Archive for the ‘Gay Marriage’ Category

Australian leader says gay marriage could be law this year – ABC News

Australia’s prime minister said Tuesday that Parliament could legalize gay marriage this year if the nation’s voters endorse it in a rare nonbinding poll in November.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said he expected the public would support marriage equality in the so-called plebiscite, and that he would personally campaign for a ‘yes’ vote. It would be only the fourth time in Australian history, and first time in 43 years, that the government puts a legally nonbinding question to the electorate.

“I have other calls on my time as prime minister, but I will certainly support a ‘yes’ vote,” Turnbull told reporters.

The conservative Liberal Party-led coalition was narrowly re-elected in July 2016 with a promise to let voters decide whether Australia should recognize same-sex marriage through a popular vote. But the Senate in November blocked the plebiscite, which would cost 170 million Australian dollars ($135 million) and promote a divisive public debate.

The Liberal Party held a crisis meeting late Monday to resolve infighting and rejected a push to allow lawmakers to decide the issue now.

The government on Tuesday endorsed the party decision to ask the Senate this week to reconsider allowing the plebiscite, which would be held Nov. 25. Voting would be compulsory and failure to vote would be punishable by a fine, though a voluntary vote would be held if the Senate again rejects the measure.

If most Australians want gay marriage, the Parliament would vote on legislation before the last two-week session of Parliament of the year ends on Dec. 7.

“Strong leaders carry out their promises, weak leaders break them,” Turnbull told reporters.

Gay-rights advocates say enough lawmakers already back marriage equality to make same-sex marriage legal in Australia now. For the first time in Australian history, both the prime minister and opposition leader back the reform.

Rights advocates see the plebiscite as both a delaying tactic forced by a hard right-wing minority and a strategy to undermine political support.

Opponents of the plebiscite argue that the government-funded advertising campaigns for the cases for and against would give authority to bigoted and homophobic arguments. Supporters say it would give ordinary people a voice in a debate dominated by activists.

If the Senate again blocks the plebiscite, the government intends to hold a voluntary postal plebiscite by Nov. 15. Voters would mail in their opinions instead of using ballot boxes at a cost of up to AU$122 million ($97 million). Responses would be voluntary and therefore less indicative of public opinion.

Opponents argue that the postal plebiscite would also need Senate approval, and have threatened a court challenge if it proceeds. Turnbull said he is confident that the postal option did not need Senate endorsement.

Finance Minister Mathias Cormann, the government’s deputy Senate leader and an opponent of same-sex marriage, said some type of plebiscite is essential if Parliament is to decide the marriage equality question.

Opposition leader Bill Shorten dismissed a plebiscite as “a colossal waste of money and time.”

“Yet again the hopes of people who want to be able to marry the person they love have been dashed by a weak prime minister and the right wing of the Liberal Party,” Shorten said.

“We should just get on and have a vote on marriage equality straight away in the Parliament,” he added.

Lyle Shelton, managing director of the Australian Christian Lobby, said his advocacy group had collected 55,000 signatures on a petition demanding a plebiscite.

Sheldon handed the petition to Sen. Cory Bernardi, leader of the minor Australian Conservatives party, to present to the Senate. Bernardi has said he would vote against gay marriage regardless of what the plebiscite found.

Mark Moody-Basedow and his wife, Vicki, celebrated the new plebiscite plan and their second wedding anniversary by posing for photos outside Parliament House in what they described as the medieval-style outfits that they wore on their wedding day.

Vicki Moody-Basedow designed the couple’s white costumes, embroidered with “righteousness,” ”holiness” and “Jesus.” She said they believed in “traditional marriage,” but added that the majority view should prevail in Australia.

“It’s the right of every Australian citizen to be able to say what they think about this topic, so I think the plebiscite is a great idea,” she said.

Read more here:

Australian leader says gay marriage could be law this year – ABC News

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Nation’s Sexual Degenerates Impatient For Gay Marriage Slippery Slope To Kick In – The Onion (satire)

WASHINGTONAssuming theyd be stripping away the moral fabric of society almost immediately after the Supreme Courts 2015 decision to legalize same-sex marriage, the nations degenerates reported Monday that they have grown impatient for the gay marriage slippery slope to kick in. We were promised that when gay marriage was legalized, itd only be a matter of time before sickos like me would be having sex with our petswell, Ive got a dog and a cat I still havent fucked, said an exasperated Alan Beleski, 42, one of the deviants from across the country who told reporters they were tired of waiting for the inevitable collapse in decency that would normalize acts such as bestiality, incest, and necrophilia. Goddammit, whats taking so long? When gay marriages were finally recognized in this country, I thought, Hell yeah! I can finally openly proclaim my love for my sex doll, and I can also legally marry five other dolls because polygamys A-okay, too. But all that seems like a million years ago. At press time, the nations degenerates took small comfort in states like Massachusetts where, with parental and court approval, a child can be married off at any age.

Go here to see the original:

Nation’s Sexual Degenerates Impatient For Gay Marriage Slippery Slope To Kick In – The Onion (satire)

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Haiti may ban gay marriage, public support for LGBTQ rights – WGN-TV

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti A gay rights group in Haiti says it is fighting to head off a proposed law that would ban same-sex marriage and prohibit any public demonstrations in favor of LGBTQ people in the Caribbean country.

A bill passed by the Haitian Senate last week provides for up to three years in prison and a fine of about $8,000 for either party to a marriage not between a man and a woman. The bill also would ban any public support or advocacy for LGBTQ rights.

Haitian law already specifically defines marriage as between a man and a woman.

Charlot Jeudy of the gay rights organization Kouraj said Monday that the legislation would violate the constitution and his group will try to persuade members of the Chamber of Deputies to reject it.

Read the original:

Haiti may ban gay marriage, public support for LGBTQ rights – WGN-TV

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Britain’s first same-sex marriage celebrated in a Scottish church … – Deseret News

LONDON The first gay marriage in an Anglican church in Britain took place this week, a day after Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby described the continuing squabbles over same-sex marriage in the worldwide Anglican Communion as intractable.

The gay couple, known as Mark and Rick, had their order of service posted on Facebook, which told people that they were married on Tuesday (Aug. 1) at a service that included the Eucharist at St. Johns Episcopal Church in the center of Edinburgh. The Rev. Markus Dnzkofer, rector of St. Johns, a church of the Scottish Episcopal Church, which is part of the Anglican Communion, officiated.

