Archive for the ‘Gaza’ Category

1.25m students begin new academic year in Gaza – Middle East Monitor

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

According to the Ministry of Education in Gaza, nearly 1.25 million students are heading to 3,000 schools in the West Bank and Gaza Strip today to begin the new academic year.

The Ministry of Education in Gaza recently announced the opening of nine new schools with complete facilities. These schools will operate based on the two-session system. The ministry also announced it completed the expansion of nine other schools in preparation for the current academic year.

The ministry also completed maintenance on 44 schools making the number of government schools operating during the new academic year 397 attended by nearly 260,000 students.

Read: Gazas tailors stitch together uniforms for the new school year

According to the Minister of Education and Higher Education Sabri Sidem, Palestinian high school students performed better in their exams in 2007 compared to last year.

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

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1.25m students begin new academic year in Gaza – Middle East Monitor

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

British couple’s message in a bottle reaches Gaza, World News … – AsiaOne


AsiaOne
British couple's message in a bottle reaches Gaza, World News …
AsiaOne
A picture shows the message Palestinian fisherman Jihad al-Soltan found in a bottle off a Gaza beach after it was placed in the water last July by two British …
Couple's Message In A Bottle Travels 800 Kilometres, Reaches GazaNDTV

all 2 news articles »

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British couple’s message in a bottle reaches Gaza, World News … – AsiaOne

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Young Girls in the Gaza Strip Flourish Despite Repression – VICE

In 2012, Turkish photojournalist Monique Jaques traveled to the Gaza Strip to document Operation Pillar of Defenseone of the countless battles between the Israeli Defense Forces and Hamas. What was intended to be an eight-day assignment turned into a five-year-long personal project, Gaza Girls: Growing Up in the Gaza Strip, which documents the lives of young women growing up and coming of age in the tumultuous region. Jaques was motivated by the girls’ tenacity, determination, and passion in spite of the adversity they are forced to endure daily.

“Gaza is a troubled land, and growing up there isn’t easy. It is a 45-square-mile district, isolated by towering concrete blast walls, reams of barbed wire, and foreign soldiers who patrol its perimeters,” Jaques recalls in her artist statement of her time spent there. “After years of blockades and travel restrictions, the territory is isolated and shut off from the rest of the world. At night, the never-ending buzz of drones lull you into a light sleep under their watchful din. If you stand on the beach, you can see lights coming from Israela land that you will never be able to touch. Boundaries and surveillance define your existence.”

Doaa in a friend’s bedroom. Unmarried girls have few places in which to be themselves. Bedrooms and private cars are sanctuaries where girls can sing and dance without being judged by the public or their own families.

The result is constant scrutiny and pressure. The Gaza Striproughly twice the size of Washington, DC, and home to more than 2 million peopleis overcrowded and has been compared to living in an outdoor prison, according to Jaques. With everyone living so close together, and extended families together under one roof, there is little room for privacy. “Add conservative Islam and bored family members looking to gossip to the mix, and it creates tension and pressure for girls figuring out who they want to be,” says Jaques.

For Jaques, this project was not just about finding young girls to photograph and moving on to her next subjectit was about forging bonds between the girls she met. “I worked slowly. I spoke with the girls and knew them well before we started photographing. Many of them I have known throughout the years, but I’m always meeting new people.” Because she was not working to meet a deadline, she was really able to devote her time to make the project more personal. Her favorite part of the project is returning to Gaza to see how these young women have developed and how their lives have changed. “Last week, when I went back, one of the girls I photographed had a baby!”

Jaques hopes that Gaza Girls can expose an underreported side of a very complicated conflict and give people a better understanding of the region and a deeper sense of empathy. “At the end of the day, they’re just girls like you and me,” says Jaques. “They live inside a terribly complicated conflict but think and dream just like we do.”

Through interacting and meeting the Gaza girls, Jaques saw more similarities between the girls she was photographing herself at a young agefrom their interest in clothes and makeup to boys at school. “They have this desire to travel and explore and to be independent like I did at their age,” Jaques says. “But while in the rest of the world we might get to discover those dreams and live them out, they can’t.”

A girl shows off her Palestinian-themed nails after a recent bombing campaign.

Hours after a ceasefire was declared between Hamas and Israel, the people of Gaza City begin to rebuild. Shops open, and families go out to witness the damage incurred by the recent strikes.

