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November 24, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

George Lincoln Rockwell, father of American Nazis, still in …

On 28 August 1963, the day Martin Luther King Jr delivered his I Have a Dream speech on the national mall, an American Nazi arrived early.

George Lincoln Rockwell, the media-savvy, pipe-smoking founder of the American Nazi Party, was blatantly racist, homophobic and antisemitic. Just 17 years after the US and its allies had defeated Nazi Germany, he had tried to hold a rally celebrating Hitlers birthday in New York.

In the capital, Rockwell had predicted that 10,000 angry counter-demonstrators would join him to protest Kings March on Washington. He had also been spreading fears about black mobs attacking Congress. Instead, the Washington DC police department, which Rockwell assumed would be on his side, had denied him a permit to demonstrate.

More than 200,000 Americans joined King for a peaceful event that would reshape American history. Rockwell and fewer than 90 followers were surrounded by about 100 police officers, the Guardian reported. When one supporter attempted to give a speech, he was arrested.

Frederick Simonelli, author of a 1999 biography of Rockwell, American Fhrer, would note that the American Nazis tiny band of followers that day included an unknown number who were conducting undercover surveillance for law enforcement or Jewish community groups.

Nonetheless, when King marched in Chicago in 1966, he was greeted by thousands of angry white protesters, some holding signs that referenced Rockwell or carried slogans like Join the White Rebellion and We Worked Hard For What We Got, the Chicago Tribune reported.

Rockwell died in 1967, murdered by one of his own followers. American neo-Nazi groups remained, largely in obscurity.

Then, earlier this month, people around the world were shocked by footage from Charlottesville, where hundreds of young white nationalists, neo-Nazis and other far-right activistschanted You will not replace us and Jews will not replace us.

What happened in Charlottesville on 12 August?

White nationalists gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia, to protest against a plan to remove a statue of Robert E. Lee, the Confederacys top general in the American civil war.

Demonstrators chanted racist statements, carried antisemitic placards and held torches during the Unite the Right rally, which was organised by white nationalist Jason Kessler.

The march was met by anti-fascist demonstrators, and some skirmishes broke out before James Fields, 20, allegedly ploughed a car into a group of counter-demonstrators.

Civil rights activist Heather Heyer, 32, died and others were injured. Fields has been charged with murder.

Many of the hate groups that are attracting the most attention today including Vanguard America, the group that James Fields, the man charged with killing Heather Heyer was photographed standing with in Charlottesville are newly-founded. They are not part of the handful of current neo-Nazi organizations, including the National Socialist Movement and the National Alliance, that grew out of the splintering of Rockwells American Nazi Party, said Marilyn Mayro, senior fellow at the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism.

Where Rockwell used explicit Nazi iconography, many new white nationalist groups have adopted alternative fascist symbols.

They want to rebrand white supremacy, so the swastika is not so much a part of their movement, said Mayro, adding that with some exceptions, Rockwell doesnt seem to be venerated by these groups, but they use some of the tactics that he promoted.

However, strategies used by Rockwell to gain media attention talks on college campuses, violent clashes without outraged opponents, debates over the freedom of speech are replicated today.

In 1960, for example, Rockwell made headlines with his reported support for Richard Nixons candidacy for president. In 2016, white supremacists David Duke and Richard Spencer made headlines by endorsing Donald Trump.

I completely repudiate him and the evil he represents, Nixon said in 1960, according to the Associated Press.

In 2016, Trump did not immediately disavow support from Duke. After Charlottesville, he drew fire for a delayed and equivocal response.

Who coined the term ‘alt-right’?

The white supremacist Richard Spencer devised the term in 2010. He has described the movement as “identity politics for white Americans and for Europeans around the world”.

What does it stand for?

The movement supports extreme rightwing ideologies, including white nationalism used interchangeably with white supremacism and antisemitism. It positions itself broadly against egalitarianism, democracy, universalism and multiculturalism.

Some “alt-right” supporters have argued that their hardline, extremist positions are not truly meant,but are a way to disrupt conventional and accepted thinking. Memes, irony and ambiguity are sometimes used in an attempt to wrongfoot critics.

How does the ‘alt-right’ relate to the Trump administration?

The Trump administration includes figures who are associated with the “alt-right”, including the former Breitbart News executive chairman Steve Bannon, now the White House chief strategist. Many of Trump’s policy positions have won favour with the movement.

For some leaders of extremist groups, Rockwell does remain an inspiration. Matthew Heimbach, the 26-year-old leader of the Traditionalist Worker Party, a neo-Nazi group that marched in Charlottesville, said in an interview in May that Rockwells writings and speeches were the things that worked to bring me to National Socialism.

Heimbach called Rockwell one of the most gifted orators of the 20th century. We really want to be able to carry the banner of what he died doing, being a true political National Socialist, he said.

He mastered the art of turning virulent racism into a spectacle the media could not resist

Rockwells most important legacy may be the instinct for showmanship. Rockwell was tall, dimpled and telegenic, deploying a trademark corn cob pipe and an instinct for dramatic poses, swastikas deployed for effect, leveraging outrage into constant press attention.

In 1961, he and his followers drove a Volkswagen emblazoned with the words hate bus through the American South, parodying the Freedom Riders who fought for civil rights reform.

Many of his claims among them the assertion that he would be elected president in 1972 on the National Socialist ticket were clearly delusional. But he mastered the art of turning virulent racism and antisemitism into a spectacle the media could not resist.

Like many of todays most prominent alt-right leaders and backers, Rockwell was not a member of the white working class. The son of a vaudeville star, he attended Brown University, where he drew comics for the campus newspaper, then served in the navy in the second world war and Korea. By 1952, Simonelli wrote in his 1999 biography, one of Rockwells cousins was shocked by the vehemence with which he was denouncing Jewish traitors.

In 1963, a report from the Anti-Defamation League found that Rockwell had only 16 troopers in residence with him in a rickety two-story barracks in Arlington, Virginia. The plumbing was faulty and the American Nazis were subsisting on canned hash, chicken stew and even cat food, the report said.

Rockwell remains a nuisance, but is not a menace, the report said, calling him a mere pimple on the American body politic.

One of the keys to Rockwells failure, Simonelli wrote, was the decision of Jewish organizations to give the Nazi leader the silent treatment. After several years of responding to his provocations, which produced headlines regarding clashes in New York, Washington and Boston, some Jewish community organizations worked together to ignore him, a tactic they called quarantine.

Finally, on 25 August 1967, outside a laundromat in Arlington, Rockwell was shot dead. One of his former followers, John Patler, was convicted of his murder.

On Friday, in Arlington, NBC reported that a small group of American Nazis offered a salute to their fallen leader.

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George Lincoln Rockwell, father of American Nazis, still in …

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October 19, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

My 16 months as a Nazi – Macleans.ca

I AM A LICENSED private investigator who, more than a year ago, was employed by the Canadian Jewish Congress to infiltrate the Canadian Nazi Party. I was more successful than I expected. I became a trusted officer of the partyits local Heinrich Himmlerthough I’ve managed to avoid being linked with the nationwide publicity that has made the name of John Beattie, the unemployed clerk who is the party’s leader, familiar to most Canadians. And now Ithink my job is done.

I have provided the Congress with the names of most known Canadian Nazis; with tape recordings of Nazi meetings I’ve bugged through tiny radio transmitters; with detailed accounts of Beattie’s movements and plans. A few weeks ago, in what should be a coup de grce, I handed over copies of all Beattie’s party records, which included members’ and supporters’ names and addresses, and copies of all his correspondence. The Congress now even has a list of those who contribute to party funds: the shadowy supporters who keep Beattie going but haven’t the guts to acknowledge publicly that they are Nazis.

The Jewish Congress wants to nullify Beattie’s potential effectiveness as a political force by using the laws of the land, and even now it is pressuring Parliament to outlaw the kind of hate literature Beattie is distributing (though he’s not the only one doing so). There are others who would use more violent means to remove Beattie from the scene. Some of these either are or were among the lunatic fringe of an organization, largely Jewish, called N3 (after Newton’s third law: For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction). And while, in recent weeks, there has been a change in the N3 leadership, these fanatics are still active and still represent a physical threat to Beattie.

It is these anti-Nazi commandosa Toronto police inspector has called them the Jewish Mafia”who besieged a house Beattie once used as a headquarters; who have vainly chased him after each of his public meetings; who have beaten his associates, including one elderly man; who have pestered his blond, 20-year-old wife Carol, following her home from the office where she works to help support Beattie, herself and their two-year-old daughter Melissa. It is this group that twice tried to bribe me to set Beattie up for them, and which has sworn to prevent Beattie from speaking in his chosen forum, the park called Allan Gardens in Toronto.

Beattie still hopes to hold another meeting in Toronto this fall. Toronto city council and the courts refused permission in August but, as I write, Beattie is looking for loopholes that would allow the meeting to take place. If he’s successful, these anti-Nazis might well resort to violence.

Indirectly, I met Beattie as a result of the first of his park speeches. It was held in May last year, and, predictably, it sparked a riot among a crowd that the newspapers later estimated to be about 4,000 strong. The police rescued Beattie before he received more than a bloodied nose, but they also arrested several N3 adherents and charged them with causing a disturbance. This pattern was to be repeated on three subsequent occasions on which Beattie appeared in the downtown park. But on this occasion the lawyer for the arrested N3 men employed me to subpoena Beattie as a witness at their trial, and at the same time told me N3 might employ me as an undercover agent if I could win Beattie’s confidence.

That night I called at Beattie’s apartment in mid-Toronto, but even then he was running scared. What do you want? he yelled through the closed door. I told him. Who are you? he yelled back. I told him. And then, for 10 minutes, we talked through the door while I tried to persuade him that it would prevent him being plagued by me or my assistants if he opened the door now and received the subpoena. Finally, he let me in.

Until that moment I, like most people whose knowledge of the man is culled from newspapers, had an image of Beattie as a spellbinder: a fanatic perhaps, but an impressive one. The reality was disappointing. He is almost six feet tall, and gangling. He is 24 years old. He has a sort of death’s-head face: hollowed cheeks, with sallow skin stretched tight across prominent bones and mousy hair combed, Hitlerian style, across his forehead. He’s hardly an impressive figure, but the fact doesn’t bother him: after all, neither was Hitler. I served the subpoena and asked how his party was progressing. He was suspicious and noncommittal, but did lend me some hate literature, all published by the U.S. Nazis.

A couple of days later, I returned the literatureand this time carried with me a bottle of rum. I offered him a drink (I later found he never refuses) and we sat and he talked. Hitler, he said, was the greatest man in history next to Christ. Hitler never exterminated six million Jews, he said; that was a Jew-communist lie. Next to the New Testament, he said, Mein Kampf was the greatest book ever written. I sat and I listenedand I shivered.

When I had undertaken to try to befriend Beattie, I regarded it as a joba situation in which I could no more afford emotional involvement than if I had been investigating, say, a case of industrial espionage, or a divorce. But from the start I began getting emotionally involved. My wife is German, and her family suffered under the Gestapo. Our sense of outrage has been dulled by overexposure to the sins of Nazi Germany, and it’s too convenient to dismiss Beattie and his henchmenonly a dozen active members, plus perhaps 100 unseen supportersas a bunch of vicious, but harmless, misfits. Misfits they are, but they are also the most visible part of a growing right-wing movement in Canada which, I have come to believe, could represent a threat to our national stability.

I have seen old people, survivors of Hitler’s extermination camps, reduced to near-hysteria by hate literature. I met one lady on the fringe of the rioting crowd at a Beattie meeting who sobbed so deeply I almost wept with her, and she told me that she hadn’t slept since the Nazis followed me to Canada.” After every fresh wave of publicity, more sympathizers come crawling out of the woodwork to offer Beattie money and encouragement. Beattie himself has said, “I’m just the man who stands up and says what I am. You waitwhen theres a depression and the masses are looking for a scapegoat, that’s when thousands will declare themselves for us. U.S. Nazi commander” George Lincoln Rockwell has told Beattie he has a substantial list of Canadian contacts, and in August he sent Beattie a list of 279 people in Ontario who have contributed money to the U.S. party or have written to Rockwell for information and literature.

But that night I first met Beattie and listened to him spew his own brand of perverted reasoning, I knew nothing of the effect and the possible dangers of Nazism in Canada. All I felt then was an emotional revulsion. I managed to blurt out that it was time someone like him showed up the Jews for what they really were. My conscience wouldn’t let me say more, but I felt that statement was ambiguous enough to feed his conceit.

Now I had an excuse for maintaining a relationship with Beattie. As a result of that first public meeting of his, he faced a charge of causing a public disturbance. I offered him the benefit of the legal knowledge I have gained from eight years working as a peace officer for the county of York and as a private detective. I helped him prepare his defence, and although he was convicted and fined $150, he began to trust me. I helped him in the same way later when he was charged with unlawful assembly, and he came to regard me as his closest friend.

Beattie is strangely likable at times, particularly when he and his party are not flourishing; when he feels successful he grows more arrogant. Superficially, Beattie can be charming, but I have seen his less attractive characteristics. I’ve heard him lie to his wife Carol over something as trivial as whether he’d stopped on the way home for a glass of beer. In public he is a doting father to his daughter, but I’ve seen him spank the child for an offence as trivial as upsetting an ashtray. As a conspirator he’s a joke: he once met a Toronto geologist and his wife who gave him $75, offered him support and even employed him at $60 a week for a month during which he labelled rock specimens. Their identity was supposed to be a strict secret, but within three days hed told me their name and address.

While he will arrogantly face a rioting mob at one of his public meetingsTheres no glory in it unless the Jews draw blood, he once told mehe will cross the street to avoid a man who he thinks gave him a queer look. Once, when we parked my car in a downtown lot, a man passing by recognized Beattie, ran off and, before we could leave, returned with two other men. Beattie ran like a scared rabbit, and we escaped through a bowling alley and out onto Yonge Street. And yet three middle-aged men are hardly a lethal threat to two younger onesBeattie 24, and myself. 37.

Perhaps this wariness has helped him survive, though. I personally wonder how the anti-Nazi commandos have failed so often. Once he left his apartment to go to his public speakin at Allan Gardens and found seven men standing in two groups, waiting for him. Somehow he dodged between the groups and, with the would-be attackers in pursuit, ran to a neighbour’s house. From there he called the police, who took him to Allan Gardens in a police car. After one meeting, a group of anti-Nazi commandos trailed him to the home of a supporter on Admiral Road. There Beattie cowered behind the closed door while two carloads of men waited outside and a third car prowled the area. I drove to Admiral Road and spotted the stake-out. The attackers’ prowl car got on my tail. I lost the tail by driving back downtown before returning to pick up Beattie, who escaped by sneaking out the back door of the house and crawling over the garden fence.

He also believes I helped save him when N3 staked out a hall in which he had planned to hold a supporters meeting. I had been tipped off that N3 planned to break up the meeting with stink bombs, and I told my Jewish Congress contact. When I drove Beattie past the hall and he saw about 15 cars full of N3 people, plus about a score of police cars posted there on the advice of the Jewish Congress, he quickly cancelled the meetingand thanked me. You probably saved my life again, he said.

There is a part of Beattie that enjoys the danger, the threats. They make him feel importantand it is the need to feel important that to a large extent sustains his enthusiasm for Nazism. He is hugely delighted with the fuss he has caused. Early in 1965, when there were just Beattie and a couple of teenagers. Jack DeCock and Peter Riedel, in the Nazi business, theyincredibly, it seems nowcaused riots and demonstrations just by declaring themselves Nazis. Newspapers across the country ran stories about their activities. “Just think,” Beattie once told me, three or four kids, that’s all we were, and we had the country up in arms.

But that, I discovered, is the tactic of the tiny Nazi groups in a dozen countries. They send one another newspaper clippings, and congratulate one another by mail. I once secretly taped a telephone conversation between Beattie and Lincoln Rockwell. Beattie greeted Rockwell: Hello commander. We got some good front-page publicity about my speakin’ this Sunday. The Jews were screaming their heads off from every synagogue in the city.”

Wonderful,” said Rockwell. “I sure will be happy to see that.”

Sadly, it is the N3 organization and the anti-Nazi extremists who, in their attempts to destroy Beattie, provide him with most of the publicity he craves. If it werent for the riots and the assaults and the public protest meetings they hold, there’d be no real news in Beattie. Charles Wittenberg, the leader of N3 until he resigned in July, never fully appreciated this fact.

Wittenberg never did offer to employ me professionally, and for a while it seemed I had become embroiled in what I considered an odious mess for no good professional reason. In September 1965, however, Sydney Harris, Ben Kayfetz and Sydney Midanik of the Canadian Jewish Congress engaged me to continue spying on Beattie. From then I reported almost daily to Kayfetz, always phoning in the name “Mr. Harold” for the sake of secrecy. It was not a profitable arrangement for methe most I ever charged the Congress was $200 for a month’s workbut by now my emotional involvement was total.

I was as alarmed about Beattie as were the Congress and N3. It’s not Beattie himself I fear: it’s the uncounted Nazi sympathizers, and the growing number of anti-communist, right-wing organizations that display neo-Nazi symptoms. It leads me to fear a situation in which the Nazi Party might fall into the hands of an intelligent demagogue and gain financial support from wealthy but misguided right-wing sympathizers.

When I first met Beattie, his Nazis were not a formally constituted party but consisted of fewer than a dozen young misfits. However, there were about a dozen older men, mostly middle-aged German immigrants, waiting in the shadows. Beattie, who was once active in the Social Credit Party, had met most of these people in 1964 through the breakaway Social Credit movement of Neil Carmichael, a Toronto stamp dealer who has been disowned by the national Social Credit Party, and who has since himself disowned Beattie and his Nazis. It was, I gathered, these immigrant Nazis who fed Beatties interest with stories of the glorious Third Reich, but they were too cautious to declare themselves openly when Beattie first hoisted his swastika in 1964.

Beattie seemed to regard me as the first of a new and more desirable type of Nazi. Anyway, at about the time we met he purged the group of its violent teenagers and began the campaign he is still running to present the Nazis as a well-financed, well-organized, respectable group. To this end he ordained that the Canadian Nazi uniform should be dark suit, dark tie and white shirt. This may have been making necessity a virtue, for he only owns one suita dark one. Some of his older, casual clothes are mine, cut down to size. Along with his image-building goes a dream to forge a grand alliance of the right-wing anti-communist organizations which are proportionately as numerous in Canada as they are in the U.S., though here they’re less well-publicized.

Beattie needs this dream of a grand alliance which, he believes, would make him powerful and affluent. The prospect of affluence is particularly attractive. He is no longer eligible for unemployment insurance and now lives on his wifes salary as a clerk, and whatever he can collect from supporters. I believe he’d work if he couldhe was a clerk until about 15months agoand he was probably truthful when he told the Unemployment Insurance Commission he is refused jobs because of his political beliefs.

For some months last year he lived partly by peddling a magazine of a reputable religious charitable order from door to door. One of his close cronies, Hendrick VanDerwindthe’s called the general because he always wears a ragged, pseudo-military uniform to party meetingsis Ontario representative of the order, and he appointed Beattie a collector under the name of John Baker, an alias he often uses.

But canvassing was, I suspect, too much like hard work: now he supplements his wifes income with gifts from supporters. Once he collected $17 from six people at a party meeting, then took his wife out drinking.

I spent months cultivating Beattie before he trusted me completely and I could obtain this kind of information to pass on to the Congress. Mostly, however, the Congress wanted names, names, namesthe names of anyone and everyone connected with Beattie, and how much money they gave him. They have most of them now, from my reports and from Beatties files, which he handed over to me in July when he was evicted from his fifth apartment in a year for not paying his rent.

When I handed copies of the files to the Congress, I felt pangs of remorse, for Beattie had come to regard me as something of a father substitute. His father and mother parted when Beattie and his younger brothernow a university student, who disapproves of Johns activitieswere teenagers. She remarried, but that marriage failed, too, and she was found dead, apparently of pneumonia, in her Toronto apartment last January. Beattie is not given to self-analysis, but he told me he believes his anti-Semitism dates from the time his mother lived poorly while he could see signs of wealth all around. He says that wealth was mostly displayed by Jews.

Beattie’s Nazi activities must have dismayed his mother. A Toronto justice of the peace told me recently that she visited him three months before her death and asked whether she could commit her son to a mental institution. She cried when he told her there was no evidence that Beattie was legally insane.

Most people are not aware that in the first year that Beattie was generating so much publicity as a Nazi, he was, in fact, not accepted as such by the World Union of National Socialists, the international Nazi movement dominated by George Lincoln Rockwell, of the U.S., and Colin Jordan, of Britain. One reason for Beattie’s campaign for respectability” was to secure their acceptance of him and his group, and soafter N3 extremists had unsuccessfully plotted to break up Beattie’s supporters’ meeting in August of last yearthe Canadian Nazis went underground for a period of reorganization.