The wedding was a small intimate occasion, said Dnzkofer. The couple, he said, were Americans with Scottish connections who had been together 24 years.

This was not some pretty, fancy occasion, he said. They wanted a religious ceremony and they wanted it to be a nuptial Mass.

In June, the Scottish Episcopal Church, which is part of the Anglican Communion, announced that it was allowing gay weddings after its synod voted to amend its canon law on marriage. The change was made when the synod agreed the law stating that marriage was between one man and one woman should be removed.

Anglican national churches in Brazil, South Africa, South India, New Zealand and Canada have taken steps toward approving and celebrating same-sex relationships amid strong resistance among other national churches within the 80 million-member global body. The Episcopal Church in the U.S. has allowed gay marriage since 2015.

The Scottish vote sparked a backlash from traditionalists in the Global Anglican Future Conference, or GAFCON. The group responded by announcing it had appointed a missionary bishop to Scotland to offer alternative leadership for traditionalist Anglicans opposed to the synods decision.

Welby, speaking to the BBC from Africa where he has been traveling, was asked if the Anglican Communions rift over homosexuality might worsen, given that the communions center of growth is on that continent, where traditional views on marriage hold sway.

The archbishop answered: Its an intractable problem. This is more complex than having a binary approach. There is not an easy fix, but the primates (of the Anglican Communion) have said that they will work together.

But the situation in Scotland will make the archbishop of Canterburys task in keeping the Anglican Communion together much more difficult.

Since the vote in June, at least nine Scottish Episcopal Church clergy have registered to officiate at same-sex weddings. The first to sign up was the Rev. Kelvin Holdsworth, the provost of St Marys Cathedral in Glasgow.

Holdsworth, a leading figure in the Changing Attitude Scotland campaign, said that people in Scotland have changed their minds on gay marriage and now support it.

The congregation has been hugely supportive. There were loud cheers in church when I announced that bookings for weddings were now open to all couples, when I received permission to do this a couple of weeks ago, Holdsworth said. Several members of the congregation were wearing badges saying, The Archbishop of Canterbury has no jurisdiction in this realm of Scotland.

St. Johns Church in Edinburgh first announced that it would offer the rite of marriage beginning in July. Dnzkofer said that there had been dialogue throughout the Scottish Episcopal Church about human sexuality and same-sex marriage.

It has been easier than in the Church of England, he said. We are a smaller church, we are not the established church and there is less of an evangelical voice. But we heard different perspectives and heard very different voices.

Dnzkofer estimated about 80 percent of his congregation approved the change in doctrine. St Johns website reflects these varying opinions, with an apology for the deep pain the church caused to LGBTQ people and their families. (W)e asked for forgiveness for our resistance to proclaiming the love of God more courageously. We have failed.

But it also says that it recognizes that the radical move by the Scottish Episcopal Church will be difficult for some people. We also have failed in loving more generously and embracing more compassionately those who disagree with recent developments in church and state. For this we are sorry, too.

The proximity of Scotland to the Church of England will make the situation particularly difficult for Welby. Although they have only an estimated 100,000 members, the impact of gay weddings in its Scottish Episcopal churches will be significant, according to Simon Sarmiento, of the website, Thinking Anglicans.

Gay Anglicans in England will be able to travel to Scotland to get married, putting more pressure on the Church of England, he said.

Within the Church of England there are deeply divergent views on gays, and at the most recent General Synod, a bishops report advocating no change in the churchs stance on the blessing of gay partnerships or the conducting of gay marriages was narrowly rejected.

Since then a Pastoral Advisory Group has been set up and chaired by Bishop of Newcastle Christine Hardman to support and advise dioceses on pastoral approaches to human sexuality.

Holdsworth said Welby is wrong to say the problem is intractable and urged him to speak to gay people who want to help come up with solutions.

If Justin Welby wants to hear from passionate Anglicans with lots of ideas about how to solve these troubles then one of the things he needs to do is to speak to the people concerned. LGBT people from around the communion would be willing to meet him to help find solutions, Holdsworth said. The last time an international meeting of LGBT activists was invited to meet with a senior leader from the Anglican Communion was in 2005.

(Catherine Pepinster is a London-based correspondent)

View original post here:

Britain’s first same-sex marriage celebrated in a Scottish church … – Deseret News

Fair Usage Law

August 7, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Irish PM: ‘Matter of time’ for N. Ireland and gay marriage – ABC News

Ireland’s prime minister says it is “only a matter of time” before same-sex marriage is legalized in Northern Ireland the only part of the United Kingdom where it still is banned.

Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, Ireland’s first openly gay leader, made the comments at a gay pride event on Saturday in Belfast.

Northern Ireland remains the only part of the British Isles where same-sex marriages are not allowed. A 2015 voter referendum legalized them in the republic of Ireland.

The issue has been one of the sticking points preventing the restoration of the Catholic-Protestant power-sharing government in Northern Ireland.

The Democratic Unionists, Northern Ireland’s biggest British Protestant party and a key partner to British Prime Minister Theresa May’s government, has opposed same-sex marriage.

The Catholic nationalist Sinn Fein supports it.

Go here to read the rest:

Irish PM: ‘Matter of time’ for N. Ireland and gay marriage – ABC News

Fair Usage Law

August 6, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

First same-sex wedding deepens Anglican divide – The Guardian

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and his Ugandan counterpart, the Rev Stanley Ntagali, arrive at a camp in Uganda to visit South Sudanese refugees. Photograph: James Akena/Reuters

The first gay Anglican wedding in Britain took place last week, just a day after the archbishop of Canterbury said the continuing row in the Anglican Communion over same-sex relationships was an intractable problem.

The couple, known as Mark and Rick, got married on Tuesday at a Eucharist service where the Rev Markus Dunzkofer, of the Scottish Episcopal church, officiated. Dunzkofer, rector of St Johns, in Princes Street, Edinburgh, said history was made at the wedding, held in the chapel of a Dalhousie hotel.

Mark and Rick had been together 24 years, he said, and were keen to have a service with holy communion. The couple are from the US, but with strong Scottish connections. A copy of their order of service, posted on Facebook, described the wedding as the solemnisation of marriage with the celebration of holy communion.

It was a small, intimate occasion, said Dunzkofer. This was not some pretty, fancy occasion. They wanted a religious ceremony.

