from

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Kim Davis is back at work several days after being released from jail. The embattled Kentucky county clerk says she still refuses to authorize marriage licenses, but will not stop her deputies from issuing them. VPC

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The Kentucky clerk who was jailed after refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples hasn’t exactly gotten the warmest welcome in her hometown after her release. A billboard defending gay m

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Kim Davis was flanked by Liberty Counsel attorney Mat Staver and former Arkanasa Gov. Mike Huckabee, a Republican candidate for president. WHAS-11

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In a brief moment at the microphone during the rally in her support, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis spoke to supporters. Jonathan Palmer/Special to The C-J

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Hundreds of people gathered outside the Carter County Detention Center in Grayson on Saturday and prayed for jailed Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis. James Crisp/Special to The C-J James Crisp / special to The Courier-Journall

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Several hundred people demonstrated their support for County Clerk Kim Davis in Kentucky as she spent her third day in jail on contempt charges. She was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to gay couples. (Sept. 5) AP

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Mathew Staver of the Liberty Counsel, which is representing Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, told reporters outside the Carter County jail that he had spoken with Davis and she told him “all is well.” He said she has been reading the Bible in her cell. Dustin Strupp / The Courier-Journal

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The first same-sex couple to receive a marriage license at the Rowan County Clerk’s Office was William Smith, Jr. and James Yates. Alton Strupp, The C-J

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Reactions to a judge’s decision to hold a Kentucky county clerk in contempt of court for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples are as polarized as the issue itself. Dustin Strupp / The Courier-Journal

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Gay marriage supporters await arrival of Kim Davis. Alton Strupp, The C-J

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Kim Davis supporters rally in Ashland at the Carl D. Perkins Federal building in Ashland, Ky as they await the arrival of county clerk Kim Davis for her hearing. Alton Strupp, The C-J

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Jonathan Lovitz, Chris Stoll, Ria Tabacco Mar and Zack Ford explain why Kim Davis can’t be fired.

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The marriage history of a defiant Kentucky county clerk has become public record.Rowan County clerk Kim Davis has been married four times, including twice to her current husband Joe Davis.She has ther

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Kim Davis is confronted by David Moore and David Ermold over the Rowan County clerk’s refusal to issue a marriage license. Michael Wynn, The C-J

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Jonathan Lovitz and Chris Stoll deliver a message to Kentucky clerk Kim Davis.

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Bobby Jindal: Kentucky Clerk Shouldn’t Resign Over Her Religious Beliefs

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Kentucky Clerk Kim Davis is still refusing to issue marriage licenses. Here’s what could happen if she continues to deny couples’ licenses.

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Kim Davis critics and supporters demonstrated outside the Rowan County Courthouse on Tuesday. Michael Wynn, The C-J

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Removing defiant Kentucky clerk Kim Davis from her position isn’t an easy prospect.Davis the Rowan County official who said she feels empowered by “God’s authority” to defy the U.S. Supreme Court an

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Same-sex marriage supporters rally under the hashtag to demand that Kentucky county clerk issue marriage licenses. According to the Associated Press Kim Davis said she was able to deny the licenses “u

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James Yates and William Smith Jr. attempted to obtain a marriage license in Rowan County for the third time on Thursday. Michael Wynn, The C-J

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Rowan couple talks about getting license after obtaining the paperwork in February. Mike Wynn/The Courier-Journal

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William Smith Jr. And James Yates talk to press after getting refused a marriage license in Rowan County, Ky. Michael Wynn, The C-J

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April Miller and Karen Roberts were refused a license in Rowan County on Thursday.

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James Yates and Will Smith Jr. were denied a marriage license in Rowan County on Thursday.

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James Yates and Will Smith Jr. Requested a marriage license in Rowan County on Thursday, but were denied for a second time.

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In a brief moment at the microphone during the rally in her support, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis spoke to supporters. Jonathan Palmer/Special to The C-J

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Evangelicals Must Stick With Church Despite ‘False Teaching’ On Gay Marriage, Says the Bishop of Maidstone – Virtue Online

‘In the face of false teaching, the Apostle Paul tells Timothy both to keep his distance from it but also to continue in patient teaching,’ Bishop Thomas writes. ‘He recognises that this may involve suffering.’

The ‘floating’ bishop, whose position was installed to appease conservatives, offers oversight to those parishes who refuse to recognise female ordination but find themselves under a woman bishop.

Thomas admits a number of his fellow bishops are calling for the Church to be more affirming of same-sex relationships but says evangelicals ‘are on a different trajectory’.