Nisreen Shawa, a worker for the Palestinian Medical Relief Foundation at the Hamza Bin Abd-el Muttalib School, where they do art therapy and exercises with girls after the recent bombings.

At a salon in Gaza City, women come to get their hair, nails, and makeup done before weddings. In many families, a woman is not allowed to be seen without a veil by a man outside of her family, so beauty salons are for women only.

Medical students from Islamic University on break in the Maternity Ward of Al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza

Yara and her brother waiting for their father to return with shawarma as an evening treat after a recent conflict ended.

Hadeel Fawzy Abushar, 25, records a song in a studio in Gaza City. Few female singers remain as families and local government look down on the practice. Hadeel started when she was 12, as all of her sisters are singers.

Madleen Koolab takes Gazans out for rides on Thursday nights, a popular evening for families. Madleen owns the boat and uses it to fish during the week.

For many Gazans, the sea is the only place they can be without being reminded of their isolation. Sabah Abu Ghanem,14, and her sister surf early in the morning outside of Gaza City. The sisters place first in many competitions inside the strip but have never left to compete.

Mannequins wear available clothing in a shop near the main street of Gaza.

Girls watch the sun set at the harbor in Gaza City. While living in Gaza is undeniably tough, being a woman there is harder.

Yara and her friends prepare a dance number during a blackout. Fuel is scarce in Gaza, and many families only receive six to eight hours of electricity a day.

A phone shaped like lips and a prayer rug sit in the corner during a blackout.

A woman walks by a mural discouraging domestic violence outside of Al-Shifa Hospital. According to a 2012 study, some 37 percent of women are subjected to domestic violence by their husbands.

Girls play football in the northern Gaza town of Beit Lahiyah. Women in Gaza typically do all types of sports till the age of 16, when family pressure forces them to stop as many families seek to find husbands for them.

You can purchase Gaza Girls here, and follow Clara Mokri and Monique Jaques on Instagram.

Read more from the original source:
Young Girls in the Gaza Strip Flourish Despite Repression – VICE

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

Summer Camp In Gaza – Power Line (blog)

Kids in Hamas-controlled Gaza go to summer camp, just like kids in the U.S. They build fires, they play games, they watch movies, they learn new skills. And at the end of the camp, they put on a show for their parents to show what they have learned.

This short video was put together by the Israeli Defense Forces. In just one minute, it explains why peace in that region of the world is so hard to attain. Really, what you see here is child abuse:

Read more from the original source:
Summer Camp In Gaza – Power Line (blog)

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

Is War in Gaza Unavoidable? – Foreign Affairs

Earlier this summer, it seemed like war in the Gaza Strip was inevitable. Israel had accepted Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas request to cut off electricity for the approximately two million Gazans who live under Hamas rule. Abbas hoped to pressure Hamas into relinquishing control over the strip, which was plunged into darkness as the cornered faction faced pressure from Israel and Abbas on one side and Egypt on the other. It seemed only a matter of time before Hamas lashed out. That is, until an unlikely savior emerged: exiled Fatah leader Muhammad Dahlan. The archrival of Abbas rushed to Egypt and brokered an agreement between Cairo and Hamas for an emergency fuel shipment. As the situation calmed, Dahlan announced a new arrangement for Gaza: he would raise money for Gaza abroad. In return, Hamas would allow his supporters to return to Gaza and operate freely there.

Yet this latest Middle East agreement is only a temporary fix. Hamas leaders have few goals in common with the exiled leader of their rival party, save two important ones: to ameliorate the hardships of life in Gaza and thwart their mutual rival, Abbas, in the West Bank. The current arrangement ostensibly serves these two purposes, but it does so only in the near term. It may have delayed a war this summer, but it has made a future conflict more likely.

For Hamas, siding with Dahlan was the only realistic option to avoid launching another war. Strapped for cash and facing a restive population (10,000 Gazans marched on Hamas electricity headquarters in January in protest), Hamas was starting to feel the effects of the Saudi and United Arab Emiratesled blockade of one of its patrons, Qatar. Dahlan, too, was desperate for a way to remain relevant. Ever since Abbas exiled him in 2011, the former security chief in Gaza has made his home in the UAE, courting regional favor and pumping money into the Palestinian Territories. Yet Dahlan has been increasingly marginalized in Palestinian

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Is War in Gaza Unavoidable? – Foreign Affairs

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British couple’s message in a bottle reaches Gaza fisherman after 500-mile journey – Telegraph.co.uk

“Hello, Thank you for picking up this bottle. As a reward here are some magic flowers,” the couple wrote in their letter.