It was at this time that some of the Nazi supporters, whom Beattie told me he had first met through Neil Carmichael’s group, began to accept him as a leader and to acknowledge their own sympathies. Beattie’s meetings began to assume super-secret proportions. Supporterseven the known faithfulwould never be told where a meeting would take place: only when. Then they’d be picked up, often by me at a street-corner rendezvous, and driven to the house or restaurant where that night’s meeting was to be held.

Among those around him at this time were Wolfgang Schilbach, a fairly well-known Toronto painter, and Stan Gabrovsky, a Bulgarian who has a small factory where, under the name Ab-Co, he repairs office equipment. He has duplicating equipment Beattie often uses to produce party literature. There was also Joe Bruy, a 35-year-old clerk, and Peter Lonsdale who, like most of Beattie’s supporters, either is or was a member of at least one far-right-wing organization.

On Jan. 10 this year Beattie called the meeting at which a Nazi party was to be formally organized. We held it in the empty apartment below mine in an old three-story house opposite Toronto’s High Park. The chairman was Peter Lonsdale. The others were Frank Farkas, Joe Bruy, Stan Gabrovsky, VanDerwindt, myself and, of course, Beattie. Farkas, Bruy and Gabrovsky were appointed supporter-recruiters among the Hungarian, German and Bulgarian communities respectively. Their job was to issue supporter cards to those who promised to donate regularly but who didn’t want to be known publicly as Nazis. VanDerwindt was elected historian. A teenager called John Glowinski, who uses the name Richard Herring in the party, was elected in his absence to be Youth Corps leader. I was chosen secret-service chief, with the job of checking applicants for membership. Later, I did check about 15 prospective members, and turned down those who seemed intelligent and therefore dangerous.

I bugged that meeting with the same tiny radio transmitter I used at most of the Nazis’ meetings. It transmits a signal for about two city blocks, and this timeas on other occasionsI had an assistant parked nearby in a car which held the receiver and a tape recorder. For most meetings I strapped the transmitter to my leg, but for this meeting I hid it inside my wife’s carpet cleaner, which was left standing against the wall of the room in which the meeting was held. It worked well, and the Jewish Congress now has a recording of Beattie accepting the role of leader with a modest denunciation of the Jews and the communists and the negroes; of Lonsdale preaching the gospel of racial purity and Farkas, Bruy and Gabrovsky bragging about the number of their friends in the ethnic communities who would be proud to support the Nazi movement. I couldn’t think of anything rousing to say about Nazism, so I simply told them that I would talk to them all later about security and report directly to Beattie.

We seven at that meeting, along with real estate dealer Kurt Weinberg, were to be the inner circle, or executive, of the party. Weinberg wasn’t present at the founding meeting, but he did attend subsequent gatherings. Lonsdale didn’t; something must have put him off. Our inner-circle meetings, which followed that inaugural meeting, were little different from the gatherings that had been held earlier, and only when we met at Beattie’s house were there any Nazi trappings in evidence.

Once, for instance, we met in the basement of the house where Beattie rented an apartment. There were seven of us, and we sat around a card table at which Beattie, sitting beneath a gigantic swastika flag, presided. There werent enough chairs, so some of us sat on boxes and leaned against the rough cement walls of the basement. It was dank and there was a chill in the air, and the light from naked bulbs made our shadows dance huge against the walls. The whole thing looked properly conspiratorial.

Most of that meeting was taken up with laying elaborate plans to protect Beattie when he next spoke in Allan Gardens (they were never put into operation, because the police provided all the protection he needed), and with little Joe Bruyhe’s about five foot six, and peers at you inquisitorially through horn-rimmed glassestelling us about the wonderful life Germans led under Hitler.

It was at that meeting that I came closest to being unmasked. The transmitter bug was taped to the back of my leg in such a way that it was impossible for me to turn it off without pulling my trouser leg up and displaying the bug. Beatties wife Carol had been wandering the neighbourhood, walking baby Melissa, to make sure there were no men sitting ominously in cars, waiting. When she returned, she turned on an FM radio. My transmitter starts squealing when an FM waveband is being used nearby. And so, when Carol turned the set on, the bug started squealing and one or two of my Nazi friends began to get curious. I said it must be the radio making the noise, then dashed to the lavatory to turn off my transmitter. By the time I returned to the basement, the incident was forgotten. Carol had made tea and sandwiches for everybody, and Beattie sat beneath his swastika, saying, The time will soon come when well be able to march down Spadina Avenue [the centre of the Jewish garment district] with banners flying in such force no one will dare try to stop us.

With the formal creation of a Canadian Nazi Party, Lincoln Rockwell unreservedly accepted Beattie as the Canadian Nazi leader with a party affiliated to the World Union of National Socialists. And I was its Heinrich Himmler. As such I’d often have to dash across to wherever Beattie was then living to inspect a caller he’d refused to admit to his apartment, to make sure the man wasn’t a potential assassin. On other occasions I would have to drive him to secret assignations in the city, or to Oshawa, Ont., where we met his Oshawa group”three German-born immigrants whom Beattie admires for their blind fanaticism.

I also had to arrange for someone to drive him to the Niagara peninsula last March for his first meeting with Rockwell. Since neither is welcome in the others country, they met in the centre of the Queenston-Lewiston Bridge, midway between Canadian and U.S. immigration posts. They discussed ways to improve the distribution of propaganda, and the possibility of calling a conference in Canada of the world’s Nazi leaders.

Beattie had some months earlier refused to travel to a U.S. border city to meet Rockwell. He told Rockwell he was too busy. In fact, he couldn’t go because he hadnt the price of a bus ticket. But by the time of the Queenston Bridge meeting he was better off; he had become more expert at extracting money from his supporters. Even so, he has never been as successful as when he had to pay his $150 fine last year. He collected the fine three times over from his supporters, and when he came to pay the fine he cashed two unemployment insurance cheques, obtained 150 one-dollar bills and told reporters each came from a poor but dedicated supporter.

Thats what makes good publicity, he said. Tell em anything if its going to get your name in the paper.

I doubt whether most reporters believed him, but the N3-inspired riots have made John Beattie newsworthy. It’s not surprising that in July newspapers published his claim that he and Lincoln Rockwell planned a Nazi leaders’ convention in Toronto for November. But Beattie worried in case Rockwell was annoyed. I taped the phone conversation when he told a Rockwell aide, I said it for publicity reasons. I hope the commander takes no offence.

In fact, Beattie will say or do anything as long as it’s legal; he knows that his position makes him vulnerable if he breaks the law, and he is careful to stay within it. The Jewish Congress would be delighted to see him put out of action by legal means, but neither they nor I have been able to provide the ammunition.

But though we have failed to stop Beattie in this manner, the Congress hopes that legislation outlawing hate literature will place severe limitations on Beattie’s capacity to spread his propaganda. For my part, I hope this account of how I duped Beattie and became a Nazi leader for the Jewish Congress will discredit the party to the point where it will be forced out of business.

I have spent so much time with Beattie in the past 16 months that I’ve felt pangs of disloyalty during the preparation of this article. But heor, rather, what he stands formust be destroyed. To Beattie I can only say, I’m sorry, John, but you deserve it.

Link:

My 16 months as a Nazi – Macleans.ca

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July 30, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

Fascism on the rise: Portland extremists reveal themselves – Psuvanguard.com

Raul Gonzales. Alanna Madden/PSU Vanguard

Jake Von Ott, regional coordinator of Identity Evropa. Anna Williams/PSU Vanguard

[Note from Vanguard Editor-in-Chief, Colleen Leary]:

In recent years, droves of new residents have flocked to Portland, many under the guise of a Portlandia-branded utopian liberal oasis: an easy-going city open to people of all ages, shapes, sizes, persuasions, colors and backgrounds. This perception is, quite simply, false.

Recent public displays of hate, racism, white pride and violence in the name of nationalism have solicited public response of shock and dismay. Surely this couldnt be happening in our happy, safe and inclusive Portland.

In reality, this is nothing new to Portland, a city whose history has been mired in racism and discrimination from day one. In 1859, the state of Oregon established itself as white-only, an exclusion that officially ended in 1922. At the time, the state touted the largest per capita membership of the Ku Klux Klan. In 1988, three racist skinheads attacked a 27-year-old Ethiopian named Mulugeta Seraw. One skinhead bludgeoned him to death. Until the early 2000s, Oregon legislation maintained language excluding people of color from owning or leasing property.

The recent displays of hate, racism and violence in Portland highlight a longstanding crisis, one that has apparently attracted the attention of an up-and-coming, outspoken generation of extremists whose views reflect an unfortunately familiar Portland tradition.

So who is leading the charge? What do they really think? Why do they believe what they believe? How did they land on their views? Whats their intended outcome? The Vanguards Anna Williams spoke with some of Portlands most well-known characters in these overlapping movements and consulted academic experts who helped shed light on how this type of ideology attracts its proponents.

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On a sunny Friday afternoon in Portlands Tom McCall Waterfront Park, a sea of leather-vested Warriors for Freedom bikers, American flags, filming iPhones, and news reporters surrounded a calm and quiet man everyone seemed to recognize but no one seemed to know.

A skinhead.

Raul Gonzales, who Trump-supporters and antifa, or anti-fascist, counter-protesters recognized from social media, arrived to participate in the June 30 March for Freedom organized by Washington native and libertarian vlogger Joey Gibson.

Gonzales identity was unmistakable: His distinct black polo branded by 1950s tennis champion Fred Perry, Levis tucked into his boots, and white suspenders are all garb traditional British working-class skinheads in the 1960s adopted as their signature style. A skinhead tattoo tagged Gonzales right forearm.

Gibsons popularly-dubbed patriot movement publicly denounces white supremacist groups. Gibson includes groups and fraternities like Nazis, skinheads, Ku Klux Klan, and Identity Evropa in this classification.

The night before Gibsons second visit to Portland on June 4, he announced such groups would be denied entrance into his Trump free speech rally held in downtown Portlands Terry Schrunk Plaza.

However, Identity Evropa, Gonzales himself, and the Oregon National Socialist Movement, deemed a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, all profess to having joined in on the march. They offered cheers, zealous speeches, and insult-hurling tossed at the antifa, union groups, and anti-hate liberals counter-protesting to the north, east, and west of Gibsons rally.

Since Gibson brought the patriot movement to Portland, groups aligning with Gibson who call themselves western nationalists, national socialists, western identitarians, white identitarians, western chauvinists, neo-Nazis and traditional skinheads have popped up in the press, leaving Portlanders to question whether their city will retreat back to its deadly skinhead capitol of the country roots.

Highlighting this fear is the fact that Jeremy Christian, an alt-right, self-professed libertarian, participated in a Gibson rally last April. A few weeks later, Christian antagonized two women of color on a MAX train then stabbed three men that tried to intervene, killing two.

Christian has been unapologetic in the courtroom, calling himself a patriot, a title he shares with Gibsons movement.

Gonzales told Gibson he wanted to march to support free speech. If you supported us, you wouldnt be here, Gibson responded. Because you give us a bad name.

Gonzales does not look like the typical white, bare-shaven skinhead portrayed in the movies. As his namesake implies, Gonzales is half-Mexican on his fathers side. Though his dark eyes and hair belie European heritage, Gonzales considers himself a very tan white person.

Calm and unphased, though a little awkward, Gonzales eagerly engaged in conversation about his day, his five-month-old daughter, his relationship successes and failures, and his favorite television shows.

However, Gonzales past proves to be anything but easy going.

Just 24 years old, Gonzales spent the majority of his life in and out of foster care in Hillsboro, Oregon. Beginning at five years old, Gonzales said he resided in 15 foster homes and six group homes, each of which were physically, emotionally, and sexually abusive. Gonzales father, he said, was entrenched in drug dealing.

Early on, Gonzales doubted his mothers liberal worldview.

My moms liberal beliefs made her think everything was OK, he recalled. At a Boys and Girls Club owned by Beaverton police, Gonzales said he was always getting into fights because there were gang members that wanted me to join [them].

Gonzales recalled seeing the Columbine High School massacre on the news when he was five years old. Even at that point, Gonzales said he realized, Its not just me having problems, its the whole world. Something is going wrong. My moms beliefs cannot be accurate.

As Gonzales grew older, he learned about Nazi WWII from his veteran grandfather. Gonzales Croatian ancestors helped build German U-boats for the war. He recalled his great-aunt had harbored anti-Serbian sentiments because she thought [Serbians] treated [Croatians] like shit.

The Ustase regime in the Independent State of Croatia exterminated what the United States Holocaust Museum estimates to be almost 350,000 ethnic Serbs between 1941 and 1945. Perhaps 200,000 more were forcefully converted to Catholicism. Having heard his aunts beliefs, however, Gonzales thought, Maybe some of us really were the good guys on the Axis side of things.

When Gonzales was 12 years old, he bonded with a man everyone called J.C., an ironic namesake, as he claimed to be a Satanist.

When youre 12 years old and got nobody to look up to and youre getting picked on, someones going to come along and bring their values with them and sell you the pitch, Gonzales said.

Gonzales said J.C. often carried around a copy of Adolf Hitlers manifesto Mein Kampf.

At the same time, Gonzales developed a taste for anti-communist, white nationalist bands such as Oi! and Skrewdriver. A foster brother stick-and-poked an SS tattoo onto Gonzales right wrist. SS represents a coalition of the German Nazi Party, the Schutzstaffel, some factions of which were responsible for running Jewish concentration camps during WWII.

Though Gonzales claimed at the June 30 march he was not a neo-Nazi, he later told the Vanguard, Im definitely a nationalist. I guess I could be labelled as a neo-Nazi and Id be fine with that.

Gonzales wears a swastika tattoo on his right shoulder.

The SPLC defines white nationalists as those espousing white supremacist or white separatist ideals. Neo-Nazis, sometimes described as national socialists, the SPLC states, share a hatred for Jews and a love of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany.

Though Gonzales espouses nonviolence, he both doubts the validity of the Holocaust and believes whites are oppressed in America.

Gonzales echoed a sentiment common among followers of Gibsons rallies: White freedom of speech is under attack.

During Gibsons June 4 rally, guest speaker and alt-right celebrity Tim Baked Alaska Gionet livestreamed a video with Oregon Identity Evropa Regional Coordinator Jake Von Ott.

Originating on social media and deep internet forums and meme pages, the alt-right is a rabbit hole of racist and nationalist opinions cloaked in humor. Gionet, who worked alongside far-right provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos, has been criticized for past anti-semitic language.

In the livestream, Gionet asks Von Ott to recite the 14 words. Smiling into the camera, Von Ott said, We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children. The 14 words are arguably derived from a passage in Mein Kampf, which advocates for securing the future of the Aryan race.

The American 14 words were coined by David Lane, a former member of the Pacific Northwest terrorist organization The Order. In 1984, The Order assassinated a Jewish talk show host. Lane died in prison in 2007 while serving a 190-year sentence for crimes he committed as an Order member.

Von Ott, a tall, freshly turned-20-year-old with a long, confident stride, arrived at the June 4 rally with about 40 other IE members marching in formation. Gibson said IE was not allowed into the plaza, which Von Ott contends. Von Ott said some of his friends were present at the June 30 march, apparently unknown to Gibson.

In a YouTube video recently taken down by the far-right Right Source Media channel, Von Ott claimed a close relationship with IE founder Nathan Damigo.

Damigo, a 30-year-old former U.S. Marine Corporal, founded IE in March 2016. Damigo told the LA Times that IE comprises a generation of awakened Europeans who oppose those who would defame our history and rich cultural heritage.

When Damigo first presented the notion of white identitarianism, he was widely criticized by students of the Cal State Stanislaus ethnic studies class, where he had been invited to speak for his complex, circumspect explanation.

Von Ott told the Vanguardidentitarianism simply means being proud of your European heritage. Acccording to the SPLC, the phrase was coined in the early 2000s by Generation Identitaire, an anti-immigrant group in France that mockingly served soup containing pork in majority Muslim neighborhoods.

Beginning in 2007, Damigo served one year in county jail and four years in prison for holding a La Mesa, California cab driver, who Damigo thought was Iranian, at gunpoint and robbing him of $43. This came one month after Damigo finished his second tour of duty in Iraq. According to court records, the LA Timesreported Damigo suffered from severe post traumatic stress disorder, drug and alcohol abuse, paranoia and flashbacks.

Damigo, however, took the opportunity in prison to study race and identity. Damigo was inspired by Lanes book My Awakening, as well as by racial provocateur Jean-Philippe Rushton and science writer Nicholas Wade.

Damigo came out of prison believing that different races were separated by genetic predispositions.

Von Ott agreed. The Africans [are] scientifically proven to have lower IQs and less impulse control than people of European, or white, origin, he claimed.[Black Lives Matter] only proves our point in terms of low impulse control,Von Ott said

BLM formed in 2012 after George Zimmerman was acquitted for his murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. BLM, like antifa, protests police corruption and racism, and has been at the center of controversy for some demonstrations turning violent. BLM, however, also organizes vigils, participates on panels around the country, and lobbies for police reform.

Researchers from Stanford University who study genetic differences between races, condemn Wades speculation that recent natural selection has led to worldwide differences in IQ test results, political institutions and economic development.

Adding to a commitment to back up its views with scientific evidence rather than feeling and emotion, Von Ott said, IE believes the liberal concept of multiculturalism is toxic to America. A multiracial society is a multi-racist society, Von Ott added.

Von Ott referenced a controversial study by Harvard professor Robert D. Putnam, which found that in newly diverse populations, fewer people vote, volunteer, or donate to charities. Some people view that as a strong case against diversity, but Putnam has publicly decried that view.

In a March 2017 letter to the Wall Street Journal, Putnam wrote, Ethnic diversity is, on balance, an important social asset, as the history of the U.S. demonstrates. In the short to medium run, however, immigration and ethnic diversity challenge social solidarity and inhibit social capital. In the medium to long run, on the other hand, successful immigrant societies like the U.S. create new forms of social solidarity and dampen the negative effects of diversity by constructing new, more encompassing identities.

Von Ott said he fears, however, that as more immigrants come to the U.S., white European identity will disappear.

Von Ott calls himself a strong Christian, while adding, Christianity is not a warrior religion by any means, but he believes every race has the right to conquer another. He said he isnt advocating violence against any other race, but as non-white births exceed white births in America, IE sees sole reproduction with members of the Aryan race to be paramount.

Von Ott compared white peoples possible plight to that of Native Americans. [Native Americans] are the most likely to interracially marry and have interracial children, Von Ott said. Their culture and [their] children have been obliterated from the face of the earth. They no longer have any relevance here at all. None.

Additionally, Von Ott argued that allowing refugees of Islamic origin into America will inevitably bring a culture of violence across the border. In the Muslim world, at age 6 [children are] given an [AK-47] and told to go fight, go kill, Von Ott claimed. Well, you have two cultures colliding, a European and Muslim culture. At the end of the day, whos going to win a one-on-one fight?

In contrast, the Council on American-Islamic Relations says 2017 is set to become one of the worst years ever for anti-Muslim hate crimes. Most incidents documented by CAIR are of non-violent harassment, but the second most common are hate crimes that involve physical violence or property destruction.

According to researchers at the University of Buffalo and the University of Alabama, on the other hand, over two decades of research have consistently shown areas of high immigration statistics to have lower crime rates than those with minimal immigrant populations.

Though self-proclaimed libertarian, American-loving people like Von Ott and Damigo deny being neo-Nazis or fascists, the roots of IEs ideology are undeniable.

Von Ott said he admires George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of neo-Nazism in America. Rockwell founded the American Nazi Party in 1959, which was formerly known, in more convoluted language, as the World Union of Free Enterprise and National Socialists. Rockwell, a well-documented racist, was ousted from the Navy and assassinated in a shopping mall parking lot in 1967.

Von Ott said he denounces Rockwells violent rhetoric and behaviors. However, Von Ott qualified, I admire his willingness and how American he was. Von Ott paused. By how American, I mean the fact that against everybody he still stood for what he believed in.

Rockwell believed former U.S. Presidents Dwight Eisenhower and Harry Truman were traitors that should be hanged.

Former Portland State professor, author, and white supremacist expert Randy Blazak explained that groups ranging from white identitarian to white supremacist operate under different language, but the same ideology.

Hate groups dont call themselves hate groups, Blazak said. They call themselves white civil rights organizations. Its public relations. Its a new title of an old song.

Many such groups deny Nazi sympathy but cling to symbolism like the 14 words and sieg heil gestures. Logically, they would just abandon all that to bring [new members] in, Blazak explained. But the reality is, thats their roots. They feel connected to it.