He writes: ‘The time may be on us where individual congregations and parishes have to take fresh steps to show that they are not following the trajectory of others.

‘This may well involve them in difficult decisions, unpopular actions and awkward situations.’

But he urged conservative parishes in general not to abandon the CofE.

‘The doctrinal foundations of the Church of England are worth protecting,’ he writes.

‘If we are clergy, we need to remember that when the Apostle Paul warned of false teachers, he didn’t urge the Ephesian elders to run away in order to avoid attack, but instead said ‘guard the flock’.

‘So we need to stand firm — continuing to teach and do the work of evangelism, continuing to turn up at Synods in order to contend for the gospel, continuing to encourage one another by meeting together, and continuing to support those who run into difficulty.’

Quoting a 19th century essay by theologian and bishop J C Ryle he concluded: ‘Let us not desert our post to save trouble, and move out to please our adversaries … The good ship of the Church of England may have some rotten planks about her. The crew may, many of them, be useless and mutinous, and not trustworthy. But there are still some faithful ones among them. There is still hope for the good old craft. The Great Pilot has not yet left her. Let us therefore stick by the ship.’

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Trailblazing Brazilian mayor marries same-sex partner – CNN

“It wasn’t supposed to be a political act,” Edgar de Souza said. “It was a ceremony for us. We waited long enough! But of course, it was also political.”

That is because Souza was marrying his longtime male partner, Alexsandro Luciano Trindade.

“It’s the first time in Brazil that a mayor has starred in his own same-sex marriage!” Souza said with a laugh. “We want to give visibility to gay marriage and encourage others to take advantage of their rights.”

He said he has received some hate mail, but mostly messages of support on social media.

Same-sex marriage has been legal in Brazil since 2013 after a decision by the National Council of Justice recognized marriage as a right for same-sex couples across the country. In the first three years, more than 14,000 same-sex couples were married.

Once a bastion of conservative Catholic values, Latin America has become something of a trailblazer for gay rights, with Argentina, Uruguay and Mexico City leading the charge along with Brazil.

Souza became the first openly gay mayoral candidate in Brazil during his first campaign, in 2012. He threw his hat in the ring after three successful terms in the local legislature.

“It was a dirty campaign,” he said.

“My rivals said I was going to turn the town hall into a gay nightclub. They put up posters of me with my partner and said I would corrupt families,” Souza said.

“But it backfired. The people of Lins rejected the homophobic attacks and I jumped 10% in the polls!

Souza won re-election last year.

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Five Evangelical Pastors Who Back Gay Marriage – ChristianToday

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The word ‘evangelical’ used to be a tightly defined description.

If you said someone was evangelical you knew pretty much what you were getting inerrancy of the Bible, importance of preaching, a focus on evangelism, warnings of hell and most of all opposition to gay marriage.

Being anti-same sex marriage and evangelicalism used to be synonymous, so much so that when Steve Chalke announced he backed the change in law he was kicked out of the Evangelical Alliance.

But now it is not so clear.

While still far from the mainstream and the overwhelming majority of self-described evangelicals are still opposed to gay marriage, there are a growing list of pastors who describe themselves as evangelical and yet support same sex couples.

Tony Campolo

The famous evangelist and pastor announced his change of position in a statementlast June.

‘It has taken countless hours of prayer, study, conversation and emotional turmoil to bring me to the place where I am finally ready to call for the full acceptance of Christian gay couples into the Church,’ he wrote.

‘Through [my wife] Peggy, I have come to know so many gay Christian couples whose relationships work in much the same way as our own. Our friendships with these couples have helped me understand how important it is for the exclusion and disapproval of their unions by the Christian community to end. We in the Church should actively support such families. Furthermore, we should be doing all we can to reach, comfort and include all those precious children of God who have been wrongly led to believe that they are mistakes or just not good enough for God, simply because they are not straight.’

Rob Bell

In a debateat San Francisco’s Grace Cathedral in 2013, the author and pastor Rob Bell, already discredited by many evangelicals for his book Love Wins, gave a blanket endorsement of gay marriage.

‘I am for marriage. I am for fidelity. I am for love, whether it’s a man and woman, a woman and a woman, a man and a man … I think this is the world we are living in and we need to affirm people wherever they are.’

He went on to give a wholesale criticism of traditional evangelicalism and in particular its own subculture: ‘I think we are witnessing the death of a particular subculture that doesn’t work. I think there is a very narrow, politically intertwined, culturally ghettoised, Evangelical subculture that was told “we’re gonna change the thing” and they haven’t … And we have supported policies and ways of viewing the world that are actually destructive. And we’ve done it in the name of God and we need to repent.’