“We are currently on holiday on Rhodes and we would love to know how far this bottle got, even if it’s just the next beach,” said the letter inside, signed “Faithfully, Zac and Beth”.

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British couple’s message in a bottle reaches Gaza fisherman after 500-mile journey – Telegraph.co.uk

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Egypt Reportedly Set to Reopen Its Gaza Crossing on Regular Basis in September – Haaretz

Home > Middle East News > Palestinians

Rafah border crossing has only opened for 14 days so far in 2017, but Palestinians expect it to reopen after Id al-Adha holiday

The Rafah border crossing between the Gaza Strip and

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Egypt Reportedly Set to Reopen Its Gaza Crossing on Regular Basis in September – Haaretz

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Children from Gaza visit Jerusalem for first time – CNN

The group of about 100 children were too busy snapping their own pictures around the holy site, scarcely able to believe they were really in Jerusalem.

“When we saw Al-Aqsa mosque, we felt so happy,” said 13-year-old Hind Slameh Abu Hilu, who couldn’t stop smiling following afternoon prayers. “We prayed in Al-Aqsa, which we used to feel was impossible. We felt so happy.”

For most of the children, it was not only their first time in Jerusalem; it was their first time outside of Gaza, and they could barely contain their excitement.

The group came on a trip organized by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), which provides help to Palestinian refugees in Gaza and the West Bank.

It was the first UNRWA trip designed specifically to bring children to visit the Jerusalem holy sites, organizers said, including the Al-Aqsa mosque and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The approximately 100 children between the ages of 8-14 will also visit parts of the West Bank.

“When we were on the road, a lot of them said to me, ‘I don’t feel that this is true.’ Finally, it is going to be true,” said Ragh Dahamdouna, one of the teachers accompanying the students. “The children here are so happy, so excited.”

Dahamdouna couldn’t contain her own excitement.

“I think I am a little child here, and I let myself enjoy the atmosphere, enjoy the friendship, enjoy everything!”

“Most of these children have never met any of their extended family here,” said Scott Anderson, director of UNRWA operations in the West Bank. “So to have that opportunity (is great), and frankly, the program is fantastic. They’re going to see parts of the West Bank that many people never get to see.”

The group entered Israel through the Erez border crossing early Sunday afternoon. After a short drive, they were eating lunch in the Old City of Jerusalem, ready to explore the sacred city. They made their way through the winding alleys of Jerusalem to the Lion’s Gate entrance in the Muslim Quarter.

As they passed through the stone archway, the realization dawned on them: They had arrived at one of the holiest sites in the world. To Muslims, this is the Noble Sanctuary, home to the Al-Aqsa mosque, the third holiest site in Islam. To Jews, this is the the Temple Mount, the holiest place in the world.

To these children, it was a dream come true.

“It’s a very holy place for Muslims and for others in the world,” beamed 13-year-old Ahmad Abu Almashayakeh, from the Magazi refugee camp in Gaza. “It’s a very fantastic feeling, and it’s like a new thing you’re doing in your life.”

When it came time to leave Al-Aqsa and walk the short distance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, organizers struggled to round up the children. They were too excited to leave.

“I hope this is not going to be the last time,” said Abu Hilu after leaving the holy site. “It is the first time, and I hope we will repeat this trip many times later on.”

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Children from Gaza visit Jerusalem for first time – CNN

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Gaza’s tailors stitch together uniforms for the new school year – Middle East Monitor

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

Childrens bags are made and hung ready to be purchased for the new school year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

School uniforms are made and hung ready to be purchased for the new school year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor]

The new school year is due to start in a few days and Gazas tailors and seamstresses are making about 20 per cent of the school clothes. The rest are imported.

The owners of the factories are complaining. One of them, Khaled Saqer, told MEMO that sales barely cover the cost of the uniforms. Although the prices are the same and havent changed, there are new burdens, such as higher costs of living and higher wages. The main change that the owners are experiencing now is the use of more fuel and thus higher production costs since they rarely have electricity and so have to rely on generators for several days every week.

Eid Al-Adha coincides with the new school year, and the Palestinians in Gaza are suffering due to the new salary cuts enforced by the Palestinian Authority on its staff as well as Gaza government employees, who only receive 50 per cent of their official salaries. Families are forced to sacrifice the purchase of new clothes for the Eid celebration and only buy school supplies and uniforms, as they are more important. They have even had to cut down to one school uniform per child instead of the customary two.