Gibson said on June 30 he was aware Gionet and Von Ott had hailed the 14 words at his June 4 rally, to his disapproval. Were looking into it, Gibson said. If a statement needs to be made, it will be made.

Over a month later, Gibson has not issued any statements.

Von Ott wears a neatly-clipped haircut identical to Damigos. Damigos Twitter handle, in fact, is @fashyhaircut, a play on fascism. Gonzales said he believes this all-American teenager image attracts young people into movements like IE and skinheads a lot more than a guy wearing a band t-shirt and waving a swastika flag.

Recently, Rose City Antifa leaked a series of overtly violent and racist statements Von Ott posted on a white nationalist Facebook page. In one of these posts Von Ott said his brother, who was dating a half-Asian woman, had yellow fever. Tagged to his complaint, Von Ott posted a photo of Hitler and his associates looking up with disgust, with the word degenerate written underneath.

In another post, Von Ott asked group members what the punishment would be if his friend stabbed refugees in Germany. His post was met with humor and encouragement from the group, which included his own mother. In another screenshot, Von Otts mother posted a sketched image of a white family, the father wearing a swastika armband, with a caption that read, We are rising! Unite!

Von Ott confirmed these posts were his own and his mothers. Von Ott said he regrets his posts, claiming he has matured in the four months since, and they were merely locker room talk. This is the same justification Donald Trump offered after he was caught saying his celebrity status allowed him to grab women by the genitals.

Von Ott explained that he posted about stabbing refugees after his cousin, allegedly, was sexually assaulted by three refugees in Europe. Neither Von Ott nor his mother mentioned any incident like this in his post.

Von Ott added that because white voices are so silenced in America, people like him are forced into online echo chambers where hateful statements turned to humor are a release for those who fear losing their jobs because of their views.

Von Ott said since creating another white nationalist group on Facebook, he deletes any posts encouraging violence. However, he admits there may be some people that actually espouse violence in online echo chambers. Von Ott reasons such posts should be removed because they are unproductive and we need to be professionals.

John Based Spartan Turano showed up to Gibsons April 27 Berkeley, California rally and June 4 rally in Portland cos-playing as a Trojan soldier, sporting a plastic helmet and chest armor atop his American flag board shorts. When Turano got riled up at counter-protesters, he ripped his armor and helmet off, then flexed his arm and chest muscles at the crowd and cursed them out.

At the Berkeley protest, Turano called antifa protesters cowards and declared, Ill smash on them until I cant breathe. Turano could be seen on video screaming and chucking back projectiles antifa threw at the patriot crowd.

On June 11, however, just one week after his appearance in Portland, Turano showed up to another free speech vs. antifa demonstration in San Bernardino to counter-protest the same patriot crowd he hailed from. Turano held a sign that read, Resist hate, love only.

Gibsons followers were quick to call Turano a traitor.

Turano is a single father from La Puente, California. Turanos Facebook is devoid of any Based Spartan pictures, featuring only photos of him and his kids in clothing sprinkled with marijuana leaves.

Turano said hes never been a political person. He has only voted once in his life, and that was for President Trump. Turano said he disagrees with the president on immigration and womens rights issues.

Turano said he used to think all antifa hated our guts and intended to protest violently. When Turano came to Portland on June 4, however, he said a petite Jewish counter-protester came up to him and asked, Does my life matter?

It just made me feel bad, Turano said. I hadnt really been paying attention; I just thought we were surrounded by all these people who hated us. But I met some people that seemed so nice. Turano added that in his state of mind when he attended the Berkeley protest, he thought these [antifa] people hate America.

Turano said as a single, working father, he did not have time to sit behind a computer screen and follow the alt-right. When Turano began to see swastikas at these protests and racial slurs on the internet, however, he came to understand how the other side saw patriots.

Racist aint too far from the truth, Turano declared.

Being Based Spartan gave Turano a rush, but he said he now feels the patriot movement only loved me because they thought I was violent and I looked threatening and intimidating. Turano added, People emailed me to tell me I helped these idiot groups grow, and Im responsible for making it a family idea. I made a horrible mistake. I dont like bullies.

Turano said he thinks the discrimination he sees Latinos face in Southern California is spearheaded by the alt-right.

Even the good people say horrible things, Turano said. This lady I know struck out at a [Latino] girl and I cant believe she went there. She has a Mexican husband and an immigrant mother-in-law and she said this racial slur. Theres no hope.

When Turano was sixteen, he got a swastika tattoo on his right hand. Turano did not explain why. I ended up cutting it out, he said. Turano ended up marrying an undocumented immigrant and having children.

Still visible on Turanos right bicep, however, is a White Pride tattoo. Turano said he got it to identify himself in prison, but he does not plan on removing it. Turano, still a conservative, declared like Von Ott and Gonzales, I think everyone should be proud of who they are.

Perhaps this is what attracted Turano to the free speech patriot movement in the first place.

Gibson said if extremist groups show up to his events, they show up. Moving forward, Gibson said he wants to empower leaders to create their own groups.

From Western Chauvinist Proud Boys fleeing the rise of feminism, to alt-right Kekistan members who wish to free offensive shit-posters from liberal social justice warriors, to IE members that claim white genocide, every patriot wants First Amendment rights on their own terms.

Whatever the patriot movement seeks to empower has been lost in a name game of nit-picked, white-pride identities. As Gibson shouts free speech and freedom from cultural brainwashing from his loudspeaker, his movement brings to the surface a violent, racist, and un-American past.

Turano said he has just now come to understand that. To the people of Portland, Turano wished to say, Im sorry for disturbing you while supporting something I did not understand. It was during a healing time and I totally dropped the ball.

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Fascism on the rise: Portland extremists reveal themselves – Psuvanguard.com

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COLUMN: PRIESTESS OF THE ALT-RIGHT – DAWN.com

I am a big fan of Hindu [sic]. Donald J. Trump, Oct 15, 2016.

Nobody wanted peace more than Adolf Hitler. Savitri Devi, The Lightning and the Sun (1958).

The name Savitri Devi pseudonym for Maximiani Julia Portas, a Greek-French polemicist who lived from 1905 to 1982 wont necessarily ring a bell for readers. Not unless youre immersed in occult Nazism, of which Devis late biographer, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke (died 2012), was a foremost scholar.

I have been researching and writing a lot about white supremacy these last six months in fact, Im currently putting together a book defining the modern Alt-right. An interesting question has been the extent to which the Alt-right (the harmless-sounding moniker under which neo-Nazi forces have assimilated and rebranded themselves in the United States) retains traditional white supremacist influences, including the occult strain, of which Devi along with the Chilean Miguel Serrano, satanists such as Aleister Crowley and Anton LaVey and proponents of racially redefined Nordic religions such as Asatru and Odinism is but one manifestation.

Devi was a lifelong peripatetic traveller with several long stays in India, particularly during the Third Reich when she was stuck in Calcutta and couldnt experience the thrill of the Nazi regime first-hand. When she was banned from one country (such as Britain or Germany after the passage of post-war laws prohibiting the dissemination of Nazi propaganda), she simply travelled under different identities.

In the early 1960s, there was a famous gathering of the Western worlds unregenerate Nazis in Britain, leading to the formation of the World Union of National Socialists, at which Devi was an eager luminary. This event was a major influence on important American white supremacists (such as George Lincoln Rockwell and William L. Pierce) of the second half of the 20th century, who in turn are direct forerunners of the modern Alt-right and, of course, the most prominent and monstrous Alt-right troll of all, Donald Trump.

But before Devi reached that position of influence, there was a lot of travelling and searching to do. At first in India she advocated Hindu-Muslim unity. But soon she became interested in Hindutva and was an admirer of the early proponents of that ideology, specifically Tilak, Savarkar, Hedgewar, and Golwalkar. From being a proponent of communal unity, Devi became a convert to Hindus preserving their racial stock at any cost.

There is a persistent belief in Nazi esotericism that the original Aryans came from the far north of the planet and settled in India in prehistoric times. (Some esoteric Nazis believe that Hitler bides his time underneath the North Pole.) This original Aryan stock, which colonised India, is said to be the source of northern European peoples. German scholarship was much interested in this theory.

Aryan supremacists are obsessed with the tragic outcome of miscegenation in India; they want to avoid a similar degeneracy by way of genetic dilution (the darkening of whiteness) at any cost in the West hence their recent demands for a separate white homeland in North America.

Devi married a Bengali Brahmin propagandist named Asit Krishna Mukherji, a sympathiser of the Third Reich and publisher of the fascist journal The New Mercury from Calcutta. Despite her global peripateticism in ensuing decades, Mukherji remained Devis avid supporter, funding the publication of her books The Lightning and the Sun and The Impeachment of Man. During the Second World War, Devi and Mukherji may have facilitated Subhas Chandra Boses efforts to seek liaison with the Japanese empire (after Boses repeated failures to elicit Hitlers direct sympathies for Indian independence).

An intertwined dance between great optimism and pessimism seems to mark fascist movements everywhere. National regeneration, after all, presupposes national degeneration, from which a group of people led by a saviour (Hitler as the racial avatar, as Devi had it) will show the way out. Just as in Germany Oswald Spengler with his overwrought theory of Western decline held sway in the interwar years, Hindutva presupposed a perversion of racial hierarchy that had to be urgently addressed.

For Devi, the transition from German to Hindu pessimism was seamless; the present Kali Yuga [dark age] was familiar enough to her from the European tradition. (The extent to which canonical Hindu texts authorise, or do not authorise, hierarchical or racist thinking is something I intend to research because I simply dont know enough; Hindutva, of course, is a different matter.) In Indias colour-conscious society Devi found a natural habitat to write books theorising a universal Aryan race whose destiny it was to rule the world. (The swastika originates in the Sanskrit term svastika and is a sacred Hindu symbol.)

In order to pursue the Aryan dream of following the sun westward (Manifest Destiny) one must first impeach man; one must be a misanthrope in order to postulate mankinds divinity. Devi was attracted to Hinduisms deep ecological emphasis that remains an element of neo-Nazism to this day. We think of deep ecology as a tendency of the left, but the extreme right continues to advance Malthusian propositions in order to save humanity from its own proclivity to multiply.

The contemporary Alt-right has decided to mute the esoteric side and fire up passions along more elemental bread-and-butter lines, such as immigration. I dont see the esoteric character as foundational, but it is inseparable, as Devis writings demonstrate, from the broader racial ideology. Devi, like her fellow conspirator Mukherji, held a very long view and would have been ecstatic at the turn things have taken in America.

The dream of racial segregation seems to be self-fulfilling; it only needs adept propagandists able to estimate the eventual impact of their dark visions. Devi was such a visionary, whose every dark thought remains a challenge to our common humanity.

The columnist is the author of Karachi Raj and Soraya: Sonnets. His book on literary criticism, Literary Writing in the 21st Century: Conversations, was published recently

Published in Dawn, Books & Authors, July 9th, 2017

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Q&A: Larry King on asking simple questions and listening closely – Columbia Journalism Review

A great interview is one of the journalists most powerful tools. It can be informative, entertaining, thoughtful. For the next five weeks, the Columbia Journalism Review and MaximumFun.orgwill broadcast conversations with some of the worlds greatest interviewers. Hosted by NPRs Jesse Thorn, the podcast, called The Turnaround, will examine the science and art of journalism.

This episode features Larry King, longtime television and radio show host. An edited transcript is below.

Jesse Thorn: So my first question was, when was the first time that you realized you were an interviewer? I know you always wanted to be a broadcaster.

Larry King: Oh, since I was five years old I wanted to be on the radio. I just wanted to be an announcer. I wanted to be anything. I wanted to talk into a microphone. I dont know why, I must have had a good voice pre-puberty. Because people kept telling me, You gotta be on the radio. So I would imitate radio shows. I would listen to The Shadow, and then I would go into my bathroomwe were very poor in Brooklynand I would go, Who know what evil lurks in the heart of men? The Shadow knows. A tale well-calculated to keep you insuspense. I was driven by the sounds. Still am. And I knocked around a while, didnt go to college. My father had died when I was very young. I worked at a bunch of odd jobs, finally went down to Miami, broke in on a small station.

Jesse: So this is the part that I want to interject on. Because one of the things I am interested in is you mentioned you were really poor in Brooklyn.

Larry: Very.

Jesse: This couldnt be further from the entertainment industry, the radio industry, or whatever. So what gave you the idea, Oh, I could actually do this?

Larry: Just by listening, imitating. It stroked something in me, that I was comfortable with it. Had I not done it, I would have been a standup comic. I love making people laugh. I do a lot of speaking. But I just wanted to be on the radio, in any capacity.

I thought eventually it would be sports because Im a sports freak. And I love all sports, and I love going to sports events. Ive broadcast Dolphin games, and Ive done baseball. I thought Id be a sportscaster. Red Barber, the Dodger announcer, was one of my heroes, as was Arthur Godfrey, who I later worked with. But I went to Miami, got a job at a small station. I was a disc jockey for about a year and a half. Playing records, doing news in the afternoon, sports broadcastsfifty dollars a week I was making. And there was a restaurant in Miami Beach called Pumpernicks, a very popular restaurant. And their slow time of the day was 10 to 11 in the morning, because it wasnt breakfast, it wasnt lunch. And the owner of the restaurant used to listen to me in the morning, doing my morning show, usually very funny, a lot of humor. And he said, Would you like to do a radio show from my restaurant from 10 to 11 when I dont get crowds? We might build up some crowds. The station went for it because he paid the station. I got a little extra. So every day Id finish my shift, 6 to 9, drive up to Pumpernicks, and do 10 to 11. And I would interview waiters, and there was no producer on the show, you know people would just call people up from the audience. And then one day, out of nowhere, Bobby Darinthe great Bobby Darinwalked in. Mack the Knife was the number one [song]. And I interviewed him for an hour. Later we walked down the street down Collins Avenue, and he said to me, Youve interviewed before? I said, No, I just talk to regular people. And he said, I think you ought to take this up seriously because you really have a knack.

ICYMI:Eight simple rules for doing accurate journalism

Jesse: Well, thats what I was going to say. I mean I think one of the things about your interview style thats special is that youre a very modest interviewer. Like you are not afraid to ask a simple question, a what is this question.

Larry: Theyre the best. Because when you thinkI watch some of these press conferences, and the question takes longer than the answer. And the people show off. There was no showing off. [The] New Yorker did a piece on me, called it Street Questions. Im a guy in the street. Hey! What are you doin?

So, when the Gulf War was on, and we would have guests on every night associated with the war: writers, politicians, generals. And I always asked the same question: What happened today? I wasnt there. You were there. You were covering it. What happened? Thats the simplest question in the world. Whyd you do this? What happened? I dont know more law than a lawyer. I dont know more politics than a politician. I dont, I have opinions. But Ive never run for office. Ive never argued a case in front of a jury. I dont know more medicine than a doctor, Ive never operated. Ive never done science. I ask questions of scientists. Im a layman. Im a pure layman whos intensely curious. What I do have is a sense of pace. I know when somethings going well, I know how to draw people out. But I dont think I could teach a course in it. I dont know that I have a method. I just know that I go to the basics.

And from the basics, you learn a lot, and you can bring people. One of the best examples I can give is my first interview with Frank Sinatra, who didnt do a lot of interviews. Jackie Gleason got him for me. And his PR guy said to me, Frank doesnt do these things. Hes doing it as a favor to Jackie Gleason. But one thing: do not bring up the kidnapping of his son. He doesnt want to talk about it, he will not talk about it. I thought, thats fair, I dont have to bring it up, OK.

In the middle of the interview, were really in touch. And I asked him, The thing with you and the pressis it overdone, or have you been bum rapped? He says, Well, it might have been overdone. But Ive been bum rapped. Take my sons kidnapping. He brought it up. I just was asking good questions. And thats the framework of which I like to work. I dont have to know a great deal about [it]. In fact, my favorite guests are people I dont know at all. I like doing physicists; I know nothing about physics. I like doing astronomers, because I dont know about the heavens, but I wonder about them. What is an astronomer when he walks down the street and looks up? What does he think about?

Jesse: Are you always listening for that little something that stands out? That little interesting bit that you can pull on a little?

Larry: Yeah. Because the key of interviewing is listening. If you dont listen, youre not a good interviewer. I hate interviewers who come with a long list of prepared questions. Uh, because theyre going to depend on going from the fourth question to the fifth question without listening to the answer of the fourth question. Because theyre concentrating on what theyre going to ask for the fifth. And thats not the way it works for me. So I concentrate solely on the answer, and I trust my instincts to come up with questions. Even if the answerer fully answered the question, Im ready in my head to go somewhere with it. Theres no dead air.

Jesse: Do you get scared ever?

Larry: No. Only the first time I was on the air. I was playing records.They had just given me a new name, and I had my record ready to go, and all my life I had dreamed of this. And I turned down the mic, and I turned down the record, and nothing came out. And the general manager kicked open the door to the control room and said, This is a communications business, dammit. Communicate! And I put on the mic, and I said, My name is Larry King. Thats the first time I said that, because I had just been given that name, they thought my real name wasnt good enough, and Im very nervous, but all my life I had wanted to be in radio. I dreamed of this moment, and I had been scared. So for two minutes, youve been listening to a record go up and down and nothing coming out, so please, bear with me.

And I learned something that day, which later Arthur Godfrey would tell me, You learned the whole secret of this business. The secret of what were doing right now is theres no secret. Be yourself. Be yourself. Answer honestly, be honest, be upfront with the audience. You can never go wrong. So what I did that day even though I wasnt thinking that way. If you were listening that day, and I was reading a commercial and goofed, or miscued a recordits his first day! Its his first day. I told that story in Canada once, and the guy said to me, Well suppose you were walking down the hall at NBC. Someone grabbed you, sat you down, put some papers in front of you, and said, Tom Brokaw is sick, youre on.’ I would look at the camera and say, I was walking down the hall at NBC. Someone just grabbed me handed me these papers, tells me Tom Brokaws sick, and Im on. I would thentrust me, Ive never anchored news, Ill do the best I can. Hey, it aint brain surgery.

Larry: See, tape is a safety ground that I dont want. Because I was born of the moment. I didnt know Bobby Darin was coming in. I liked that. We used to do on my radio showI had the first national radio talk show. We used to do a night which was Who Is The Guest? They would not tell me who the guest is. And this guy would walk in, Ive got to do a two-hour interview, guy or woman, and all they have to do is tell me their name. And then Id find out who they were, and then Id ask them questions. I loved that. Because the less I know, the better. Now that sounds strange to people. Like if you wrote a book, I wouldnt read the book before I interviewed you, because I would then know too much about the book. And Im in the same boat as the audience, they havent read the book. So were all in this together. Theres no such thing as the perfect interview. Yes, you can miss something. No ones ever done the perfect interview.

Jesse: How does this work when youre interviewing somebody that you dont like?

Larry: Thats the hardest. You still have to do the best job you can. Sometimes you get confrontIve only got really confrontational with racists, racism. When I landed in MiamiI took a train down to Miami to, I lived with my uncle. I had 14 dollars in my pocket, and the first thing I saw was a colored water fountain. And I didnt understand that at all. There was a colored water fountain and a white water fountain. So I drank out of the colored water fountain. It was good. Then I got on a bus to go over to Miami Beach. And I sat in the back of the bus, and the bus driver stopped the bus, and he asked me to move forward. Of course, the back of the bus is for Negroes. I remember said to him, My fathers a Negro, so Im comfortable in the back of the bus. Which was not true. So I never understood racism. Why would the pigment of skin mean anything? Anything? So when I had George Wallace on early, or the head of the Ku Klux Klan, or George Lincoln Rockwell, the anti-Semitic racist. That blew my mind, and I would get confrontational and sometimes have arguments. Its not good to argue with the guest. Because its maybe interesting for the audience, but it puts you out of control. When you argue, youre not in control. And I like to beyoure in control, youre in control of this interview, Jesse, not me. You. This is your interview. Youre in control; you could stop it, you could end it, you could go anywhere you want.

Larry: If you have an agenda, youre not gonna learn, in my opinion. I dont learn anything when I watch shows in which the host and his guest are of one point of view, and thats the whole thing. You know, so whether its Bill OReilly with an arch-conservative or Rachel Maddow with an arch-liberal, I dont know anything. I know that Rachel Maddow stands for this and her guest stands for that, and they both agree. Thats a not a learning process to me. Its not a real Q&A. A real Q&A takes meIm interested in a heart of a person. How people react to things. Whats it like to be a president and send someone to war. Whats it like at night when you get the statistics132 killed today. How do you sleep?

Jesse: You know youre describing it as an exercise in curiosity, but is it partly an exercise in empathy, and just wondering what other peoples lives are like?