Jim Wallis

An outspoken critic of the Religious Right and president of the Sojournersmagazine, Jim Wallis reversed his stance on gay marriage in an interview with the Huffington Postin 2013.

‘How do we commit liberals and conservatives to re-covenanting marriage, reestablishing, renewing marriage?,’ he asked.

‘I think we should include same-sex couples in that renewal of marriage, [but] I want to talk marriage first. Marriage needs some strengthening. Let’s start with marriage, and then I think we have to talk about, now, how to include same-sex couples in that deeper understanding of marriage. I want a deeper commitment to marriage that is more and more inclusive, and that’s where I think the country is going.’

Jen Hatmaker

One of the relatively few prominent female voices on the evangelical scene, Hatmaker received a fierce backlash when she said she thought God saw monogamous gay relationships as holy.

In an interview with Religion News Serviceshe said: ‘From a spiritual perspective, since gay marriage is legal in all 50 states, our communities have plenty of gay couples who, just like the rest of us, need marriage support and parenting help and Christian community. They are either going to find those resources in the church or they are not.

‘Not only are these our neighbors and friends, but they are brothers and sisters in Christ. They are adopted into the same family as the rest of us, and the church hasn’t treated the LGBT community like family. We have to do better.’

Asked if she would attend a gay friend’s wedding she said it was an easy answer: ‘I would attend that wedding with gladness, and I would drink champagne. I want the very best for my gay friends. I want love and happiness and faithfulness and commitment and community. Yes. That’s an easy answer.’

Danny Cortez

The Southern Baptist church pastor from Los Angeles, California, announced in 2014 he is ‘gay affirming’ and had accepted his son’s homosexuality.

‘In August of 2013, on a sunny day at the beach, I realized I no longer believed in the traditional [church] teachings regarding homosexuality,’ Cortez said in a letter published on Patheosblog.

‘And it was especially the testimony of my gay friends that helped me to see how they have been marginalised that my eyes became open to the injustice that the church has wrought.’

He wrote that many had left his church after the announcement but those who remained decided to agree to disagree and not pass judgment.

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Documentary ‘The Freedom to Marry’ chronicles the long road for … – Los Angeles Times

When it first came together, the documentary “The Freedom to Marry” probably looked like something of a victory lap. A chance to celebrate the individuals whose decades of work on the fight for marriage equality led to the 2015 Supreme Court ruling making it legal for gay people to marry in all 50 states. All that is still true today, but something else is as well. In a political climate in which all things progressive are at risk, the film is a reminder of the long and difficult work that victory took as well as a notification that no triumph can be taken for granted. As directed by Eddie Rosenstein, “The Freedom to Marry” is hardly the first documentary to deal with that ongoing battle. Especially memorable was “The Case Against 8,” the detailed story of the intense legal maneuvering surrounding the Supreme Court’s earlier 2013 ruling against Proposition 8, the California ballot initiative that said only marriage between a man and a woman would be recognized in the state. Though Rosenstein spends much of the film on the months leading up to and following the oral arguments on the landmark 2015 court decision, “The Freedom to Marry” is not as focused as “The Case Against 8” is on one specific case. Rather, because director Rosenstein (whose previous work includes producing the Klezmer doc “A Tickle In the Heart”) was a childhood acquaintance of this film’s protagonist, “Freedom to Marry” focuses on the trajectory of his career. That subject would be Evan Wolfson, founder and president of the advocacy group Freedom to Marry and a man who could truthfully say that “for 32 years I spent the most part of most days” driving the national narrative on that issue. Though the documentary could do without encomiums from Wolfson’s parents about what a brilliant child he was, it is clear that as an adult he was smart, dynamic and far-seeing about this matter in a way that few others were. Wolfson wrote his 1983 third-year Harvard Law thesis paper on gay marriage at a time when almost no one outside (or even inside) the gay community thought this was a viable idea. But Wolfson, himself gay, understood that “by claiming this vocabulary of marriage,” the gay community would be “creating an engine of transformation that would help change non-gay people’s understanding” of their lives. Before Wolfson’s vision became reality, several cultural changes took place. First came AIDS, which, he says “shattered the silence of gay people’s lives. The movement went from being about being left alone don’t harass me to a movement about being let in.” After Wolfson and his legal partner Dan Foley had unexpected success in 1993 with gay marriage in Hawaii, he formed a strong professional relationship with Mary Bonauto, a civil rights attorney from GLAD (Gay and Lesbian Advocates and Defenders.) Jumping forward to 2015, it was Bonauto who ended up handling oral arguments when the gay marriage case went to the Supreme Court. “The Freedom to Marry” also spends time with the marriage plaintiffs April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse, terrified by the notion that the foster kids they were parenting could be taken away from their family if they could not legally adopt them. Whenever we see Wolfson, he is strategizing about his issue, and his ideas are a key part of why the American political landscape went from zero states allowing gay marriage to 37 a decade later. When the Supreme Court decided in favor of marriage, President Obama called it “justice that arrives like a thunderbolt.” But Wolfson saw it slightly differently. “That,” he says with a sigh, “only took 32 years.” ————– The Freedom to Marry Not rated Running time: 1 hour, 26 minutes Playing: Laemmle Monica Film Center, Santa Monica See the most-read stories in Entertainment this hour kenneth.turan@latimes.com Twitter: @KennethTuran ALSO ‘When We Rise’ makes the gay rights movement part of a universal struggle The ambitious LGBT miniseries ‘When We Rise’ arrives in a new era of upheaval