Mark and Ricks marriage is the first in the Scottish Episcopal church, which is part of the Anglican Communion. The Episcopal church announced in June that it was allowing gay weddings after its synod voted to amend canon law on marriage. It agreed that the doctrine stating that marriage was between one man and one woman should be removed.

The vote sparked a backlash from traditionalists, with the conservative Anglican group Gafcon announcing that it was appointing a missionary bishop, committed to keeping marriage heterosexual, to work in Scotland.

The archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, has struggled to keep the worldwide Anglican Communion together over the issue of same-sex relationships, with many African bishops voicing opposition to gay weddings and to clergy being involved in gay relationships themselves.

Welby visited Africa to highlight the plight of refugees but his trip highlighted divisions over same-sex marriage. During the trip, he spent time with the archbishop of Uganda, Stanley Ntagali, a leading conservative evangelical, who walked out of a gathering of archbishops in Canterbury last year, angered by the wests liberal attitudes to homosexuality. Ntagali said that he would not return until godly order was restored.

Since then, Canadian and Scottish Anglicans have voted for same-sex marriage; the Americans also accept it.

In an interview with Radio 4s Today programme, Welby said that the dispute over homosexuality between the growing church in Africa and the west was an intractable problem. This is more complex than having a binary approach, he said. There is not an easy fix, but the primates [of the Anglican Communion] have said that they will work together.

But the situation in Scotland will make the archbishop of Canterburys task in keeping the Anglican Communion together much more difficult.

Simon Sarmiento, of the website Thinking Anglicans, said: The Scottish Episcopal church is small in numbers but this will undoubtedly have an impact. It brings this issue that much closer. Gay Anglicans in England will be able to travel to Scotland to get married, putting more pressure on the Church ofEngland.

The Scottish church, which has around 100,000 members, voted for gay marriage after years of debate at diocesan and church level. Dunzkofer said that about 80% of his congregation supported the move to allow gay weddings and there had been long discussions. It has been easier than in the Church of England. We are a smaller church, we are not the established church and there is less of an evangelical voice, he said. But we heard different perspectives and heard very different voices.

Since the vote in June, at least nine Scottish Episcopal Church clergy have registered to officiate at same-sex weddings. The first to sign up was the Rev Kelvin Holdsworth, the provost of St Marys Cathedral in Glasgow. There were loud cheers in church when when I received permission to do this a couple of weeks ago, said Holdsworth. Several members of the congregation were wearing badges saying, The Archbishop of Canterbury has no jurisdiction in this realm of Scotland.

In recent weeks politicians have also piled pressure on the Church of England. Theresa May said she had changed her own mind on gay weddings over the years and the church should reflect on its ban. The equalities minister, Justine Greening, also said that the Church of England must keep up with the modern world by allowing gay weddings. And in Scotland, Conservative leader Ruth Davidson, who is gay and a member of the Church of Scotland, has often spoken of her support for gay marriage.

Read more:

First same-sex wedding deepens Anglican divide – The Guardian

Fair Usage Law

August 6, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Special Coalition party room meeting to tackle gay marriage – SBS

A private members’ bill, supported by Dean Smith, Trent Zimmerman, Warren Entsch, Trevor Evans and Tim Wilson, has been circulated ahead of a special party room meeting on the issue in Canberra on Monday afternoon.

The legislation would allow two people to marry regardless of their sex or gender.

It also would protect all religious ministers and civil celebrants from legal action if they refuse to marry same-sex couples, and covers service providers – such as bakers, florists and photographers – if they can prove their business is linked to a religious body.

Dean Smith told the ABC, the move should not be seen as threat to the leadership of the Prime Minister or the government.

“Every difficult issue does not need to be seen through the prism of leadership. This is a test for each and every member of the parliamentary Liberal party first and foremost. It is a respectful place the party room,” Mr Smith said.

“People come with their points of view. They do show courtesy to each other. There is an expectation that people come and put their best foot forward and make the most convincing argument that they can. This does not have to be seen through the prism of leadership. I actually think that is a distraction.”

Crossbench senator Nick Xenophon, who helped shoot down the plebiscite late last year, said the Smith bill seemed a sensible way forward and he would support it if it got up in the Senate.

Liberal front-bencher Craig Laundy doesn’t support the private member’s bill.

He says the Turnbull government must stand by its pledge to hold a plebiscite on gay marriage.

Mr Laundy has told the ABC, there could be backlash from voters if the government walks away from its election promise.

He says the Turnbull government must stand by its pledge to hold a plebiscite on gay marriage.

Mr Laundy has told the ABC, there could be backlash from voters if the government walks away from its election promise.

“I will be when I get into the party room explaining that in the current political environment governments that turn their back on policies they have taken and commitments they have taken to an election, there is a not too distant recent history of that being viewed dimly by those in the electorate.”

Gay marriage campaigners have welcomed Liberal senator Dean Smith’s private member’s bill calling it strong and robust.

Australian Marriage Equality co-chair Alex Greenwich welcomed the bill as the strongest yet on the issue.

“It’s a strong bill. It’s a bill which is designed to allow same sex couples access to civil marriage, while respecting the religious protection of marriage. So this is a bill which we hope will gain support, not only from the government partyroom, but indeed from the entire parliament.”

The bill outlines the creation of a new category of “religious marriage celebrants” who can refuse to officiate a gay marriage ceremony, without the fear of being taken to court for discrimination.

Director of Legal Advocacy at the Human Rights Law Centre, Anna Brown, says the new category gets the balance between religious freedom and marriage equality.

“Same sex couples will have the dignity and the certainty of knowing when they go to a civil marriage celebrant, they will be not refused service, so this is about protecting civil marriage and not allowing civil discrimination in civil marriage.

“But whilst also protecting religious freedom. So civil marriage will allow same-sex couples and religious marriage will be protected.”

Another alternative being considered is a postal vote.

Senator Smith labelled a postal vote an even worse idea.

Marriage equality advocates have promised to launch a High Court challenge if the idea gets up based on legal advice that the government would need specific legislation to hold a postal vote on the issue and allocate sufficient funds.

Rainbow Families spokeswoman Felicity Marlowe has called for the postal plebiscite vote not to go ahead.

But she’s told SBS World News change must happen and is long overdue.

“For so many Rainbow Families, their children have been waiting a long time to see their mums or dads walk down the aisle and say ‘I love you’,” she said.