Larry: Yeah thats part of it, empathy, curiosity. Peter Ustinov, the great actor, told me he likes being interviewed because he gets to think about things he doesnt think about. I dont walk around thinking about the things youve just asked me. But it forces me to think about them. And therefore, I enjoy it. As much as I like asking questions, I like being asked, if theyre good questions and it causes me to be thoughtful. Im not a texter, I dont like texting. I like the sound of the human voice. Im into voice. I like, something about the inflections in voice, that you dont get in a transcript.

ICYMI:Should journalists expose trolls?

Jesse: Do you think the fact that youre Larry King affects the way that people react to you when you ask them questions?

Larry: It well might. Walter Cronkite told me that when you get famous, it gets harder. You know he was at thein 1960, he went to the Texas caucuses at the convention. As soon as he walked in the room, they all stopped. Got autographs from him and stuff like that. Its not what its supposed to be. So I guess that its happened. People get a little intimidated at the thought of it; theyre thrilled to meet you. Especially when I interviewlike young rock stars, singers, young people who have listened to me as children. They come like a little in awe, I put them at ease right away, usually with humor. I use humor a lot. I kid around a lot, tell them the latest joke Ive heard. I love telling jokes, I love jokes. Jokes are genius to me. Who, cartoonsyou read The New Yorker cartoons?

Jesse: Mmhmm.

Larry: Theyre genius. Genius! They had a cartoon once of two guys up against the wall. Nothing but loin cloths on. Handcuffed around the neck, the hands, and the feet. Attached, in the middle of the wall, attached to it. With nothing on, handcuffs on every parts of their body, and one says to the other, Now, heres my plan. Thats funny.

Jesse: Is it different for you now that you are older than almost everyone you interview? Larry: I know Im 83. Eighty-goddamn-three! My father died in 46. Whenever I got to be 46, I used to think I would die. At 53, I had a heart attack. Six months later had quintuple bypass. Ive had type 2 diabetes. Ive had prostate cancer. I have good medicine, good doctors. I take care of myself. But I have wayIll tell youthis is really weird. I have one insurance policy where Ive already paid more than the face value of the policy. I out-bet the insurance company; they won. When you take out insurance, youre betting youre gonna die. Theyre betting youre gonna live, and they have the actuary. Theyve got the figures. Now how I got this policy after a heart attack and heart surgery, for two million dollars, it was. Ive had other policies before that. And I already paid it in 20 years. No, 30 years. Thirty years, I had the heart attack 30 years ago, Ive already paid the two million.

Jesse: The change in your life came around the time that you just describe, the time that you passed the age that your father died, and the time that you had a heart attack that nearly killed you.

Larry: Right. I joined CNN in 85, had the heart attack in 87. CNN is when I really blossomed, cause it was television, it was worldwide. I read the obits every day. And my biggest fear is death. I guess Im an atheist, agnostic, I dont believe in an afterlife. And since I cant believe in an afterlife, I dont want to die. Someone asked me the other day, What do you want your obit to read? I read obituaries every day. Today there was two 83s, an 81, an 87, and a 71. I see the ages right away. I wanted my obit to read, Oldest man who ever lived passed away today. He was shot in the head and died immediately by an angry husband as he was sleeping with the former Playmate of the Year. He was 136 years old. It took three days to wipe the smile off his face.

Jesse: Your wifes Mormon, right?

Larry: Yeah. So they believe theyre going somewhere. And so shes going to see me after I die. Now I cant believe that. And what bugs me about it is, shes going to handle the death pretty well. Because she knows shes going to see me again. I want people to grieve. I would love toif I die there is some spirit afterwardId love to see whats going on. Because what I am is curious, and so if I die, will Trump finish four years? Will the Dodgers finally win a World Series after, since 1988?

The Turnaround is available on MaximumFun.org. You can also subscribe on Apple Podcasts to get new episodes as they become available.

Photo credit: Amanda Edwards (Getty)

ICYMI:The most important recent development at theNYTimes

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Q&A: Larry King on asking simple questions and listening closely – Columbia Journalism Review

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July 9, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

Trump shared Twitter content created by neo-Nazis long before his CNN tweet – Raw Story

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks to supporters through a bullhorn during a campaign stop at the Canfield County Fair in Canfield, Ohio, U.S., September 5, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar

President Donald Trump shared an animated meme created by an apparent neo-Nazi depicting him body-slamming CNN and thats not even the first time hes circulated white nationalist themes.

The animation, which was taken from Trumps appearance at a WWE professional wrestling event, was apparently created by an obviously racist Reddit user called HanAssholeSolo.

The reporter who revealed the memes creator said he has been deluged with anti-Semitic death threats from Nazi sympathizers who support Trump.

As a presidential candidate, in February 2016, Trump retweeted and then deleted a message from the Twitter user WhiteGenocideTM complimenting the size of his rally crowds.

That users profile shows an image of George Lincoln Rockwell, founder of the American Nazi Party, and links to anti-Semitic, Holocaust denial and racist content.

Trump actually retweeted another post by WhiteGenocideTM a few weeks earlier, when he shared an image showing Jeb Bushs head superimposed on a panhandlers body, holding a sign that reads, Vote Trump.

He tweeted an image in July 2016 calling Hillary Clinton crooked, next to a six-pointed star that closely resembled the Star of David which emerged from a neo-Nazi forum on the 8chan website.

House Speaker Paul Ryan denounced the tweet as anti-Semitic, but Trumps social media director Dan Scavino claimed he randomly chose the star from a stock art collection on Microsoft Word, while Trump insisted the graphic was a sheriffs badge.

Fortune used social media analytics software developed by Little Bird and found that prominent members of the Trump campaign, including former campaign spokeswoman Katrina Pierson, followed the most influential members of the white nationalist #WhiteGenocide network.

Trump himself doesnt follow any of those Twitter accounts, but nearly 68 percent of the top #WhiteGenocide influencers follow him, while 24 percent follow Scavino.

He retweeted the user @NeilTurner_ whose Twitter bio claims white genocide is real five times during the campaign, despite following only 42 accounts at the time.

Fortunes analysis found Trump and his campaign have used social media to court support within the white supremacist community, whether intentionally or unintentionally. And it appears to have worked.

Kellyanne Conway, who served as Trumps campaign manager during the final stretch before the election and now serves as a senior White House adviser, tweeted love you back in February to an account called Lib Hypocrisy whose bio includes the hashtags #WhiteIdentity, #Nationalist, and #SteveBannon.

The presidents son, Donald Trump Jr., has also shared white nationalist themes and ideas on his Twitter account.

Trump Jr. retweeted a post in August 2016 by Kevin MacDonald, a retired psychology professor that the Southern Poverty Law Center has called the neo-Nazi movements favorite academic.

Hes also shared posts using the Pepe the Frog character identified with the neo-Nazi alt-right movement, and he cracked a gas chamber joke in September 2016.

Later that month, Trump Jr. drew widespread condemnation for comparing Syrian refugees to poisoned candy an analogy based on two separate white supremacist memes with roots in Nazi propaganda.

The analogy, which has been used on message boards and shared as social media memes, originally used M&Ms as the candy in question but that changed after George Zimmerman gunned down Trayvon Martin while the unarmed black teen was walking home from buying a drink and some Skittles.

But the poisoned candy analogy goes back even further, to an anti-Semitic childrens book published by Julius Streicher, the publisher of the Nazi newspaper Der Strmer who was executed in 1946 as a war criminal.

The book tells the tale of the poisonous mushroom, and was used to indoctrinate children in hate.

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McVeigh Worship: The New Extremist Trend – Southern Poverty Law Center

Yes, that Timothy McVeigh. The guy who used a Ryder truck to bomb the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, killing 168 innocent children and adults and wounding more than 600 others.

His act 22 years ago, for those who may have forgotten, was the deadliest terrorist attack in the United States before the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

McVeigh was convicted of terrorism and executed just three months before those attacks.

His name and heinous crime are not forgotten, nor should they be, while there seems to be a growing admiration for McVeigh in some extremist circles. One militia honcho even likened McVeigh to Jesus Christ.

Check out these recent mentions of McVeigh:

In mid-May, police in Tampa, Florida, responded to the scene of a double-murder involving young, self-described neo-Nazis.

Brandon Russell, who shared the apartment with the murder suspect, was charged with possession of bomb-making materials and chemicals, including ammonium nitrate the same kind of material used by McVeigh.

In Russells bedroom at the apartment he shared with the murder suspect and the two slain neo-Nazis, police found a framed photograph of Timothy McVeigh. Russell, whos in custody, hasnt publicly explained that fascination.

In late May, police in Washington, D.C., arrested a man with an AR-15 assault rifle, a 40- caliber handgun and 90 rounds of ammunition at the Trump Hotel, not far from the Capitol and the White House.

Police saidBryan Moles, 43, of Edinboro, Pennsylvania, told a tipster that he wanted to get close to Trump and wanted to be like Timothy McVeigh.

Court document say Moles, who had worked as a physician, was armed with an assault rifle and a handgun and was in the nations capitol to see the president. He told an acquaintance, court documents say, that he had enough ammunition to make his car resemble Timothy McVeigh on a camping trip.

Before traveling to Washington, D.C., police learned Moles emptied his bank account, leaving behind a balance of $4.19 perhaps symbolic of the 4-19 date of McVeighs act of terrorism in 1995.

Homicidal Portland stabber Jeremy Christian praised McVeigh on the anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing in an April Facebook post, writing, May all the Gods Bless Timothy McVeigh — a TRUE PATRIOT!!!

Then on May 26,Jeremy Christian, who held extremist views, went on a rampagein Portland, Oregon, slashing the throats and killing two men who attemptedto come to the aid of two women Christian was harassing.

Just a month earlier,on the anniversaryof McVeigh’s deadly act of terrorism, Christian praised theOklahoma City bomber in a Facebook post. May all the Gods Bless Timothy McVeigh — a TRUE PATRIOT!!! Christian wrote.

More recently, neo-NaziAndrew Weev Auernheimer, who writes for the racist web site Daily Stormer, said he was serious in proposing a crowd-funding account to raise money to build a permanent monument in a memorial grove honoring McVeigh.

Think of it, a gigantic bronze statue of Timothy McVeigh poised triumphantly atop a Ryder truck, arms raised as if to form an Algiz rune from his body, with a plaque that states the honest truth, Auernheimer wrote.Nothing would be a greater insult to these pizza-party guarding federal swine than a permanent monument honoring [McVeighs] journey to Valhalla or Flkvangr atop the piles of their corpses.

I am not joking, Auernheimer wrote. This should be done. Imagine how angry it would make people.

Last year, during the illegal occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon by antigovernment figurehead Ammon Bundy and his militia followers,Norm Olson, another long-time militia activist and leader, made ominous public comments about McVeigh.

The battle for the rights of the people rages on and it should be assumed that lone wolf patriots may be planning another response to the central government’s abuses, Olson wrote. He claimed federal agents murdered Bundy associate LaVoy Finicum, inciting Patriots, during the 2016 refuge occupation.

Once the fuse is lit, it will be hard to extinguish, Olson said. There’s a place that we all should think about: Oklahoma City.

Two days later, Olson, who has been active in militia groups in Michigan and Alaska, said he was ready to tell members of Congress that Timothy McVeigh DIED FOR YOUR SINS!!!!!!!!!

It’sworth remembering that Olson had a unique glimpse of McVeigh. He and Oklahoma bombing co-conspirator, Terry Nichols, attended a meeting of the Michigan Militia, which Olson founded in 1994, a year before the Oklahoma City bombing.

Anger and frustration create a personal vendetta, Olson wrote last year, claiming that the U.S. governments case against Tim McVeigh was based on hismotive.

His motive was VENDETTA, retaliation, retribution, eye-for-eye ..f. call it what you want, but there will be blood … maybe not right away, but soon, Olsons said in his ominous public warning.

Apparently referring to McVeigh, Olson said there are other Patriots out there who want to be remembered and are coming to the realization that THERE IS NO JUSTICE … IT IS JUST US!

Of course, McVeigh may never be as popular as other extremist and far-right heroes and memes – – the swastika, the burning cross, Adolf Hitler, Pepe the Frog, George Lincoln Rockwell, the numbers 88 and 14 words, the KKK blood-drop cross, William Pierce.

But the question remains, why would anyone romanticize a modern-day, extremist serial killer and terrorist?

Tom Pyszczynski, a professor of psychology at University of Colorado who has written about the psychological makeup of extremists, said he believes only a relatively small number of people are enthralled with McVeigh.

The psychological, social, economic and political forces that lead some Americans to idolize McVeigh are the same as those that lead disenfranchised or disillusioned young people in other parts of the world to idolize Osama bin Laden or ISIS, Pyszczynski told Hatewatch.

They see them [McVeigh, et al] as heroes who stand up for people like them, said Pyszczynski, who co-developed and tested a terror management theory, dealing with the role of death in life and the role that meaning and self-esteem play in managing the fear of death.

Of course, the specifics of the issues and lives of the people who follow ISIS and those who idolize McVeigh are different, but beneath the surface it usually boils down to a feeling that one’s people are disrespected and mistreated, that one’s way of life is under siege from powerful forces, and that the world as they know it has gotten out of control, the university psychologist said.

All people crave meaning in life and a sense of personal or group heroism to protect them from their deepest fears, he said, explaining that ultimately boils down to the facts of life, involving death and vulnerability.

But some people, he said, aren’t able to find this in their worlds. So they look elsewhere, to radical fringe groups, like ISIS for some, or white nationalist groups for others.

These groups typically have heroes who are idolized as standing up to powerful forces and if they die in that fight, they are considered martyrs, Pyszczynski said.

Clark McCauley, a research professor of psychology at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, offered similar brief views about those individuals enchanted with McVeigh.

McVeigh is … a symbol of resistance and a hero for those who hate and fear the U.S. Government, McCauley told Hatewatch. This includes a wide range of people, some who see themselves as neo-Nazis and some who do not.

McVeighs bombing plan generally followed a fictional account of a race war depicted in the Turner Diaries, a novel written by William Pierce, a one-time college professor who went on to lead the National Alliance, a neo-Nazi hate group.

McCauley said he doesnt personally believe McVeigh was a neo-Nazi, so he can therefore be a hero for many different anti-government groups.

Pyszczynski, who teaches at the Colorado Springs university, said people who feel their way of life is under siege identify with heroes like McVeigh.

So radical ideologies, whether they be Islamist or white nationalist, are appealing to people who struggle to find meaning and a sense of personal value in their own lives and view another group as the repository of evil against which they must fight to reclaim that meaning and value, he said.

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McVeigh Worship: The New Extremist Trend – Southern Poverty Law Center

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Six Nazi spies were executed in D.C. White supremacists gave them … – Washington Post

A team of power company workers was trudging through a seldom-visited thicket in Southwest Washington when they spotted something odd in a ditch.

Protruding from the grass was a rectangular slab of granite.

They looked closer, and an inscription on the surface came into focus. What they saw astonished them.

It was a memorial. In honor of Nazi spies. On U.S. government property.

In memory of agents of the German Abwehr, the engraving began, executed August 8, 1942.

Below that were six names, and below those was another cryptic line: Donated by the N.S.W.P.P.

News of the unsettling discovery soon reached Jim Rosenstock, who worked in resource management for the National Park Service and also happened to be a local history buff. He was curious, but also skeptical. How could someone have planted such an item there? And why? And above all who?

Rosenstock needed to see it for himself, so he, too, made the hike into Blue Plains, a woody area known best for a wastewater treatment plant and an abundance of mosquitoes. And thats when he saw the stone.

I kind of started doing a little bit of my own research, Rosenstock recalled of that day in 2006 when he began to help unravel an only-in-Washington mystery, complete with World War II espionage, nationwide panic, a mass electrocution, J. Edgar Hoover chicanery, white supremacists, classic federal bureaucracy and a U.S. Supreme Court case that played a significant role in Americas modern war on terror.

***

For decades, very few people in Washington, or elsewhere, knew of the stones existence. It wasnt a secret so much as something that just never got out remarkable in a town famous for its leaks.

Only when a former Park Police detective mentioned it in passing to a Washington Post reporter, then provided photographic evidence, did anyone ask the Park Service about it.

[Hitlers mother was the only person he genuinely loved. Cancer killed her decades before he became a monster.]

A spokeswoman referred the Post to the now-retired Rosenstock, because perhaps no one has thought more about the 31-by-26-by-8-inch object than he has.

At the start of World War II, Rosenstock discovered when he began his research, Adolf Hitler had been determined to show the world just how susceptible America was to a Nazi attack, so he ordered his military to devise a plan.

The high command, according to a 2002 Post story, recruited eight Germans for the mission. In teams of four, the men were loaded onto a pair of U-boats, one destined for Jacksonville, Fla., and the other for a beach near the tip of Long Island.

On June 13, 1942, the New York group reached shore and was almost immediately discovered by an unarmed Coast Guards member on foot patrol. The men escaped, but by morning, the Coast Guard had unearthed the Germans buried supplies: fuses, pre-made bombs and four crates of TNT.

That wouldnt have mattered to their leader, George John Dasch, who hadnt intended to wreak devastation on Hitlers behalf anyway. When the group reached New York City, he and a comrade decided to turn the others in, so Dasch phoned the FBI.

Four days later, he took the $82,000 hed been given for the operation more than $1 million in todays money and boarded a train for Washington. There, he met with FBI agents, whom he expected to welcome him as a hero.

They didnt.

J. Edgar Hoover, the infamous head of the bureau, recognized an opportunity. In late June, with all eight men caught, Hoover announced their capture in New York and claimed credit for his agency.

He made no mention of Dasch.

The country went wild, Francis Biddle, then attorney general, later wrote in a memoir.

Hundreds of German aliens were rounded up and others, suspected of spying, were arrested. The Justice Department banned German and Italian barbers, servers and busboys from Washingtons hotels and restaurants because three of the would-be saboteurs had worked as waiters in America.

Ignoring due process, President Franklin Roosevelt ordered that the men be tried in secret before a military commission a tactic, then backed by the U.S. Supreme Court, that President George W. Bush would replicate 59 years later in his directive that Guantanamo Bay detainees be judged in a similar fashion.

In mid-summer 1942, seven U.S. Army generals found all eight men guilty but left their punishment to the president. He sentenced six to death and two, including Dasch, to lengthy prison terms (both were deported after the war).

The electrocutions began at 12:01 p.m. on Aug. 8. By 1:04, all six were dead.

Three days later, they were secretly buried amid a seldom-visited thicket of Southwest Washington known as Blue Plains.

***

Rosenstock quickly learned the backstory of the six Nazi spies listed on the stone, but another question remained: Who had placed it there?

The line at the bottom referencing the N.S.W.P.P. offered a clue.

Until the mid-1960s, the National Socialist White Peoples Party had gone by a more familiar name: the American Nazi Party. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the groups founder, George Lincoln Rockwell, had given it the new title shortly before his assassination in 1967.

By the 1970s, though, the group had begun to split apart and had lost much of its relevance, leading Rosenstock to believe the Nazi memorial dates back to that time.

The party didnt entirely cease to exist until 1983, the law center said, so the stone may had been carved more recently though that still means it likely sat on Park Service land for more than two decades before the power companys discovery.

[Hitler refused to use sarin gas during World War II. The mystery is why.]

For Rosenstock and his colleagues, the memorial presented a conundrum. It was deplorable, and certainly not something that belonged on public property, but none of their handbooks suggested how to deal with a 200-plus pound monument to Nazis installed on public land by white supremacists.

Plus, the Park Service couldnt do anything until they were sure it hadnt been placed atop someones bones.

What if, they wondered, the Nazis were buried beneath it?

The Park Service scoured World War II-era records for details on their bodies, but researchers could find nothing that provided a definitive answer. Old maps showed conflicting spots, including one beneath a building.

The location is a little bit confusing, he said, and I think deliberately so.

Rosenstock suspected that whoever disposed of the spies bodies didnt want them found.

What he did learn, though, is that no one was buried beneath the stone because a creek had run through that area in the 1940s.

Still, the Park Service hadnt decided what should be done.

It was an illegal monument, Rosenstock said. And we certainly did not want to be hosting a site for midnight rituals on Hitlers birthday.

That was a legitimate concern. Rosenstock once found deer bones arranged atop the memorial. Others had found candles around it and noticed that it was regularly cleaned.

At least one fellow in the Park Service suggested breaking it up with sledge hammers and throwing it in the river, he recalled. Its not the argument that historic preservationists make.

The memorial remained intact.

In 2010, under the direction of a museum curator, a forklift exhumed the granite block and lowered it into a truck.

The stone, tagged OXCO-475, now spends its days beneath a protective blanket on a shelf at a storage facility in suburban Maryland. Park Service staff asked that The Post be no more specific than that because, though they didnt mind its long-unknown story being told, theyd prefer that its exact location remain a secret.