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Assembly passes resolution to recognize same-sex marriage – Las Vegas Sun

By Cy Ryan (contact) Thursday, March 9, 2017 | 4:22 p.m. CARSON CITY Assembly Democrats today pushed through a proposed constitutional amendment and a bill recognizing the rights of gays and lesbians. By a vote of 27-14, lawmakers approved a resolution to amend the Nevada Constitution to recognize same-sex marriages. The Assembly also approved 26-16 a bill to require state agencies and foster homes to be trained on issues regarding children who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. Assemblyman Nelson Araujo, D-Las Vegas, speaking in support of the constitutional change, said, It is time for Nevada to recognize all marriages. He said the U.S. Supreme Court has already ruled that states must recognize same-sex marriage. The Nevada Constitution says a marriage can only be between a man and a woman. The measure was enacted by a vote of the people. Assembly Minority Leader Paul Anderson, R-Las Vegas, said he opposes discrimination but added Nevadans had decided the issue. Its time to move on, he said in a floor speech. But Assemblyman Elliott Anderson, D-Las Vegas, said Nevada has changed and any ban on gay marriage cannot be enforced. The bill, meanwhile, says the state Division of Child and Family Services must provide training for those who work with foster homes, detention facilities and mental health facilities. Araujo said the bill is aimed at eliminating neglect and discrimination. Both measures now go to the Senate. If the resolution is approved, it must be passed by the 2019 Legislature and ratified by the voters.

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March 10, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Wyoming Judge Under Fire for Religious Beliefs on Gay Marriage – CBN News

Ruth Neely has been a small town judge in Pinedale for more than 20 years. She has never been asked to perform a same-sex marriage, but was asked the hypothetical question of whether she would perform a same-sex ceremony if asked to do so. Judge Neely publicly stated that if asked, she would refuse to perform same-sex marriage ceremonies because doing so would violate her religious beliefs. On Tuesday, the state’s Supreme Court censured Neely for making that hypothetical statement, saying she violated the state’s code of judicial conduct. “No judge can turn down a request to perform a marriage for reasons that undermine the integrity of the judiciary by demonstrating a lack of independence and impartiality.” According to Fox News, in 2014, Neely stated her position on same-sex marriage during a interview about gay marriage in the local newspaper. She restated her position under oath: “If I ever were to receive a request to perform a same-sex marriage, which has never happened, I would ensure that the couple received the services that they requested by very kindly giving them the names and phone numbers of other magistrates who could perform their wedding.” The court declined to remove Neely from her position because of how long she’s been in her role as judge “for which she is widely respected.” The court also said her statement was an isolated response “to a quickly changing legal landscape one in which many judges have experienced similar turmoil.” The Alliance Defending Freedom represents Judge Neely. Senior Counsel Jim Campbell released the following statement to CBN News: “By affirming that Judge Neely may remain in her judicial positions, the Wyoming Supreme Court has recognized that her honorable beliefs about marriage do not disqualify her from serving her community as a judge, which she has done with distinction for more than two decades. The court rejected the Wyoming Commission on Judicial Conduct and Ethics’ recommendation that Judge Neely be removed from office for expressing her belief that marriage is the union of one man and one woman. The court also stated that removing her would have ‘unnecessarily circumscribe protected expression’ and thus violated the Constitution. Judge Neely looks forward to serving her community for many years to come.”

