Archive for the ‘George Lincoln Rockwell’ Category

Give Trump the silent treatment – The Hill (blog)

Years ago, I was a lawyer for the American Jewish Congress, Commission on Law and Social Action in New York City.

Im reminded now about one case that we handled that involved the Nazi spokesman George Lincoln Rockwell who sought the right to speak at a public park.

Among others, Jewish groups protested. Why allow vile speech in public places, they claimed?

I argued that we only brought attention to his stupid rants by making him a victim who would claim he was denied his First Amendment rights.

The same thing is going on now in Berkeley, California where two outrageous speakers were rebuffed by liberals who dont want them to have a voice, so obnoxious to protesters.

In all these instances, my view is the ACLU view, and a pragmatic one, at that. Only by protesting their rights to speak do we give these provocateurs the larger audience they never would have had if they were simply ignored.

These examples bring me to the point that national media is being fooled by President Trump.

During the debates, while Trump insulted the media, they sat there like props, and gave his insults the very audience he desired. Now, Trumps outrageous tweets are covered endlessly by media on both sides of the political spectrum.

The media networks included havent learned their lesson from the election where Trump news sucked the air out of coverage of his competitors, Democratic and Republican. Trump insults the Pope, John McCainJohn McCainTop commander: Don’t bet on China reining in North Korea Trudeau, Trump speak for second night about US-Canada trade McCain: China has done nothing on North Korea MORE, his opponents, and the media itself which covers Trumps outrages ad nauseum, to the exclusion of reasonable other points of view.

The same phenomenon continues to the present. Trump tweets and the media genuflects. Trump cares nothing about press criticism so long as he gets the coverage. He boasted to Associated Press that his ratings for press coverage is the highest since 9/11! Its a tremendous advantage, he instructed the media he publicly deplores.

Bernie SandersBernie SandersNebraska Dem chair slams Perez for dismissing anti-abortion Dems Sanders: Trump couldn’t be ‘more wrong’ on climate Sanders on skipping WH Korea briefing: ‘I did not want to be part of a photo op’ MORE is now the most popular politician in America, according to, ironically, to a Fox News poll.

But do you see the media covering his every move? His constructive politicking gets sparse coverage while Trump’s outrages are exhaustively covered, in protest and in admiration, but to the exclusion of his political opponents in his party and the opposition. One expects fawning coverage from his admirers at FOX; but Rachel, Wolf, Lawrence, et. al., you are keeping him in the news and that is his power.

Look the other way when he rants to his followers, and like Rockwell, and Coulter and others who media popularized in the past, and they will be left only with their right to speak to their relatively few followers, and are denied the larger audience.

Ronald Goldfarb is a Washington, DC attorney, literary agent and author of 13 books.

The views expressed by contributors are their own and are not the views of The Hill.

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Give Trump the silent treatment – The Hill (blog)

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April 27, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

Happy George Lincoln Rockwell Day Daily Stormer

Zeiger Daily Stormer March 9, 2017

Commander Rockwell: the original Nazi troll.

Today, the 9th of March, is the 99th birthday of commander George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party. This is a figure that everyone on the right should be familiar with, and draw inspiration from.

While theres much to be learned from the lives of Hitler or Mussolini, they lived in a very different world than what we have today; their societies werent completely Jewed in the way America is. They still had strong men and national pride.

In that sense, Rockwells life speaks to modern people much more directly than former great men who fought for Western civilization. He faced many of the same issues we face today, and fought the same forces that oppose us as well.

For this occasion, Ive made a modern, readable version of his classic autobiography This Time, the World available to everyone.

Download here. Cover by Alexander Slavros.

This is a book I would actually recommend over Mein Kampf to anyone wanting to learn about the struggle. Rockwell did some incredible things in his day, including starting popular magazines, publishing comic books, meeting with high level government officials and military leaders, and even opening communications with black nationalists who desired to separate from White America.

The American Nazi Party was the origin point for a lot of the movements and organizations that upheld the torch of radical nationalism in America. William Pierce of the National Alliance, Joseph Tomassi of the NSLF and James Mason of Universal Order were all members of Rockwells group at some point or other.

His studies in marketing gave him a keen understanding of human psychology and the use of propaganda to affect the masses. He used this understanding to great effect, taking the American media by storm in much the same way that Nazi trolls are doing today.

Its important to remember our roots and learn from our past heroes.

So lets declare this George Lincoln Rockwell day!

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Happy George Lincoln Rockwell Day Daily Stormer

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April 21, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

When Malcolm X Met the Nazis – Vice

Members of the American Nazi Party listened to Malcolm X speak at a Nation of Islam rally in Washington, DC, on June 25, 1961. Contact sheet Eve Arnold/Magnum Photos

On Sunday, June 25, 1961, ten members of the American Nazi Party arrived at a Nation of Islam rally in Washington, DC. The party’s founder, George Lincoln Rockwell, led them inside the Uline Arena, a quarter-million-square-foot stadium that would later host the Beatles’ first US concert. Ramrod-straight, square-jawed, and with a merciless, piercing gaze, Rockwell looked like a Hollywood villain straight out of central casting. (“How much taller he is than Hitler,” Esquire noted in an otherwise withering essay. “And how much better-looking.”) The Uline had nearly sold out. The Nazis were outnumbered 800 to one.

The fascists hadn’t come to make a bloody last stand. Instead, guards from the Fruit of Islam, the NOI’s paramilitary branch, frisked the men and ushered them to front-row-center seats. Their crisp brownshirt costumes and swastika armbands stood out against the suits and ties surrounding them. Despite the 90-degree heat, Rockwell and his men waited hours for the event’s main attraction. There is no record of anyone cracking a smile at the situation’s absurdity.

The night’s keynote speaker, NOI leader Elijah Muhammad, canceled his appearance because of illness. According to historian William Schmaltz, Malcolm X delivered a speech, followed by an appeal for donations that singled out the few Caucasians in the audience. Rockwell contributed $20. When Life photographer Eve Arnold raised her camera to capture the Nazis, Rockwellpresumably alerted to her Jewish ancestry by the Muslimsallegedly rasped, “I’ll make a bar of soap out of you.” (She replied, “As long as it isn’t a lampshade.”)

Overt anti-Semitism, it turned out, was something the two groups could bond over. While Rockwell pushed his hatred of Jews to frothy extremes, Muhammad backed a range of racist theories, including the hoax that the Jews had financed the slave trade. (Malcolm X was cagier about his anti-Semitism, often deferring to Muhammad’s conspiracy theories rather than offering his own.) To publicly rage against Jews in the summer of 1961 may have offended the general public even more than it would today. Six thousand miles away, the Adolf Eichmann trial, in Israel, had captivated the world and dramatically increased coverage of Holocaust atrocities.

Division of the races was another mutual bugbear. Malcolm X’s speech that night was titled “Separation or Death.” Inside the arena, Rockwell told reporters, “I am fully in concert with their program, and I have the highest respect for Elijah Muhammad.” The question of where to send America’s blacksthe NOI wanted a chunk of the US, while the ANP wanted a full deportation to Africawas, he said, his only quarrel with the Muslims.

This wasn’t quite true. The Nazis and NOI also disagreed over whether black people were human beings. Over the course of his three-year career as an open Nazi, Rockwell had repeatedly referred to African Americans as “ring-in-the-nose niggers,” “basically animalistic,” and “no better than chimpanzees.” With the alliance, he’d suddenly slapped a massive asterisk onto his own white supremacy.

Remarkably, the NOI had a history of such partnerships. Six months earlier, Muhammad had sent Malcolm X to a top-secret meeting with the Atlanta Ku Klux Klan. In a throwback to Marcus Garvey’s 1922 Klan summit, the two groups brokered a bizarre truce: local mosque safety in return for NOI support on racial separation.

But that meeting had served a purpose, no matter how tenuous. The alliance with the Nazis held no obvious benefit for the Muslims. The differences between Malcolm X and Rockwell were existential. Where the former had risen from a life of crime to national prominence, the latter had exerted himselfand destroyed his family and financesto become a national pariah, sinking from a decorated Navy officer to a delusional Nazi commander in just six years.

Overt anti-Semitism, it turned out, was something the two groups could bond over.

The Washington summit would have provided a bitter contrast to Rockwell’s normal, meager gatherings. An audience of 8,000 was something he could have only dreamed of. Even the building’s imposing vaulted ceiling hinted at the fascist architecture he saw as his inalienable destiny (throughout his career, he made repeated references to controlling the United States by 1972). For the Nazi leader, the alliance served a fantasy rooted in grandiose absurdism. “Can you imagine a rally of the American Nazis in Union Square,” Rockwell later wrote his followers, “protected from Jewish hecklers by a solid phalanx of Elijah Muhammad’s stalwart black stormtroopers?”

And where Malcolm X was famously complex, Rockwell self-identified as a cartoon character. With the media controlled by Jews, he’d reasoned, mainstream political protest from the extreme right was doomed to failure through obscurity.

“I tried and nobody paid attention to me,” he later told an interviewer of his pre-Nazi political activities. “But no one can ignore Nazis marching in the streets.”

Following this logic, the ANP produced a variety of merchandise catering to the juvenile bigot. One item, The Diary of Anne Fink (16 pages of Holocaust atrocity photos with jokey captions), was advertised in The Rockwell Report as “sick humor,” an odd allusion to Mad magazine, Lenny Bruce, and a world of Jewish, “degenerate” comedy that the Nazis should, logically, have railed against.

One result of this oafish marketing was that Rockwell recruited exceptionally inept personnel, attracting hordes of Nazis he admitted were “unbelievably stupid.” And yet he persisted in shooting for the lowest common denominator’s lowest common denominator. The ANP mocked the anti-segregation Freedom Riders with a VW van dubbed the “Hate Bus.” Some ANP picketers wore Groucho Marx glasses and rubber noses in their protests. Why would the famously disciplined NOI ally itself with such caricatures?

AMERICAN NAZI PARTY

The ANP was founded in 1959 by George Lincoln Rockwell in Arlington, Vriginia. Rockwell was assasinated eight years later by a former ANP member.

A possible answer came eight months later. On February 25, 1962, the ANP was invited to a second rally, this time the NOI’s Saviours’ Day convention in Chicago. Rockwell addressed the crowd after Muhammad. Facing an estimated 12,000 African Americans, the Nazi leader pulled no punches.

“You know that we call you ‘niggers.’ But wouldn’t you rather be confronted by honest white men who tell you to your face what the others all say behind your back?”

As a public speaker, Rockwell was entertaining without being particularly authoritative (in cadence, he mimicked comedian Red Skelton). His was not the voice of a fhrer, and the Chicago International Amphitheater wasn’t his Nuremberg Rally. Surely the irony of the moment wouldn’t have escaped him; this was the largest crowd he’d ever addressed (and would ever address again).

“I am not afraid to stand here and tell you I hate race-mixing and will fight it to the death,” Rockwell continued. “But at the same time, I will do everything in my power to help the Honorable Elijah Muhammad carry out his inspired plan for land of your own in Africa. Elijah Muhammad is right. Separation or death!” The audience teetered between polite applause and boos. Two months later, Muhammad, writing in the NOI newspaper, admonished his flock for their frosty reception: “If they are speaking the truth for us, what do we care? We’ll stand on our heads and applaud!”

This mutual nod to “honesty” and “truth” gives us a peek at the possible foundation of the alliance. Rockwell and Muhammad saw each other as authentic, as people willing to speak the truththeir versions of itno matter the cost. Their marketing to their constituencies depended on this image, and each man drew legitimacy from the appearance of being a straight shooter. Rockwell’s existence was useful to the NOI as a recruiting tool, his physical presence a testament to Muhammad’s own authenticity.

Malcolm X wasn’t part of this legitimacy trap, and he made it known that Rockwell’s high esteem wasn’t reciprocated. When the Nazi was applauded in 1961 for donating $20, Malcolm X laughed into the microphone and said, “You got the biggest hand you ever got, didn’t you, Mr. Rockwell?”

As the civil rights struggles of the 50s gave way to the triumphs of the early 60s, both men found themselves operating in the vast shadow of Martin Luther King Jr. The Nazis, challenged by the juggernaut of legislative triumphs following King’s actions, dug in. Malcolm X, faced with a growing gap between his NOI rhetoric and the successes of nonviolent action, softened his tone.

Rockwell and Muhammad saw each other as authentic, as people willing to speak the truththeir versions of itno matter the cost.

After leaving the NOI in 1964, Malcolm X used the movement’s alliance with the Klan as a charge against Muhammad. The following year, he sent a telegram to George Lincoln Rockwell:

This is to warn you that I am no longer held in check from fighting white supremacists by Elijah Muhammad’s separatist Black Muslim movement, and that if your present racist agitation against our people there in Alabama causes physical harm to Reverend King or any other black Americans who are only attempting to enjoy their rights as free human beings, that you and your Ku Klux Klan friends will be met with maximum physical retaliation…

Within three years, both men were dead, allegedly assassinated by former allies.

But the ghost of the alliance lives on today. The Nation of Islam, under the auspices of Louis Farrakhan, maintains an open partnership with white supremacist Tom Metzger. And in the last decade, the American Nazi Party website established a “Non-Aryan Sympathizer Page,” offering “a means for non-whites to aid in our struggle” with mail-in contributions.

Malcolm X’s posthumous alliance was stranger still: mainstream acceptance by the white-supremacist society he fought against in life. The US government eventually awarded him a postage stamp.

Follow Sam on Twitter.

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When Malcolm X Met the Nazis – Vice

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April 18, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

In an Angry and Fearful Nation, an Outbreak of Anti-Semitism – PQ Monthly

By A.C. Thompson and Ken Schwencke, ProPublica

In late November, Marna Street, a violist with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, was walking to her car after a rehearsal. Street was shocked by what she discovered: Someone had painted a swastika, about 14 inches across, on the trunk of her car.

The vandals, Street said, had probably targeted her vehicle, which was parked in a garage not far from the University of Cincinnati, because shed placed a magnet on it indicating that she is Jewish. Street eventually managed to scrub off the graffiti. She put the magnet in the glovebox of her car.

I had that feeling in the pit of my stomach, like somebody just punched me, recalled Street, 68, speaking publicly for the first time. It was, she said, a cross between fear and just plain hurt.