Read more Retropolis:

The secret deal the Associated Press made with the Nazis during WWII

The disturbing history of cat abuse: public hangings, pipe beatings and The Great Cat Massacre

Discovered: Never-before seen photos of Charles Lindberghs first Spirit of St. Louis flight

Great God, he is alive!The first man executed by electric chair died slower than Thomas Edison expected.

Blood in the water: Four dead, a coast terrified and the birth of modern shark mania

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Six Nazi spies were executed in D.C. White supremacists gave them … – Washington Post

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george lincoln rockwell | eBay

eBay determines this price through a machine learned model of the product’s sale prices within the last 90 days. eBay determines trending price through a machine learned model of the products sale prices within the last 90 days. “New” refers to a brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item, and “Used” refers to an item that has been used previously.

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George Lincoln Rockwell, father of American Nazis, still in …

On 28 August 1963, the day Martin Luther King Jr delivered his I Have a Dream speech on the national mall, an American Nazi arrived early. George Lincoln Rockwell, the media-savvy, pipe-smoking founder of the American Nazi Party, was blatantly racist, homophobic and antisemitic. Just 17 years after the US and its allies had defeated Nazi Germany, he had tried to hold a rally celebrating Hitlers birthday in New York. In the capital, Rockwell had predicted that 10,000 angry counter-demonstrators would join him to protest Kings March on Washington. He had also been spreading fears about black mobs attacking Congress. Instead, the Washington DC police department, which Rockwell assumed would be on his side, had denied him a permit to demonstrate. More than 200,000 Americans joined King for a peaceful event that would reshape American history. Rockwell and fewer than 90 followers were surrounded by about 100 police officers, the Guardian reported. When one supporter attempted to give a speech, he was arrested. Frederick Simonelli, author of a 1999 biography of Rockwell, American Fhrer, would note that the American Nazis tiny band of followers that day included an unknown number who were conducting undercover surveillance for law enforcement or Jewish community groups. Nonetheless, when King marched in Chicago in 1966, he was greeted by thousands of angry white protesters, some holding signs that referenced Rockwell or carried slogans like Join the White Rebellion and We Worked Hard For What We Got, the Chicago Tribune reported. Rockwell died in 1967, murdered by one of his own followers. American neo-Nazi groups remained, largely in obscurity. Then, earlier this month, people around the world were shocked by footage from Charlottesville, where hundreds of young white nationalists, neo-Nazis and other far-right activistschanted You will not replace us and Jews will not replace us. What happened in Charlottesville on 12 August? White nationalists gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia, to protest against a plan to remove a statue of Robert E. Lee, the Confederacys top general in the American civil war. Demonstrators chanted racist statements, carried antisemitic placards and held torches during the Unite the Right rally, which was organised by white nationalist Jason Kessler. The march was met by anti-fascist demonstrators, and some skirmishes broke out before James Fields, 20, allegedly ploughed a car into a group of counter-demonstrators. Civil rights activist Heather Heyer, 32, died and others were injured. Fields has been charged with murder. Many of the hate groups that are attracting the most attention today including Vanguard America, the group that James Fields, the man charged with killing Heather Heyer was photographed standing with in Charlottesville are newly-founded. They are not part of the handful of current neo-Nazi organizations, including the National Socialist Movement and the National Alliance, that grew out of the splintering of Rockwells American Nazi Party, said Marilyn Mayro, senior fellow at the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism. Where Rockwell used explicit Nazi iconography, many new white nationalist groups have adopted alternative fascist symbols. They want to rebrand white supremacy, so the swastika is not so much a part of their movement, said Mayro, adding that with some exceptions, Rockwell doesnt seem to be venerated by these groups, but they use some of the tactics that he promoted. However, strategies used by Rockwell to gain media attention talks on college campuses, violent clashes without outraged opponents, debates over the freedom of speech are replicated today. In 1960, for example, Rockwell made headlines with his reported support for Richard Nixons candidacy for president. In 2016, white supremacists David Duke and Richard Spencer made headlines by endorsing Donald Trump. I completely repudiate him and the evil he represents, Nixon said in 1960, according to the Associated Press. In 2016, Trump did not immediately disavow support from Duke. After Charlottesville, he drew fire for a delayed and equivocal response. Who coined the term ‘alt-right’? The white supremacist Richard Spencer devised the term in 2010. He has described the movement as “identity politics for white Americans and for Europeans around the world”. What does it stand for? The movement supports extreme rightwing ideologies, including white nationalism used interchangeably with white supremacism and antisemitism. It positions itself broadly against egalitarianism, democracy, universalism and multiculturalism. Some “alt-right” supporters have argued that their hardline, extremist positions are not truly meant,but are a way to disrupt conventional and accepted thinking. Memes, irony and ambiguity are sometimes used in an attempt to wrongfoot critics. How does the ‘alt-right’ relate to the Trump administration? The Trump administration includes figures who are associated with the “alt-right”, including the former Breitbart News executive chairman Steve Bannon, now the White House chief strategist. Many of Trump’s policy positions have won favour with the movement. For some leaders of extremist groups, Rockwell does remain an inspiration. Matthew Heimbach, the 26-year-old leader of the Traditionalist Worker Party, a neo-Nazi group that marched in Charlottesville, said in an interview in May that Rockwells writings and speeches were the things that worked to bring me to National Socialism. Heimbach called Rockwell one of the most gifted orators of the 20th century. We really want to be able to carry the banner of what he died doing, being a true political National Socialist, he said. He mastered the art of turning virulent racism into a spectacle the media could not resist Rockwells most important legacy may be the instinct for showmanship. Rockwell was tall, dimpled and telegenic, deploying a trademark corn cob pipe and an instinct for dramatic poses, swastikas deployed for effect, leveraging outrage into constant press attention. In 1961, he and his followers drove a Volkswagen emblazoned with the words hate bus through the American South, parodying the Freedom Riders who fought for civil rights reform. Many of his claims among them the assertion that he would be elected president in 1972 on the National Socialist ticket were clearly delusional. But he mastered the art of turning virulent racism and antisemitism into a spectacle the media could not resist. Like many of todays most prominent alt-right leaders and backers, Rockwell was not a member of the white working class. The son of a vaudeville star, he attended Brown University, where he drew comics for the campus newspaper, then served in the navy in the second world war and Korea. By 1952, Simonelli wrote in his 1999 biography, one of Rockwells cousins was shocked by the vehemence with which he was denouncing Jewish traitors. In 1963, a report from the Anti-Defamation League found that Rockwell had only 16 troopers in residence with him in a rickety two-story barracks in Arlington, Virginia. The plumbing was faulty and the American Nazis were subsisting on canned hash, chicken stew and even cat food, the report said. Rockwell remains a nuisance, but is not a menace, the report said, calling him a mere pimple on the American body politic. One of the keys to Rockwells failure, Simonelli wrote, was the decision of Jewish organizations to give the Nazi leader the silent treatment. After several years of responding to his provocations, which produced headlines regarding clashes in New York, Washington and Boston, some Jewish community organizations worked together to ignore him, a tactic they called quarantine. Finally, on 25 August 1967, outside a laundromat in Arlington, Rockwell was shot dead. One of his former followers, John Patler, was convicted of his murder. On Friday, in Arlington, NBC reported that a small group of American Nazis offered a salute to their fallen leader.

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October 19, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

My 16 months as a Nazi – Macleans.ca

I AM A LICENSED private investigator who, more than a year ago, was employed by the Canadian Jewish Congress to infiltrate the Canadian Nazi Party. I was more successful than I expected. I became a trusted officer of the partyits local Heinrich Himmlerthough I’ve managed to avoid being linked with the nationwide publicity that has made the name of John Beattie, the unemployed clerk who is the party’s leader, familiar to most Canadians. And now Ithink my job is done. I have provided the Congress with the names of most known Canadian Nazis; with tape recordings of Nazi meetings I’ve bugged through tiny radio transmitters; with detailed accounts of Beattie’s movements and plans. A few weeks ago, in what should be a coup de grce, I handed over copies of all Beattie’s party records, which included members’ and supporters’ names and addresses, and copies of all his correspondence. The Congress now even has a list of those who contribute to party funds: the shadowy supporters who keep Beattie going but haven’t the guts to acknowledge publicly that they are Nazis. The Jewish Congress wants to nullify Beattie’s potential effectiveness as a political force by using the laws of the land, and even now it is pressuring Parliament to outlaw the kind of hate literature Beattie is distributing (though he’s not the only one doing so). There are others who would use more violent means to remove Beattie from the scene. Some of these either are or were among the lunatic fringe of an organization, largely Jewish, called N3 (after Newton’s third law: For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction). And while, in recent weeks, there has been a change in the N3 leadership, these fanatics are still active and still represent a physical threat to Beattie. It is these anti-Nazi commandosa Toronto police inspector has called them the Jewish Mafia”who besieged a house Beattie once used as a headquarters; who have vainly chased him after each of his public meetings; who have beaten his associates, including one elderly man; who have pestered his blond, 20-year-old wife Carol, following her home from the office where she works to help support Beattie, herself and their two-year-old daughter Melissa. It is this group that twice tried to bribe me to set Beattie up for them, and which has sworn to prevent Beattie from speaking in his chosen forum, the park called Allan Gardens in Toronto. Beattie still hopes to hold another meeting in Toronto this fall. Toronto city council and the courts refused permission in August but, as I write, Beattie is looking for loopholes that would allow the meeting to take place. If he’s successful, these anti-Nazis might well resort to violence. Indirectly, I met Beattie as a result of the first of his park speeches. It was held in May last year, and, predictably, it sparked a riot among a crowd that the newspapers later estimated to be about 4,000 strong. The police rescued Beattie before he received more than a bloodied nose, but they also arrested several N3 adherents and charged them with causing a disturbance. This pattern was to be repeated on three subsequent occasions on which Beattie appeared in the downtown park. But on this occasion the lawyer for the arrested N3 men employed me to subpoena Beattie as a witness at their trial, and at the same time told me N3 might employ me as an undercover agent if I could win Beattie’s confidence. That night I called at Beattie’s apartment in mid-Toronto, but even then he was running scared. What do you want? he yelled through the closed door. I told him. Who are you? he yelled back. I told him. And then, for 10 minutes, we talked through the door while I tried to persuade him that it would prevent him being plagued by me or my assistants if he opened the door now and received the subpoena. Finally, he let me in. Until that moment I, like most people whose knowledge of the man is culled from newspapers, had an image of Beattie as a spellbinder: a fanatic perhaps, but an impressive one. The reality was disappointing. He is almost six feet tall, and gangling. He is 24 years old. He has a sort of death’s-head face: hollowed cheeks, with sallow skin stretched tight across prominent bones and mousy hair combed, Hitlerian style, across his forehead. He’s hardly an impressive figure, but the fact doesn’t bother him: after all, neither was Hitler. I served the subpoena and asked how his party was progressing. He was suspicious and noncommittal, but did lend me some hate literature, all published by the U.S. Nazis. A couple of days later, I returned the literatureand this time carried with me a bottle of rum. I offered him a drink (I later found he never refuses) and we sat and he talked. Hitler, he said, was the greatest man in history next to Christ. Hitler never exterminated six million Jews, he said; that was a Jew-communist lie. Next to the New Testament, he said, Mein Kampf was the greatest book ever written. I sat and I listenedand I shivered. When I had undertaken to try to befriend Beattie, I regarded it as a joba situation in which I could no more afford emotional involvement than if I had been investigating, say, a case of industrial espionage, or a divorce. But from the start I began getting emotionally involved. My wife is German, and her family suffered under the Gestapo. Our sense of outrage has been dulled by overexposure to the sins of Nazi Germany, and it’s too convenient to dismiss Beattie and his henchmenonly a dozen active members, plus perhaps 100 unseen supportersas a bunch of vicious, but harmless, misfits. Misfits they are, but they are also the most visible part of a growing right-wing movement in Canada which, I have come to believe, could represent a threat to our national stability. I have seen old people, survivors of Hitler’s extermination camps, reduced to near-hysteria by hate literature. I met one lady on the fringe of the rioting crowd at a Beattie meeting who sobbed so deeply I almost wept with her, and she told me that she hadn’t slept since the Nazis followed me to Canada.” After every fresh wave of publicity, more sympathizers come crawling out of the woodwork to offer Beattie money and encouragement. Beattie himself has said, “I’m just the man who stands up and says what I am. You waitwhen theres a depression and the masses are looking for a scapegoat, that’s when thousands will declare themselves for us. U.S. Nazi commander” George Lincoln Rockwell has told Beattie he has a substantial list of Canadian contacts, and in August he sent Beattie a list of 279 people in Ontario who have contributed money to the U.S. party or have written to Rockwell for information and literature. But that night I first met Beattie and listened to him spew his own brand of perverted reasoning, I knew nothing of the effect and the possible dangers of Nazism in Canada. All I felt then was an emotional revulsion. I managed to blurt out that it was time someone like him showed up the Jews for what they really were. My conscience wouldn’t let me say more, but I felt that statement was ambiguous enough to feed his conceit. Now I had an excuse for maintaining a relationship with Beattie. As a result of that first public meeting of his, he faced a charge of causing a public disturbance. I offered him the benefit of the legal knowledge I have gained from eight years working as a peace officer for the county of York and as a private detective. I helped him prepare his defence, and although he was convicted and fined $150, he began to trust me. I helped him in the same way later when he was charged with unlawful assembly, and he came to regard me as his closest friend. Beattie is strangely likable at times, particularly when he and his party are not flourishing; when he feels successful he grows more arrogant. Superficially, Beattie can be charming, but I have seen his less attractive characteristics. I’ve heard him lie to his wife Carol over something as trivial as whether he’d stopped on the way home for a glass of beer. In public he is a doting father to his daughter, but I’ve seen him spank the child for an offence as trivial as upsetting an ashtray. As a conspirator he’s a joke: he once met a Toronto geologist and his wife who gave him $75, offered him support and even employed him at $60 a week for a month during which he labelled rock specimens. Their identity was supposed to be a strict secret, but within three days hed told me their name and address. While he will arrogantly face a rioting mob at one of his public meetingsTheres no glory in it unless the Jews draw blood, he once told mehe will cross the street to avoid a man who he thinks gave him a queer look. Once, when we parked my car in a downtown lot, a man passing by recognized Beattie, ran off and, before we could leave, returned with two other men. Beattie ran like a scared rabbit, and we escaped through a bowling alley and out onto Yonge Street. And yet three middle-aged men are hardly a lethal threat to two younger onesBeattie 24, and myself. 37. Perhaps this wariness has helped him survive, though. I personally wonder how the anti-Nazi commandos have failed so often. Once he left his apartment to go to his public speakin at Allan Gardens and found seven men standing in two groups, waiting for him. Somehow he dodged between the groups and, with the would-be attackers in pursuit, ran to a neighbour’s house. From there he called the police, who took him to Allan Gardens in a police car. After one meeting, a group of anti-Nazi commandos trailed him to the home of a supporter on Admiral Road. There Beattie cowered behind the closed door while two carloads of men waited outside and a third car prowled the area. I drove to Admiral Road and spotted the stake-out. The attackers’ prowl car got on my tail. I lost the tail by driving back downtown before returning to pick up Beattie, who escaped by sneaking out the back door of the house and crawling over the garden fence. He also believes I helped save him when N3 staked out a hall in which he had planned to hold a supporters meeting. I had been tipped off that N3 planned to break up the meeting with stink bombs, and I told my Jewish Congress contact. When I drove Beattie past the hall and he saw about 15 cars full of N3 people, plus about a score of police cars posted there on the advice of the Jewish Congress, he quickly cancelled the meetingand thanked me. You probably saved my life again, he said. There is a part of Beattie that enjoys the danger, the threats. They make him feel importantand it is the need to feel important that to a large extent sustains his enthusiasm for Nazism. He is hugely delighted with the fuss he has caused. Early in 1965, when there were just Beattie and a couple of teenagers. Jack DeCock and Peter Riedel, in the Nazi business, theyincredibly, it seems nowcaused riots and demonstrations just by declaring themselves Nazis. Newspapers across the country ran stories about their activities. “Just think,” Beattie once told me, three or four kids, that’s all we were, and we had the country up in arms. But that, I discovered, is the tactic of the tiny Nazi groups in a dozen countries. They send one another newspaper clippings, and congratulate one another by mail. I once secretly taped a telephone conversation between Beattie and Lincoln Rockwell. Beattie greeted Rockwell: Hello commander. We got some good front-page publicity about my speakin’ this Sunday. The Jews were screaming their heads off from every synagogue in the city.” Wonderful,” said Rockwell. “I sure will be happy to see that.” Sadly, it is the N3 organization and the anti-Nazi extremists who, in their attempts to destroy Beattie, provide him with most of the publicity he craves. If it werent for the riots and the assaults and the public protest meetings they hold, there’d be no real news in Beattie. Charles Wittenberg, the leader of N3 until he resigned in July, never fully appreciated this fact. Wittenberg never did offer to employ me professionally, and for a while it seemed I had become embroiled in what I considered an odious mess for no good professional reason. In September 1965, however, Sydney Harris, Ben Kayfetz and Sydney Midanik of the Canadian Jewish Congress engaged me to continue spying on Beattie. From then I reported almost daily to Kayfetz, always phoning in the name “Mr. Harold” for the sake of secrecy. It was not a profitable arrangement for methe most I ever charged the Congress was $200 for a month’s workbut by now my emotional involvement was total. I was as alarmed about Beattie as were the Congress and N3. It’s not Beattie himself I fear: it’s the uncounted Nazi sympathizers, and the growing number of anti-communist, right-wing organizations that display neo-Nazi symptoms. It leads me to fear a situation in which the Nazi Party might fall into the hands of an intelligent demagogue and gain financial support from wealthy but misguided right-wing sympathizers. When I first met Beattie, his Nazis were not a formally constituted party but consisted of fewer than a dozen young misfits. However, there were about a dozen older men, mostly middle-aged German immigrants, waiting in the shadows. Beattie, who was once active in the Social Credit Party, had met most of these people in 1964 through the breakaway Social Credit movement of Neil Carmichael, a Toronto stamp dealer who has been disowned by the national Social Credit Party, and who has since himself disowned Beattie and his Nazis. It was, I gathered, these immigrant Nazis who fed Beatties interest with stories of the glorious Third Reich, but they were too cautious to declare themselves openly when Beattie first hoisted his swastika in 1964. Beattie seemed to regard me as the first of a new and more desirable type of Nazi. Anyway, at about the time we met he purged the group of its violent teenagers and began the campaign he is still running to present the Nazis as a well-financed, well-organized, respectable group. To this end he ordained that the Canadian Nazi uniform should be dark suit, dark tie and white shirt. This may have been making necessity a virtue, for he only owns one suita dark one. Some of his older, casual clothes are mine, cut down to size. Along with his image-building goes a dream to forge a grand alliance of the right-wing anti-communist organizations which are proportionately as numerous in Canada as they are in the U.S., though here they’re less well-publicized. Beattie needs this dream of a grand alliance which, he believes, would make him powerful and affluent. The prospect of affluence is particularly attractive. He is no longer eligible for unemployment insurance and now lives on his wifes salary as a clerk, and whatever he can collect from supporters. I believe he’d work if he couldhe was a clerk until about 15months agoand he was probably truthful when he told the Unemployment Insurance Commission he is refused jobs because of his political beliefs. For some months last year he lived partly by peddling a magazine of a reputable religious charitable order from door to door. One of his close cronies, Hendrick VanDerwindthe’s called the general because he always wears a ragged, pseudo-military uniform to party meetingsis Ontario representative of the order, and he appointed Beattie a collector under the name of John Baker, an alias he often uses. But canvassing was, I suspect, too much like hard work: now he supplements his wifes income with gifts from supporters. Once he collected $17 from six people at a party meeting, then took his wife out drinking. I spent months cultivating Beattie before he trusted me completely and I could obtain this kind of information to pass on to the Congress. Mostly, however, the Congress wanted names, names, namesthe names of anyone and everyone connected with Beattie, and how much money they gave him. They have most of them now, from my reports and from Beatties files, which he handed over to me in July when he was evicted from his fifth apartment in a year for not paying his rent. When I handed copies of the files to the Congress, I felt pangs of remorse, for Beattie had come to regard me as something of a father substitute. His father and mother parted when Beattie and his younger brothernow a university student, who disapproves of Johns activitieswere teenagers. She remarried, but that marriage failed, too, and she was found dead, apparently of pneumonia, in her Toronto apartment last January. Beattie is not given to self-analysis, but he told me he believes his anti-Semitism dates from the time his mother lived poorly while he could see signs of wealth all around. He says that wealth was mostly displayed by Jews. Beattie’s Nazi activities must have dismayed his mother. A Toronto justice of the peace told me recently that she visited him three months before her death and asked whether she could commit her son to a mental institution. She cried when he told her there was no evidence that Beattie was legally insane. Most people are not aware that in the first year that Beattie was generating so much publicity as a Nazi, he was, in fact, not accepted as such by the World Union of National Socialists, the international Nazi movement dominated by George Lincoln Rockwell, of the U.S., and Colin Jordan, of Britain. One reason for Beattie’s campaign for respectability” was to secure their acceptance of him and his group, and soafter N3 extremists had unsuccessfully plotted to break up Beattie’s supporters’ meeting in August of last yearthe Canadian Nazis went underground for a period of reorganization. It was at this time that some of the Nazi supporters, whom Beattie told me he had first met through Neil Carmichael’s group, began to accept him as a leader and to acknowledge their own sympathies. Beattie’s meetings began to assume super-secret proportions. Supporterseven the known faithfulwould never be told where a meeting would take place: only when. Then they’d be picked up, often by me at a street-corner rendezvous, and driven to the house or restaurant where that night’s meeting was to be held. Among those around him at this time were Wolfgang Schilbach, a fairly well-known Toronto painter, and Stan Gabrovsky, a Bulgarian who has a small factory where, under the name Ab-Co, he repairs office equipment. He has duplicating equipment Beattie often uses to produce party literature. There was also Joe Bruy, a 35-year-old clerk, and Peter Lonsdale who, like most of Beattie’s supporters, either is or was a member of at least one far-right-wing organization. On Jan. 10 this year Beattie called the meeting at which a Nazi party was to be formally organized. We held it in the empty apartment below mine in an old three-story house opposite Toronto’s High Park. The chairman was Peter Lonsdale. The others were Frank Farkas, Joe Bruy, Stan Gabrovsky, VanDerwindt, myself and, of course, Beattie. Farkas, Bruy and Gabrovsky were appointed supporter-recruiters among the Hungarian, German and Bulgarian communities respectively. Their job was to issue supporter cards to those who promised to donate regularly but who didn’t want to be known publicly as Nazis. VanDerwindt was elected historian. A teenager called John Glowinski, who uses the name Richard Herring in the party, was elected in his absence to be Youth Corps leader. I was chosen secret-service chief, with the job of checking applicants for membership. Later, I did check about 15 prospective members, and turned down those who seemed intelligent and therefore dangerous. I bugged that meeting with the same tiny radio transmitter I used at most of the Nazis’ meetings. It transmits a signal for about two city blocks, and this timeas on other occasionsI had an assistant parked nearby in a car which held the receiver and a tape recorder. For most meetings I strapped the transmitter to my leg, but for this meeting I hid it inside my wife’s carpet cleaner, which was left standing against the wall of the room in which the meeting was held. It worked well, and the Jewish Congress now has a recording of Beattie accepting the role of leader with a modest denunciation of the Jews and the communists and the negroes; of Lonsdale preaching the gospel of racial purity and Farkas, Bruy and Gabrovsky bragging about the number of their friends in the ethnic communities who would be proud to support the Nazi movement. I couldn’t think of anything rousing to say about Nazism, so I simply told them that I would talk to them all later about security and report directly to Beattie. We seven at that meeting, along with real estate dealer Kurt Weinberg, were to be the inner circle, or executive, of the party. Weinberg wasn’t present at the founding meeting, but he did attend subsequent gatherings. Lonsdale didn’t; something must have put him off. Our inner-circle meetings, which followed that inaugural meeting, were little different from the gatherings that had been held earlier, and only when we met at Beattie’s house were there any Nazi trappings in evidence. Once, for instance, we met in the basement of the house where Beattie rented an apartment. There were seven of us, and we sat around a card table at which Beattie, sitting beneath a gigantic swastika flag, presided. There werent enough chairs, so some of us sat on boxes and leaned against the rough cement walls of the basement. It was dank and there was a chill in the air, and the light from naked bulbs made our shadows dance huge against the walls. The whole thing looked properly conspiratorial. Most of that meeting was taken up with laying elaborate plans to protect Beattie when he next spoke in Allan Gardens (they were never put into operation, because the police provided all the protection he needed), and with little Joe Bruyhe’s about five foot six, and peers at you inquisitorially through horn-rimmed glassestelling us about the wonderful life Germans led under Hitler. It was at that meeting that I came closest to being unmasked. The transmitter bug was taped to the back of my leg in such a way that it was impossible for me to turn it off without pulling my trouser leg up and displaying the bug. Beatties wife Carol had been wandering the neighbourhood, walking baby Melissa, to make sure there were no men sitting ominously in cars, waiting. When she returned, she turned on an FM radio. My transmitter starts squealing when an FM waveband is being used nearby. And so, when Carol turned the set on, the bug started squealing and one or two of my Nazi friends began to get curious. I said it must be the radio making the noise, then dashed to the lavatory to turn off my transmitter. By the time I returned to the basement, the incident was forgotten. Carol had made tea and sandwiches for everybody, and Beattie sat beneath his swastika, saying, The time will soon come when well be able to march down Spadina Avenue [the centre of the Jewish garment district] with banners flying in such force no one will dare try to stop us. With the formal creation of a Canadian Nazi Party, Lincoln Rockwell unreservedly accepted Beattie as the Canadian Nazi leader with a party affiliated to the World Union of National Socialists. And I was its Heinrich Himmler. As such I’d often have to dash across to wherever Beattie was then living to inspect a caller he’d refused to admit to his apartment, to make sure the man wasn’t a potential assassin. On other occasions I would have to drive him to secret assignations in the city, or to Oshawa, Ont., where we met his Oshawa group”three German-born immigrants whom Beattie admires for their blind fanaticism. I also had to arrange for someone to drive him to the Niagara peninsula last March for his first meeting with Rockwell. Since neither is welcome in the others country, they met in the centre of the Queenston-Lewiston Bridge, midway between Canadian and U.S. immigration posts. They discussed ways to improve the distribution of propaganda, and the possibility of calling a conference in Canada of the world’s Nazi leaders. Beattie had some months earlier refused to travel to a U.S. border city to meet Rockwell. He told Rockwell he was too busy. In fact, he couldn’t go because he hadnt the price of a bus ticket. But by the time of the Queenston Bridge meeting he was better off; he had become more expert at extracting money from his supporters. Even so, he has never been as successful as when he had to pay his $150 fine last year. He collected the fine three times over from his supporters, and when he came to pay the fine he cashed two unemployment insurance cheques, obtained 150 one-dollar bills and told reporters each came from a poor but dedicated supporter. Thats what makes good publicity, he said. Tell em anything if its going to get your name in the paper. I doubt whether most reporters believed him, but the N3-inspired riots have made John Beattie newsworthy. It’s not surprising that in July newspapers published his claim that he and Lincoln Rockwell planned a Nazi leaders’ convention in Toronto for November. But Beattie worried in case Rockwell was annoyed. I taped the phone conversation when he told a Rockwell aide, I said it for publicity reasons. I hope the commander takes no offence. In fact, Beattie will say or do anything as long as it’s legal; he knows that his position makes him vulnerable if he breaks the law, and he is careful to stay within it. The Jewish Congress would be delighted to see him put out of action by legal means, but neither they nor I have been able to provide the ammunition. But though we have failed to stop Beattie in this manner, the Congress hopes that legislation outlawing hate literature will place severe limitations on Beattie’s capacity to spread his propaganda. For my part, I hope this account of how I duped Beattie and became a Nazi leader for the Jewish Congress will discredit the party to the point where it will be forced out of business. I have spent so much time with Beattie in the past 16 months that I’ve felt pangs of disloyalty during the preparation of this article. But heor, rather, what he stands formust be destroyed. To Beattie I can only say, I’m sorry, John, but you deserve it.