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March 9, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Domestic partners could lose Wisconsin health coverage now that same-sex marriage is legal – Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Matt Schrek (left) and Jose Fernando Guitterez were the first couple to get married at the Milwaukee County Courthouse after the ban on same sex marriage was revoked in June 2014. The state would discontinue state health coverage and other benefits for thousands of domestic partners of state and local workers, arguing that such partnerships are no longer necessary because same-sex marriage is legal.(Photo: Gary Porter / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)Buy Photo MADISON – The state would discontinue state health coverage and other benefits for thousands ofdomestic partners of state and local workers even thosewhose partners have already died, under Gov. Scott Walker’s budget bill. But within hours of a Milwaukee Journal Sentinel report that the bill would affect a handful of survivors whose partner had died, Walkerspokesman Tom Evenson said that wasn’t the proposal’s intent. “We’re willing to work with the Legislature on a potential fix for this,” he said. Evenson said the thrust of the measure is to require all state and local workers to marry if they want to receive theirstate benefits a step made possible by the 2014legalization of same-sex marriage in Wisconsin. That makes domestic partner benefits unnecessary, he said But marriage is no longer an option for the handful of people in Wisconsin whose domestic partner has already died. The budget bill makes an exception for the domestic partners of police and firefighters who were harmed or died while on duty,according to an analysis by the Legislature’s nonpartisan budget office. But otherwise, health coverage for domestic partners would end on Jan. 1, 2018. Dropping coverage for survivors particularly troubled Outagamie County Executive Tom Nelson, a Democrat and former state lawmaker who said that it would affect domestic partners of county employees. “This is just really unconscionable. This has to be rectified,” Nelson said. Rep. JoCasta Zamarippa (D-Milwaukee), who is bisexual, echoed Nelson’s words, calling it “unfair, unequal, and simply wrong” to drop benefits for domestic partners. There are 4,100 couplesboth same-sex and opposite sex who have at least one of them in a state or local government job and who have registered for health, pension or other benefits, the Legislative Fiscal Bureau reports. There are at least seven participants who continue to buy state health insurance after the death of their domestic partner, according to a state official. The change would only affect the benefits of these government employees. It does not affect the separate statewide domestic partner registry for same-sex only couples that was established by Democratic lawmakers and Gov. Jim Doyle in 2009. Domestic partner benefits have dropped in prominence following the 2015 decision by the U.S. Supreme Courtthat legalized same-sex marriage nationwide and dealt the final blow toWisconsin’s gay marriage ban. Currently, the domestic partners of a deceased state employee have access to state health coverage, though they have to pay the state’s full cost of the insurance. If Walker’s bill is not amended, they would lose that access, according to the Fiscal Bureau. Journal Sentinel reporter Patrick Marley contributed to this article. Read or Share this story: https://jsonl.in/2naRdez

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March 9, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Proposed bill would ban same-sex marriage in Arkansas – THV11.com

Brittany Breeding , KTHV 3:29 PM. CST March 08, 2017 CREDIT: Getty Images LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) A bill has been proposed to make marriage only between a man and a woman. Twenty Representatives and one Senator introduced House Bill 2098. Representative Stephen Meeks (R-Greenbrier) is the lead sponsor of the bill. HB2098 would not recognize marriages between two people of the same sex, even if the marriage happened in a different state or country. The bill states Marriage shall be only between a man and a woman. A marriage between persons of the same sex is void. No marriage licenses would be able to be issued to couples of the same sex. Same-sex couples would also not be entitled to the benefits of marriage. However, the bill would not prohibit an employer from extending benefits to a person who is a domestic partner of an employee. The bill goes on to state that in marriages between a man and a woman, the woman has to be at least 16-years-old and the man has to be 17-years-old. In marriages that happen before the age of 18, written consent of a parent or guardian has to be given before the marriage can happen. The bill joins at least fifteen other bills designed to limit the freedoms of Arkansas LGBT community. 2017 KTHV-TV KTHV Battle lines drawn over recent ‘anti-LGBT’ bills proposed in Ark. legislature KTHV As concerns mount over LGBT rights, study shows lack of protections KTHV Arkansas Supreme Court strikes city’s LGBT protections KTHV Arkansas’ LGBT community still face challenges despite progress KTHV Texas court hears case to limit gay marriage legalization, restrict spousal benefits KTHV Vote tallies for two constitutional amendments defining marriage, right to life

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March 9, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Kim Davis avoids legal fees in gay marriage suit – The Courier-Journal