Working with a coalition of organizations, ProPublica late last year launched Documenting Hate, an attempt to gather evidence of hate crimes and episodes of bigotry from a divided America. The account from Cincinnati is one of the anti-Semitic incidents the project has chronicled. But there are scores more.

Indeed, Documenting Hate recorded more than 330 reports of anti-Semitic incidents during a three-month span from early November to early February. The accounts our list is by no means comprehensive come via personal submissions, police documents and news articles. The majority, though not all, have been authenticated through either news reports, interviews or other evidence, like photos.

The incidents have taken place in big cities and small towns, along the countrys liberal coasts and in deep red states. Some of the episodes swastikas and threatening messages spray-painted at schools and colleges around the nation have been worrisome, though relatively minor. Others have been more serious, such as the 65 bomb threats targeting Jewish organizations across the country during the period we examined (there have been nearly 70 more since then). In many cases, the culprits singled out specific individuals for abuse, defacing their homes and autos with swastikas and menacing comments.

In the first week of March President Trump, after weeks of criticism for being slow to condemn the incidents, called them horrible and painful and a very sad reminder of the work that still must be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil.

The remarks, however, came after a number of confounding comments about the issue. During a Feb. 16 news conference, Trump castigated Jake Turx, a reporter for Ami, a Jewish magazine, for asking what the government was doing to address the increase in anti-Semitic events. Trump accused Turx of lying about the question he wanted to ask, and instructed him to sit down. And without citing any evidence, Trump has wondered whether some of the recent anti-Semitic incidents were carried out by liberals, or Jews themselves, intent on discrediting him.

Theres a push on the left to conflate anti-Semitism with Trump, while at the same time criticizing him for having Jared Kushner, who wears his Jewishness as proudly as anyone, as his most trusted confidant and in the highest echelons of the White House staff, said Joe Borelli, a Trump supporter who represents Staten Island on the New York city council, according to Breitbart News. It is mind-boggling.

The White House would not comment for the record when asked whether President Trump had in any way contributed to the threats and violence.

In New York City, the police department said anti-Semitic hate crimes nearly doubled in the first two months of 2017 as compared to the same period last year.

On a national level, data on hate crimes and bias incidents is spotty at best. The FBI admits the information it collects is incomplete many police departments dont participate in the hate crimes tracking program and the bureau has yet to release statistics on 2016 and 2017. As a result, determining with authority whether anti-Semitic events are rising or declining is difficult.

There is little question, however, that the incidents have generated genuine concern. In a rare show of unity, all 100 U.S. senators this week issued a public letter urging the Department of Justice, FBI and Department of Homeland Security to protect Jewish institutions and prosecute those responsible for terrorizing them. In New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently announced a $25 million grant to better protect daycare and community centers from threats.

The available data does support the idea of an uptick. After years of decline, anti-Semitic crimes began trending upward in 2015, according to FBI data. Experts say that increase seems to have accelerated in recent months, as Trumps unique brand of nativist populism has helped to pull more extreme right-wing groups, some of them avowedly racist, closer to the political mainstream. On Twitter, openly anti-Semitic figures have built vast networks of supporters and cultivated large audiences, while the Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi website geared towards millennials, has seen its traffic grow to roughly a half a million unique visitors per month. In New York City, the police department said anti-Semitic hate crimes nearly doubled in the first two months of 2017 as compared to the same period last year.

One of the constituencies Trump mobilized was the KKK-style anti-Semitic extreme right, said Lawrence Rosenthal, a scholar of fascist history and director of the Center for Right-Wing Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. These groups had been absolutely on the fringe of American politics for at least my lifetime and I am getting old.

Oren Segal, who tracks anti-Semitic incidents in his role as director of the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism, concurs. The anti-Semites think they have a champion in the highest office, said Segal, who believes that divisive rhetoric aired during last falls presidential campaign has emboldened racists [and anti-Semites] and inspired them to strike out at their perceived enemies in the Jewish community.

We have seen a significant uptick in the reports weve received, certainly starting around the election in November and continuing through the first two months of 2017, Segal told ProPublica.

Not everyone who has encountered Nazi imagery is Jewish many LGBTQ people, African Americans and others have also been targeted.

Amid the larger national debate about any responsibility Trump may bear for racist and anti-Semitic behavior, the accounts emerging from the Documenting Hate database offer a chance to appreciate the very personal experiences of violation and fear.

We identified:

ProPublicas review, which did not involve incidents occurring online, where anti-Semitic trolling and abuse have become widespread, uncovered many episodes which had never before been reported by the media or investigated by police.

Our tally is almost surely an undercount. It consists of incidents covered in media reports, as well as accounts gathered by the Southern Poverty Law Center and a coalition of news organizations including ProPublica, Univision News, Buzzfeed News and The New York Times Opinion section.

The reports we examined generally fall into two categories. Most appear to have been committed by angry individuals who arent affiliated with any organized group. They are often teens or adolescents who defame Jews and other minority groups through graffiti or verbal taunting. In some cases, the Nazi symbol was specifically aimed at non-Jewish minorities.

A smaller number were orchestrated by extremist political groups, such as the New Order, an outgrowth of the long-dormant American Nazi Party founded by George Lincoln Rockwell, and the Atomwaffen Division, a new, youthful fascist group. A handful of cases involved a saboteur who remotely hijacked computer printers at Stanford and other colleges, programming them to spit out page after page of neo-Nazi propaganda.

Some experts tracking this wave of incidents said it was crucial to situate them within a wider historical context.

Generally, weve seen a remarkable decline in anti-Semitism over the past 40 years, noted Jonathan Sarna, a history professor at Brandeis University and one of the foremost chroniclers of Jewish-American life. In the 1950s, we didnt just have bomb threats we had bombings. Synagogues in the south were bombed.

Sarna added, Its important to be vigilant and concerned. But its also important not to overreact.

Across the nation, Jews were directly harassed with hateful imagery and messages in dozens of instances we examined.

During Hanukkah last year, vandals desecrated a large home-made menorah that stood in the front yard of a home in Chandler, Arizona, twisting the sacred symbol into a swastika. Days after the presidential election, New York State Sen. Brad Hoylman found a swastika carved into the elevator door in his Manhattan apartment building and received a flyer in the mail saying that Jews would be punished for failing to convert to Christianity.

Not everyone who has encountered Nazi imagery is Jewish many LGBTQ people, African Americans and others have also been targeted.

On college campuses, much of the new anti-Semitism has been coming from organized groups of extremists out to intimidate or recruit new members.

In Cincinnati, Street, who is the principal violist emeritus with the symphony and a music teacher, said the graffiti on her car left her feeling very vulnerable. Her father and grandmother fled Nazi Germany for the safety of the U.S. in the 1940s.

Several weeks after Streets car was defaced, schools in her city began getting hit with anti-Semitic graffiti.

First, someone painted a large white swastika on a sign at Cincinnatis Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, the largest seminary for Reform Judaism in North America.

When the incident happened in early January, it was another psychic blow for Street. She worried about her friends who work at the college, and tried to understand the acts of ugliness taking place in her city. The crimes, she said, are not huge, but compounded they are very frightening.

Across the nation, similar graffiti appeared on the campuses of more than 35 other colleges during the three months examined by ProPublica.

Late on the night of Jan. 21, a mask-wearing vandal equipped with a spray can defaced Withrow University High School, a public school on Cincinnatis east side, painting Trump and swastikas all over the campus. The vandal, who tagged signs, sidewalks and buildings, also painted anti-gay and anti-black slurs.

Dozens of other schools were also tagged with anti-Semitic graffiti during the same time period.

At a high school in Newton, Massachusetts, somebody wrote Burn the Jews, white power, and Trump!!! on a bathroom stall. At Wilbur Cross High School in New Haven, Connecticut, red swastikas were spray-painted all over the athletic complex. In Murfreesboro, Tennessee, two teenage girls were expelled from Blackman High School for drawing a swastika in a bathroom stall.

Some people will say that the swastika vandalism is just being done by a bunch of kids and dismiss it as irrelevant. I think its the opposite. The fact that young kids are doing this is potentially the scariest part of it, said Segal of the Anti-Defamation League.

On college campuses, much of the new anti-Semitism has been coming from organized groups of extremists out to intimidate or recruit new members.

At the University of Washington, in Seattle, a pro-Trump student group calling itself the UW Wall Building Association flirted with Nazism in a public Facebook post suggesting that undocumented immigrants should be sent to concentration camps.

Neo-Nazis also crisscrossed the university campus at night, pasting up stark black-and-white posters threatening violence and uploading videos of their exploits to YouTube. One poster, featuring the deaths head, or Totenkopf insignia, used by the SS during World War II, promised to drive out the sodomites and degenerates of Seattle. Another poster encouraged students to join your local Nazis and visit the website IronMarch.com, a fascist web hang-out that encourages people to exterminate Jews and start a race war.

People are just shocked. We cant believe this is happening, said a graduate student who requested anonymity for fear of being harassed.

When the student saw the posters, she said she felt physically ill. I called my mom and was sobbing. I was so upset. My ancestors were slaughtered by the Nazis, said the student, who is Jewish.

The neo-fascist organization did not reply to a request for an interview about its activities.

White nationalist groups including Identity Evropa, led by a California man convicted of attacking an Arab cab driver at gunpoint, and True Cascadia, which aims to promote white ethnic consciousness in the Pacific Northwest, are also propagandizing at the school.

Segal has tracked 112 instances of white supremacist groups posting flyers on college campuses since September 2016.

Over the past several months, synagogues and other Jewish institutions have come under sustained harassment.

In December, somebody repeatedly hurled rocks through the windows of Temple Menorah-Keneseth Chai, a historic synagogue in Philadelphia. On the opposite side of the country, in Las Vegas, a young man in jeans and a pull-over sweatshirt scratched a swastika into a black marble column during Shabbat services at Chabad of Southern Nevada.

In other states, Christian churches ministering to LGBTQ people or to Latinxs have also been tagged with swastikas.

But it is the array of bomb threats directed at Jewish community centers that has captured the most media attention and generated the most concern.* Federal authorities on March 3 charged Juan Thompson, an erratic former journalist who once wrote for the Intercept website, with making threats to a small number of JCCs as well as other Jewish institutions.

But the figures responsible for the scores of threats to other JCCs remain at large. On March 7, another 17 locations of Jewish institutions in the U.S. received bomb threats.

Some faith leaders are urging President Trump to issue a stronger public condemnation of anti-Semitism before the problem worsens. We need him to say very forcefully, This is not acceptable and to follow up with action, said Rabbi Steven Fox, chief executive of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the nations most prominent rabbinical body.

Fox said Jewish community leaders have requested a meeting with the White House to discuss the surge in anti-Semitic activity, but, so far, have not been granted an audience with Trump or his advisors.

Within his denomination, Reform Judaism, there is great concern about this uptick in hate crimes, this increase in hate speech, Fox told ProPublica. In the last two years weve seen this real hatred for anybody thats different hatred for Muslims, hatred for the LGBTQ community. We see it as a deeply troubling trend, not just in America, but in the world.

New America Media is partnering with the Documenting Hate Project, a collaborative of media outlets, civil rights groups and tech companies nationwide working to document the rise of hate crimes and incidents of bias or harassment in the United States since the 2016 election.

*Note from the PQ Editor: This article does not discuss the significance of race in the disparity between media attention dedicated to threats against the Jewish community and media attention given to threats against the Black, Latinx, Muslim, and non-white immigrant and refugee communities. Information on hate crimes against minority communities can be found through the Southern Poverty Law Center at www.splcenter.org.

Originally published by New America Media.

Photo credit: Map by Ken Schwencke and Al Shaw, ProPublica: Bomb Threats to Jewish Community Centers and Organizations.

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In an Angry and Fearful Nation, an Outbreak of Anti-Semitism – PQ Monthly

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March 24, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

An Outbreak of Anti-Semitism in an Angry and Fearful America Since Trump Election – FlaglerLive.com

The tip of a vile, familiar, tower. (Bogdan Migulski)

In late November, Marna Street, a violist with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, was walking to her car after a rehearsal. Street was shocked by what she discovered: Someone had painted a swastika, about 14 inches across, on the trunk of her car.

The vandals, Street said, had probably targeted her vehicle, which was parked in a garage not far from the University of Cincinnati, because shed placed a magnet on it indicating that she is Jewish. Street eventually managed scrub off the graffiti. She put the magnet in the glovebox of her car.

I had that feeling in the pit of my stomach, like somebody just punched me, recalled Street, 68, speaking publicly for the first time. It was, she said, a cross between fear and just plain hurt.

Working with a coalition of organizations, ProPublica late last year launched Documenting Hate, an attempt to gather evidence of hate crimes and episodes of bigotry from a divided America. The account from Cincinnati is one of the anti-Semitic incidents the project has chronicled. But there are scores more.

Indeed, Documenting Hate recorded more than 330 reports of anti-Semitic incidents during a three-month span from early November to early February. The accounts our list is by no means comprehensive come via personal submissions, police documents and news articles. The majority, though not all, have been authenticated through either news reports, interviews or other evidence, like photos.

The incidents have taken place in big cities and small towns, along the countrys liberal coasts and in deep red states. Some of the episodes swastikas and threatening messages spray-painted at schools and colleges around the nation have been worrisome, though relatively minor. Others have been more serious, such as the 65 bomb threats targeting Jewish organizations across the country during the period we examined (there have been nearly 70 more since then). In many cases, the culprits singled out specific individuals for abuse, defacing their homes and autos with swastikas and menacing comments.

President Trump, after weeks of criticism for being slow to condemn the incidents, last week called them horrible and painful and a very sad reminder of the work that still must be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil.

The remarks, however, came after a number of confounding comments about the issue. During a Feb. 16 news conference, Trump castigated Jake Turx, a reporter for Ami, a Jewish magazine, for asking what the government was doing to address the increase in anti-Semitic events. Trump accused Turx of lying about the question he wanted to ask, and instructed him to sit down. And without citing any evidence, Trump has wondered whether some of the recent anti-Semitic incidents were carried out by liberals, or Jews themselves, intent on discrediting him.

Theres a push on the left to conflate anti-Semitism with Trump, while at the same time criticizing him for having Jared Kushner, who wears his Jewishness as proudly as anyone, as his most trusted confidant and in the highest echelons of the White House staff, said Joe Borelli, a Trump supporter who represents Staten Island on the New York city council, according to Breitbart News. It is mind-boggling.