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July 30, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

Fascism on the rise: Portland extremists reveal themselves – Psuvanguard.com

Raul Gonzales. Alanna Madden/PSU Vanguard Jake Von Ott, regional coordinator of Identity Evropa. Anna Williams/PSU Vanguard [Note from Vanguard Editor-in-Chief, Colleen Leary]: In recent years, droves of new residents have flocked to Portland, many under the guise of a Portlandia-branded utopian liberal oasis: an easy-going city open to people of all ages, shapes, sizes, persuasions, colors and backgrounds. This perception is, quite simply, false. Recent public displays of hate, racism, white pride and violence in the name of nationalism have solicited public response of shock and dismay. Surely this couldnt be happening in our happy, safe and inclusive Portland. In reality, this is nothing new to Portland, a city whose history has been mired in racism and discrimination from day one. In 1859, the state of Oregon established itself as white-only, an exclusion that officially ended in 1922. At the time, the state touted the largest per capita membership of the Ku Klux Klan. In 1988, three racist skinheads attacked a 27-year-old Ethiopian named Mulugeta Seraw. One skinhead bludgeoned him to death. Until the early 2000s, Oregon legislation maintained language excluding people of color from owning or leasing property. The recent displays of hate, racism and violence in Portland highlight a longstanding crisis, one that has apparently attracted the attention of an up-and-coming, outspoken generation of extremists whose views reflect an unfortunately familiar Portland tradition. So who is leading the charge? What do they really think? Why do they believe what they believe? How did they land on their views? Whats their intended outcome? The Vanguards Anna Williams spoke with some of Portlands most well-known characters in these overlapping movements and consulted academic experts who helped shed light on how this type of ideology attracts its proponents. _____________________________________________________________ On a sunny Friday afternoon in Portlands Tom McCall Waterfront Park, a sea of leather-vested Warriors for Freedom bikers, American flags, filming iPhones, and news reporters surrounded a calm and quiet man everyone seemed to recognize but no one seemed to know. A skinhead. Raul Gonzales, who Trump-supporters and antifa, or anti-fascist, counter-protesters recognized from social media, arrived to participate in the June 30 March for Freedom organized by Washington native and libertarian vlogger Joey Gibson. Gonzales identity was unmistakable: His distinct black polo branded by 1950s tennis champion Fred Perry, Levis tucked into his boots, and white suspenders are all garb traditional British working-class skinheads in the 1960s adopted as their signature style. A skinhead tattoo tagged Gonzales right forearm. Gibsons popularly-dubbed patriot movement publicly denounces white supremacist groups. Gibson includes groups and fraternities like Nazis, skinheads, Ku Klux Klan, and Identity Evropa in this classification. The night before Gibsons second visit to Portland on June 4, he announced such groups would be denied entrance into his Trump free speech rally held in downtown Portlands Terry Schrunk Plaza. However, Identity Evropa, Gonzales himself, and the Oregon National Socialist Movement, deemed a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, all profess to having joined in on the march. They offered cheers, zealous speeches, and insult-hurling tossed at the antifa, union groups, and anti-hate liberals counter-protesting to the north, east, and west of Gibsons rally. Since Gibson brought the patriot movement to Portland, groups aligning with Gibson who call themselves western nationalists, national socialists, western identitarians, white identitarians, western chauvinists, neo-Nazis and traditional skinheads have popped up in the press, leaving Portlanders to question whether their city will retreat back to its deadly skinhead capitol of the country roots. Highlighting this fear is the fact that Jeremy Christian, an alt-right, self-professed libertarian, participated in a Gibson rally last April. A few weeks later, Christian antagonized two women of color on a MAX train then stabbed three men that tried to intervene, killing two. Christian has been unapologetic in the courtroom, calling himself a patriot, a title he shares with Gibsons movement. Gonzales told Gibson he wanted to march to support free speech. If you supported us, you wouldnt be here, Gibson responded. Because you give us a bad name. Gonzales does not look like the typical white, bare-shaven skinhead portrayed in the movies. As his namesake implies, Gonzales is half-Mexican on his fathers side. Though his dark eyes and hair belie European heritage, Gonzales considers himself a very tan white person. Calm and unphased, though a little awkward, Gonzales eagerly engaged in conversation about his day, his five-month-old daughter, his relationship successes and failures, and his favorite television shows. However, Gonzales past proves to be anything but easy going. Just 24 years old, Gonzales spent the majority of his life in and out of foster care in Hillsboro, Oregon. Beginning at five years old, Gonzales said he resided in 15 foster homes and six group homes, each of which were physically, emotionally, and sexually abusive. Gonzales father, he said, was entrenched in drug dealing. Early on, Gonzales doubted his mothers liberal worldview. My moms liberal beliefs made her think everything was OK, he recalled. At a Boys and Girls Club owned by Beaverton police, Gonzales said he was always getting into fights because there were gang members that wanted me to join [them]. Gonzales recalled seeing the Columbine High School massacre on the news when he was five years old. Even at that point, Gonzales said he realized, Its not just me having problems, its the whole world. Something is going wrong. My moms beliefs cannot be accurate. As Gonzales grew older, he learned about Nazi WWII from his veteran grandfather. Gonzales Croatian ancestors helped build German U-boats for the war. He recalled his great-aunt had harbored anti-Serbian sentiments because she thought [Serbians] treated [Croatians] like shit. The Ustase regime in the Independent State of Croatia exterminated what the United States Holocaust Museum estimates to be almost 350,000 ethnic Serbs between 1941 and 1945. Perhaps 200,000 more were forcefully converted to Catholicism. Having heard his aunts beliefs, however, Gonzales thought, Maybe some of us really were the good guys on the Axis side of things. When Gonzales was 12 years old, he bonded with a man everyone called J.C., an ironic namesake, as he claimed to be a Satanist. When youre 12 years old and got nobody to look up to and youre getting picked on, someones going to come along and bring their values with them and sell you the pitch, Gonzales said. Gonzales said J.C. often carried around a copy of Adolf Hitlers manifesto Mein Kampf. At the same time, Gonzales developed a taste for anti-communist, white nationalist bands such as Oi! and Skrewdriver. A foster brother stick-and-poked an SS tattoo onto Gonzales right wrist. SS represents a coalition of the German Nazi Party, the Schutzstaffel, some factions of which were responsible for running Jewish concentration camps during WWII. Though Gonzales claimed at the June 30 march he was not a neo-Nazi, he later told the Vanguard, Im definitely a nationalist. I guess I could be labelled as a neo-Nazi and Id be fine with that. Gonzales wears a swastika tattoo on his right shoulder. The SPLC defines white nationalists as those espousing white supremacist or white separatist ideals. Neo-Nazis, sometimes described as national socialists, the SPLC states, share a hatred for Jews and a love of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany. Though Gonzales espouses nonviolence, he both doubts the validity of the Holocaust and believes whites are oppressed in America. Gonzales echoed a sentiment common among followers of Gibsons rallies: White freedom of speech is under attack. During Gibsons June 4 rally, guest speaker and alt-right celebrity Tim Baked Alaska Gionet livestreamed a video with Oregon Identity Evropa Regional Coordinator Jake Von Ott. Originating on social media and deep internet forums and meme pages, the alt-right is a rabbit hole of racist and nationalist opinions cloaked in humor. Gionet, who worked alongside far-right provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos, has been criticized for past anti-semitic language. In the livestream, Gionet asks Von Ott to recite the 14 words. Smiling into the camera, Von Ott said, We must secure the existence of our people and a future for white children. The 14 words are arguably derived from a passage in Mein Kampf, which advocates for securing the future of the Aryan race. The American 14 words were coined by David Lane, a former member of the Pacific Northwest terrorist organization The Order. In 1984, The Order assassinated a Jewish talk show host. Lane died in prison in 2007 while serving a 190-year sentence for crimes he committed as an Order member. Von Ott, a tall, freshly turned-20-year-old with a long, confident stride, arrived at the June 4 rally with about 40 other IE members marching in formation. Gibson said IE was not allowed into the plaza, which Von Ott contends. Von Ott said some of his friends were present at the June 30 march, apparently unknown to Gibson. In a YouTube video recently taken down by the far-right Right Source Media channel, Von Ott claimed a close relationship with IE founder Nathan Damigo. Damigo, a 30-year-old former U.S. Marine Corporal, founded IE in March 2016. Damigo told the LA Times that IE comprises a generation of awakened Europeans who oppose those who would defame our history and rich cultural heritage. When Damigo first presented the notion of white identitarianism, he was widely criticized by students of the Cal State Stanislaus ethnic studies class, where he had been invited to speak for his complex, circumspect explanation. Von Ott told the Vanguardidentitarianism simply means being proud of your European heritage. Acccording to the SPLC, the phrase was coined in the early 2000s by Generation Identitaire, an anti-immigrant group in France that mockingly served soup containing pork in majority Muslim neighborhoods. Beginning in 2007, Damigo served one year in county jail and four years in prison for holding a La Mesa, California cab driver, who Damigo thought was Iranian, at gunpoint and robbing him of $43. This came one month after Damigo finished his second tour of duty in Iraq. According to court records, the LA Timesreported Damigo suffered from severe post traumatic stress disorder, drug and alcohol abuse, paranoia and flashbacks. Damigo, however, took the opportunity in prison to study race and identity. Damigo was inspired by Lanes book My Awakening, as well as by racial provocateur Jean-Philippe Rushton and science writer Nicholas Wade. Damigo came out of prison believing that different races were separated by genetic predispositions. Von Ott agreed. The Africans [are] scientifically proven to have lower IQs and less impulse control than people of European, or white, origin, he claimed.[Black Lives Matter] only proves our point in terms of low impulse control,Von Ott said BLM formed in 2012 after George Zimmerman was acquitted for his murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. BLM, like antifa, protests police corruption and racism, and has been at the center of controversy for some demonstrations turning violent. BLM, however, also organizes vigils, participates on panels around the country, and lobbies for police reform. Researchers from Stanford University who study genetic differences between races, condemn Wades speculation that recent natural selection has led to worldwide differences in IQ test results, political institutions and economic development. Adding to a commitment to back up its views with scientific evidence rather than feeling and emotion, Von Ott said, IE believes the liberal concept of multiculturalism is toxic to America. A multiracial society is a multi-racist society, Von Ott added. Von Ott referenced a controversial study by Harvard professor Robert D. Putnam, which found that in newly diverse populations, fewer people vote, volunteer, or donate to charities. Some people view that as a strong case against diversity, but Putnam has publicly decried that view. In a March 2017 letter to the Wall Street Journal, Putnam wrote, Ethnic diversity is, on balance, an important social asset, as the history of the U.S. demonstrates. In the short to medium run, however, immigration and ethnic diversity challenge social solidarity and inhibit social capital. In the medium to long run, on the other hand, successful immigrant societies like the U.S. create new forms of social solidarity and dampen the negative effects of diversity by constructing new, more encompassing identities. Von Ott said he fears, however, that as more immigrants come to the U.S., white European identity will disappear. Von Ott calls himself a strong Christian, while adding, Christianity is not a warrior religion by any means, but he believes every race has the right to conquer another. He said he isnt advocating violence against any other race, but as non-white births exceed white births in America, IE sees sole reproduction with members of the Aryan race to be paramount. Von Ott compared white peoples possible plight to that of Native Americans. [Native Americans] are the most likely to interracially marry and have interracial children, Von Ott said. Their culture and [their] children have been obliterated from the face of the earth. They no longer have any relevance here at all. None. Additionally, Von Ott argued that allowing refugees of Islamic origin into America will inevitably bring a culture of violence across the border. In the Muslim world, at age 6 [children are] given an [AK-47] and told to go fight, go kill, Von Ott claimed. Well, you have two cultures colliding, a European and Muslim culture. At the end of the day, whos going to win a one-on-one fight? In contrast, the Council on American-Islamic Relations says 2017 is set to become one of the worst years ever for anti-Muslim hate crimes. Most incidents documented by CAIR are of non-violent harassment, but the second most common are hate crimes that involve physical violence or property destruction. According to researchers at the University of Buffalo and the University of Alabama, on the other hand, over two decades of research have consistently shown areas of high immigration statistics to have lower crime rates than those with minimal immigrant populations. Though self-proclaimed libertarian, American-loving people like Von Ott and Damigo deny being neo-Nazis or fascists, the roots of IEs ideology are undeniable. Von Ott said he admires George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of neo-Nazism in America. Rockwell founded the American Nazi Party in 1959, which was formerly known, in more convoluted language, as the World Union of Free Enterprise and National Socialists. Rockwell, a well-documented racist, was ousted from the Navy and assassinated in a shopping mall parking lot in 1967. Von Ott said he denounces Rockwells violent rhetoric and behaviors. However, Von Ott qualified, I admire his willingness and how American he was. Von Ott paused. By how American, I mean the fact that against everybody he still stood for what he believed in. Rockwell believed former U.S. Presidents Dwight Eisenhower and Harry Truman were traitors that should be hanged. Former Portland State professor, author, and white supremacist expert Randy Blazak explained that groups ranging from white identitarian to white supremacist operate under different language, but the same ideology. Hate groups dont call themselves hate groups, Blazak said. They call themselves white civil rights organizations. Its public relations. Its a new title of an old song. Many such groups deny Nazi sympathy but cling to symbolism like the 14 words and sieg heil gestures. Logically, they would just abandon all that to bring [new members] in, Blazak explained. But the reality is, thats their roots. They feel connected to it. Gibson said on June 30 he was aware Gionet and Von Ott had hailed the 14 words at his June 4 rally, to his disapproval. Were looking into it, Gibson said. If a statement needs to be made, it will be made. Over a month later, Gibson has not issued any statements. Von Ott wears a neatly-clipped haircut identical to Damigos. Damigos Twitter handle, in fact, is @fashyhaircut, a play on fascism. Gonzales said he believes this all-American teenager image attracts young people into movements like IE and skinheads a lot more than a guy wearing a band t-shirt and waving a swastika flag. Recently, Rose City Antifa leaked a series of overtly violent and racist statements Von Ott posted on a white nationalist Facebook page. In one of these posts Von Ott said his brother, who was dating a half-Asian woman, had yellow fever. Tagged to his complaint, Von Ott posted a photo of Hitler and his associates looking up with disgust, with the word degenerate written underneath. In another post, Von Ott asked group members what the punishment would be if his friend stabbed refugees in Germany. His post was met with humor and encouragement from the group, which included his own mother. In another screenshot, Von Otts mother posted a sketched image of a white family, the father wearing a swastika armband, with a caption that read, We are rising! Unite! Von Ott confirmed these posts were his own and his mothers. Von Ott said he regrets his posts, claiming he has matured in the four months since, and they were merely locker room talk. This is the same justification Donald Trump offered after he was caught saying his celebrity status allowed him to grab women by the genitals. Von Ott explained that he posted about stabbing refugees after his cousin, allegedly, was sexually assaulted by three refugees in Europe. Neither Von Ott nor his mother mentioned any incident like this in his post. Von Ott added that because white voices are so silenced in America, people like him are forced into online echo chambers where hateful statements turned to humor are a release for those who fear losing their jobs because of their views. Von Ott said since creating another white nationalist group on Facebook, he deletes any posts encouraging violence. However, he admits there may be some people that actually espouse violence in online echo chambers. Von Ott reasons such posts should be removed because they are unproductive and we need to be professionals. John Based Spartan Turano showed up to Gibsons April 27 Berkeley, California rally and June 4 rally in Portland cos-playing as a Trojan soldier, sporting a plastic helmet and chest armor atop his American flag board shorts. When Turano got riled up at counter-protesters, he ripped his armor and helmet off, then flexed his arm and chest muscles at the crowd and cursed them out. At the Berkeley protest, Turano called antifa protesters cowards and declared, Ill smash on them until I cant breathe. Turano could be seen on video screaming and chucking back projectiles antifa threw at the patriot crowd. On June 11, however, just one week after his appearance in Portland, Turano showed up to another free speech vs. antifa demonstration in San Bernardino to counter-protest the same patriot crowd he hailed from. Turano held a sign that read, Resist hate, love only. Gibsons followers were quick to call Turano a traitor. Turano is a single father from La Puente, California. Turanos Facebook is devoid of any Based Spartan pictures, featuring only photos of him and his kids in clothing sprinkled with marijuana leaves. Turano said hes never been a political person. He has only voted once in his life, and that was for President Trump. Turano said he disagrees with the president on immigration and womens rights issues. Turano said he used to think all antifa hated our guts and intended to protest violently. When Turano came to Portland on June 4, however, he said a petite Jewish counter-protester came up to him and asked, Does my life matter? It just made me feel bad, Turano said. I hadnt really been paying attention; I just thought we were surrounded by all these people who hated us. But I met some people that seemed so nice. Turano added that in his state of mind when he attended the Berkeley protest, he thought these [antifa] people hate America. Turano said as a single, working father, he did not have time to sit behind a computer screen and follow the alt-right. When Turano began to see swastikas at these protests and racial slurs on the internet, however, he came to understand how the other side saw patriots. Racist aint too far from the truth, Turano declared. Being Based Spartan gave Turano a rush, but he said he now feels the patriot movement only loved me because they thought I was violent and I looked threatening and intimidating. Turano added, People emailed me to tell me I helped these idiot groups grow, and Im responsible for making it a family idea. I made a horrible mistake. I dont like bullies. Turano said he thinks the discrimination he sees Latinos face in Southern California is spearheaded by the alt-right. Even the good people say horrible things, Turano said. This lady I know struck out at a [Latino] girl and I cant believe she went there. She has a Mexican husband and an immigrant mother-in-law and she said this racial slur. Theres no hope. When Turano was sixteen, he got a swastika tattoo on his right hand. Turano did not explain why. I ended up cutting it out, he said. Turano ended up marrying an undocumented immigrant and having children. Still visible on Turanos right bicep, however, is a White Pride tattoo. Turano said he got it to identify himself in prison, but he does not plan on removing it. Turano, still a conservative, declared like Von Ott and Gonzales, I think everyone should be proud of who they are. Perhaps this is what attracted Turano to the free speech patriot movement in the first place. Gibson said if extremist groups show up to his events, they show up. Moving forward, Gibson said he wants to empower leaders to create their own groups. From Western Chauvinist Proud Boys fleeing the rise of feminism, to alt-right Kekistan members who wish to free offensive shit-posters from liberal social justice warriors, to IE members that claim white genocide, every patriot wants First Amendment rights on their own terms. Whatever the patriot movement seeks to empower has been lost in a name game of nit-picked, white-pride identities. As Gibson shouts free speech and freedom from cultural brainwashing from his loudspeaker, his movement brings to the surface a violent, racist, and un-American past. Turano said he has just now come to understand that. To the people of Portland, Turano wished to say, Im sorry for disturbing you while supporting something I did not understand. It was during a healing time and I totally dropped the ball.