Subscribe today for full access on your desktop, tablet, and mobile device. 408 Let friends in your social network know what you are reading about Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis had faced paying about $233,000 in legal fees and costs Try Another Audio CAPTCHA Image CAPTCHA Help CancelSend A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. The Associated Press Published 1:21 p.m. ET March 7, 2017 | Updated 9 hours ago But Davis’ lawyers say the pope told her to ‘stay strong.’ 1 of 29 Kentucky Gov. Steven Beshear, urging a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed against him by Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, says her legal claims “demonstrate the absurdity” of her position. In court 2 of 29 Pope Francis waited until his historic U.S. visit was over to make his most direct comments on the nation’s debate over gay marriage, saying government officials should have the right to refrain from 3 of 29 Kim Davis is back at work several days after being released from jail. The embattled Kentucky county clerk says she still refuses to authorize marriage licenses, but will not stop her deputies from issuing them. VPC 4 of 29 The Kentucky clerk who was jailed after refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples hasn’t exactly gotten the warmest welcome in her hometown after her release. A billboard defending gay m 5 of 29 Kim Davis was flanked by Liberty Counsel attorney Mat Staver and former Arkanasa Gov. Mike Huckabee, a Republican candidate for president. WHAS-11 6 of 29 In a brief moment at the microphone during the rally in her support, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis spoke to supporters. Jonathan Palmer/Special to The C-J 7 of 29 Hundreds of people gathered outside the Carter County Detention Center in Grayson on Saturday and prayed for jailed Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis. James Crisp/Special to The C-J James Crisp / special to The Courier-Journall 8 of 29 Several hundred people demonstrated their support for County Clerk Kim Davis in Kentucky as she spent her third day in jail on contempt charges. She was jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to gay couples. (Sept. 5) AP 9 of 29 Mathew Staver of the Liberty Counsel, which is representing Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, told reporters outside the Carter County jail that he had spoken with Davis and she told him “all is well.” He said she has been reading the Bible in her cell. Dustin Strupp / The Courier-Journal 10 of 29 The first same-sex couple to receive a marriage license at the Rowan County Clerk’s Office was William Smith, Jr. and James Yates. Alton Strupp, The C-J 11 of 29 Reactions to a judge’s decision to hold a Kentucky county clerk in contempt of court for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples are as polarized as the issue itself. Dustin Strupp / The Courier-Journal 12 of 29 Gay marriage supporters await arrival of Kim Davis. Alton Strupp, The C-J 13 of 29 Kim Davis supporters rally in Ashland at the Carl D. Perkins Federal building in Ashland, Ky as they await the arrival of county clerk Kim Davis for her hearing. Alton Strupp, The C-J 14 of 29 Jonathan Lovitz, Chris Stoll, Ria Tabacco Mar and Zack Ford explain why Kim Davis can’t be fired. 15 of 29 The marriage history of a defiant Kentucky county clerk has become public record.Rowan County clerk Kim Davis has been married four times, including twice to her current husband Joe Davis.She has ther 16 of 29 Kim Davis is confronted by David Moore and David Ermold over the Rowan County clerk’s refusal to issue a marriage license. Michael Wynn, The C-J 17 of 29 Jonathan Lovitz and Chris Stoll deliver a message to Kentucky clerk Kim Davis. 18 of 29 Bobby Jindal: Kentucky Clerk Shouldn’t Resign Over Her Religious Beliefs 19 of 29 Kentucky Clerk Kim Davis is still refusing to issue marriage licenses. Here’s what could happen if she continues to deny couples’ licenses. 20 of 29 Kim Davis critics and supporters demonstrated outside the Rowan County Courthouse on Tuesday. Michael Wynn, The C-J 21 of 29 Removing defiant Kentucky clerk Kim Davis from her position isn’t an easy prospect.Davis the Rowan County official who said she feels empowered by “God’s authority” to defy the U.S. Supreme Court an 22 of 29 Same-sex marriage supporters rally under the hashtag to demand that Kentucky county clerk issue marriage licenses. According to the Associated Press Kim Davis said she was able to deny the licenses “u 23 of 29 James Yates and William Smith Jr. attempted to obtain a marriage license in Rowan County for the third time on Thursday. Michael Wynn, The C-J 24 of 29 Rowan couple talks about getting license after obtaining the paperwork in February. Mike Wynn/The Courier-Journal 25 of 29 William Smith Jr. And James Yates talk to press after getting refused a marriage license in Rowan County, Ky. Michael Wynn, The C-J 26 of 29 April Miller and Karen Roberts were refused a license in Rowan County on Thursday. 27 of 29 James Yates and Will Smith Jr. were denied a marriage license in Rowan County on Thursday. 28 of 29 James Yates and Will Smith Jr. Requested a marriage license in Rowan County on Thursday, but were denied for a second time. 29 of 29 Video | Vatican Doesn’t Want You To Think Pope Endorses Kim Davis KY Governor: Kim Davis’ Statements Show ‘Absurdity’ Pope Wades Into U.S. Gay Marriage Debate After Historic Visit Kentucky clerk won’t block, or issue, marriage licenses Kim Davis Mocked by ‘Marriage’ Billboard in Her Hometown Kim Davis out of jail; Mike Huckabee willing to take her place [Video] Video | Kim Davis free, speaks at rally Video | Rally for Kim Davis Raw: Hundreds rally for jailed clerk Kim Davis Kim Davis’ attorney Mathew Staver meets with the media [Video] Video | First same-sex couple gets marriage license in Rowan County Video | Reactions to Kim Davis ruling form those who were there Video | Gay marriage supporters at Kim Davis hearing Video | Kim Davis supporters rally in Ashland Here’s Why Kentucky Clerk Kim Davis Can’t Be Fired Defiant Kentucky County Clerk Has Marriage History Come to Light Watch | Kim Davis turns away gay couple A Message To Kentucky Clerk Kim Davis: ‘Girl, Take Off That Romper’ Bobby Jindal: Kentucky Clerk Shouldn’t Resign Over Her Religious Beliefs What Happens If Kim Davis Keeps Denying Marriage Licenses? Video | Kim Davis protests outside Rowan courthouse Why Hasn’t Clerk Defying Gay Marriage Ruling Been Fired? #DoYourJob Trends After Kentucky Clerk Refuses Same-Sex Marriage Licenses Video | Same-sex couple gets refused again in Rowan County Rowan couple talks about getting license Video | Couple talks about getting turned away for marriage license Another couple gets denied marriage license Video | Gay couple talks about getting refused a marriage license Video | Gay couple denied marriage license In a brief moment at the microphone during the rally in her support, Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis spoke to supporters. Jonathan Palmer/Special to The C-J