The White House would not comment for the record when asked whether President Trump had in any way contributed to the threats and violence.

On a national level, data on hate crimes and bias incidents is spotty at best. The FBI admits the information it collects is incomplete many police departments dont participate in the hate crimes tracking program and the bureau has yet to release statistics on 2016 and 2017. As a result, determining with authority whether anti-Semitic events are rising or declining is difficult.

There is little question, however, that the incidents have generated genuine concern. In a rare show of unity, all 100 U.S. senators this week issued a public letter urging the Department of Justice, FBI and Department of Homeland Security to protect Jewish institutions and prosecute those responsible for terrorizing them. In New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently announced a $25 million grant to better protect day care and community centers from threats.

The available data does support the idea of an uptick. After years of decline, anti-Semitic crimes began trending upward in 2015, according to FBI data. Experts say that increase seems to have accelerated in recent months, as Trumps unique brand of nativist populism has helped to pull more extreme right-wing groups, some of them avowedly racist, closer to the political mainstream. On Twitter, openly anti-Semitic figures have built vast networks of supporters and cultivated large audiences, while the Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi website geared towards millennials, has seen its traffic grow to roughly a half a million unique visitors per month. In New York City, the police department said anti-Semitic hate crimes nearly doubled in the first two months of 2017 as compared to the same period last year.

One of the constituencies Trump mobilized was the KKK-style anti-Semitic extreme right, said Lawrence Rosenthal, a scholar of fascist history and director of the Center for Right-Wing Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. These groups had been absolutely on the fringe of American politics for at least my lifetime and I am getting old.

Oren Segal, who tracks anti-Semitic incidents in his role as director of the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism, concurs. The anti-Semites think they have a champion in the highest office, said Segal, who believes that divisive rhetoric aired during last falls presidential campaign has emboldened racists and inspired them to strike out at their perceived enemies in the Jewish community.

We have seen a significant uptick in the reports weve received, certainly starting around the election in November and continuing through the first two months of 2017, Segal told ProPublica.

Amid the larger national debate about any responsibility Trump may bear for racist and anti-Semitic behavior, the accounts emerging from the Documenting Hate database offer a chance to appreciate the very personal experiences of violation and fear.

We identified:

ProPublicas review, which did not involve incidents occurring online, where anti-Semitic trolling and abuse have become widespread, uncovered many episodes which had never before been reported by the media or investigated by police.

Our tally is almost surely an undercount. It consists of incidents covered in media reports, as well as accounts gathered by the Southern Poverty Law Center and a coalition of news organizations including ProPublica, Univision News, Buzzfeed News and The New York Times Opinion section.

The reports we examined generally fall into two categories. Most appear to have been committed by angry individuals who arent affiliated with any organized group. They are often teens or adolescents who defame Jews and other minority groups through graffiti or verbal taunting. In some cases, the Nazi symbol was specifically aimed at non-Jews.

A smaller number were orchestrated by extremist political groups, such as the New Order, an outgrowth of the long-dormant American Nazi Party founded by George Lincoln Rockwell, and the Atomwaffen Division, a new, youthful fascist group. A handful of cases involved a saboteur who remotely hijacked computer printers at Stanford and other colleges, programming them to spit out page after page of neo-Nazi propaganda.

Some experts tracking this wave of incidents said it was crucial to situate them within a wider historical context.

Generally, weve seen a remarkable decline in anti-Semitism over the past 40 years, noted Jonathan Sarna, a history professor at Brandeis University and one of the foremost chroniclers of Jewish-American life. In the 1950s, we didnt just have bomb threats we had bombings. Synagogues in the south were bombed.

Sarna added: Its important to be vigilant and concerned. But its also important to not to overreact.

Across the nation, Jews were directly harassed with hateful imagery and messages in dozens of instances we examined.

During Hanukkah last year, vandals desecrated a large home-made menorah that stood in the front yard of a home in Chandler, Arizona, twisting the sacred symbol into a swastika. Days after the presidential election, New York State Sen. Brad Hoylman found a swastika carved into the elevator door in his Manhattan apartment building and received a flyer in the mail saying that Jews would be punished for failing to convert to Christianity.

Not everyone who has encountered Nazi imagery is Jewish gays, lesbians, African Americans and others have also been targeted.

Consider the story of Karen Schaeffer, who found a swastika and the word SCUM drawn on her front door in mid-November.

I was pretty scared, said Schaeffer, who lives in Wyandotte, Michigan, a small blue-collar town outside of Detroit. Im not even Jewish, but I am a pretty loud-mouthed liberal woman in a town that doesnt always appreciate that.

She has an idea about what drew the attention of the anti-Semites: a campaign sign in her window for Bernie Sanders, the Vermont senator who unsuccessfully ran against Hillary Clinton in the Democratic presidential primary.

Police came to Schaeffers house to investigate, but made no arrests.

In Cincinnati, Street, who is the principal violist emeritus with the symphony and a music teacher, said the graffiti on her car left her feeling very vulnerable. Her father and grandmother fled Nazi Germany for the safety of the U.S. in the 1940s.

Several weeks after Streets car was defaced, schools in her city began getting hit with anti-Semitic graffiti.

First, someone painted a large white swastika on a sign at Cincinnatis Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, the largest seminary for Reform Judaism in North America.

When the incident happened in early January, it was another psychic blow for Street. She worried about her friends who work at the college, and tried to understand the acts of ugliness taking place in her city. The crimes, she said, are not huge, but compounded they are very frightening.

Across the nation, similar graffiti appeared on the campuses of at more than 35 other colleges during the three months examined by ProPublica.

Late on the night of Jan. 21, a mask-wearing vandal equipped with a spray can defaced Withrow University High School, a public school on Cincinnatis east side, painting Trump and swastikas all over the campus. The vandal, who tagged signs, sidewalks and buildings, also painted anti-gay and anti-black slurs.

Dozens of other schools were also tagged with anti-Semitic graffiti during the same time period.

At a high school in Newton, Massachusetts, somebody wrote Burn the Jews, white power, and Trump!!! on a bathroom stall. At Wilbur Cross High School in New Haven, Connecticut, red swastikas were spray-painted all over the athletic complex. In Murfreesboro, Tennessee, two teenage girls were expelled from Blackman High School for drawing a swastika in a bathroom stall.

Some people will say that the swastika vandalism is just being done by a bunch of kids and dismiss it as irrelevant. I think its the opposite. The fact that young kids are doing this is potentially the scariest part of it, said Segal of the Anti-Defamation League.

On college campuses, much of the new anti-Semitism has been coming from organized groups of extremists out to intimidate or recruit new members.

At the University of Washington, in Seattle, a pro-Trump student group calling itself the UW Wall Building Association flirted with Nazism in a public Facebook post suggesting that undocumented immigrants should be sent to concentration camps.

Neo-Nazis also crisscrossed the university campus at night, pasting up stark black-and-white posters threatening violence and uploading videos of their exploits to YouTube. One poster, featuring the deaths head, or Totenkopf insignia, used by the SS during World War II, promised to Drive out the sodomites and degenerates of Seattle. Another poster encouraged students to join your local Nazis and visit the website IronMarch.com, a fascist web hang-out that encourages people to exterminate Jews and start a race war now.

People are just shocked. We cant believe this is happening, said a graduate student who requested anonymity for fear of being harassed.

When the student saw the posters, she said she felt physically ill. I called my mom and was sobbing. I was so upset. My ancestors were slaughtered by the Nazis, said the student, who is Jewish.

The neo-fascist organization did not reply to a request for an interview about its activities.

White nationalist groups including Identity Evropa, led by a California man convicted of attacking an Arab cab driver at gunpoint, and True Cascadia, which aims to promote White ethnic consciousness in the Pacific Northwest, are also propagandizing at the school.

Segal has tracked 112 instances of white supremacist groups posting flyers on college campuses since September 2016.

Over the past several months, synagogues and other Jewish institutions have come under sustained harassment.

In December, somebody repeatedly hurled rocks through the windows of Temple Menorah-Keneseth Chai, a historic synagogue in Philadelphia. On the opposite side of the country, in Las Vegas, a young man in jeans and a pull-over sweatshirt scratched a swastika into a black marble column during Shabbat services at Chabad of Southern Nevada.

In other states, Christian churches ministering to gays and lesbians or Latinos have also been tagged with swastikas.

But it is the array of bomb threats directed at Jewish community centers that has captured the most media attention and generated the most concern. Federal authorities on March 3 charged Juan Thompson, an erratic former journalist who once wrote for the Intercept website, with making threats to a small number of JCCs as well as other Jewish institutions.

But the figures responsible for the scores of threats to other JCCs remain at large. On March 7, another 17 locations of Jewish institutions in the U.S. received bomb threats.

Some faith leaders are urging President Trump to issue a stronger public condemnation of anti-Semitism before the problem worsens. We need him to say very forcefully, This is not acceptable and to follow up with action, said Rabbi Steven Fox, chief executive of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the nations most prominent rabbinical body.

Fox said Jewish community leaders have requested a meeting with the White House to discuss the surge in anti-Semitic activity, but, so far, have not been granted an audience with Trump or his advisors.

Within his denomination, Reform Judaism, there is great concern about this uptick in hate crimes, this increase in hate speech, Fox told ProPublica. In the last two years weve seen this real hatred for anybody thats different hatred for Muslims, hatred for the LGBTQ community. We see it as a deeply troubling trend, not just in America, but in the world.

A.C. Thompson and Ken Schwencke, ProPublica

Read more of our coverage in the Documenting Hate project. And see the map of hate for the past three months here.

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An Outbreak of Anti-Semitism in an Angry and Fearful America Since Trump Election – FlaglerLive.com

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‘Swastika war’: When the neo-Nazis fought in court to march in Skokie – Chicago Tribune

Four decades ago, a neo-Nazi group announced plans to march in Skokie, home to thousands of Holocaust survivors. The news set off a rhetorical firestorm that the Chicago Tribune dubbed the “Skokie swastika war.”

Then and now as the Jewish community sits on edge after a spate of bomb threats and vandalism at Jewish Community Centers, schools and cemeteries around the U.S. and Canada the Nazi symbol was embraced by anti-Semites.

A vandal who recently broke a window of the Chicago Loop Synagogue signed his malicious handiwork with swastika stickers. Headstones were marked with swastikas at desecrated Jewish cemeteries in the St. Louis area and Philadelphia.

In 1977, the swastika became the centerpiece of a constitutional question posed by a small group of neo-Nazis who called themselves “National Socialists” a callback to the formal name of Adolf Hitler’s political party. When the group encountered pushback over its plans to march through Skokie that spring while carrying flags bearing the swastika, its leader, Frank Collin, invoked the First Amendment as his defense.

In a January 1978 letter to the Tribune, months into a court battle over the group’s right to march, Collin explained: “By forcing the ‘free speech for National Socialism’ issue in Skokie we are fighting for our basic rights everywhere.”

The leader of Skokie’s Holocaust survivor community had asserted that the sight of a swastika would have a devastating effect on those who saw loved ones marched off to Nazi gas chambers. Sol Goldstein invoked a famed maxim of the late Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. about the limits of free speech.

“I also defend the (First) Amendment,” Goldstein told the Tribune. “But this is like calling, ‘Fire!’ in a crowded theater.”

Those positions were hotly argued and reargued in state and federal courtrooms until the U.S. Supreme Court resolved the issue. There were screaming matches between’s Collin’s handful of followers and protesters carrying signs that read, “Smash the Nazis” and “Never Again Treblinka,” a reference to a World War II extermination camp in Poland. Collin’s opponents founded a counter-organization, the Run The Nazis Out Coalition.

The bitter debate opened crevices in Chicago’s Jewish community. “My interest in the Nazis’ march is quite personal,” George Baum wrote in the Tribune in August 1977, recalling his liberation from the Theresienstadt concentration camp in the Czech Republic. “That day of rejoicing and sadness haunts the graveyard of my memories.”

About 15,000 children had passed through the camp. Baum was one of a hundred who survived. He explained his take on the proposed neo-Nazi march by quoting Alexander Hamilton: “Liberty may be endangered by the abuses of liberty as well as by the abuses of power.”

Jews are traditionally champions of free speech. They contribute generously to the American Civil Liberties Union, an organization that defends First Amendment rights on a nonpartisan basis. But when the Chicago chapter took on Frank Collin as a client, Jewish members were outraged. “I feel strongly that the principle of free speech must be defended,” a woman wrote in a letter to the ACLU that was quoted in a Tribune column. “But in this case, please let a non-Jew do the defending.”

A Jewish lawyer who served as a volunteer attorney for the ACLU resigned, the Tribune column went on. He wanted no part of an “organization that represents individuals whose ultimate goal is the destruction of us all.” Less than halfway through the 14-month controversy, the ACLU’s executive director told the Tribune the organization had lost between 700 and 1,000 members. “And the number is probably higher by now,” David Hamlin said.

But ACLU members weren’t the only ones whose Jewishness and politics were in conflict. “It is a mystery,” Collin’s grandmother said of his rabid anti-Semitism. Her son-in-law, Collin’s father, was Jewish.

Collin’s parents steadfastly refused to be interviewed. But by his grandmother’s account, her daughter, Virginia, and Max Collin lived “quietly in a Chicago suburb,” and Frank was the eldest of their four children. Virginia was Catholic, and Max was a German Jew who had survived the Dachau concentration camp in Germany. Coming to America, he changed his name from Cohen to Collin.

Frank Collin went to Catholic elementary and high schools and attended Southern Illinois University before dropping out.

Somewhere along the way, Frank Collin became infatuated with George Lincoln Rockwell, a white supremacist and self-proclaimed “commandant” of the American Nazi Party. Collin became the party’s Midwest director, a grandiose title considering that its membership nationally was estimated at a few hundred or less.

When Rockwell was assassinated in 1967 by a disaffected follower, Collin expected to be named his successor. But he was passed over.

Taking with him a few of Rockwell’s followers, Collin founded his own group, the National Socialist Party of America. He set up headquarters at 2519 W. 71st St., thinking he’d find a receptive audience on Chicago’s Southwest Side. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had been assaulted there while campaigning in 1966 for open housing in what was then a predominantly white neighborhood.