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July 30, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

COLUMN: PRIESTESS OF THE ALT-RIGHT – DAWN.com

I am a big fan of Hindu [sic]. Donald J. Trump, Oct 15, 2016. Nobody wanted peace more than Adolf Hitler. Savitri Devi, The Lightning and the Sun (1958). The name Savitri Devi pseudonym for Maximiani Julia Portas, a Greek-French polemicist who lived from 1905 to 1982 wont necessarily ring a bell for readers. Not unless youre immersed in occult Nazism, of which Devis late biographer, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke (died 2012), was a foremost scholar. I have been researching and writing a lot about white supremacy these last six months in fact, Im currently putting together a book defining the modern Alt-right. An interesting question has been the extent to which the Alt-right (the harmless-sounding moniker under which neo-Nazi forces have assimilated and rebranded themselves in the United States) retains traditional white supremacist influences, including the occult strain, of which Devi along with the Chilean Miguel Serrano, satanists such as Aleister Crowley and Anton LaVey and proponents of racially redefined Nordic religions such as Asatru and Odinism is but one manifestation. Devi was a lifelong peripatetic traveller with several long stays in India, particularly during the Third Reich when she was stuck in Calcutta and couldnt experience the thrill of the Nazi regime first-hand. When she was banned from one country (such as Britain or Germany after the passage of post-war laws prohibiting the dissemination of Nazi propaganda), she simply travelled under different identities. In the early 1960s, there was a famous gathering of the Western worlds unregenerate Nazis in Britain, leading to the formation of the World Union of National Socialists, at which Devi was an eager luminary. This event was a major influence on important American white supremacists (such as George Lincoln Rockwell and William L. Pierce) of the second half of the 20th century, who in turn are direct forerunners of the modern Alt-right and, of course, the most prominent and monstrous Alt-right troll of all, Donald Trump. But before Devi reached that position of influence, there was a lot of travelling and searching to do. At first in India she advocated Hindu-Muslim unity. But soon she became interested in Hindutva and was an admirer of the early proponents of that ideology, specifically Tilak, Savarkar, Hedgewar, and Golwalkar. From being a proponent of communal unity, Devi became a convert to Hindus preserving their racial stock at any cost. There is a persistent belief in Nazi esotericism that the original Aryans came from the far north of the planet and settled in India in prehistoric times. (Some esoteric Nazis believe that Hitler bides his time underneath the North Pole.) This original Aryan stock, which colonised India, is said to be the source of northern European peoples. German scholarship was much interested in this theory. Aryan supremacists are obsessed with the tragic outcome of miscegenation in India; they want to avoid a similar degeneracy by way of genetic dilution (the darkening of whiteness) at any cost in the West hence their recent demands for a separate white homeland in North America. Devi married a Bengali Brahmin propagandist named Asit Krishna Mukherji, a sympathiser of the Third Reich and publisher of the fascist journal The New Mercury from Calcutta. Despite her global peripateticism in ensuing decades, Mukherji remained Devis avid supporter, funding the publication of her books The Lightning and the Sun and The Impeachment of Man. During the Second World War, Devi and Mukherji may have facilitated Subhas Chandra Boses efforts to seek liaison with the Japanese empire (after Boses repeated failures to elicit Hitlers direct sympathies for Indian independence). An intertwined dance between great optimism and pessimism seems to mark fascist movements everywhere. National regeneration, after all, presupposes national degeneration, from which a group of people led by a saviour (Hitler as the racial avatar, as Devi had it) will show the way out. Just as in Germany Oswald Spengler with his overwrought theory of Western decline held sway in the interwar years, Hindutva presupposed a perversion of racial hierarchy that had to be urgently addressed. For Devi, the transition from German to Hindu pessimism was seamless; the present Kali Yuga [dark age] was familiar enough to her from the European tradition. (The extent to which canonical Hindu texts authorise, or do not authorise, hierarchical or racist thinking is something I intend to research because I simply dont know enough; Hindutva, of course, is a different matter.) In Indias colour-conscious society Devi found a natural habitat to write books theorising a universal Aryan race whose destiny it was to rule the world. (The swastika originates in the Sanskrit term svastika and is a sacred Hindu symbol.) In order to pursue the Aryan dream of following the sun westward (Manifest Destiny) one must first impeach man; one must be a misanthrope in order to postulate mankinds divinity. Devi was attracted to Hinduisms deep ecological emphasis that remains an element of neo-Nazism to this day. We think of deep ecology as a tendency of the left, but the extreme right continues to advance Malthusian propositions in order to save humanity from its own proclivity to multiply. The contemporary Alt-right has decided to mute the esoteric side and fire up passions along more elemental bread-and-butter lines, such as immigration. I dont see the esoteric character as foundational, but it is inseparable, as Devis writings demonstrate, from the broader racial ideology. Devi, like her fellow conspirator Mukherji, held a very long view and would have been ecstatic at the turn things have taken in America. The dream of racial segregation seems to be self-fulfilling; it only needs adept propagandists able to estimate the eventual impact of their dark visions. Devi was such a visionary, whose every dark thought remains a challenge to our common humanity. The columnist is the author of Karachi Raj and Soraya: Sonnets. His book on literary criticism, Literary Writing in the 21st Century: Conversations, was published recently Published in Dawn, Books & Authors, July 9th, 2017

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July 9, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

Q&A: Larry King on asking simple questions and listening closely – Columbia Journalism Review

A great interview is one of the journalists most powerful tools. It can be informative, entertaining, thoughtful. For the next five weeks, the Columbia Journalism Review and MaximumFun.orgwill broadcast conversations with some of the worlds greatest interviewers. Hosted by NPRs Jesse Thorn, the podcast, called The Turnaround, will examine the science and art of journalism. This episode features Larry King, longtime television and radio show host. An edited transcript is below. Jesse Thorn: So my first question was, when was the first time that you realized you were an interviewer? I know you always wanted to be a broadcaster. Larry King: Oh, since I was five years old I wanted to be on the radio. I just wanted to be an announcer. I wanted to be anything. I wanted to talk into a microphone. I dont know why, I must have had a good voice pre-puberty. Because people kept telling me, You gotta be on the radio. So I would imitate radio shows. I would listen to The Shadow, and then I would go into my bathroomwe were very poor in Brooklynand I would go, Who know what evil lurks in the heart of men? The Shadow knows. A tale well-calculated to keep you insuspense. I was driven by the sounds. Still am. And I knocked around a while, didnt go to college. My father had died when I was very young. I worked at a bunch of odd jobs, finally went down to Miami, broke in on a small station. Jesse: So this is the part that I want to interject on. Because one of the things I am interested in is you mentioned you were really poor in Brooklyn. Larry: Very. Jesse: This couldnt be further from the entertainment industry, the radio industry, or whatever. So what gave you the idea, Oh, I could actually do this? Larry: Just by listening, imitating. It stroked something in me, that I was comfortable with it. Had I not done it, I would have been a standup comic. I love making people laugh. I do a lot of speaking. But I just wanted to be on the radio, in any capacity. I thought eventually it would be sports because Im a sports freak. And I love all sports, and I love going to sports events. Ive broadcast Dolphin games, and Ive done baseball. I thought Id be a sportscaster. Red Barber, the Dodger announcer, was one of my heroes, as was Arthur Godfrey, who I later worked with. But I went to Miami, got a job at a small station. I was a disc jockey for about a year and a half. Playing records, doing news in the afternoon, sports broadcastsfifty dollars a week I was making. And there was a restaurant in Miami Beach called Pumpernicks, a very popular restaurant. And their slow time of the day was 10 to 11 in the morning, because it wasnt breakfast, it wasnt lunch. And the owner of the restaurant used to listen to me in the morning, doing my morning show, usually very funny, a lot of humor. And he said, Would you like to do a radio show from my restaurant from 10 to 11 when I dont get crowds? We might build up some crowds. The station went for it because he paid the station. I got a little extra. So every day Id finish my shift, 6 to 9, drive up to Pumpernicks, and do 10 to 11. And I would interview waiters, and there was no producer on the show, you know people would just call people up from the audience. And then one day, out of nowhere, Bobby Darinthe great Bobby Darinwalked in. Mack the Knife was the number one [song]. And I interviewed him for an hour. Later we walked down the street down Collins Avenue, and he said to me, Youve interviewed before? I said, No, I just talk to regular people. And he said, I think you ought to take this up seriously because you really have a knack. ICYMI:Eight simple rules for doing accurate journalism Jesse: Well, thats what I was going to say. I mean I think one of the things about your interview style thats special is that youre a very modest interviewer. Like you are not afraid to ask a simple question, a what is this question. Larry: Theyre the best. Because when you thinkI watch some of these press conferences, and the question takes longer than the answer. And the people show off. There was no showing off. [The] New Yorker did a piece on me, called it Street Questions. Im a guy in the street. Hey! What are you doin? So, when the Gulf War was on, and we would have guests on every night associated with the war: writers, politicians, generals. And I always asked the same question: What happened today? I wasnt there. You were there. You were covering it. What happened? Thats the simplest question in the world. Whyd you do this? What happened? I dont know more law than a lawyer. I dont know more politics than a politician. I dont, I have opinions. But Ive never run for office. Ive never argued a case in front of a jury. I dont know more medicine than a doctor, Ive never operated. Ive never done science. I ask questions of scientists. Im a layman. Im a pure layman whos intensely curious. What I do have is a sense of pace. I know when somethings going well, I know how to draw people out. But I dont think I could teach a course in it. I dont know that I have a method. I just know that I go to the basics. And from the basics, you learn a lot, and you can bring people. One of the best examples I can give is my first interview with Frank Sinatra, who didnt do a lot of interviews. Jackie Gleason got him for me. And his PR guy said to me, Frank doesnt do these things. Hes doing it as a favor to Jackie Gleason. But one thing: do not bring up the kidnapping of his son. He doesnt want to talk about it, he will not talk about it. I thought, thats fair, I dont have to bring it up, OK. In the middle of the interview, were really in touch. And I asked him, The thing with you and the pressis it overdone, or have you been bum rapped? He says, Well, it might have been overdone. But Ive been bum rapped. Take my sons kidnapping. He brought it up. I just was asking good questions. And thats the framework of which I like to work. I dont have to know a great deal about [it]. In fact, my favorite guests are people I dont know at all. I like doing physicists; I know nothing about physics. I like doing astronomers, because I dont know about the heavens, but I wonder about them. What is an astronomer when he walks down the street and looks up? What does he think about? Jesse: Are you always listening for that little something that stands out? That little interesting bit that you can pull on a little? Larry: Yeah. Because the key of interviewing is listening. If you dont listen, youre not a good interviewer. I hate interviewers who come with a long list of prepared questions. Uh, because theyre going to depend on going from the fourth question to the fifth question without listening to the answer of the fourth question. Because theyre concentrating on what theyre going to ask for the fifth. And thats not the way it works for me. So I concentrate solely on the answer, and I trust my instincts to come up with questions. Even if the answerer fully answered the question, Im ready in my head to go somewhere with it. Theres no dead air. Jesse: Do you get scared ever? Larry: No. Only the first time I was on the air. I was playing records.They had just given me a new name, and I had my record ready to go, and all my life I had dreamed of this. And I turned down the mic, and I turned down the record, and nothing came out. And the general manager kicked open the door to the control room and said, This is a communications business, dammit. Communicate! And I put on the mic, and I said, My name is Larry King. Thats the first time I said that, because I had just been given that name, they thought my real name wasnt good enough, and Im very nervous, but all my life I had wanted to be in radio. I dreamed of this moment, and I had been scared. So for two minutes, youve been listening to a record go up and down and nothing coming out, so please, bear with me. And I learned something that day, which later Arthur Godfrey would tell me, You learned the whole secret of this business. The secret of what were doing right now is theres no secret. Be yourself. Be yourself. Answer honestly, be honest, be upfront with the audience. You can never go wrong. So what I did that day even though I wasnt thinking that way. If you were listening that day, and I was reading a commercial and goofed, or miscued a recordits his first day! Its his first day. I told that story in Canada once, and the guy said to me, Well suppose you were walking down the hall at NBC. Someone grabbed you, sat you down, put some papers in front of you, and said, Tom Brokaw is sick, youre on.’ I would look at the camera and say, I was walking down the hall at NBC. Someone just grabbed me handed me these papers, tells me Tom Brokaws sick, and Im on. I would thentrust me, Ive never anchored news, Ill do the best I can. Hey, it aint brain surgery. Larry: See, tape is a safety ground that I dont want. Because I was born of the moment. I didnt know Bobby Darin was coming in. I liked that. We used to do on my radio showI had the first national radio talk show. We used to do a night which was Who Is The Guest? They would not tell me who the guest is. And this guy would walk in, Ive got to do a two-hour interview, guy or woman, and all they have to do is tell me their name. And then Id find out who they were, and then Id ask them questions. I loved that. Because the less I know, the better. Now that sounds strange to people. Like if you wrote a book, I wouldnt read the book before I interviewed you, because I would then know too much about the book. And Im in the same boat as the audience, they havent read the book. So were all in this together. Theres no such thing as the perfect interview. Yes, you can miss something. No ones ever done the perfect interview. Jesse: How does this work when youre interviewing somebody that you dont like? Larry: Thats the hardest. You still have to do the best job you can. Sometimes you get confrontIve only got really confrontational with racists, racism. When I landed in MiamiI took a train down to Miami to, I lived with my uncle. I had 14 dollars in my pocket, and the first thing I saw was a colored water fountain. And I didnt understand that at all. There was a colored water fountain and a white water fountain. So I drank out of the colored water fountain. It was good. Then I got on a bus to go over to Miami Beach. And I sat in the back of the bus, and the bus driver stopped the bus, and he asked me to move forward. Of course, the back of the bus is for Negroes. I remember said to him, My fathers a Negro, so Im comfortable in the back of the bus. Which was not true. So I never understood racism. Why would the pigment of skin mean anything? Anything? So when I had George Wallace on early, or the head of the Ku Klux Klan, or George Lincoln Rockwell, the anti-Semitic racist. That blew my mind, and I would get confrontational and sometimes have arguments. Its not good to argue with the guest. Because its maybe interesting for the audience, but it puts you out of control. When you argue, youre not in control. And I like to beyoure in control, youre in control of this interview, Jesse, not me. You. This is your interview. Youre in control; you could stop it, you could end it, you could go anywhere you want. Larry: If you have an agenda, youre not gonna learn, in my opinion. I dont learn anything when I watch shows in which the host and his guest are of one point of view, and thats the whole thing. You know, so whether its Bill OReilly with an arch-conservative or Rachel Maddow with an arch-liberal, I dont know anything. I know that Rachel Maddow stands for this and her guest stands for that, and they both agree. Thats a not a learning process to me. Its not a real Q&A. A real Q&A takes meIm interested in a heart of a person. How people react to things. Whats it like to be a president and send someone to war. Whats it like at night when you get the statistics132 killed today. How do you sleep? Jesse: You know youre describing it as an exercise in curiosity, but is it partly an exercise in empathy, and just wondering what other peoples lives are like? Larry: Yeah thats part of it, empathy, curiosity. Peter Ustinov, the great actor, told me he likes being interviewed because he gets to think about things he doesnt think about. I dont walk around thinking about the things youve just asked me. But it forces me to think about them. And therefore, I enjoy it. As much as I like asking questions, I like being asked, if theyre good questions and it causes me to be thoughtful. Im not a texter, I dont like texting. I like the sound of the human voice. Im into voice. I like, something about the inflections in voice, that you dont get in a transcript. ICYMI:Should journalists expose trolls? Jesse: Do you think the fact that youre Larry King affects the way that people react to you when you ask them questions? Larry: It well might. Walter Cronkite told me that when you get famous, it gets harder. You know he was at thein 1960, he went to the Texas caucuses at the convention. As soon as he walked in the room, they all stopped. Got autographs from him and stuff like that. Its not what its supposed to be. So I guess that its happened. People get a little intimidated at the thought of it; theyre thrilled to meet you. Especially when I interviewlike young rock stars, singers, young people who have listened to me as children. They come like a little in awe, I put them at ease right away, usually with humor. I use humor a lot. I kid around a lot, tell them the latest joke Ive heard. I love telling jokes, I love jokes. Jokes are genius to me. Who, cartoonsyou read The New Yorker cartoons? Jesse: Mmhmm. Larry: Theyre genius. Genius! They had a cartoon once of two guys up against the wall. Nothing but loin cloths on. Handcuffed around the neck, the hands, and the feet. Attached, in the middle of the wall, attached to it. With nothing on, handcuffs on every parts of their body, and one says to the other, Now, heres my plan. Thats funny. Jesse: Is it different for you now that you are older than almost everyone you interview? Larry: I know Im 83. Eighty-goddamn-three! My father died in 46. Whenever I got to be 46, I used to think I would die. At 53, I had a heart attack. Six months later had quintuple bypass. Ive had type 2 diabetes. Ive had prostate cancer. I have good medicine, good doctors. I take care of myself. But I have wayIll tell youthis is really weird. I have one insurance policy where Ive already paid more than the face value of the policy. I out-bet the insurance company; they won. When you take out insurance, youre betting youre gonna die. Theyre betting youre gonna live, and they have the actuary. Theyve got the figures. Now how I got this policy after a heart attack and heart surgery, for two million dollars, it was. Ive had other policies before that. And I already paid it in 20 years. No, 30 years. Thirty years, I had the heart attack 30 years ago, Ive already paid the two million. Jesse: The change in your life came around the time that you just describe, the time that you passed the age that your father died, and the time that you had a heart attack that nearly killed you. Larry: Right. I joined CNN in 85, had the heart attack in 87. CNN is when I really blossomed, cause it was television, it was worldwide. I read the obits every day. And my biggest fear is death. I guess Im an atheist, agnostic, I dont believe in an afterlife. And since I cant believe in an afterlife, I dont want to die. Someone asked me the other day, What do you want your obit to read? I read obituaries every day. Today there was two 83s, an 81, an 87, and a 71. I see the ages right away. I wanted my obit to read, Oldest man who ever lived passed away today. He was shot in the head and died immediately by an angry husband as he was sleeping with the former Playmate of the Year. He was 136 years old. It took three days to wipe the smile off his face. Jesse: Your wifes Mormon, right? Larry: Yeah. So they believe theyre going somewhere. And so shes going to see me after I die. Now I cant believe that. And what bugs me about it is, shes going to handle the death pretty well. Because she knows shes going to see me again. I want people to grieve. I would love toif I die there is some spirit afterwardId love to see whats going on. Because what I am is curious, and so if I die, will Trump finish four years? Will the Dodgers finally win a World Series after, since 1988? The Turnaround is available on MaximumFun.org. You can also subscribe on Apple Podcasts to get new episodes as they become available. Photo credit: Amanda Edwards (Getty) ICYMI:The most important recent development at theNYTimes