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March 7, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Evangelicals Must Stick With Church Despite ‘False Teaching’ On Gay Marriage, Says the Bishop of Maidstone – Virtue Online

‘In the face of false teaching, the Apostle Paul tells Timothy both to keep his distance from it but also to continue in patient teaching,’ Bishop Thomas writes. ‘He recognises that this may involve suffering.’ The ‘floating’ bishop, whose position was installed to appease conservatives, offers oversight to those parishes who refuse to recognise female ordination but find themselves under a woman bishop. Thomas admits a number of his fellow bishops are calling for the Church to be more affirming of same-sex relationships but says evangelicals ‘are on a different trajectory’. He writes: ‘The time may be on us where individual congregations and parishes have to take fresh steps to show that they are not following the trajectory of others. ‘This may well involve them in difficult decisions, unpopular actions and awkward situations.’ But he urged conservative parishes in general not to abandon the CofE. ‘The doctrinal foundations of the Church of England are worth protecting,’ he writes. ‘If we are clergy, we need to remember that when the Apostle Paul warned of false teachers, he didn’t urge the Ephesian elders to run away in order to avoid attack, but instead said ‘guard the flock’. ‘So we need to stand firm — continuing to teach and do the work of evangelism, continuing to turn up at Synods in order to contend for the gospel, continuing to encourage one another by meeting together, and continuing to support those who run into difficulty.’ Quoting a 19th century essay by theologian and bishop J C Ryle he concluded: ‘Let us not desert our post to save trouble, and move out to please our adversaries … The good ship of the Church of England may have some rotten planks about her. The crew may, many of them, be useless and mutinous, and not trustworthy. But there are still some faithful ones among them. There is still hope for the good old craft. The Great Pilot has not yet left her. Let us therefore stick by the ship.’ END

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March 7, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Trailblazing Brazilian mayor marries same-sex partner – CNN

“It wasn’t supposed to be a political act,” Edgar de Souza said. “It was a ceremony for us. We waited long enough! But of course, it was also political.” That is because Souza was marrying his longtime male partner, Alexsandro Luciano Trindade. “It’s the first time in Brazil that a mayor has starred in his own same-sex marriage!” Souza said with a laugh. “We want to give visibility to gay marriage and encourage others to take advantage of their rights.” He said he has received some hate mail, but mostly messages of support on social media. Same-sex marriage has been legal in Brazil since 2013 after a decision by the National Council of Justice recognized marriage as a right for same-sex couples across the country. In the first three years, more than 14,000 same-sex couples were married. Once a bastion of conservative Catholic values, Latin America has become something of a trailblazer for gay rights, with Argentina, Uruguay and Mexico City leading the charge along with Brazil. Souza became the first openly gay mayoral candidate in Brazil during his first campaign, in 2012. He threw his hat in the ring after three successful terms in the local legislature. “It was a dirty campaign,” he said. “My rivals said I was going to turn the town hall into a gay nightclub. They put up posters of me with my partner and said I would corrupt families,” Souza said. “But it backfired. The people of Lins rejected the homophobic attacks and I jumped 10% in the polls! Souza won re-election last year.