“They know their parents are committed to each other and they know that love makes a family but there’s just something about the ceremony and celebration of a marriage that’s particularly special. It would be a fantastic day for children in rainbow families when finally they can see their parents married.”

See the article here:

Special Coalition party room meeting to tackle gay marriage – SBS

Fair Usage Law

August 6, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Irish PM: ‘Matter of time’ for N. Ireland and gay marriage – New Haven Register

Photo: Peter Morrison, AP

Irish PM: ‘Matter of time’ for N. Ireland and gay marriage

LONDON (AP) Ireland’s prime minister says it is “only a matter of time” before same-sex marriage is legalized in Northern Ireland the only part of the United Kingdom where it still is banned.

Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, Ireland’s first openly gay leader, made the comments at a gay pride event on Saturday in Belfast.

Northern Ireland remains the only part of the British Isles where same-sex marriages are not allowed. A 2015 voter referendum legalized them in the republic of Ireland.

The issue has been one of the sticking points preventing the restoration of the Catholic-Protestant power-sharing government in Northern Ireland.

The Democratic Unionists, Northern Ireland’s biggest British Protestant party and a key partner to British Prime Minister Theresa May’s government, has opposed same-sex marriage.

The Catholic nationalist Sinn Fein supports it.

Read the rest here:

Irish PM: ‘Matter of time’ for N. Ireland and gay marriage – New Haven Register

Fair Usage Law

August 5, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Britain’s first Anglican same-sex marriage celebrated in a Scottish … – Religion News Service

Anglican Communion By Catherine Pepinster | 23 hours ago

St. Johns Episcopal Church in Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo courtesy of Creative Commons/Jan Brnemann

LONDON (RNS) The first gay marriage in an Anglican church in Britain took place this week, aday after Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby described the continuing squabbles over same-sex marriage in the worldwide Anglican Communion as intractable.

The Rev. Markus Dnzkofer of St. Johns Episcopal Church in Edinburgh, Scotland.

The gay couple, known as Mark and Rick, had their order of service posted on Facebook, which told people that they were married on Tuesday (Aug. 1) at a service that included the Eucharist at St. Johns Episcopal Church in the center of Edinburgh. The Rev. Markus Dnzkofer, rector of St. Johns, a church of the Scottish Episcopal Church, which is part of the Anglican Communion, officiated.

The wedding was a small intimate occasion, said Dnzkofer. The couple, he said, were Americans with Scottish connections who had been together 24 years.

This was not some pretty, fancy occasion, he said. They wanted a religious ceremony and they wanted it to be a nuptial Mass.

In June, the Scottish Episcopal Church, which is part of the Anglican Communion, announced that it was allowing gay weddings after its synod voted to amend its canon law on marriage. The change was made when the synod agreed the law stating that marriage was between one man and one woman should be removed.

Anglican national churches in Brazil, South Africa, South India, New Zealand and Canada have taken steps toward approving and celebrating same-sex relationships amid strong resistance among other national churches within the 80 million-member global body. The Episcopal Church in the U.S. has allowed gay marriage since 2015.

The Scottish vote sparked a backlash from traditionalists in the Global Anglican Future Conference, or GAFCON. The group responded by announcing it had appointed a missionary bishop to Scotland to offer alternative leadership for traditionalist Anglicans opposed to the synods decision.

Welby, speaking to the BBC from Africa where he has been traveling, was asked if the Anglican Communions rift over homosexuality might worsen, given that the communions center of growth is on that continent, where traditional views on marriage hold sway.

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, after his enthronement ceremony at Canterbury Cathedral, in Canterbury, southern England, on March 21, 2013. Photo by Luke MacGregor/Reuters

The archbishop answered: Its an intractable problem. This is more complex than having a binary approach. There is not an easy fix, but the primates (of the Anglican Communion) have said that they will work together.

But the situation in Scotland will make the archbishop of Canterburys task in keeping the Anglican Communion together much more difficult.

Since the vote in June, at least nine Scottish Episcopal Church clergy have registered to officiate at same-sex weddings. The first to sign up was the Rev. Kelvin Holdsworth, the provost of St Marys Cathedral in Glasgow.

Holdsworth, a leading figure in the Changing Attitude Scotland campaign, said that people in Scotland have changed their minds on gay marriage and now support it.

The congregation has been hugely supportive. There were loud cheers in church when I announced that bookings for weddings were now open to all couples, when I received permission to do this a couple of weeks ago, Holdsworth said. Several members of the congregation were wearing badges saying, The Archbishop of Canterbury has no jurisdiction in this realm of Scotland.

St. Johns Church in Edinburgh first announced that it would offer the rite of marriage beginning in July. Dnzkofer said that there had been dialogue throughout the Scottish Episcopal Church about human sexuality and same-sex marriage.

St. Johns Episcopal Church, left, in Edinburgh, Scotland, with Edinburgh Caste in the background. Photo courtesy of Creative Commons/The Rev. Lawrence Lew

It has been easier than in the Church of England, he said. We are a smaller church, we are not the established church and there is less of an evangelical voice. But we heard different perspectives and heard very different voices.

Dnzkofer estimated about 80 percent of his congregation approved the change in doctrine. St Johns website reflects these varying opinions, with an apology for the deep pain the church caused to LGBTQ people and their families. (W)e asked for forgiveness for our resistance to proclaiming the love of God more courageously. We have failed.

But it also says that it recognizes that the radical move by the Scottish Episcopal Church will be difficult for some people. We also have failed in loving more generously and embracing more compassionately those who disagree with recent developments in church and state. For this we are sorry, too.

The proximity of Scotland to the Church of England will make the situation particularly difficult for Welby. Although they have only an estimated 100,000 members, the impact of gay weddings in its Scottish Episcopal churches will be significant, according to Simon Sarmiento, of the website, Thinking Anglicans.

Gay Anglicans in England will be able to travel to Scotland to get married, putting more pressure on the Church of England, he said.

Within the Church of England there are deeply divergent views on gays, and at the most recent General Synod, a bishops report advocating no change in the churchs stance on the blessing of gay partnerships or the conducting of gay marriages was narrowly rejected.

Since then a Pastoral Advisory Group has been set up and chaired by Bishop of Newcastle Christine Hardman to support and advise dioceses on pastoral approaches to human sexuality.