Many residents were of Eastern European ancestry. They, too, had relatives who had suffered under Nazi occupation. So the sight of Nazi regalia was anathema, as Julian Kulas, a Ukrainian community leader, noted. “To dismiss the appearance of swastikas, brown shirts and jackboots on American soil a scant generation after (the Holocaust) betrays willful inattention to one of the most tragic episodes of human history,” Kulas wrote in a statement of solidarity with the Jewish community that was reported in the Tribune in June 1978.

While the court battles with Skokie waged on, and thinking a dramatic move would get the media’s attention, Collin planned a rally in Chicago’s Marquette Park, where King had been attacked. The symbolism was patent: Collin’s group promised to be a bulwark against the black residents of nearby neighborhoods.

A new confrontation between blacks and whites was the last thing Chicago’s leaders wanted. So the Chicago Park District put obstacles in Collin’s way. His group would have to post a $350,000 insurance bond. When the ACLU objected, saying that the amount was unreasonable, a federal judge reduced it to $60,000. At a second hearing, the judge found that, because Collin’s views were unpopular, brokers weren’t willing to write him an insurance policy, so he was given the right to march without posting a bond.

Collin won his courtroom battles almost in spite of himself. “He told me, in effect, to go to h-e-l-l,” a judge said after an especially testy session early in the fight. “He said, in effect, he doesn’t care what I do that he’s got other plans.”

But Collin did float his idea of a compromise. He wouldn’t march in Skokie if his group was allowed to hold a rally in Marquette Park. Once the bond requirement was lifted, the neo-Nazis marched twice in the park. Each time the police cut the demonstration short, in the face of counterdemonstrations. Rallies at the Daley and Kluczynski Federal Building plazas were marked by similar clashes.

So in the end it was something of an anti-climax when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Collin’s right of free speech extended to Skokie. “After bitter controversy, the courts cleared the Skokie march, but Collin called it off,” the Tribune noted July 8, 1978.

Collin disappeared from the political scene but not from the news. In 1980, he was convicted of sexually molesting young boys and sent to prison. After being released, he dabbled in paganism and new-age anthropology. He abandoned National Socialism for reasons as mysterious as those that brought him into the cult of Hitler.

As his grandmother had said: “We don’t know how or when it started.”

rgrossman@chicagotribune.com

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The Legit Smit: ‘I turned from hate to the Lord’ – Ridgecrest Daily Independent

Michael Smit Staff Writer

I usually don’t mention my past, but it’s something that has to be said,” Donald Baker told me as he leaned back in his bed at the Bella Sera nursing unit. “I don’t like to dwell upon the past, but what’s happening now is the same situation.”

Before I arrived, he had asked the nurses to clear a space for me to sit next to his bed. Baker is 74 years old and has Parkinson’s disease. His speaking voice is nearly a whisper. There’s not much breath behind his voice, so the words sound as if they barely make it out of his lungs and trickle past his lips.

I leaned in closer to hear what it was that needed to be said about his past. But instead of speaking, he pulled up his sleeve to reveal a small, bluish green mark. A Nazi swastika. I took out my notebook and prepared for a story.

I wasn’t sure if I was going to need that notebook before arriving at Bella Sera. Rather than tracking down an interviewee for this edition of Residents of Ridgecrest, Baker had called me.

I walked down the halls of the nursing home, looking into hospital-style rooms with white haired patients staring into empty space and I wondered if I was chasing an empty lead. This isn’t a demographic I have much experience talking to normally.

In movies, the only conversation the nursing home patients can carry is cantankerous ramblings about nothing, as if they don’t have the better part of a century’s worth of sights, thoughts, and life stored within them.

I arrived in his room to find some of those memories hanging on the wall. Among pictures of his family was a news article written about him with the headline “He Listened To Hitler — Now To God.”

Baker said he joined the American Nazi Party as a young man in the mid 1960s. He even earned what he said was their highest honor, the Bronze Medal of Adolf Hitler.

I asked how he first got involved in the American Nazi Party. He said he was in prison for stealing a car, and he had a sort of angel and demon on his shoulder.

One inmate was trying to get him to reform and come to church. He said he even joined the church for a while. He was soon transferred to a different prison where he met a bodyguard for George Lincoln Rockwell, a man the BBC called “The American Hitler.” He was the founder of the American Nazi Party.

As a young man, Baker found fraternity through hate easier than patiently reforming through love. He said he officially joined the American Nazi Party as soon as he got out of prison.

I asked Baker what drove him to join the Nazis. I was expecting a complex answer of political revolution riddled with the dogma of racial superiority. Instead, his answer was simple and direct: they hated black and Jewish people.

This was in the early 60s. The Civil Rights Movement was in full swing. School segregation had only recently ended, but other forms of segregation were still rampant through many states in the south.

Baker said he was thrown in prison again along with seven other American Nazi members after they tried to disrupt the Democratic National Convention in 1964 in Atlanta, Georgia when Lyndon B. Johnson was nominated. In the middle of the convention floor, Baker yelled out, “Only Rockwell can save this nation. Johnson has betrayed his race!”

Johnson would go on to sign the Civil Rights Act into law. Baker would be thrown in jail. Upon release, the American Nazis held a welcoming party for him and awarded him the Bronze Medal of Adolf Hitler.

He expected to feel pride when he received the award, but instead he said he felt a deep deadness. Soon after that, Baker saw a preacher on TV and remembered the man he met in prison so many years ago. He bought a Bible and began reading it again, though he had to hide the book from other American Nazi members.

Eventually, he left the American Nazi Party and joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

“And this is funny,” Baker chuckled, recalling the first time he saw his genealogy report, and important practice at the LDS church. “I found out I got Native, Jewish, and German blood. I would’ve been kicked out anyway!”

Baker moved to Salt Lake City. He would later hitch hike to Bishop, then live in Trona for a while, before finally landing in Ridgecrest. He’s now an active participant with a local LDS church and says his favorite hobby is helping people. He regularly speaks with Ward 2, giving the testimony of his life’s radical changes.

“This story has to get out so people don’t fall in the trap I did,” Baker said. “I’m not saying Donald Trump started it, but the influence is there.” He doesn’t like that Trump promised in his campaign to ban Muslims, then wrote an executive order attempting to partially do so.

“Not all Muslims are terrorists,” Baker said. His history makes him worry when a politician tries to paint a wide group of people as the enemy.

He sited evidence of this influence in threats and attacks against groups of people. A Jewish cemetery vandalized, Southwest Asians shot in the United States, a mosque set on fire and more mosques threatened.

Baker worries that we could be on the brink of seeing history repeat itself. “Extremism breeds extremism,” he said.

“Extremism,” feels like a fitting word for the modern American political climate. We’ve rarely ever been so polarized over politics, as almost every national news source has pointed out. Each side demonizes the other. Fiercely loyal political teams form. There’s no good destination this road leads to.

I asked Baker what he would like to see instead. “We should treat every person like a brother,” he said.

Extremism breeds extremism, but empathy also breeds empathy. We have been a diverse nation since the very beginning, and that diversity is our greatest strength. Diversity of thought, diversity of lifestyle, diversity of color, diversity of faith.

We’ll disagree on policy from time to time, but let us learn from the past and always remember that we are brothers. What broke Baker out of his Nazi ideology is when he started listening. Listening to the pastor, listening to people of other races, listening to other ideas. So in this polarizing time, let’s stop talking sometimes and listen.

I thanked Baker for his time and walked my way back through the halls of Bella Sera, looking through the doorways at patients and wondering of the things they’ve seen. ‘I turned from hate to the Lord.’

Michael Smit is the community/education and water reporter for the Daily Independent. When not busy reporting, he writes about interesting, everyday people and their lives. Have a story or know someone, email him at msmit@ridgecrestca.com.

The views expressed are those of the columnist and do not necessarily represent the official stance of the Daily Independent.

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American Nazi Party – Wikipedia

The American Nazi Party (ANP) was first an American political party founded by George Lincoln Rockwell. Its headquarters were in Arlington, Virginia. Rockwell founded the organization as the World Union of Free Enterprise National Socialists (WUFENS), but renamed it the American Nazi Party in 1960.[2] The party was based largely upon the ideals and policies of Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Party in Germany during the Nazi era, and embraced its uniforms and iconography.[3][A]

The Rockwell organization broke up shortly after he was assassinated in 1967. Since the late 1960s, there have been a number of small groups that have used the name, “American Nazi Party”.

The WUFENS headquarters was located in a residence on Williamsburg Boulevard in Arlington, but was moved as the ANP headquarters to a house at 928 North Randolph Street (now a hotel and office building site). Rockwell and some party members also established a “Stormtrooper Barracks” in an old mansion owned by the widow of Willis Kern[7] in the Dominion Hills section of Arlington at what is now the Upton Hill Regional Park, the tallest hill in the county. After Rockwell’s death, the headquarters was moved again to one side of a duplex brick and concrete storefront at 2507 North Franklin Road which featured a swastika prominently mounted above the front door. This site was visible from busy Wilson Boulevard. Today, the Franklin Road address is often misidentified as Rockwell’s headquarters when in fact it was the successor organization’s last physical address in Arlington (now a coffeehouse).[8][9][10]

Under Rockwell, the party embraced Nazi uniforms and iconography. [B]

After several years of living in impoverished conditions, Rockwell began to experience some financial success with paid speaking engagements at universities where he was invited to express his controversial views as exercises in free speech. This inspired him to end the rancorous “Phase One” party tactics and begin “Phase Two”, a plan to recast the group as a legitimate political party by toning down the verbal and written attacks against non-whites, replacing the party rallying cry of “Sieg Heil!” with “White Power!”, limiting public display of the swastika, and entering candidates in local elections. On January 1, 1967, Rockwell renamed the ANP the National Socialist White People’s Party (NSWPP), a move that alienated some hard-line members.

In 1966, it was renamed the National Socialist White Peoples Party, a conscious imitation of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Rockwell wanted a more ecumenical approach and felt that the swastika banner was impeding organizational growth. Matt Koehl, although a purist National Socialist, succeeded Rockwell as the new leader and this ended the American Nazi Party. Rockwell was assassinated by one of his own members. Thereafter, the members engaged in internecine disputes, and they were either expelled by Koehl or they resigned. After the assassination of Rockwell, the party dissipated and ad hoc organizations usurped the American Nazi Party logo. Those included James Burford in Chicago and John Bishop in Iowa.[11]

The years 1966 and 1967 were in many ways the apogee of Rockwell’s fame and organization.[11] Famously, he was interviewed by Playboy magazine, an event that stirred controversy within the ranks.[11][12] At the time Rockwell had about 500 followers.[4]

Before he could fully implement party reforms, Rockwell was assassinated on August 25, 1967 by a disgruntled follower, John Patler, who was part of a splinter group.[4]

An assassination attempt was made on Rockwell on June 28, 1967. As Rockwell returned from shopping, he drove into the long driveway of the “Stormtrooper barracks” located in Arlington’s Dominion Hills subdivision and found it blocked by a felled tree and brush. Rockwell assumed that it was another prank by local teens. As a party member cleared the obstruction, two shots were fired at Rockwell from behind one of the swastika-embossed brick driveway pillars. One of the shots ricocheted off the car, right next to his head. Leaping from the car, Rockwell pursued the gunman. On June 30, Rockwell petitioned the Arlington County Circuit Court for a gun permit; no action was ever taken on his request.

On August 25, 1967, while leaving the Econowash laundromat at the Dominion Hills Shopping Center, an assassin, hiding on the roof of the building, fired two bullets into Rockwell’s car through the windshield. One missed, the other hit his chest and ruptured his heart. His car slowly rolled backwards to a stop and Rockwell staggered out of the front passenger side door of the car, stood briefly while pointing upward at the strip mall’s rooftop where the shots had come from, and then collapsed on the pavement. He was pronounced dead at the scene.[7][13] Rockwell’s assailant was John Patler, a former ANP/NSWPP member whom Rockwell had ejected from the party for allegedly trying to introduce Marxist doctrine into the party’s platforms.

Rockwell’s deputy commander, Matt Koehl, a staunch Hitlerist, assumed the leadership role after a party council agreed that he should retain command. Koehl continued some of Rockwells reforms such as emphasizing the prospect of a future all-white society, and toning down public denigration of non-whites. Koehl retained the swastika-festooned party literature and the pseudo-Nazi uniforms of the party’s “Storm Troopers” which were modeled on those worn by the Nazi Party’s Sturmabteilung. In 1968, Koehl moved the party to a new headquarters on 2507 North Franklin Road, clearly visible from Arlington’s main thoroughfare, Wilson Boulevard. He also established a printing press, a “George Lincoln Rockwell Memorial Book Store”, and member living quarters on property nearby.[citation needed]

The party began to experience ideological divisions among its followers as it entered the 1970s. In 1970, member Frank Collin, who was himself secretly the son of a Jewish father, broke away from the group and founded the National Socialist Party of America in Chicago, which became famous for its attempt to march through Skokie, Illinois, home to many Holocaust survivors. This led to the United States Supreme Court case, National Socialist Party of America v. Village of Skokie. Other dissatisfied members of the NSWPP chose to support William Luther Pierce, and formed the National Alliance in 1974.[citation needed]

Further membership erosion occurred as Koehl, drawing heavily upon the teachings of Hitlerian mystic Savitri Devi, began to suggest that National Socialism was more akin to a religious movement than a political one. He espoused the belief that Adolf Hitler was the gift of an inscrutable divine providence sent to rescue the white race from decadence and gradual extinction caused by a declining birth rate and miscegenation. Hitler’s death in 1945 was viewed as a type of martyrdom; a voluntary, Christ-like self-sacrifice, that looked forward to a spiritual resurrection of National Socialism at a later date when the Aryan race would need it the most. These esoteric beliefs led to disputes with the World Union of National Socialists, which Rockwell had founded and whose leader, Danish neo-Nazi Povl Riis-Knudsen, had been appointed by Koehl. Undaunted, Koehl continued to recast the party as a new religion in formation. Public rallies were gradually phased out in favor of low-key gatherings in private venues. On Labor Day 1979, in a highly unpopular move for some members, Koehl disbanded the party’s paramilitary “Storm Troopers”.[citation needed]

The Koehl organization is now known as the New Order and it operates so far from the public spotlight that few of today’s neo-Nazis are aware of its existence or know that it is the linear descendant of Rockwell’s original ANP.[citation needed]

On November 3, 1979, some members of the NSWPP and a Ku Klux Klan group attacked a Communist Workers’ Party protest march in Greensboro, North Carolina. The alliance of neo-Nazis and Klansmen shot and killed five marchers. Forty Klansmen and neo-Nazis were involved in the shootings with sixteen Klansmen and neo-Nazis being arrested. The six strongest cases were brought to trial first, but the two criminal trials resulted in the acquittal of the defendants by all-white juries. However, in a 1985 civil lawsuit, the survivors won a $350,000 judgment against the city, the Klansmen, and the neo-Nazis for violating the civil rights of the demonstrators. The shootings became known as the “Greensboro Massacre”.[citation needed]

Since the late 1960s, there have been a number of small groups that have used the name “American Nazi Party”.