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Gaza’s tailors stitch together uniforms for the new school year – Middle East Monitor

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1.25m students begin new academic year in Gaza – Middle East Monitor

New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor] New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor] New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor] New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor] New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor] New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor] According to the Ministry of Education in Gaza, nearly 1.25 million students are heading to 3,000 schools in the West Bank and Gaza Strip today to begin the new academic year. The Ministry of Education in Gaza recently announced the opening of nine new schools with complete facilities. These schools will operate based on the two-session system. The ministry also announced it completed the expansion of nine other schools in preparation for the current academic year. The ministry also completed maintenance on 44 schools making the number of government schools operating during the new academic year 397 attended by nearly 260,000 students. Read: Gazas tailors stitch together uniforms for the new school year According to the Minister of Education and Higher Education Sabri Sidem, Palestinian high school students performed better in their exams in 2007 compared to last year. New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor] New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor] New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor] New academic year in Gaza on 23 August, 2017 [Mohammed Asad/Middle East Monitor]

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

British couple’s message in a bottle reaches Gaza, World News … – AsiaOne

AsiaOne British couple's message in a bottle reaches Gaza, World News … AsiaOne A picture shows the message Palestinian fisherman Jihad al-Soltan found in a bottle off a Gaza beach after it was placed in the water last July by two British … Couple's Message In A Bottle Travels 800 Kilometres, Reaches Gaza NDTV all 2 news articles »

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

Young Girls in the Gaza Strip Flourish Despite Repression – VICE

In 2012, Turkish photojournalist Monique Jaques traveled to the Gaza Strip to document Operation Pillar of Defenseone of the countless battles between the Israeli Defense Forces and Hamas. What was intended to be an eight-day assignment turned into a five-year-long personal project, Gaza Girls: Growing Up in the Gaza Strip, which documents the lives of young women growing up and coming of age in the tumultuous region. Jaques was motivated by the girls’ tenacity, determination, and passion in spite of the adversity they are forced to endure daily. “Gaza is a troubled land, and growing up there isn’t easy. It is a 45-square-mile district, isolated by towering concrete blast walls, reams of barbed wire, and foreign soldiers who patrol its perimeters,” Jaques recalls in her artist statement of her time spent there. “After years of blockades and travel restrictions, the territory is isolated and shut off from the rest of the world. At night, the never-ending buzz of drones lull you into a light sleep under their watchful din. If you stand on the beach, you can see lights coming from Israela land that you will never be able to touch. Boundaries and surveillance define your existence.” Doaa in a friend’s bedroom. Unmarried girls have few places in which to be themselves. Bedrooms and private cars are sanctuaries where girls can sing and dance without being judged by the public or their own families. The result is constant scrutiny and pressure. The Gaza Striproughly twice the size of Washington, DC, and home to more than 2 million peopleis overcrowded and has been compared to living in an outdoor prison, according to Jaques. With everyone living so close together, and extended families together under one roof, there is little room for privacy. “Add conservative Islam and bored family members looking to gossip to the mix, and it creates tension and pressure for girls figuring out who they want to be,” says Jaques. For Jaques, this project was not just about finding young girls to photograph and moving on to her next subjectit was about forging bonds between the girls she met. “I worked slowly. I spoke with the girls and knew them well before we started photographing. Many of them I have known throughout the years, but I’m always meeting new people.” Because she was not working to meet a deadline, she was really able to devote her time to make the project more personal. Her favorite part of the project is returning to Gaza to see how these young women have developed and how their lives have changed. “Last week, when I went back, one of the girls I photographed had a baby!” Jaques hopes that Gaza Girls can expose an underreported side of a very complicated conflict and give people a better understanding of the region and a deeper sense of empathy. “At the end of the day, they’re just girls like you and me,” says Jaques. “They live inside a terribly complicated conflict but think and dream just like we do.” Through interacting and meeting the Gaza girls, Jaques saw more similarities between the girls she was photographing herself at a young agefrom their interest in clothes and makeup to boys at school. “They have this desire to travel and explore and to be independent like I did at their age,” Jaques says. “But while in the rest of the world we might get to discover those dreams and live them out, they can’t.” A girl shows off her Palestinian-themed nails after a recent bombing campaign. Hours after a ceasefire was declared between Hamas and Israel, the people of Gaza City begin to rebuild. Shops open, and families go out to witness the damage incurred by the recent strikes. Nisreen Shawa, a worker for the Palestinian Medical Relief Foundation at the Hamza Bin Abd-el Muttalib School, where they do art therapy and exercises with girls after the recent bombings. At a salon in Gaza City, women come to get their hair, nails, and makeup done before weddings. In many families, a woman is not allowed to be seen without a veil by a man outside of her family, so beauty salons are for women only. Medical students from Islamic University on break in the Maternity Ward of Al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza Yara and her brother waiting for their father to return with shawarma as an evening treat after a recent conflict ended. Hadeel Fawzy Abushar, 25, records a song in a studio in Gaza City. Few female singers remain as families and local government look down on the practice. Hadeel started when she was 12, as all of her sisters are singers. Madleen Koolab takes Gazans out for rides on Thursday nights, a popular evening for families. Madleen owns the boat and uses it to fish during the week. For many Gazans, the sea is the only place they can be without being reminded of their isolation. Sabah Abu Ghanem,14, and her sister surf early in the morning outside of Gaza City. The sisters place first in many competitions inside the strip but have never left to compete. Mannequins wear available clothing in a shop near the main street of Gaza. Girls watch the sun set at the harbor in Gaza City. While living in Gaza is undeniably tough, being a woman there is harder. Yara and her friends prepare a dance number during a blackout. Fuel is scarce in Gaza, and many families only receive six to eight hours of electricity a day. A phone shaped like lips and a prayer rug sit in the corner during a blackout. A woman walks by a mural discouraging domestic violence outside of Al-Shifa Hospital. According to a 2012 study, some 37 percent of women are subjected to domestic violence by their husbands. Girls play football in the northern Gaza town of Beit Lahiyah. Women in Gaza typically do all types of sports till the age of 16, when family pressure forces them to stop as many families seek to find husbands for them. You can purchase Gaza Girls here, and follow Clara Mokri and Monique Jaques on Instagram.