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July 9, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

Trump shared Twitter content created by neo-Nazis long before his CNN tweet – Raw Story

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks to supporters through a bullhorn during a campaign stop at the Canfield County Fair in Canfield, Ohio, U.S., September 5, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar President Donald Trump shared an animated meme created by an apparent neo-Nazi depicting him body-slamming CNN and thats not even the first time hes circulated white nationalist themes. The animation, which was taken from Trumps appearance at a WWE professional wrestling event, was apparently created by an obviously racist Reddit user called HanAssholeSolo. The reporter who revealed the memes creator said he has been deluged with anti-Semitic death threats from Nazi sympathizers who support Trump. As a presidential candidate, in February 2016, Trump retweeted and then deleted a message from the Twitter user WhiteGenocideTM complimenting the size of his rally crowds. That users profile shows an image of George Lincoln Rockwell, founder of the American Nazi Party, and links to anti-Semitic, Holocaust denial and racist content. Trump actually retweeted another post by WhiteGenocideTM a few weeks earlier, when he shared an image showing Jeb Bushs head superimposed on a panhandlers body, holding a sign that reads, Vote Trump. He tweeted an image in July 2016 calling Hillary Clinton crooked, next to a six-pointed star that closely resembled the Star of David which emerged from a neo-Nazi forum on the 8chan website. House Speaker Paul Ryan denounced the tweet as anti-Semitic, but Trumps social media director Dan Scavino claimed he randomly chose the star from a stock art collection on Microsoft Word, while Trump insisted the graphic was a sheriffs badge. Fortune used social media analytics software developed by Little Bird and found that prominent members of the Trump campaign, including former campaign spokeswoman Katrina Pierson, followed the most influential members of the white nationalist #WhiteGenocide network. Trump himself doesnt follow any of those Twitter accounts, but nearly 68 percent of the top #WhiteGenocide influencers follow him, while 24 percent follow Scavino. He retweeted the user @NeilTurner_ whose Twitter bio claims white genocide is real five times during the campaign, despite following only 42 accounts at the time. Fortunes analysis found Trump and his campaign have used social media to court support within the white supremacist community, whether intentionally or unintentionally. And it appears to have worked. Kellyanne Conway, who served as Trumps campaign manager during the final stretch before the election and now serves as a senior White House adviser, tweeted love you back in February to an account called Lib Hypocrisy whose bio includes the hashtags #WhiteIdentity, #Nationalist, and #SteveBannon. The presidents son, Donald Trump Jr., has also shared white nationalist themes and ideas on his Twitter account. Trump Jr. retweeted a post in August 2016 by Kevin MacDonald, a retired psychology professor that the Southern Poverty Law Center has called the neo-Nazi movements favorite academic. Hes also shared posts using the Pepe the Frog character identified with the neo-Nazi alt-right movement, and he cracked a gas chamber joke in September 2016. Later that month, Trump Jr. drew widespread condemnation for comparing Syrian refugees to poisoned candy an analogy based on two separate white supremacist memes with roots in Nazi propaganda. The analogy, which has been used on message boards and shared as social media memes, originally used M&Ms as the candy in question but that changed after George Zimmerman gunned down Trayvon Martin while the unarmed black teen was walking home from buying a drink and some Skittles. But the poisoned candy analogy goes back even further, to an anti-Semitic childrens book published by Julius Streicher, the publisher of the Nazi newspaper Der Strmer who was executed in 1946 as a war criminal. The book tells the tale of the poisonous mushroom, and was used to indoctrinate children in hate.

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July 4, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

McVeigh Worship: The New Extremist Trend – Southern Poverty Law Center

Yes, that Timothy McVeigh. The guy who used a Ryder truck to bomb the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, killing 168 innocent children and adults and wounding more than 600 others. His act 22 years ago, for those who may have forgotten, was the deadliest terrorist attack in the United States before the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. McVeigh was convicted of terrorism and executed just three months before those attacks. His name and heinous crime are not forgotten, nor should they be, while there seems to be a growing admiration for McVeigh in some extremist circles. One militia honcho even likened McVeigh to Jesus Christ. Check out these recent mentions of McVeigh: In mid-May, police in Tampa, Florida, responded to the scene of a double-murder involving young, self-described neo-Nazis. Brandon Russell, who shared the apartment with the murder suspect, was charged with possession of bomb-making materials and chemicals, including ammonium nitrate the same kind of material used by McVeigh. In Russells bedroom at the apartment he shared with the murder suspect and the two slain neo-Nazis, police found a framed photograph of Timothy McVeigh. Russell, whos in custody, hasnt publicly explained that fascination. In late May, police in Washington, D.C., arrested a man with an AR-15 assault rifle, a 40- caliber handgun and 90 rounds of ammunition at the Trump Hotel, not far from the Capitol and the White House. Police saidBryan Moles, 43, of Edinboro, Pennsylvania, told a tipster that he wanted to get close to Trump and wanted to be like Timothy McVeigh. Court document say Moles, who had worked as a physician, was armed with an assault rifle and a handgun and was in the nations capitol to see the president. He told an acquaintance, court documents say, that he had enough ammunition to make his car resemble Timothy McVeigh on a camping trip. Before traveling to Washington, D.C., police learned Moles emptied his bank account, leaving behind a balance of $4.19 perhaps symbolic of the 4-19 date of McVeighs act of terrorism in 1995. Homicidal Portland stabber Jeremy Christian praised McVeigh on the anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing in an April Facebook post, writing, May all the Gods Bless Timothy McVeigh — a TRUE PATRIOT!!! Then on May 26,Jeremy Christian, who held extremist views, went on a rampagein Portland, Oregon, slashing the throats and killing two men who attemptedto come to the aid of two women Christian was harassing. Just a month earlier,on the anniversaryof McVeigh’s deadly act of terrorism, Christian praised theOklahoma City bomber in a Facebook post. May all the Gods Bless Timothy McVeigh — a TRUE PATRIOT!!! Christian wrote. More recently, neo-NaziAndrew Weev Auernheimer, who writes for the racist web site Daily Stormer, said he was serious in proposing a crowd-funding account to raise money to build a permanent monument in a memorial grove honoring McVeigh. Think of it, a gigantic bronze statue of Timothy McVeigh poised triumphantly atop a Ryder truck, arms raised as if to form an Algiz rune from his body, with a plaque that states the honest truth, Auernheimer wrote.Nothing would be a greater insult to these pizza-party guarding federal swine than a permanent monument honoring [McVeighs] journey to Valhalla or Flkvangr atop the piles of their corpses. I am not joking, Auernheimer wrote. This should be done. Imagine how angry it would make people. Last year, during the illegal occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon by antigovernment figurehead Ammon Bundy and his militia followers,Norm Olson, another long-time militia activist and leader, made ominous public comments about McVeigh. The battle for the rights of the people rages on and it should be assumed that lone wolf patriots may be planning another response to the central government’s abuses, Olson wrote. He claimed federal agents murdered Bundy associate LaVoy Finicum, inciting Patriots, during the 2016 refuge occupation. Once the fuse is lit, it will be hard to extinguish, Olson said. There’s a place that we all should think about: Oklahoma City. Two days later, Olson, who has been active in militia groups in Michigan and Alaska, said he was ready to tell members of Congress that Timothy McVeigh DIED FOR YOUR SINS!!!!!!!!! It’sworth remembering that Olson had a unique glimpse of McVeigh. He and Oklahoma bombing co-conspirator, Terry Nichols, attended a meeting of the Michigan Militia, which Olson founded in 1994, a year before the Oklahoma City bombing. Anger and frustration create a personal vendetta, Olson wrote last year, claiming that the U.S. governments case against Tim McVeigh was based on hismotive. His motive was VENDETTA, retaliation, retribution, eye-for-eye ..f. call it what you want, but there will be blood … maybe not right away, but soon, Olsons said in his ominous public warning. Apparently referring to McVeigh, Olson said there are other Patriots out there who want to be remembered and are coming to the realization that THERE IS NO JUSTICE … IT IS JUST US! Of course, McVeigh may never be as popular as other extremist and far-right heroes and memes – – the swastika, the burning cross, Adolf Hitler, Pepe the Frog, George Lincoln Rockwell, the numbers 88 and 14 words, the KKK blood-drop cross, William Pierce. But the question remains, why would anyone romanticize a modern-day, extremist serial killer and terrorist? Tom Pyszczynski, a professor of psychology at University of Colorado who has written about the psychological makeup of extremists, said he believes only a relatively small number of people are enthralled with McVeigh. The psychological, social, economic and political forces that lead some Americans to idolize McVeigh are the same as those that lead disenfranchised or disillusioned young people in other parts of the world to idolize Osama bin Laden or ISIS, Pyszczynski told Hatewatch. They see them [McVeigh, et al] as heroes who stand up for people like them, said Pyszczynski, who co-developed and tested a terror management theory, dealing with the role of death in life and the role that meaning and self-esteem play in managing the fear of death. Of course, the specifics of the issues and lives of the people who follow ISIS and those who idolize McVeigh are different, but beneath the surface it usually boils down to a feeling that one’s people are disrespected and mistreated, that one’s way of life is under siege from powerful forces, and that the world as they know it has gotten out of control, the university psychologist said. All people crave meaning in life and a sense of personal or group heroism to protect them from their deepest fears, he said, explaining that ultimately boils down to the facts of life, involving death and vulnerability. But some people, he said, aren’t able to find this in their worlds. So they look elsewhere, to radical fringe groups, like ISIS for some, or white nationalist groups for others. These groups typically have heroes who are idolized as standing up to powerful forces and if they die in that fight, they are considered martyrs, Pyszczynski said. Clark McCauley, a research professor of psychology at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, offered similar brief views about those individuals enchanted with McVeigh. McVeigh is … a symbol of resistance and a hero for those who hate and fear the U.S. Government, McCauley told Hatewatch. This includes a wide range of people, some who see themselves as neo-Nazis and some who do not. McVeighs bombing plan generally followed a fictional account of a race war depicted in the Turner Diaries, a novel written by William Pierce, a one-time college professor who went on to lead the National Alliance, a neo-Nazi hate group. McCauley said he doesnt personally believe McVeigh was a neo-Nazi, so he can therefore be a hero for many different anti-government groups. Pyszczynski, who teaches at the Colorado Springs university, said people who feel their way of life is under siege identify with heroes like McVeigh. So radical ideologies, whether they be Islamist or white nationalist, are appealing to people who struggle to find meaning and a sense of personal value in their own lives and view another group as the repository of evil against which they must fight to reclaim that meaning and value, he said.

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June 27, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

Six Nazi spies were executed in D.C. White supremacists gave them … – Washington Post

A team of power company workers was trudging through a seldom-visited thicket in Southwest Washington when they spotted something odd in a ditch. Protruding from the grass was a rectangular slab of granite. They looked closer, and an inscription on the surface came into focus. What they saw astonished them. It was a memorial. In honor of Nazi spies. On U.S. government property. In memory of agents of the German Abwehr, the engraving began, executed August 8, 1942. Below that were six names, and below those was another cryptic line: Donated by the N.S.W.P.P. News of the unsettling discovery soon reached Jim Rosenstock, who worked in resource management for the National Park Service and also happened to be a local history buff. He was curious, but also skeptical. How could someone have planted such an item there? And why? And above all who? Rosenstock needed to see it for himself, so he, too, made the hike into Blue Plains, a woody area known best for a wastewater treatment plant and an abundance of mosquitoes. And thats when he saw the stone. I kind of started doing a little bit of my own research, Rosenstock recalled of that day in 2006 when he began to help unravel an only-in-Washington mystery, complete with World War II espionage, nationwide panic, a mass electrocution, J. Edgar Hoover chicanery, white supremacists, classic federal bureaucracy and a U.S. Supreme Court case that played a significant role in Americas modern war on terror. *** For decades, very few people in Washington, or elsewhere, knew of the stones existence. It wasnt a secret so much as something that just never got out remarkable in a town famous for its leaks. Only when a former Park Police detective mentioned it in passing to a Washington Post reporter, then provided photographic evidence, did anyone ask the Park Service about it. [Hitlers mother was the only person he genuinely loved. Cancer killed her decades before he became a monster.] A spokeswoman referred the Post to the now-retired Rosenstock, because perhaps no one has thought more about the 31-by-26-by-8-inch object than he has. At the start of World War II, Rosenstock discovered when he began his research, Adolf Hitler had been determined to show the world just how susceptible America was to a Nazi attack, so he ordered his military to devise a plan. The high command, according to a 2002 Post story, recruited eight Germans for the mission. In teams of four, the men were loaded onto a pair of U-boats, one destined for Jacksonville, Fla., and the other for a beach near the tip of Long Island. On June 13, 1942, the New York group reached shore and was almost immediately discovered by an unarmed Coast Guards member on foot patrol. The men escaped, but by morning, the Coast Guard had unearthed the Germans buried supplies: fuses, pre-made bombs and four crates of TNT. That wouldnt have mattered to their leader, George John Dasch, who hadnt intended to wreak devastation on Hitlers behalf anyway. When the group reached New York City, he and a comrade decided to turn the others in, so Dasch phoned the FBI. Four days later, he took the $82,000 hed been given for the operation more than $1 million in todays money and boarded a train for Washington. There, he met with FBI agents, whom he expected to welcome him as a hero. They didnt. J. Edgar Hoover, the infamous head of the bureau, recognized an opportunity. In late June, with all eight men caught, Hoover announced their capture in New York and claimed credit for his agency. He made no mention of Dasch. The country went wild, Francis Biddle, then attorney general, later wrote in a memoir. Hundreds of German aliens were rounded up and others, suspected of spying, were arrested. The Justice Department banned German and Italian barbers, servers and busboys from Washingtons hotels and restaurants because three of the would-be saboteurs had worked as waiters in America. Ignoring due process, President Franklin Roosevelt ordered that the men be tried in secret before a military commission a tactic, then backed by the U.S. Supreme Court, that President George W. Bush would replicate 59 years later in his directive that Guantanamo Bay detainees be judged in a similar fashion. In mid-summer 1942, seven U.S. Army generals found all eight men guilty but left their punishment to the president. He sentenced six to death and two, including Dasch, to lengthy prison terms (both were deported after the war). The electrocutions began at 12:01 p.m. on Aug. 8. By 1:04, all six were dead. Three days later, they were secretly buried amid a seldom-visited thicket of Southwest Washington known as Blue Plains. *** Rosenstock quickly learned the backstory of the six Nazi spies listed on the stone, but another question remained: Who had placed it there? The line at the bottom referencing the N.S.W.P.P. offered a clue. Until the mid-1960s, the National Socialist White Peoples Party had gone by a more familiar name: the American Nazi Party. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the groups founder, George Lincoln Rockwell, had given it the new title shortly before his assassination in 1967. By the 1970s, though, the group had begun to split apart and had lost much of its relevance, leading Rosenstock to believe the Nazi memorial dates back to that time. The party didnt entirely cease to exist until 1983, the law center said, so the stone may had been carved more recently though that still means it likely sat on Park Service land for more than two decades before the power companys discovery. [Hitler refused to use sarin gas during World War II. The mystery is why.] For Rosenstock and his colleagues, the memorial presented a conundrum. It was deplorable, and certainly not something that belonged on public property, but none of their handbooks suggested how to deal with a 200-plus pound monument to Nazis installed on public land by white supremacists. Plus, the Park Service couldnt do anything until they were sure it hadnt been placed atop someones bones. What if, they wondered, the Nazis were buried beneath it? The Park Service scoured World War II-era records for details on their bodies, but researchers could find nothing that provided a definitive answer. Old maps showed conflicting spots, including one beneath a building. The location is a little bit confusing, he said, and I think deliberately so. Rosenstock suspected that whoever disposed of the spies bodies didnt want them found. What he did learn, though, is that no one was buried beneath the stone because a creek had run through that area in the 1940s. Still, the Park Service hadnt decided what should be done. It was an illegal monument, Rosenstock said. And we certainly did not want to be hosting a site for midnight rituals on Hitlers birthday. That was a legitimate concern. Rosenstock once found deer bones arranged atop the memorial. Others had found candles around it and noticed that it was regularly cleaned. At least one fellow in the Park Service suggested breaking it up with sledge hammers and throwing it in the river, he recalled. Its not the argument that historic preservationists make. The memorial remained intact. In 2010, under the direction of a museum curator, a forklift exhumed the granite block and lowered it into a truck. The stone, tagged OXCO-475, now spends its days beneath a protective blanket on a shelf at a storage facility in suburban Maryland. Park Service staff asked that The Post be no more specific than that because, though they didnt mind its long-unknown story being told, theyd prefer that its exact location remain a secret. Read more Retropolis: The secret deal the Associated Press made with the Nazis during WWII The disturbing history of cat abuse: public hangings, pipe beatings and The Great Cat Massacre Discovered: Never-before seen photos of Charles Lindberghs first Spirit of St. Louis flight Great God, he is alive!The first man executed by electric chair died slower than Thomas Edison expected. Blood in the water: Four dead, a coast terrified and the birth of modern shark mania

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June 27, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed


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