Explanatory notes

Citations

Bibliography

Further reading

Continued here:

American Nazi Party – Wikipedia

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March 10, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

KALW Almanac: Thu. March 9, 2017 – KALW

Today Thursday, 9th of March of 2017 is the 68th day of the year.There are 297 days remaining until the end of the year.607 days until mid-term elections.1335 days until the next scheduled presidential election.The sun will rise this morning in San Francisco at 6:28and the sun will set this evening at 6:12.Today we will have 11 hours and 44 minutes of daylight.

The solar transit will be at 12:20 mid-day.

The first low tide was at 2:43 early this morning

and the next low tide will be at 3:26 this afternoon.

The first high tide will be at 8:50 this morning

and the next high tide at 10:25 tonight

The Moon is 89.7% illuminated; a Waxing Gibbous moon

Moon Direction: 293.99 WNW

Moon Altitude: -6.03

Moon Distance: 235282 mi

The Next Full Moon will be Sunday Mar 12, 2017 at 7:53 am

and our Next New Moon: Mar 27, 2017 at 7:57 pm

Next Moonrise: Today at 3:31 pm

Amerigo Vespucci Day

Bang-Clang Day

Barbie Day

False Teeth Day

Get Over It Day

Joe Franklin Day

Nametag Day

National Crabmeat Day

National Meatball Day

Panic Day

Popcorn Lovers Day

World Kidney Day

It’s also…

Teachers’ Day or Eid Al Mo-a-lim (Lebanon)

If today is your birthday…

1454 Amerigo Vespucci, Italian cartographer and explorer (d. 1512)

1824 Amasa Leland Stanford, American businessman and politician, founded Stanford University (d. 1893)

1890 Vyacheslav Molotov, Russian politician and diplomat, Soviet Minister of Foreign Affairs (d. 1986)

1892 Vita Sackville-West, English author, poet, and gardener (d. 1962)

1902 Will Geer, American actor (d. 1978)

1910 Samuel Barber, American pianist and composer (d. 1981)

1918 George Lincoln Rockwell, American sailor and politician, founded the American Nazi Party (d. 1967)

1918 Mickey Spillane, American crime novelist (d. 2006)

1926 Joe Franklin, American radio and television host (d. 2015)

1930 Ornette Coleman, American saxophonist, violinist, trumpet player, and composer (d. 2015)

1934 Yuri Gagarin, Russian colonel, pilot, and astronaut (d. 1968)

1942 John Cale, Welsh singer-songwriter, viola player, and producer

1954 Bobby Sands, PIRA volunteer; Irish republican; abstentionist MP (d. 1981)

1964 Juliette Binoche, French actress

1979 Oscar Isaac, Guatemalan-American actor

1987 Bow Wow, American rapper, actor, and television host

On this day in history

1796 Napolon Bonaparte marries his first wife, Josphine de Beauharnais.

1842 Giuseppe Verdi’s third opera, Nabucco, receives its premire performance in Milan; its success establishes Verdi as one of Italy’s foremost opera writers.

1842 The first documented discovery of gold in California occurs at Rancho San Francisco, six years before the California Gold Rush.

1916 Mexican Revolution: Pancho Villa leads nearly 500 Mexican raiders in an attack against the border town of Columbus, New Mexico.

1933 Great Depression: President Franklin D. Roosevelt submits the Emergency Banking Act to Congress, the first of his New Deal policies.

1954 CBS television broadcasts the See It Now episode, “A Report on Senator Joseph McCarthy”, hosted by Edward R Murrow and produced by Fred Friendly.

1959 The Barbie doll makes its debut at the American International Toy Fair in New York.

1961 Sputnik 9 successfully launches, carrying a human dummy nicknamed Ivan Ivanovich, and demonstrating that Soviet Union was ready to begin human spaceflight.

1997 Comet HaleBopp: Observers in China, Mongolia and eastern Siberia are treated to a rare double feature as an eclipse permits Hale-Bopp to be seen during the day.

2011 Space Shuttle Discovery makes its final landing after 39 flights.

Go here to see the original:

KALW Almanac: Thu. March 9, 2017 – KALW

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March 9, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

Give Trump the silent treatment – The Hill (blog)

Years ago, I was a lawyer for the American Jewish Congress, Commission on Law and Social Action in New York City. Im reminded now about one case that we handled that involved the Nazi spokesman George Lincoln Rockwell who sought the right to speak at a public park. Among others, Jewish groups protested. Why allow vile speech in public places, they claimed? I argued that we only brought attention to his stupid rants by making him a victim who would claim he was denied his First Amendment rights. The same thing is going on now in Berkeley, California where two outrageous speakers were rebuffed by liberals who dont want them to have a voice, so obnoxious to protesters. In all these instances, my view is the ACLU view, and a pragmatic one, at that. Only by protesting their rights to speak do we give these provocateurs the larger audience they never would have had if they were simply ignored. These examples bring me to the point that national media is being fooled by President Trump. During the debates, while Trump insulted the media, they sat there like props, and gave his insults the very audience he desired. Now, Trumps outrageous tweets are covered endlessly by media on both sides of the political spectrum. The media networks included havent learned their lesson from the election where Trump news sucked the air out of coverage of his competitors, Democratic and Republican. Trump insults the Pope, John McCainJohn McCainTop commander: Don’t bet on China reining in North Korea Trudeau, Trump speak for second night about US-Canada trade McCain: China has done nothing on North Korea MORE, his opponents, and the media itself which covers Trumps outrages ad nauseum, to the exclusion of reasonable other points of view. The same phenomenon continues to the present. Trump tweets and the media genuflects. Trump cares nothing about press criticism so long as he gets the coverage. He boasted to Associated Press that his ratings for press coverage is the highest since 9/11! Its a tremendous advantage, he instructed the media he publicly deplores. Bernie SandersBernie SandersNebraska Dem chair slams Perez for dismissing anti-abortion Dems Sanders: Trump couldn’t be ‘more wrong’ on climate Sanders on skipping WH Korea briefing: ‘I did not want to be part of a photo op’ MORE is now the most popular politician in America, according to, ironically, to a Fox News poll. But do you see the media covering his every move? His constructive politicking gets sparse coverage while Trump’s outrages are exhaustively covered, in protest and in admiration, but to the exclusion of his political opponents in his party and the opposition. One expects fawning coverage from his admirers at FOX; but Rachel, Wolf, Lawrence, et. al., you are keeping him in the news and that is his power. Look the other way when he rants to his followers, and like Rockwell, and Coulter and others who media popularized in the past, and they will be left only with their right to speak to their relatively few followers, and are denied the larger audience. Ronald Goldfarb is a Washington, DC attorney, literary agent and author of 13 books. The views expressed by contributors are their own and are not the views of The Hill.

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April 27, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

Happy George Lincoln Rockwell Day Daily Stormer

Zeiger Daily Stormer March 9, 2017 Commander Rockwell: the original Nazi troll. Today, the 9th of March, is the 99th birthday of commander George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party. This is a figure that everyone on the right should be familiar with, and draw inspiration from. While theres much to be learned from the lives of Hitler or Mussolini, they lived in a very different world than what we have today; their societies werent completely Jewed in the way America is. They still had strong men and national pride. In that sense, Rockwells life speaks to modern people much more directly than former great men who fought for Western civilization. He faced many of the same issues we face today, and fought the same forces that oppose us as well. For this occasion, Ive made a modern, readable version of his classic autobiography This Time, the World available to everyone. Download here. Cover by Alexander Slavros. This is a book I would actually recommend over Mein Kampf to anyone wanting to learn about the struggle. Rockwell did some incredible things in his day, including starting popular magazines, publishing comic books, meeting with high level government officials and military leaders, and even opening communications with black nationalists who desired to separate from White America. The American Nazi Party was the origin point for a lot of the movements and organizations that upheld the torch of radical nationalism in America. William Pierce of the National Alliance, Joseph Tomassi of the NSLF and James Mason of Universal Order were all members of Rockwells group at some point or other. His studies in marketing gave him a keen understanding of human psychology and the use of propaganda to affect the masses. He used this understanding to great effect, taking the American media by storm in much the same way that Nazi trolls are doing today. Its important to remember our roots and learn from our past heroes. So lets declare this George Lincoln Rockwell day!

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April 21, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

When Malcolm X Met the Nazis – Vice

Members of the American Nazi Party listened to Malcolm X speak at a Nation of Islam rally in Washington, DC, on June 25, 1961. Contact sheet Eve Arnold/Magnum Photos On Sunday, June 25, 1961, ten members of the American Nazi Party arrived at a Nation of Islam rally in Washington, DC. The party’s founder, George Lincoln Rockwell, led them inside the Uline Arena, a quarter-million-square-foot stadium that would later host the Beatles’ first US concert. Ramrod-straight, square-jawed, and with a merciless, piercing gaze, Rockwell looked like a Hollywood villain straight out of central casting. (“How much taller he is than Hitler,” Esquire noted in an otherwise withering essay. “And how much better-looking.”) The Uline had nearly sold out. The Nazis were outnumbered 800 to one. The fascists hadn’t come to make a bloody last stand. Instead, guards from the Fruit of Islam, the NOI’s paramilitary branch, frisked the men and ushered them to front-row-center seats. Their crisp brownshirt costumes and swastika armbands stood out against the suits and ties surrounding them. Despite the 90-degree heat, Rockwell and his men waited hours for the event’s main attraction. There is no record of anyone cracking a smile at the situation’s absurdity. The night’s keynote speaker, NOI leader Elijah Muhammad, canceled his appearance because of illness. According to historian William Schmaltz, Malcolm X delivered a speech, followed by an appeal for donations that singled out the few Caucasians in the audience. Rockwell contributed $20. When Life photographer Eve Arnold raised her camera to capture the Nazis, Rockwellpresumably alerted to her Jewish ancestry by the Muslimsallegedly rasped, “I’ll make a bar of soap out of you.” (She replied, “As long as it isn’t a lampshade.”) Overt anti-Semitism, it turned out, was something the two groups could bond over. While Rockwell pushed his hatred of Jews to frothy extremes, Muhammad backed a range of racist theories, including the hoax that the Jews had financed the slave trade. (Malcolm X was cagier about his anti-Semitism, often deferring to Muhammad’s conspiracy theories rather than offering his own.) To publicly rage against Jews in the summer of 1961 may have offended the general public even more than it would today. Six thousand miles away, the Adolf Eichmann trial, in Israel, had captivated the world and dramatically increased coverage of Holocaust atrocities. Division of the races was another mutual bugbear. Malcolm X’s speech that night was titled “Separation or Death.” Inside the arena, Rockwell told reporters, “I am fully in concert with their program, and I have the highest respect for Elijah Muhammad.” The question of where to send America’s blacksthe NOI wanted a chunk of the US, while the ANP wanted a full deportation to Africawas, he said, his only quarrel with the Muslims. This wasn’t quite true. The Nazis and NOI also disagreed over whether black people were human beings. Over the course of his three-year career as an open Nazi, Rockwell had repeatedly referred to African Americans as “ring-in-the-nose niggers,” “basically animalistic,” and “no better than chimpanzees.” With the alliance, he’d suddenly slapped a massive asterisk onto his own white supremacy. Remarkably, the NOI had a history of such partnerships. Six months earlier, Muhammad had sent Malcolm X to a top-secret meeting with the Atlanta Ku Klux Klan. In a throwback to Marcus Garvey’s 1922 Klan summit, the two groups brokered a bizarre truce: local mosque safety in return for NOI support on racial separation. But that meeting had served a purpose, no matter how tenuous. The alliance with the Nazis held no obvious benefit for the Muslims. The differences between Malcolm X and Rockwell were existential. Where the former had risen from a life of crime to national prominence, the latter had exerted himselfand destroyed his family and financesto become a national pariah, sinking from a decorated Navy officer to a delusional Nazi commander in just six years. Overt anti-Semitism, it turned out, was something the two groups could bond over. The Washington summit would have provided a bitter contrast to Rockwell’s normal, meager gatherings. An audience of 8,000 was something he could have only dreamed of. Even the building’s imposing vaulted ceiling hinted at the fascist architecture he saw as his inalienable destiny (throughout his career, he made repeated references to controlling the United States by 1972). For the Nazi leader, the alliance served a fantasy rooted in grandiose absurdism. “Can you imagine a rally of the American Nazis in Union Square,” Rockwell later wrote his followers, “protected from Jewish hecklers by a solid phalanx of Elijah Muhammad’s stalwart black stormtroopers?” And where Malcolm X was famously complex, Rockwell self-identified as a cartoon character. With the media controlled by Jews, he’d reasoned, mainstream political protest from the extreme right was doomed to failure through obscurity. “I tried and nobody paid attention to me,” he later told an interviewer of his pre-Nazi political activities. “But no one can ignore Nazis marching in the streets.” Following this logic, the ANP produced a variety of merchandise catering to the juvenile bigot. One item, The Diary of Anne Fink (16 pages of Holocaust atrocity photos with jokey captions), was advertised in The Rockwell Report as “sick humor,” an odd allusion to Mad magazine, Lenny Bruce, and a world of Jewish, “degenerate” comedy that the Nazis should, logically, have railed against. One result of this oafish marketing was that Rockwell recruited exceptionally inept personnel, attracting hordes of Nazis he admitted were “unbelievably stupid.” And yet he persisted in shooting for the lowest common denominator’s lowest common denominator. The ANP mocked the anti-segregation Freedom Riders with a VW van dubbed the “Hate Bus.” Some ANP picketers wore Groucho Marx glasses and rubber noses in their protests. Why would the famously disciplined NOI ally itself with such caricatures? AMERICAN NAZI PARTY The ANP was founded in 1959 by George Lincoln Rockwell in Arlington, Vriginia. Rockwell was assasinated eight years later by a former ANP member. A possible answer came eight months later. On February 25, 1962, the ANP was invited to a second rally, this time the NOI’s Saviours’ Day convention in Chicago. Rockwell addressed the crowd after Muhammad. Facing an estimated 12,000 African Americans, the Nazi leader pulled no punches. “You know that we call you ‘niggers.’ But wouldn’t you rather be confronted by honest white men who tell you to your face what the others all say behind your back?” As a public speaker, Rockwell was entertaining without being particularly authoritative (in cadence, he mimicked comedian Red Skelton). His was not the voice of a fhrer, and the Chicago International Amphitheater wasn’t his Nuremberg Rally. Surely the irony of the moment wouldn’t have escaped him; this was the largest crowd he’d ever addressed (and would ever address again). “I am not afraid to stand here and tell you I hate race-mixing and will fight it to the death,” Rockwell continued. “But at the same time, I will do everything in my power to help the Honorable Elijah Muhammad carry out his inspired plan for land of your own in Africa. Elijah Muhammad is right. Separation or death!” The audience teetered between polite applause and boos. Two months later, Muhammad, writing in the NOI newspaper, admonished his flock for their frosty reception: “If they are speaking the truth for us, what do we care? We’ll stand on our heads and applaud!” This mutual nod to “honesty” and “truth” gives us a peek at the possible foundation of the alliance. Rockwell and Muhammad saw each other as authentic, as people willing to speak the truththeir versions of itno matter the cost. Their marketing to their constituencies depended on this image, and each man drew legitimacy from the appearance of being a straight shooter. Rockwell’s existence was useful to the NOI as a recruiting tool, his physical presence a testament to Muhammad’s own authenticity. Malcolm X wasn’t part of this legitimacy trap, and he made it known that Rockwell’s high esteem wasn’t reciprocated. When the Nazi was applauded in 1961 for donating $20, Malcolm X laughed into the microphone and said, “You got the biggest hand you ever got, didn’t you, Mr. Rockwell?” As the civil rights struggles of the 50s gave way to the triumphs of the early 60s, both men found themselves operating in the vast shadow of Martin Luther King Jr. The Nazis, challenged by the juggernaut of legislative triumphs following King’s actions, dug in. Malcolm X, faced with a growing gap between his NOI rhetoric and the successes of nonviolent action, softened his tone. Rockwell and Muhammad saw each other as authentic, as people willing to speak the truththeir versions of itno matter the cost. After leaving the NOI in 1964, Malcolm X used the movement’s alliance with the Klan as a charge against Muhammad. The following year, he sent a telegram to George Lincoln Rockwell: This is to warn you that I am no longer held in check from fighting white supremacists by Elijah Muhammad’s separatist Black Muslim movement, and that if your present racist agitation against our people there in Alabama causes physical harm to Reverend King or any other black Americans who are only attempting to enjoy their rights as free human beings, that you and your Ku Klux Klan friends will be met with maximum physical retaliation… Within three years, both men were dead, allegedly assassinated by former allies. But the ghost of the alliance lives on today. The Nation of Islam, under the auspices of Louis Farrakhan, maintains an open partnership with white supremacist Tom Metzger. And in the last decade, the American Nazi Party website established a “Non-Aryan Sympathizer Page,” offering “a means for non-whites to aid in our struggle” with mail-in contributions. Malcolm X’s posthumous alliance was stranger still: mainstream acceptance by the white-supremacist society he fought against in life. The US government eventually awarded him a postage stamp. Follow Sam on Twitter.