Holdsworth said Welby is wrong to say the problem is intractable and urged him to speak to gay people who want to help come up with solutions.

If Justin Welby wants to hear from passionate Anglicans with lots of ideas about how to solve these troubles then one of the things he needs to do is to speak to the people concerned. LGBT people from around the communion would be willing to meet him to help find solutions, Holdsworth said. The last time an international meeting of LGBT activists was invited to meet with a senior leader from the Anglican Communion was in 2005.

(Catherine Pepinster is a London-based correspondent)

Read more from the original source:

Britain’s first Anglican same-sex marriage celebrated in a Scottish … – Religion News Service

Fair Usage Law

August 5, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Australian leader says gay marriage could be law this year – ABC News

Australia’s prime minister said Tuesday that Parliament could legalize gay marriage this year if the nation’s voters endorse it in a rare nonbinding poll in November. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said he expected the public would support marriage equality in the so-called plebiscite, and that he would personally campaign for a ‘yes’ vote. It would be only the fourth time in Australian history, and first time in 43 years, that the government puts a legally nonbinding question to the electorate. “I have other calls on my time as prime minister, but I will certainly support a ‘yes’ vote,” Turnbull told reporters. The conservative Liberal Party-led coalition was narrowly re-elected in July 2016 with a promise to let voters decide whether Australia should recognize same-sex marriage through a popular vote. But the Senate in November blocked the plebiscite, which would cost 170 million Australian dollars ($135 million) and promote a divisive public debate. The Liberal Party held a crisis meeting late Monday to resolve infighting and rejected a push to allow lawmakers to decide the issue now. The government on Tuesday endorsed the party decision to ask the Senate this week to reconsider allowing the plebiscite, which would be held Nov. 25. Voting would be compulsory and failure to vote would be punishable by a fine, though a voluntary vote would be held if the Senate again rejects the measure. If most Australians want gay marriage, the Parliament would vote on legislation before the last two-week session of Parliament of the year ends on Dec. 7. “Strong leaders carry out their promises, weak leaders break them,” Turnbull told reporters. Gay-rights advocates say enough lawmakers already back marriage equality to make same-sex marriage legal in Australia now. For the first time in Australian history, both the prime minister and opposition leader back the reform. Rights advocates see the plebiscite as both a delaying tactic forced by a hard right-wing minority and a strategy to undermine political support. Opponents of the plebiscite argue that the government-funded advertising campaigns for the cases for and against would give authority to bigoted and homophobic arguments. Supporters say it would give ordinary people a voice in a debate dominated by activists. If the Senate again blocks the plebiscite, the government intends to hold a voluntary postal plebiscite by Nov. 15. Voters would mail in their opinions instead of using ballot boxes at a cost of up to AU$122 million ($97 million). Responses would be voluntary and therefore less indicative of public opinion. Opponents argue that the postal plebiscite would also need Senate approval, and have threatened a court challenge if it proceeds. Turnbull said he is confident that the postal option did not need Senate endorsement. Finance Minister Mathias Cormann, the government’s deputy Senate leader and an opponent of same-sex marriage, said some type of plebiscite is essential if Parliament is to decide the marriage equality question. Opposition leader Bill Shorten dismissed a plebiscite as “a colossal waste of money and time.” “Yet again the hopes of people who want to be able to marry the person they love have been dashed by a weak prime minister and the right wing of the Liberal Party,” Shorten said. “We should just get on and have a vote on marriage equality straight away in the Parliament,” he added. Lyle Shelton, managing director of the Australian Christian Lobby, said his advocacy group had collected 55,000 signatures on a petition demanding a plebiscite. Sheldon handed the petition to Sen. Cory Bernardi, leader of the minor Australian Conservatives party, to present to the Senate. Bernardi has said he would vote against gay marriage regardless of what the plebiscite found. Mark Moody-Basedow and his wife, Vicki, celebrated the new plebiscite plan and their second wedding anniversary by posing for photos outside Parliament House in what they described as the medieval-style outfits that they wore on their wedding day. Vicki Moody-Basedow designed the couple’s white costumes, embroidered with “righteousness,” ”holiness” and “Jesus.” She said they believed in “traditional marriage,” but added that the majority view should prevail in Australia. “It’s the right of every Australian citizen to be able to say what they think about this topic, so I think the plebiscite is a great idea,” she said.

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Nation’s Sexual Degenerates Impatient For Gay Marriage Slippery Slope To Kick In – The Onion (satire)

WASHINGTONAssuming theyd be stripping away the moral fabric of society almost immediately after the Supreme Courts 2015 decision to legalize same-sex marriage, the nations degenerates reported Monday that they have grown impatient for the gay marriage slippery slope to kick in. We were promised that when gay marriage was legalized, itd only be a matter of time before sickos like me would be having sex with our petswell, Ive got a dog and a cat I still havent fucked, said an exasperated Alan Beleski, 42, one of the deviants from across the country who told reporters they were tired of waiting for the inevitable collapse in decency that would normalize acts such as bestiality, incest, and necrophilia. Goddammit, whats taking so long? When gay marriages were finally recognized in this country, I thought, Hell yeah! I can finally openly proclaim my love for my sex doll, and I can also legally marry five other dolls because polygamys A-okay, too. But all that seems like a million years ago. At press time, the nations degenerates took small comfort in states like Massachusetts where, with parental and court approval, a child can be married off at any age.

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Haiti may ban gay marriage, public support for LGBTQ rights – WGN-TV

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti A gay rights group in Haiti says it is fighting to head off a proposed law that would ban same-sex marriage and prohibit any public demonstrations in favor of LGBTQ people in the Caribbean country. A bill passed by the Haitian Senate last week provides for up to three years in prison and a fine of about $8,000 for either party to a marriage not between a man and a woman. The bill also would ban any public support or advocacy for LGBTQ rights. Haitian law already specifically defines marriage as between a man and a woman. Charlot Jeudy of the gay rights organization Kouraj said Monday that the legislation would violate the constitution and his group will try to persuade members of the Chamber of Deputies to reject it.