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March 7, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Five Evangelical Pastors Who Back Gay Marriage – ChristianToday

x To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video The word ‘evangelical’ used to be a tightly defined description. If you said someone was evangelical you knew pretty much what you were getting inerrancy of the Bible, importance of preaching, a focus on evangelism, warnings of hell and most of all opposition to gay marriage. Being anti-same sex marriage and evangelicalism used to be synonymous, so much so that when Steve Chalke announced he backed the change in law he was kicked out of the Evangelical Alliance. But now it is not so clear. While still far from the mainstream and the overwhelming majority of self-described evangelicals are still opposed to gay marriage, there are a growing list of pastors who describe themselves as evangelical and yet support same sex couples. Tony Campolo The famous evangelist and pastor announced his change of position in a statementlast June. ‘It has taken countless hours of prayer, study, conversation and emotional turmoil to bring me to the place where I am finally ready to call for the full acceptance of Christian gay couples into the Church,’ he wrote. ‘Through [my wife] Peggy, I have come to know so many gay Christian couples whose relationships work in much the same way as our own. Our friendships with these couples have helped me understand how important it is for the exclusion and disapproval of their unions by the Christian community to end. We in the Church should actively support such families. Furthermore, we should be doing all we can to reach, comfort and include all those precious children of God who have been wrongly led to believe that they are mistakes or just not good enough for God, simply because they are not straight.’ Rob Bell In a debateat San Francisco’s Grace Cathedral in 2013, the author and pastor Rob Bell, already discredited by many evangelicals for his book Love Wins, gave a blanket endorsement of gay marriage. ‘I am for marriage. I am for fidelity. I am for love, whether it’s a man and woman, a woman and a woman, a man and a man … I think this is the world we are living in and we need to affirm people wherever they are.’ He went on to give a wholesale criticism of traditional evangelicalism and in particular its own subculture: ‘I think we are witnessing the death of a particular subculture that doesn’t work. I think there is a very narrow, politically intertwined, culturally ghettoised, Evangelical subculture that was told “we’re gonna change the thing” and they haven’t … And we have supported policies and ways of viewing the world that are actually destructive. And we’ve done it in the name of God and we need to repent.’ Jim Wallis An outspoken critic of the Religious Right and president of the Sojournersmagazine, Jim Wallis reversed his stance on gay marriage in an interview with the Huffington Postin 2013. ‘How do we commit liberals and conservatives to re-covenanting marriage, reestablishing, renewing marriage?,’ he asked. ‘I think we should include same-sex couples in that renewal of marriage, [but] I want to talk marriage first. Marriage needs some strengthening. Let’s start with marriage, and then I think we have to talk about, now, how to include same-sex couples in that deeper understanding of marriage. I want a deeper commitment to marriage that is more and more inclusive, and that’s where I think the country is going.’ Jen Hatmaker One of the relatively few prominent female voices on the evangelical scene, Hatmaker received a fierce backlash when she said she thought God saw monogamous gay relationships as holy. In an interview with Religion News Serviceshe said: ‘From a spiritual perspective, since gay marriage is legal in all 50 states, our communities have plenty of gay couples who, just like the rest of us, need marriage support and parenting help and Christian community. They are either going to find those resources in the church or they are not. ‘Not only are these our neighbors and friends, but they are brothers and sisters in Christ. They are adopted into the same family as the rest of us, and the church hasn’t treated the LGBT community like family. We have to do better.’ Asked if she would attend a gay friend’s wedding she said it was an easy answer: ‘I would attend that wedding with gladness, and I would drink champagne. I want the very best for my gay friends. I want love and happiness and faithfulness and commitment and community. Yes. That’s an easy answer.’ Danny Cortez The Southern Baptist church pastor from Los Angeles, California, announced in 2014 he is ‘gay affirming’ and had accepted his son’s homosexuality. ‘In August of 2013, on a sunny day at the beach, I realized I no longer believed in the traditional [church] teachings regarding homosexuality,’ Cortez said in a letter published on Patheosblog. ‘And it was especially the testimony of my gay friends that helped me to see how they have been marginalised that my eyes became open to the injustice that the church has wrought.’ He wrote that many had left his church after the announcement but those who remained decided to agree to disagree and not pass judgment.

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March 6, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed


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