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April 18, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

In an Angry and Fearful Nation, an Outbreak of Anti-Semitism – PQ Monthly

By A.C. Thompson and Ken Schwencke, ProPublica In late November, Marna Street, a violist with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, was walking to her car after a rehearsal. Street was shocked by what she discovered: Someone had painted a swastika, about 14 inches across, on the trunk of her car. The vandals, Street said, had probably targeted her vehicle, which was parked in a garage not far from the University of Cincinnati, because shed placed a magnet on it indicating that she is Jewish. Street eventually managed to scrub off the graffiti. She put the magnet in the glovebox of her car. I had that feeling in the pit of my stomach, like somebody just punched me, recalled Street, 68, speaking publicly for the first time. It was, she said, a cross between fear and just plain hurt. Working with a coalition of organizations, ProPublica late last year launched Documenting Hate, an attempt to gather evidence of hate crimes and episodes of bigotry from a divided America. The account from Cincinnati is one of the anti-Semitic incidents the project has chronicled. But there are scores more. Indeed, Documenting Hate recorded more than 330 reports of anti-Semitic incidents during a three-month span from early November to early February. The accounts our list is by no means comprehensive come via personal submissions, police documents and news articles. The majority, though not all, have been authenticated through either news reports, interviews or other evidence, like photos. The incidents have taken place in big cities and small towns, along the countrys liberal coasts and in deep red states. Some of the episodes swastikas and threatening messages spray-painted at schools and colleges around the nation have been worrisome, though relatively minor. Others have been more serious, such as the 65 bomb threats targeting Jewish organizations across the country during the period we examined (there have been nearly 70 more since then). In many cases, the culprits singled out specific individuals for abuse, defacing their homes and autos with swastikas and menacing comments. In the first week of March President Trump, after weeks of criticism for being slow to condemn the incidents, called them horrible and painful and a very sad reminder of the work that still must be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil. The remarks, however, came after a number of confounding comments about the issue. During a Feb. 16 news conference, Trump castigated Jake Turx, a reporter for Ami, a Jewish magazine, for asking what the government was doing to address the increase in anti-Semitic events. Trump accused Turx of lying about the question he wanted to ask, and instructed him to sit down. And without citing any evidence, Trump has wondered whether some of the recent anti-Semitic incidents were carried out by liberals, or Jews themselves, intent on discrediting him. Theres a push on the left to conflate anti-Semitism with Trump, while at the same time criticizing him for having Jared Kushner, who wears his Jewishness as proudly as anyone, as his most trusted confidant and in the highest echelons of the White House staff, said Joe Borelli, a Trump supporter who represents Staten Island on the New York city council, according to Breitbart News. It is mind-boggling. The White House would not comment for the record when asked whether President Trump had in any way contributed to the threats and violence. In New York City, the police department said anti-Semitic hate crimes nearly doubled in the first two months of 2017 as compared to the same period last year. On a national level, data on hate crimes and bias incidents is spotty at best. The FBI admits the information it collects is incomplete many police departments dont participate in the hate crimes tracking program and the bureau has yet to release statistics on 2016 and 2017. As a result, determining with authority whether anti-Semitic events are rising or declining is difficult. There is little question, however, that the incidents have generated genuine concern. In a rare show of unity, all 100 U.S. senators this week issued a public letter urging the Department of Justice, FBI and Department of Homeland Security to protect Jewish institutions and prosecute those responsible for terrorizing them. In New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently announced a $25 million grant to better protect daycare and community centers from threats. The available data does support the idea of an uptick. After years of decline, anti-Semitic crimes began trending upward in 2015, according to FBI data. Experts say that increase seems to have accelerated in recent months, as Trumps unique brand of nativist populism has helped to pull more extreme right-wing groups, some of them avowedly racist, closer to the political mainstream. On Twitter, openly anti-Semitic figures have built vast networks of supporters and cultivated large audiences, while the Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi website geared towards millennials, has seen its traffic grow to roughly a half a million unique visitors per month. In New York City, the police department said anti-Semitic hate crimes nearly doubled in the first two months of 2017 as compared to the same period last year. One of the constituencies Trump mobilized was the KKK-style anti-Semitic extreme right, said Lawrence Rosenthal, a scholar of fascist history and director of the Center for Right-Wing Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. These groups had been absolutely on the fringe of American politics for at least my lifetime and I am getting old. Oren Segal, who tracks anti-Semitic incidents in his role as director of the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism, concurs. The anti-Semites think they have a champion in the highest office, said Segal, who believes that divisive rhetoric aired during last falls presidential campaign has emboldened racists [and anti-Semites] and inspired them to strike out at their perceived enemies in the Jewish community. We have seen a significant uptick in the reports weve received, certainly starting around the election in November and continuing through the first two months of 2017, Segal told ProPublica. Not everyone who has encountered Nazi imagery is Jewish many LGBTQ people, African Americans and others have also been targeted. Amid the larger national debate about any responsibility Trump may bear for racist and anti-Semitic behavior, the accounts emerging from the Documenting Hate database offer a chance to appreciate the very personal experiences of violation and fear. We identified: ProPublicas review, which did not involve incidents occurring online, where anti-Semitic trolling and abuse have become widespread, uncovered many episodes which had never before been reported by the media or investigated by police. Our tally is almost surely an undercount. It consists of incidents covered in media reports, as well as accounts gathered by the Southern Poverty Law Center and a coalition of news organizations including ProPublica, Univision News, Buzzfeed News and The New York Times Opinion section. The reports we examined generally fall into two categories. Most appear to have been committed by angry individuals who arent affiliated with any organized group. They are often teens or adolescents who defame Jews and other minority groups through graffiti or verbal taunting. In some cases, the Nazi symbol was specifically aimed at non-Jewish minorities. A smaller number were orchestrated by extremist political groups, such as the New Order, an outgrowth of the long-dormant American Nazi Party founded by George Lincoln Rockwell, and the Atomwaffen Division, a new, youthful fascist group. A handful of cases involved a saboteur who remotely hijacked computer printers at Stanford and other colleges, programming them to spit out page after page of neo-Nazi propaganda. Some experts tracking this wave of incidents said it was crucial to situate them within a wider historical context. Generally, weve seen a remarkable decline in anti-Semitism over the past 40 years, noted Jonathan Sarna, a history professor at Brandeis University and one of the foremost chroniclers of Jewish-American life. In the 1950s, we didnt just have bomb threats we had bombings. Synagogues in the south were bombed. Sarna added, Its important to be vigilant and concerned. But its also important not to overreact. Across the nation, Jews were directly harassed with hateful imagery and messages in dozens of instances we examined. During Hanukkah last year, vandals desecrated a large home-made menorah that stood in the front yard of a home in Chandler, Arizona, twisting the sacred symbol into a swastika. Days after the presidential election, New York State Sen. Brad Hoylman found a swastika carved into the elevator door in his Manhattan apartment building and received a flyer in the mail saying that Jews would be punished for failing to convert to Christianity. Not everyone who has encountered Nazi imagery is Jewish many LGBTQ people, African Americans and others have also been targeted. On college campuses, much of the new anti-Semitism has been coming from organized groups of extremists out to intimidate or recruit new members. In Cincinnati, Street, who is the principal violist emeritus with the symphony and a music teacher, said the graffiti on her car left her feeling very vulnerable. Her father and grandmother fled Nazi Germany for the safety of the U.S. in the 1940s. Several weeks after Streets car was defaced, schools in her city began getting hit with anti-Semitic graffiti. First, someone painted a large white swastika on a sign at Cincinnatis Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, the largest seminary for Reform Judaism in North America. When the incident happened in early January, it was another psychic blow for Street. She worried about her friends who work at the college, and tried to understand the acts of ugliness taking place in her city. The crimes, she said, are not huge, but compounded they are very frightening. Across the nation, similar graffiti appeared on the campuses of more than 35 other colleges during the three months examined by ProPublica. Late on the night of Jan. 21, a mask-wearing vandal equipped with a spray can defaced Withrow University High School, a public school on Cincinnatis east side, painting Trump and swastikas all over the campus. The vandal, who tagged signs, sidewalks and buildings, also painted anti-gay and anti-black slurs. Dozens of other schools were also tagged with anti-Semitic graffiti during the same time period. At a high school in Newton, Massachusetts, somebody wrote Burn the Jews, white power, and Trump!!! on a bathroom stall. At Wilbur Cross High School in New Haven, Connecticut, red swastikas were spray-painted all over the athletic complex. In Murfreesboro, Tennessee, two teenage girls were expelled from Blackman High School for drawing a swastika in a bathroom stall. Some people will say that the swastika vandalism is just being done by a bunch of kids and dismiss it as irrelevant. I think its the opposite. The fact that young kids are doing this is potentially the scariest part of it, said Segal of the Anti-Defamation League. On college campuses, much of the new anti-Semitism has been coming from organized groups of extremists out to intimidate or recruit new members. At the University of Washington, in Seattle, a pro-Trump student group calling itself the UW Wall Building Association flirted with Nazism in a public Facebook post suggesting that undocumented immigrants should be sent to concentration camps. Neo-Nazis also crisscrossed the university campus at night, pasting up stark black-and-white posters threatening violence and uploading videos of their exploits to YouTube. One poster, featuring the deaths head, or Totenkopf insignia, used by the SS during World War II, promised to drive out the sodomites and degenerates of Seattle. Another poster encouraged students to join your local Nazis and visit the website IronMarch.com, a fascist web hang-out that encourages people to exterminate Jews and start a race war. People are just shocked. We cant believe this is happening, said a graduate student who requested anonymity for fear of being harassed. When the student saw the posters, she said she felt physically ill. I called my mom and was sobbing. I was so upset. My ancestors were slaughtered by the Nazis, said the student, who is Jewish. The neo-fascist organization did not reply to a request for an interview about its activities. White nationalist groups including Identity Evropa, led by a California man convicted of attacking an Arab cab driver at gunpoint, and True Cascadia, which aims to promote white ethnic consciousness in the Pacific Northwest, are also propagandizing at the school. Segal has tracked 112 instances of white supremacist groups posting flyers on college campuses since September 2016. Over the past several months, synagogues and other Jewish institutions have come under sustained harassment. In December, somebody repeatedly hurled rocks through the windows of Temple Menorah-Keneseth Chai, a historic synagogue in Philadelphia. On the opposite side of the country, in Las Vegas, a young man in jeans and a pull-over sweatshirt scratched a swastika into a black marble column during Shabbat services at Chabad of Southern Nevada. In other states, Christian churches ministering to LGBTQ people or to Latinxs have also been tagged with swastikas. But it is the array of bomb threats directed at Jewish community centers that has captured the most media attention and generated the most concern.* Federal authorities on March 3 charged Juan Thompson, an erratic former journalist who once wrote for the Intercept website, with making threats to a small number of JCCs as well as other Jewish institutions. But the figures responsible for the scores of threats to other JCCs remain at large. On March 7, another 17 locations of Jewish institutions in the U.S. received bomb threats. Some faith leaders are urging President Trump to issue a stronger public condemnation of anti-Semitism before the problem worsens. We need him to say very forcefully, This is not acceptable and to follow up with action, said Rabbi Steven Fox, chief executive of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the nations most prominent rabbinical body. Fox said Jewish community leaders have requested a meeting with the White House to discuss the surge in anti-Semitic activity, but, so far, have not been granted an audience with Trump or his advisors. Within his denomination, Reform Judaism, there is great concern about this uptick in hate crimes, this increase in hate speech, Fox told ProPublica. In the last two years weve seen this real hatred for anybody thats different hatred for Muslims, hatred for the LGBTQ community. We see it as a deeply troubling trend, not just in America, but in the world. New America Media is partnering with the Documenting Hate Project, a collaborative of media outlets, civil rights groups and tech companies nationwide working to document the rise of hate crimes and incidents of bias or harassment in the United States since the 2016 election. *Note from the PQ Editor: This article does not discuss the significance of race in the disparity between media attention dedicated to threats against the Jewish community and media attention given to threats against the Black, Latinx, Muslim, and non-white immigrant and refugee communities. Information on hate crimes against minority communities can be found through the Southern Poverty Law Center at www.splcenter.org. Originally published by New America Media. Photo credit: Map by Ken Schwencke and Al Shaw, ProPublica: Bomb Threats to Jewish Community Centers and Organizations. comments