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

Summer Camp In Gaza – Power Line (blog)

Kids in Hamas-controlled Gaza go to summer camp, just like kids in the U.S. They build fires, they play games, they watch movies, they learn new skills. And at the end of the camp, they put on a show for their parents to show what they have learned. This short video was put together by the Israeli Defense Forces. In just one minute, it explains why peace in that region of the world is so hard to attain. Really, what you see here is child abuse:

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

Is War in Gaza Unavoidable? – Foreign Affairs

Earlier this summer, it seemed like war in the Gaza Strip was inevitable. Israel had accepted Palestinian Authority leader Mahmoud Abbas request to cut off electricity for the approximately two million Gazans who live under Hamas rule. Abbas hoped to pressure Hamas into relinquishing control over the strip, which was plunged into darkness as the cornered faction faced pressure from Israel and Abbas on one side and Egypt on the other. It seemed only a matter of time before Hamas lashed out. That is, until an unlikely savior emerged: exiled Fatah leader Muhammad Dahlan. The archrival of Abbas rushed to Egypt and brokered an agreement between Cairo and Hamas for an emergency fuel shipment. As the situation calmed, Dahlan announced a new arrangement for Gaza: he would raise money for Gaza abroad. In return, Hamas would allow his supporters to return to Gaza and operate freely there. Yet this latest Middle East agreement is only a temporary fix. Hamas leaders have few goals in common with the exiled leader of their rival party, save two important ones: to ameliorate the hardships of life in Gaza and thwart their mutual rival, Abbas, in the West Bank. The current arrangement ostensibly serves these two purposes, but it does so only in the near term. It may have delayed a war this summer, but it has made a future conflict more likely. For Hamas, siding with Dahlan was the only realistic option to avoid launching another war. Strapped for cash and facing a restive population (10,000 Gazans marched on Hamas electricity headquarters in January in protest), Hamas was starting to feel the effects of the Saudi and United Arab Emiratesled blockade of one of its patrons, Qatar. Dahlan, too, was desperate for a way to remain relevant. Ever since Abbas exiled him in 2011, the former security chief in Gaza has made his home in the UAE, courting regional favor and pumping money into the Palestinian Territories. Yet Dahlan has been increasingly marginalized in Palestinian

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

British couple’s message in a bottle reaches Gaza fisherman after 500-mile journey – Telegraph.co.uk

“Hello, Thank you for picking up this bottle. As a reward here are some magic flowers,” the couple wrote in their letter. “We are currently on holiday on Rhodes and we would love to know how far this bottle got, even if it’s just the next beach,” said the letter inside, signed “Faithfully, Zac and Beth”.