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Britain’s first same-sex marriage celebrated in a Scottish church … – Deseret News

LONDON The first gay marriage in an Anglican church in Britain took place this week, a day after Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby described the continuing squabbles over same-sex marriage in the worldwide Anglican Communion as intractable. The gay couple, known as Mark and Rick, had their order of service posted on Facebook, which told people that they were married on Tuesday (Aug. 1) at a service that included the Eucharist at St. Johns Episcopal Church in the center of Edinburgh. The Rev. Markus Dnzkofer, rector of St. Johns, a church of the Scottish Episcopal Church, which is part of the Anglican Communion, officiated. The wedding was a small intimate occasion, said Dnzkofer. The couple, he said, were Americans with Scottish connections who had been together 24 years. This was not some pretty, fancy occasion, he said. They wanted a religious ceremony and they wanted it to be a nuptial Mass. In June, the Scottish Episcopal Church, which is part of the Anglican Communion, announced that it was allowing gay weddings after its synod voted to amend its canon law on marriage. The change was made when the synod agreed the law stating that marriage was between one man and one woman should be removed. Anglican national churches in Brazil, South Africa, South India, New Zealand and Canada have taken steps toward approving and celebrating same-sex relationships amid strong resistance among other national churches within the 80 million-member global body. The Episcopal Church in the U.S. has allowed gay marriage since 2015. The Scottish vote sparked a backlash from traditionalists in the Global Anglican Future Conference, or GAFCON. The group responded by announcing it had appointed a missionary bishop to Scotland to offer alternative leadership for traditionalist Anglicans opposed to the synods decision. Welby, speaking to the BBC from Africa where he has been traveling, was asked if the Anglican Communions rift over homosexuality might worsen, given that the communions center of growth is on that continent, where traditional views on marriage hold sway. The archbishop answered: Its an intractable problem. This is more complex than having a binary approach. There is not an easy fix, but the primates (of the Anglican Communion) have said that they will work together. But the situation in Scotland will make the archbishop of Canterburys task in keeping the Anglican Communion together much more difficult. Since the vote in June, at least nine Scottish Episcopal Church clergy have registered to officiate at same-sex weddings. The first to sign up was the Rev. Kelvin Holdsworth, the provost of St Marys Cathedral in Glasgow. Holdsworth, a leading figure in the Changing Attitude Scotland campaign, said that people in Scotland have changed their minds on gay marriage and now support it. The congregation has been hugely supportive. There were loud cheers in church when I announced that bookings for weddings were now open to all couples, when I received permission to do this a couple of weeks ago, Holdsworth said. Several members of the congregation were wearing badges saying, The Archbishop of Canterbury has no jurisdiction in this realm of Scotland. St. Johns Church in Edinburgh first announced that it would offer the rite of marriage beginning in July. Dnzkofer said that there had been dialogue throughout the Scottish Episcopal Church about human sexuality and same-sex marriage. It has been easier than in the Church of England, he said. We are a smaller church, we are not the established church and there is less of an evangelical voice. But we heard different perspectives and heard very different voices. Dnzkofer estimated about 80 percent of his congregation approved the change in doctrine. St Johns website reflects these varying opinions, with an apology for the deep pain the church caused to LGBTQ people and their families. (W)e asked for forgiveness for our resistance to proclaiming the love of God more courageously. We have failed. But it also says that it recognizes that the radical move by the Scottish Episcopal Church will be difficult for some people. We also have failed in loving more generously and embracing more compassionately those who disagree with recent developments in church and state. For this we are sorry, too. The proximity of Scotland to the Church of England will make the situation particularly difficult for Welby. Although they have only an estimated 100,000 members, the impact of gay weddings in its Scottish Episcopal churches will be significant, according to Simon Sarmiento, of the website, Thinking Anglicans. Gay Anglicans in England will be able to travel to Scotland to get married, putting more pressure on the Church of England, he said. Within the Church of England there are deeply divergent views on gays, and at the most recent General Synod, a bishops report advocating no change in the churchs stance on the blessing of gay partnerships or the conducting of gay marriages was narrowly rejected. Since then a Pastoral Advisory Group has been set up and chaired by Bishop of Newcastle Christine Hardman to support and advise dioceses on pastoral approaches to human sexuality. Holdsworth said Welby is wrong to say the problem is intractable and urged him to speak to gay people who want to help come up with solutions. If Justin Welby wants to hear from passionate Anglicans with lots of ideas about how to solve these troubles then one of the things he needs to do is to speak to the people concerned. LGBT people from around the communion would be willing to meet him to help find solutions, Holdsworth said. The last time an international meeting of LGBT activists was invited to meet with a senior leader from the Anglican Communion was in 2005. (Catherine Pepinster is a London-based correspondent)

Fair Usage Law

August 7, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Irish PM: ‘Matter of time’ for N. Ireland and gay marriage – ABC News

Ireland’s prime minister says it is “only a matter of time” before same-sex marriage is legalized in Northern Ireland the only part of the United Kingdom where it still is banned. Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, Ireland’s first openly gay leader, made the comments at a gay pride event on Saturday in Belfast. Northern Ireland remains the only part of the British Isles where same-sex marriages are not allowed. A 2015 voter referendum legalized them in the republic of Ireland. The issue has been one of the sticking points preventing the restoration of the Catholic-Protestant power-sharing government in Northern Ireland. The Democratic Unionists, Northern Ireland’s biggest British Protestant party and a key partner to British Prime Minister Theresa May’s government, has opposed same-sex marriage. The Catholic nationalist Sinn Fein supports it.