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March 24, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

An Outbreak of Anti-Semitism in an Angry and Fearful America Since Trump Election – FlaglerLive.com

The tip of a vile, familiar, tower. (Bogdan Migulski) In late November, Marna Street, a violist with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, was walking to her car after a rehearsal. Street was shocked by what she discovered: Someone had painted a swastika, about 14 inches across, on the trunk of her car. The vandals, Street said, had probably targeted her vehicle, which was parked in a garage not far from the University of Cincinnati, because shed placed a magnet on it indicating that she is Jewish. Street eventually managed scrub off the graffiti. She put the magnet in the glovebox of her car. I had that feeling in the pit of my stomach, like somebody just punched me, recalled Street, 68, speaking publicly for the first time. It was, she said, a cross between fear and just plain hurt. Working with a coalition of organizations, ProPublica late last year launched Documenting Hate, an attempt to gather evidence of hate crimes and episodes of bigotry from a divided America. The account from Cincinnati is one of the anti-Semitic incidents the project has chronicled. But there are scores more. Indeed, Documenting Hate recorded more than 330 reports of anti-Semitic incidents during a three-month span from early November to early February. The accounts our list is by no means comprehensive come via personal submissions, police documents and news articles. The majority, though not all, have been authenticated through either news reports, interviews or other evidence, like photos. The incidents have taken place in big cities and small towns, along the countrys liberal coasts and in deep red states. Some of the episodes swastikas and threatening messages spray-painted at schools and colleges around the nation have been worrisome, though relatively minor. Others have been more serious, such as the 65 bomb threats targeting Jewish organizations across the country during the period we examined (there have been nearly 70 more since then). In many cases, the culprits singled out specific individuals for abuse, defacing their homes and autos with swastikas and menacing comments. President Trump, after weeks of criticism for being slow to condemn the incidents, last week called them horrible and painful and a very sad reminder of the work that still must be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil. The remarks, however, came after a number of confounding comments about the issue. During a Feb. 16 news conference, Trump castigated Jake Turx, a reporter for Ami, a Jewish magazine, for asking what the government was doing to address the increase in anti-Semitic events. Trump accused Turx of lying about the question he wanted to ask, and instructed him to sit down. And without citing any evidence, Trump has wondered whether some of the recent anti-Semitic incidents were carried out by liberals, or Jews themselves, intent on discrediting him. Theres a push on the left to conflate anti-Semitism with Trump, while at the same time criticizing him for having Jared Kushner, who wears his Jewishness as proudly as anyone, as his most trusted confidant and in the highest echelons of the White House staff, said Joe Borelli, a Trump supporter who represents Staten Island on the New York city council, according to Breitbart News. It is mind-boggling. The White House would not comment for the record when asked whether President Trump had in any way contributed to the threats and violence. On a national level, data on hate crimes and bias incidents is spotty at best. The FBI admits the information it collects is incomplete many police departments dont participate in the hate crimes tracking program and the bureau has yet to release statistics on 2016 and 2017. As a result, determining with authority whether anti-Semitic events are rising or declining is difficult. There is little question, however, that the incidents have generated genuine concern. In a rare show of unity, all 100 U.S. senators this week issued a public letter urging the Department of Justice, FBI and Department of Homeland Security to protect Jewish institutions and prosecute those responsible for terrorizing them. In New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently announced a $25 million grant to better protect day care and community centers from threats. The available data does support the idea of an uptick. After years of decline, anti-Semitic crimes began trending upward in 2015, according to FBI data. Experts say that increase seems to have accelerated in recent months, as Trumps unique brand of nativist populism has helped to pull more extreme right-wing groups, some of them avowedly racist, closer to the political mainstream. On Twitter, openly anti-Semitic figures have built vast networks of supporters and cultivated large audiences, while the Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi website geared towards millennials, has seen its traffic grow to roughly a half a million unique visitors per month. In New York City, the police department said anti-Semitic hate crimes nearly doubled in the first two months of 2017 as compared to the same period last year. One of the constituencies Trump mobilized was the KKK-style anti-Semitic extreme right, said Lawrence Rosenthal, a scholar of fascist history and director of the Center for Right-Wing Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. These groups had been absolutely on the fringe of American politics for at least my lifetime and I am getting old. Oren Segal, who tracks anti-Semitic incidents in his role as director of the Anti-Defamation Leagues Center on Extremism, concurs. The anti-Semites think they have a champion in the highest office, said Segal, who believes that divisive rhetoric aired during last falls presidential campaign has emboldened racists and inspired them to strike out at their perceived enemies in the Jewish community. We have seen a significant uptick in the reports weve received, certainly starting around the election in November and continuing through the first two months of 2017, Segal told ProPublica. Amid the larger national debate about any responsibility Trump may bear for racist and anti-Semitic behavior, the accounts emerging from the Documenting Hate database offer a chance to appreciate the very personal experiences of violation and fear. We identified: ProPublicas review, which did not involve incidents occurring online, where anti-Semitic trolling and abuse have become widespread, uncovered many episodes which had never before been reported by the media or investigated by police. Our tally is almost surely an undercount. It consists of incidents covered in media reports, as well as accounts gathered by the Southern Poverty Law Center and a coalition of news organizations including ProPublica, Univision News, Buzzfeed News and The New York Times Opinion section. The reports we examined generally fall into two categories. Most appear to have been committed by angry individuals who arent affiliated with any organized group. They are often teens or adolescents who defame Jews and other minority groups through graffiti or verbal taunting. In some cases, the Nazi symbol was specifically aimed at non-Jews. A smaller number were orchestrated by extremist political groups, such as the New Order, an outgrowth of the long-dormant American Nazi Party founded by George Lincoln Rockwell, and the Atomwaffen Division, a new, youthful fascist group. A handful of cases involved a saboteur who remotely hijacked computer printers at Stanford and other colleges, programming them to spit out page after page of neo-Nazi propaganda. Some experts tracking this wave of incidents said it was crucial to situate them within a wider historical context. Generally, weve seen a remarkable decline in anti-Semitism over the past 40 years, noted Jonathan Sarna, a history professor at Brandeis University and one of the foremost chroniclers of Jewish-American life. In the 1950s, we didnt just have bomb threats we had bombings. Synagogues in the south were bombed. Sarna added: Its important to be vigilant and concerned. But its also important to not to overreact. Across the nation, Jews were directly harassed with hateful imagery and messages in dozens of instances we examined. During Hanukkah last year, vandals desecrated a large home-made menorah that stood in the front yard of a home in Chandler, Arizona, twisting the sacred symbol into a swastika. Days after the presidential election, New York State Sen. Brad Hoylman found a swastika carved into the elevator door in his Manhattan apartment building and received a flyer in the mail saying that Jews would be punished for failing to convert to Christianity. Not everyone who has encountered Nazi imagery is Jewish gays, lesbians, African Americans and others have also been targeted. Consider the story of Karen Schaeffer, who found a swastika and the word SCUM drawn on her front door in mid-November. I was pretty scared, said Schaeffer, who lives in Wyandotte, Michigan, a small blue-collar town outside of Detroit. Im not even Jewish, but I am a pretty loud-mouthed liberal woman in a town that doesnt always appreciate that. She has an idea about what drew the attention of the anti-Semites: a campaign sign in her window for Bernie Sanders, the Vermont senator who unsuccessfully ran against Hillary Clinton in the Democratic presidential primary. Police came to Schaeffers house to investigate, but made no arrests. In Cincinnati, Street, who is the principal violist emeritus with the symphony and a music teacher, said the graffiti on her car left her feeling very vulnerable. Her father and grandmother fled Nazi Germany for the safety of the U.S. in the 1940s. Several weeks after Streets car was defaced, schools in her city began getting hit with anti-Semitic graffiti. First, someone painted a large white swastika on a sign at Cincinnatis Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, the largest seminary for Reform Judaism in North America. When the incident happened in early January, it was another psychic blow for Street. She worried about her friends who work at the college, and tried to understand the acts of ugliness taking place in her city. The crimes, she said, are not huge, but compounded they are very frightening. Across the nation, similar graffiti appeared on the campuses of at more than 35 other colleges during the three months examined by ProPublica. Late on the night of Jan. 21, a mask-wearing vandal equipped with a spray can defaced Withrow University High School, a public school on Cincinnatis east side, painting Trump and swastikas all over the campus. The vandal, who tagged signs, sidewalks and buildings, also painted anti-gay and anti-black slurs. Dozens of other schools were also tagged with anti-Semitic graffiti during the same time period. At a high school in Newton, Massachusetts, somebody wrote Burn the Jews, white power, and Trump!!! on a bathroom stall. At Wilbur Cross High School in New Haven, Connecticut, red swastikas were spray-painted all over the athletic complex. In Murfreesboro, Tennessee, two teenage girls were expelled from Blackman High School for drawing a swastika in a bathroom stall. Some people will say that the swastika vandalism is just being done by a bunch of kids and dismiss it as irrelevant. I think its the opposite. The fact that young kids are doing this is potentially the scariest part of it, said Segal of the Anti-Defamation League. On college campuses, much of the new anti-Semitism has been coming from organized groups of extremists out to intimidate or recruit new members. At the University of Washington, in Seattle, a pro-Trump student group calling itself the UW Wall Building Association flirted with Nazism in a public Facebook post suggesting that undocumented immigrants should be sent to concentration camps. Neo-Nazis also crisscrossed the university campus at night, pasting up stark black-and-white posters threatening violence and uploading videos of their exploits to YouTube. One poster, featuring the deaths head, or Totenkopf insignia, used by the SS during World War II, promised to Drive out the sodomites and degenerates of Seattle. Another poster encouraged students to join your local Nazis and visit the website IronMarch.com, a fascist web hang-out that encourages people to exterminate Jews and start a race war now. People are just shocked. We cant believe this is happening, said a graduate student who requested anonymity for fear of being harassed. When the student saw the posters, she said she felt physically ill. I called my mom and was sobbing. I was so upset. My ancestors were slaughtered by the Nazis, said the student, who is Jewish. The neo-fascist organization did not reply to a request for an interview about its activities. White nationalist groups including Identity Evropa, led by a California man convicted of attacking an Arab cab driver at gunpoint, and True Cascadia, which aims to promote White ethnic consciousness in the Pacific Northwest, are also propagandizing at the school. Segal has tracked 112 instances of white supremacist groups posting flyers on college campuses since September 2016. Over the past several months, synagogues and other Jewish institutions have come under sustained harassment. In December, somebody repeatedly hurled rocks through the windows of Temple Menorah-Keneseth Chai, a historic synagogue in Philadelphia. On the opposite side of the country, in Las Vegas, a young man in jeans and a pull-over sweatshirt scratched a swastika into a black marble column during Shabbat services at Chabad of Southern Nevada. In other states, Christian churches ministering to gays and lesbians or Latinos have also been tagged with swastikas. But it is the array of bomb threats directed at Jewish community centers that has captured the most media attention and generated the most concern. Federal authorities on March 3 charged Juan Thompson, an erratic former journalist who once wrote for the Intercept website, with making threats to a small number of JCCs as well as other Jewish institutions. But the figures responsible for the scores of threats to other JCCs remain at large. On March 7, another 17 locations of Jewish institutions in the U.S. received bomb threats. Some faith leaders are urging President Trump to issue a stronger public condemnation of anti-Semitism before the problem worsens. We need him to say very forcefully, This is not acceptable and to follow up with action, said Rabbi Steven Fox, chief executive of the Central Conference of American Rabbis, the nations most prominent rabbinical body. Fox said Jewish community leaders have requested a meeting with the White House to discuss the surge in anti-Semitic activity, but, so far, have not been granted an audience with Trump or his advisors. Within his denomination, Reform Judaism, there is great concern about this uptick in hate crimes, this increase in hate speech, Fox told ProPublica. In the last two years weve seen this real hatred for anybody thats different hatred for Muslims, hatred for the LGBTQ community. We see it as a deeply troubling trend, not just in America, but in the world. A.C. Thompson and Ken Schwencke, ProPublica Read more of our coverage in the Documenting Hate project. And see the map of hate for the past three months here.