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

Egypt Reportedly Set to Reopen Its Gaza Crossing on Regular Basis in September – Haaretz

Home > Middle East News > Palestinians Rafah border crossing has only opened for 14 days so far in 2017, but Palestinians expect it to reopen after Id al-Adha holiday The Rafah border crossing between the Gaza Strip and Want to enjoy ‘Zen’ reading – with no ads and just the article? Subscribe today We’ve got more newsletters we think you’ll find interesting. Please try again later. This email address has already registered for this newsletter.

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

Children from Gaza visit Jerusalem for first time – CNN

The group of about 100 children were too busy snapping their own pictures around the holy site, scarcely able to believe they were really in Jerusalem. “When we saw Al-Aqsa mosque, we felt so happy,” said 13-year-old Hind Slameh Abu Hilu, who couldn’t stop smiling following afternoon prayers. “We prayed in Al-Aqsa, which we used to feel was impossible. We felt so happy.” For most of the children, it was not only their first time in Jerusalem; it was their first time outside of Gaza, and they could barely contain their excitement. The group came on a trip organized by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), which provides help to Palestinian refugees in Gaza and the West Bank. It was the first UNRWA trip designed specifically to bring children to visit the Jerusalem holy sites, organizers said, including the Al-Aqsa mosque and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The approximately 100 children between the ages of 8-14 will also visit parts of the West Bank. “When we were on the road, a lot of them said to me, ‘I don’t feel that this is true.’ Finally, it is going to be true,” said Ragh Dahamdouna, one of the teachers accompanying the students. “The children here are so happy, so excited.” Dahamdouna couldn’t contain her own excitement. “I think I am a little child here, and I let myself enjoy the atmosphere, enjoy the friendship, enjoy everything!” “Most of these children have never met any of their extended family here,” said Scott Anderson, director of UNRWA operations in the West Bank. “So to have that opportunity (is great), and frankly, the program is fantastic. They’re going to see parts of the West Bank that many people never get to see.” The group entered Israel through the Erez border crossing early Sunday afternoon. After a short drive, they were eating lunch in the Old City of Jerusalem, ready to explore the sacred city. They made their way through the winding alleys of Jerusalem to the Lion’s Gate entrance in the Muslim Quarter. As they passed through the stone archway, the realization dawned on them: They had arrived at one of the holiest sites in the world. To Muslims, this is the Noble Sanctuary, home to the Al-Aqsa mosque, the third holiest site in Islam. To Jews, this is the the Temple Mount, the holiest place in the world. To these children, it was a dream come true. “It’s a very holy place for Muslims and for others in the world,” beamed 13-year-old Ahmad Abu Almashayakeh, from the Magazi refugee camp in Gaza. “It’s a very fantastic feeling, and it’s like a new thing you’re doing in your life.” When it came time to leave Al-Aqsa and walk the short distance to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, organizers struggled to round up the children. They were too excited to leave. “I hope this is not going to be the last time,” said Abu Hilu after leaving the holy site. “It is the first time, and I hope we will repeat this trip many times later on.”

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed

Gaza’s tailors stitch together uniforms for the new school year – Middle East Monitor

Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] Childrens bags are made and hung ready to be purchased for the new school year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] School uniforms are made and hung ready to be purchased for the new school year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] Gazas tailors are working hard towards making school uniforms for the new academic year. [Image: Mohammad Asad / Middle East Monitor] The new school year is due to start in a few days and Gazas tailors and seamstresses are making about 20 per cent of the school clothes. The rest are imported. The owners of the factories are complaining. One of them, Khaled Saqer, told MEMO that sales barely cover the cost of the uniforms. Although the prices are the same and havent changed, there are new burdens, such as higher costs of living and higher wages. The main change that the owners are experiencing now is the use of more fuel and thus higher production costs since they rarely have electricity and so have to rely on generators for several days every week. Eid Al-Adha coincides with the new school year, and the Palestinians in Gaza are suffering due to the new salary cuts enforced by the Palestinian Authority on its staff as well as Gaza government employees, who only receive 50 per cent of their official salaries. Families are forced to sacrifice the purchase of new clothes for the Eid celebration and only buy school supplies and uniforms, as they are more important. They have even had to cut down to one school uniform per child instead of the customary two.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Gaza  Comments Closed


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