Fair Usage Law

August 6, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

First same-sex wedding deepens Anglican divide – The Guardian

Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and his Ugandan counterpart, the Rev Stanley Ntagali, arrive at a camp in Uganda to visit South Sudanese refugees. Photograph: James Akena/Reuters The first gay Anglican wedding in Britain took place last week, just a day after the archbishop of Canterbury said the continuing row in the Anglican Communion over same-sex relationships was an intractable problem. The couple, known as Mark and Rick, got married on Tuesday at a Eucharist service where the Rev Markus Dunzkofer, of the Scottish Episcopal church, officiated. Dunzkofer, rector of St Johns, in Princes Street, Edinburgh, said history was made at the wedding, held in the chapel of a Dalhousie hotel. Mark and Rick had been together 24 years, he said, and were keen to have a service with holy communion. The couple are from the US, but with strong Scottish connections. A copy of their order of service, posted on Facebook, described the wedding as the solemnisation of marriage with the celebration of holy communion. It was a small, intimate occasion, said Dunzkofer. This was not some pretty, fancy occasion. They wanted a religious ceremony. Mark and Ricks marriage is the first in the Scottish Episcopal church, which is part of the Anglican Communion. The Episcopal church announced in June that it was allowing gay weddings after its synod voted to amend canon law on marriage. It agreed that the doctrine stating that marriage was between one man and one woman should be removed. The vote sparked a backlash from traditionalists, with the conservative Anglican group Gafcon announcing that it was appointing a missionary bishop, committed to keeping marriage heterosexual, to work in Scotland. The archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, has struggled to keep the worldwide Anglican Communion together over the issue of same-sex relationships, with many African bishops voicing opposition to gay weddings and to clergy being involved in gay relationships themselves. Welby visited Africa to highlight the plight of refugees but his trip highlighted divisions over same-sex marriage. During the trip, he spent time with the archbishop of Uganda, Stanley Ntagali, a leading conservative evangelical, who walked out of a gathering of archbishops in Canterbury last year, angered by the wests liberal attitudes to homosexuality. Ntagali said that he would not return until godly order was restored. Since then, Canadian and Scottish Anglicans have voted for same-sex marriage; the Americans also accept it. In an interview with Radio 4s Today programme, Welby said that the dispute over homosexuality between the growing church in Africa and the west was an intractable problem. This is more complex than having a binary approach, he said. There is not an easy fix, but the primates [of the Anglican Communion] have said that they will work together. But the situation in Scotland will make the archbishop of Canterburys task in keeping the Anglican Communion together much more difficult. Simon Sarmiento, of the website Thinking Anglicans, said: The Scottish Episcopal church is small in numbers but this will undoubtedly have an impact. It brings this issue that much closer. Gay Anglicans in England will be able to travel to Scotland to get married, putting more pressure on the Church ofEngland. The Scottish church, which has around 100,000 members, voted for gay marriage after years of debate at diocesan and church level. Dunzkofer said that about 80% of his congregation supported the move to allow gay weddings and there had been long discussions. It has been easier than in the Church of England. We are a smaller church, we are not the established church and there is less of an evangelical voice, he said. But we heard different perspectives and heard very different voices. Since the vote in June, at least nine Scottish Episcopal Church clergy have registered to officiate at same-sex weddings. The first to sign up was the Rev Kelvin Holdsworth, the provost of St Marys Cathedral in Glasgow. There were loud cheers in church when when I received permission to do this a couple of weeks ago, said Holdsworth. Several members of the congregation were wearing badges saying, The Archbishop of Canterbury has no jurisdiction in this realm of Scotland. In recent weeks politicians have also piled pressure on the Church of England. Theresa May said she had changed her own mind on gay weddings over the years and the church should reflect on its ban. The equalities minister, Justine Greening, also said that the Church of England must keep up with the modern world by allowing gay weddings. And in Scotland, Conservative leader Ruth Davidson, who is gay and a member of the Church of Scotland, has often spoken of her support for gay marriage.

Fair Usage Law

August 6, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Special Coalition party room meeting to tackle gay marriage – SBS

A private members’ bill, supported by Dean Smith, Trent Zimmerman, Warren Entsch, Trevor Evans and Tim Wilson, has been circulated ahead of a special party room meeting on the issue in Canberra on Monday afternoon. The legislation would allow two people to marry regardless of their sex or gender. It also would protect all religious ministers and civil celebrants from legal action if they refuse to marry same-sex couples, and covers service providers – such as bakers, florists and photographers – if they can prove their business is linked to a religious body. Dean Smith told the ABC, the move should not be seen as threat to the leadership of the Prime Minister or the government. “Every difficult issue does not need to be seen through the prism of leadership. This is a test for each and every member of the parliamentary Liberal party first and foremost. It is a respectful place the party room,” Mr Smith said. “People come with their points of view. They do show courtesy to each other. There is an expectation that people come and put their best foot forward and make the most convincing argument that they can. This does not have to be seen through the prism of leadership. I actually think that is a distraction.” Crossbench senator Nick Xenophon, who helped shoot down the plebiscite late last year, said the Smith bill seemed a sensible way forward and he would support it if it got up in the Senate. Liberal front-bencher Craig Laundy doesn’t support the private member’s bill. He says the Turnbull government must stand by its pledge to hold a plebiscite on gay marriage. Mr Laundy has told the ABC, there could be backlash from voters if the government walks away from its election promise. He says the Turnbull government must stand by its pledge to hold a plebiscite on gay marriage. Mr Laundy has told the ABC, there could be backlash from voters if the government walks away from its election promise. “I will be when I get into the party room explaining that in the current political environment governments that turn their back on policies they have taken and commitments they have taken to an election, there is a not too distant recent history of that being viewed dimly by those in the electorate.” Gay marriage campaigners have welcomed Liberal senator Dean Smith’s private member’s bill calling it strong and robust. Australian Marriage Equality co-chair Alex Greenwich welcomed the bill as the strongest yet on the issue. “It’s a strong bill. It’s a bill which is designed to allow same sex couples access to civil marriage, while respecting the religious protection of marriage. So this is a bill which we hope will gain support, not only from the government partyroom, but indeed from the entire parliament.” The bill outlines the creation of a new category of “religious marriage celebrants” who can refuse to officiate a gay marriage ceremony, without the fear of being taken to court for discrimination. Director of Legal Advocacy at the Human Rights Law Centre, Anna Brown, says the new category gets the balance between religious freedom and marriage equality. “Same sex couples will have the dignity and the certainty of knowing when they go to a civil marriage celebrant, they will be not refused service, so this is about protecting civil marriage and not allowing civil discrimination in civil marriage. “But whilst also protecting religious freedom. So civil marriage will allow same-sex couples and religious marriage will be protected.” Another alternative being considered is a postal vote. Senator Smith labelled a postal vote an even worse idea. Marriage equality advocates have promised to launch a High Court challenge if the idea gets up based on legal advice that the government would need specific legislation to hold a postal vote on the issue and allocate sufficient funds. Rainbow Families spokeswoman Felicity Marlowe has called for the postal plebiscite vote not to go ahead. But she’s told SBS World News change must happen and is long overdue. “For so many Rainbow Families, their children have been waiting a long time to see their mums or dads walk down the aisle and say ‘I love you’,” she said. “They know their parents are committed to each other and they know that love makes a family but there’s just something about the ceremony and celebration of a marriage that’s particularly special. It would be a fantastic day for children in rainbow families when finally they can see their parents married.”

Fair Usage Law

August 6, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Irish PM: ‘Matter of time’ for N. Ireland and gay marriage – New Haven Register

Photo: Peter Morrison, AP Irish PM: ‘Matter of time’ for N. Ireland and gay marriage LONDON (AP) Ireland’s prime minister says it is “only a matter of time” before same-sex marriage is legalized in Northern Ireland the only part of the United Kingdom where it still is banned. Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, Ireland’s first openly gay leader, made the comments at a gay pride event on Saturday in Belfast. Northern Ireland remains the only part of the British Isles where same-sex marriages are not allowed. A 2015 voter referendum legalized them in the republic of Ireland. The issue has been one of the sticking points preventing the restoration of the Catholic-Protestant power-sharing government in Northern Ireland. The Democratic Unionists, Northern Ireland’s biggest British Protestant party and a key partner to British Prime Minister Theresa May’s government, has opposed same-sex marriage. The Catholic nationalist Sinn Fein supports it.

Fair Usage Law

August 5, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed

Britain’s first Anglican same-sex marriage celebrated in a Scottish … – Religion News Service

Anglican Communion By Catherine Pepinster | 23 hours ago St. Johns Episcopal Church in Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo courtesy of Creative Commons/Jan Brnemann LONDON (RNS) The first gay marriage in an Anglican church in Britain took place this week, aday after Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby described the continuing squabbles over same-sex marriage in the worldwide Anglican Communion as intractable. The Rev. Markus Dnzkofer of St. Johns Episcopal Church in Edinburgh, Scotland. The gay couple, known as Mark and Rick, had their order of service posted on Facebook, which told people that they were married on Tuesday (Aug. 1) at a service that included the Eucharist at St. Johns Episcopal Church in the center of Edinburgh. The Rev. Markus Dnzkofer, rector of St. Johns, a church of the Scottish Episcopal Church, which is part of the Anglican Communion, officiated. The wedding was a small intimate occasion, said Dnzkofer. The couple, he said, were Americans with Scottish connections who had been together 24 years. This was not some pretty, fancy occasion, he said. They wanted a religious ceremony and they wanted it to be a nuptial Mass. In June, the Scottish Episcopal Church, which is part of the Anglican Communion, announced that it was allowing gay weddings after its synod voted to amend its canon law on marriage. The change was made when the synod agreed the law stating that marriage was between one man and one woman should be removed. Anglican national churches in Brazil, South Africa, South India, New Zealand and Canada have taken steps toward approving and celebrating same-sex relationships amid strong resistance among other national churches within the 80 million-member global body. The Episcopal Church in the U.S. has allowed gay marriage since 2015. The Scottish vote sparked a backlash from traditionalists in the Global Anglican Future Conference, or GAFCON. The group responded by announcing it had appointed a missionary bishop to Scotland to offer alternative leadership for traditionalist Anglicans opposed to the synods decision. Welby, speaking to the BBC from Africa where he has been traveling, was asked if the Anglican Communions rift over homosexuality might worsen, given that the communions center of growth is on that continent, where traditional views on marriage hold sway. Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, after his enthronement ceremony at Canterbury Cathedral, in Canterbury, southern England, on March 21, 2013. Photo by Luke MacGregor/Reuters The archbishop answered: Its an intractable problem. This is more complex than having a binary approach. There is not an easy fix, but the primates (of the Anglican Communion) have said that they will work together. But the situation in Scotland will make the archbishop of Canterburys task in keeping the Anglican Communion together much more difficult. Since the vote in June, at least nine Scottish Episcopal Church clergy have registered to officiate at same-sex weddings. The first to sign up was the Rev. Kelvin Holdsworth, the provost of St Marys Cathedral in Glasgow. Holdsworth, a leading figure in the Changing Attitude Scotland campaign, said that people in Scotland have changed their minds on gay marriage and now support it. The congregation has been hugely supportive. There were loud cheers in church when I announced that bookings for weddings were now open to all couples, when I received permission to do this a couple of weeks ago, Holdsworth said. Several members of the congregation were wearing badges saying, The Archbishop of Canterbury has no jurisdiction in this realm of Scotland. St. Johns Church in Edinburgh first announced that it would offer the rite of marriage beginning in July. Dnzkofer said that there had been dialogue throughout the Scottish Episcopal Church about human sexuality and same-sex marriage. St. Johns Episcopal Church, left, in Edinburgh, Scotland, with Edinburgh Caste in the background. Photo courtesy of Creative Commons/The Rev. Lawrence Lew It has been easier than in the Church of England, he said. We are a smaller church, we are not the established church and there is less of an evangelical voice. But we heard different perspectives and heard very different voices. Dnzkofer estimated about 80 percent of his congregation approved the change in doctrine. St Johns website reflects these varying opinions, with an apology for the deep pain the church caused to LGBTQ people and their families. (W)e asked for forgiveness for our resistance to proclaiming the love of God more courageously. We have failed. But it also says that it recognizes that the radical move by the Scottish Episcopal Church will be difficult for some people. We also have failed in loving more generously and embracing more compassionately those who disagree with recent developments in church and state. For this we are sorry, too. The proximity of Scotland to the Church of England will make the situation particularly difficult for Welby. Although they have only an estimated 100,000 members, the impact of gay weddings in its Scottish Episcopal churches will be significant, according to Simon Sarmiento, of the website, Thinking Anglicans. Gay Anglicans in England will be able to travel to Scotland to get married, putting more pressure on the Church of England, he said. Within the Church of England there are deeply divergent views on gays, and at the most recent General Synod, a bishops report advocating no change in the churchs stance on the blessing of gay partnerships or the conducting of gay marriages was narrowly rejected. Since then a Pastoral Advisory Group has been set up and chaired by Bishop of Newcastle Christine Hardman to support and advise dioceses on pastoral approaches to human sexuality. Holdsworth said Welby is wrong to say the problem is intractable and urged him to speak to gay people who want to help come up with solutions. If Justin Welby wants to hear from passionate Anglicans with lots of ideas about how to solve these troubles then one of the things he needs to do is to speak to the people concerned. LGBT people from around the communion would be willing to meet him to help find solutions, Holdsworth said. The last time an international meeting of LGBT activists was invited to meet with a senior leader from the Anglican Communion was in 2005. (Catherine Pepinster is a London-based correspondent)

Fair Usage Law

August 5, 2017   Posted in: Gay Marriage  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."