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March 12, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

‘Swastika war’: When the neo-Nazis fought in court to march in Skokie – Chicago Tribune

Four decades ago, a neo-Nazi group announced plans to march in Skokie, home to thousands of Holocaust survivors. The news set off a rhetorical firestorm that the Chicago Tribune dubbed the “Skokie swastika war.” Then and now as the Jewish community sits on edge after a spate of bomb threats and vandalism at Jewish Community Centers, schools and cemeteries around the U.S. and Canada the Nazi symbol was embraced by anti-Semites. A vandal who recently broke a window of the Chicago Loop Synagogue signed his malicious handiwork with swastika stickers. Headstones were marked with swastikas at desecrated Jewish cemeteries in the St. Louis area and Philadelphia. In 1977, the swastika became the centerpiece of a constitutional question posed by a small group of neo-Nazis who called themselves “National Socialists” a callback to the formal name of Adolf Hitler’s political party. When the group encountered pushback over its plans to march through Skokie that spring while carrying flags bearing the swastika, its leader, Frank Collin, invoked the First Amendment as his defense. In a January 1978 letter to the Tribune, months into a court battle over the group’s right to march, Collin explained: “By forcing the ‘free speech for National Socialism’ issue in Skokie we are fighting for our basic rights everywhere.” The leader of Skokie’s Holocaust survivor community had asserted that the sight of a swastika would have a devastating effect on those who saw loved ones marched off to Nazi gas chambers. Sol Goldstein invoked a famed maxim of the late Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. about the limits of free speech. “I also defend the (First) Amendment,” Goldstein told the Tribune. “But this is like calling, ‘Fire!’ in a crowded theater.” Those positions were hotly argued and reargued in state and federal courtrooms until the U.S. Supreme Court resolved the issue. There were screaming matches between’s Collin’s handful of followers and protesters carrying signs that read, “Smash the Nazis” and “Never Again Treblinka,” a reference to a World War II extermination camp in Poland. Collin’s opponents founded a counter-organization, the Run The Nazis Out Coalition. The bitter debate opened crevices in Chicago’s Jewish community. “My interest in the Nazis’ march is quite personal,” George Baum wrote in the Tribune in August 1977, recalling his liberation from the Theresienstadt concentration camp in the Czech Republic. “That day of rejoicing and sadness haunts the graveyard of my memories.” About 15,000 children had passed through the camp. Baum was one of a hundred who survived. He explained his take on the proposed neo-Nazi march by quoting Alexander Hamilton: “Liberty may be endangered by the abuses of liberty as well as by the abuses of power.” Jews are traditionally champions of free speech. They contribute generously to the American Civil Liberties Union, an organization that defends First Amendment rights on a nonpartisan basis. But when the Chicago chapter took on Frank Collin as a client, Jewish members were outraged. “I feel strongly that the principle of free speech must be defended,” a woman wrote in a letter to the ACLU that was quoted in a Tribune column. “But in this case, please let a non-Jew do the defending.” A Jewish lawyer who served as a volunteer attorney for the ACLU resigned, the Tribune column went on. He wanted no part of an “organization that represents individuals whose ultimate goal is the destruction of us all.” Less than halfway through the 14-month controversy, the ACLU’s executive director told the Tribune the organization had lost between 700 and 1,000 members. “And the number is probably higher by now,” David Hamlin said. But ACLU members weren’t the only ones whose Jewishness and politics were in conflict. “It is a mystery,” Collin’s grandmother said of his rabid anti-Semitism. Her son-in-law, Collin’s father, was Jewish. Collin’s parents steadfastly refused to be interviewed. But by his grandmother’s account, her daughter, Virginia, and Max Collin lived “quietly in a Chicago suburb,” and Frank was the eldest of their four children. Virginia was Catholic, and Max was a German Jew who had survived the Dachau concentration camp in Germany. Coming to America, he changed his name from Cohen to Collin. Frank Collin went to Catholic elementary and high schools and attended Southern Illinois University before dropping out. Somewhere along the way, Frank Collin became infatuated with George Lincoln Rockwell, a white supremacist and self-proclaimed “commandant” of the American Nazi Party. Collin became the party’s Midwest director, a grandiose title considering that its membership nationally was estimated at a few hundred or less. When Rockwell was assassinated in 1967 by a disaffected follower, Collin expected to be named his successor. But he was passed over. Taking with him a few of Rockwell’s followers, Collin founded his own group, the National Socialist Party of America. He set up headquarters at 2519 W. 71st St., thinking he’d find a receptive audience on Chicago’s Southwest Side. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had been assaulted there while campaigning in 1966 for open housing in what was then a predominantly white neighborhood. Many residents were of Eastern European ancestry. They, too, had relatives who had suffered under Nazi occupation. So the sight of Nazi regalia was anathema, as Julian Kulas, a Ukrainian community leader, noted. “To dismiss the appearance of swastikas, brown shirts and jackboots on American soil a scant generation after (the Holocaust) betrays willful inattention to one of the most tragic episodes of human history,” Kulas wrote in a statement of solidarity with the Jewish community that was reported in the Tribune in June 1978. While the court battles with Skokie waged on, and thinking a dramatic move would get the media’s attention, Collin planned a rally in Chicago’s Marquette Park, where King had been attacked. The symbolism was patent: Collin’s group promised to be a bulwark against the black residents of nearby neighborhoods. A new confrontation between blacks and whites was the last thing Chicago’s leaders wanted. So the Chicago Park District put obstacles in Collin’s way. His group would have to post a $350,000 insurance bond. When the ACLU objected, saying that the amount was unreasonable, a federal judge reduced it to $60,000. At a second hearing, the judge found that, because Collin’s views were unpopular, brokers weren’t willing to write him an insurance policy, so he was given the right to march without posting a bond. Collin won his courtroom battles almost in spite of himself. “He told me, in effect, to go to h-e-l-l,” a judge said after an especially testy session early in the fight. “He said, in effect, he doesn’t care what I do that he’s got other plans.” But Collin did float his idea of a compromise. He wouldn’t march in Skokie if his group was allowed to hold a rally in Marquette Park. Once the bond requirement was lifted, the neo-Nazis marched twice in the park. Each time the police cut the demonstration short, in the face of counterdemonstrations. Rallies at the Daley and Kluczynski Federal Building plazas were marked by similar clashes. So in the end it was something of an anti-climax when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Collin’s right of free speech extended to Skokie. “After bitter controversy, the courts cleared the Skokie march, but Collin called it off,” the Tribune noted July 8, 1978. Collin disappeared from the political scene but not from the news. In 1980, he was convicted of sexually molesting young boys and sent to prison. After being released, he dabbled in paganism and new-age anthropology. He abandoned National Socialism for reasons as mysterious as those that brought him into the cult of Hitler. As his grandmother had said: “We don’t know how or when it started.” rgrossman@chicagotribune.com Related articles: Germany’s Nazi past, and the right-wingers who want to hide it The anti-Semitism of writer’s youth comes back to haunt him When we witness anti-Semitism, our response matters Jewish group again cites anti-Semitism from Trump administration

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March 11, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

The Legit Smit: ‘I turned from hate to the Lord’ – Ridgecrest Daily Independent

Michael Smit Staff Writer I usually don’t mention my past, but it’s something that has to be said,” Donald Baker told me as he leaned back in his bed at the Bella Sera nursing unit. “I don’t like to dwell upon the past, but what’s happening now is the same situation.” Before I arrived, he had asked the nurses to clear a space for me to sit next to his bed. Baker is 74 years old and has Parkinson’s disease. His speaking voice is nearly a whisper. There’s not much breath behind his voice, so the words sound as if they barely make it out of his lungs and trickle past his lips. I leaned in closer to hear what it was that needed to be said about his past. But instead of speaking, he pulled up his sleeve to reveal a small, bluish green mark. A Nazi swastika. I took out my notebook and prepared for a story. I wasn’t sure if I was going to need that notebook before arriving at Bella Sera. Rather than tracking down an interviewee for this edition of Residents of Ridgecrest, Baker had called me. I walked down the halls of the nursing home, looking into hospital-style rooms with white haired patients staring into empty space and I wondered if I was chasing an empty lead. This isn’t a demographic I have much experience talking to normally. In movies, the only conversation the nursing home patients can carry is cantankerous ramblings about nothing, as if they don’t have the better part of a century’s worth of sights, thoughts, and life stored within them. I arrived in his room to find some of those memories hanging on the wall. Among pictures of his family was a news article written about him with the headline “He Listened To Hitler — Now To God.” Baker said he joined the American Nazi Party as a young man in the mid 1960s. He even earned what he said was their highest honor, the Bronze Medal of Adolf Hitler. I asked how he first got involved in the American Nazi Party. He said he was in prison for stealing a car, and he had a sort of angel and demon on his shoulder. One inmate was trying to get him to reform and come to church. He said he even joined the church for a while. He was soon transferred to a different prison where he met a bodyguard for George Lincoln Rockwell, a man the BBC called “The American Hitler.” He was the founder of the American Nazi Party. As a young man, Baker found fraternity through hate easier than patiently reforming through love. He said he officially joined the American Nazi Party as soon as he got out of prison. I asked Baker what drove him to join the Nazis. I was expecting a complex answer of political revolution riddled with the dogma of racial superiority. Instead, his answer was simple and direct: they hated black and Jewish people. This was in the early 60s. The Civil Rights Movement was in full swing. School segregation had only recently ended, but other forms of segregation were still rampant through many states in the south. Baker said he was thrown in prison again along with seven other American Nazi members after they tried to disrupt the Democratic National Convention in 1964 in Atlanta, Georgia when Lyndon B. Johnson was nominated. In the middle of the convention floor, Baker yelled out, “Only Rockwell can save this nation. Johnson has betrayed his race!” Johnson would go on to sign the Civil Rights Act into law. Baker would be thrown in jail. Upon release, the American Nazis held a welcoming party for him and awarded him the Bronze Medal of Adolf Hitler. He expected to feel pride when he received the award, but instead he said he felt a deep deadness. Soon after that, Baker saw a preacher on TV and remembered the man he met in prison so many years ago. He bought a Bible and began reading it again, though he had to hide the book from other American Nazi members. Eventually, he left the American Nazi Party and joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. “And this is funny,” Baker chuckled, recalling the first time he saw his genealogy report, and important practice at the LDS church. “I found out I got Native, Jewish, and German blood. I would’ve been kicked out anyway!” Baker moved to Salt Lake City. He would later hitch hike to Bishop, then live in Trona for a while, before finally landing in Ridgecrest. He’s now an active participant with a local LDS church and says his favorite hobby is helping people. He regularly speaks with Ward 2, giving the testimony of his life’s radical changes. “This story has to get out so people don’t fall in the trap I did,” Baker said. “I’m not saying Donald Trump started it, but the influence is there.” He doesn’t like that Trump promised in his campaign to ban Muslims, then wrote an executive order attempting to partially do so. “Not all Muslims are terrorists,” Baker said. His history makes him worry when a politician tries to paint a wide group of people as the enemy. He sited evidence of this influence in threats and attacks against groups of people. A Jewish cemetery vandalized, Southwest Asians shot in the United States, a mosque set on fire and more mosques threatened. Baker worries that we could be on the brink of seeing history repeat itself. “Extremism breeds extremism,” he said. “Extremism,” feels like a fitting word for the modern American political climate. We’ve rarely ever been so polarized over politics, as almost every national news source has pointed out. Each side demonizes the other. Fiercely loyal political teams form. There’s no good destination this road leads to. I asked Baker what he would like to see instead. “We should treat every person like a brother,” he said. Extremism breeds extremism, but empathy also breeds empathy. We have been a diverse nation since the very beginning, and that diversity is our greatest strength. Diversity of thought, diversity of lifestyle, diversity of color, diversity of faith. We’ll disagree on policy from time to time, but let us learn from the past and always remember that we are brothers. What broke Baker out of his Nazi ideology is when he started listening. Listening to the pastor, listening to people of other races, listening to other ideas. So in this polarizing time, let’s stop talking sometimes and listen. I thanked Baker for his time and walked my way back through the halls of Bella Sera, looking through the doorways at patients and wondering of the things they’ve seen. ‘I turned from hate to the Lord.’ Michael Smit is the community/education and water reporter for the Daily Independent. When not busy reporting, he writes about interesting, everyday people and their lives. Have a story or know someone, email him at msmit@ridgecrestca.com. The views expressed are those of the columnist and do not necessarily represent the official stance of the Daily Independent.

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March 11, 2017   Posted in: George Lincoln Rockwell  Comments Closed

American Nazi Party – Wikipedia

The American Nazi Party (ANP) was first an American political party founded by George Lincoln Rockwell. Its headquarters were in Arlington, Virginia. Rockwell founded the organization as the World Union of Free Enterprise National Socialists (WUFENS), but renamed it the American Nazi Party in 1960.[2] The party was based largely upon the ideals and policies of Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Party in Germany during the Nazi era, and embraced its uniforms and iconography.[3][A] The Rockwell organization broke up shortly after he was assassinated in 1967. Since the late 1960s, there have been a number of small groups that have used the name, “American Nazi Party”. The WUFENS headquarters was located in a residence on Williamsburg Boulevard in Arlington, but was moved as the ANP headquarters to a house at 928 North Randolph Street (now a hotel and office building site). Rockwell and some party members also established a “Stormtrooper Barracks” in an old mansion owned by the widow of Willis Kern[7] in the Dominion Hills section of Arlington at what is now the Upton Hill Regional Park, the tallest hill in the county. After Rockwell’s death, the headquarters was moved again to one side of a duplex brick and concrete storefront at 2507 North Franklin Road which featured a swastika prominently mounted above the front door. This site was visible from busy Wilson Boulevard. Today, the Franklin Road address is often misidentified as Rockwell’s headquarters when in fact it was the successor organization’s last physical address in Arlington (now a coffeehouse).[8][9][10] Under Rockwell, the party embraced Nazi uniforms and iconography. [B] After several years of living in impoverished conditions, Rockwell began to experience some financial success with paid speaking engagements at universities where he was invited to express his controversial views as exercises in free speech. This inspired him to end the rancorous “Phase One” party tactics and begin “Phase Two”, a plan to recast the group as a legitimate political party by toning down the verbal and written attacks against non-whites, replacing the party rallying cry of “Sieg Heil!” with “White Power!”, limiting public display of the swastika, and entering candidates in local elections. On January 1, 1967, Rockwell renamed the ANP the National Socialist White People’s Party (NSWPP), a move that alienated some hard-line members. In 1966, it was renamed the National Socialist White Peoples Party, a conscious imitation of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Rockwell wanted a more ecumenical approach and felt that the swastika banner was impeding organizational growth. Matt Koehl, although a purist National Socialist, succeeded Rockwell as the new leader and this ended the American Nazi Party. Rockwell was assassinated by one of his own members. Thereafter, the members engaged in internecine disputes, and they were either expelled by Koehl or they resigned. After the assassination of Rockwell, the party dissipated and ad hoc organizations usurped the American Nazi Party logo. Those included James Burford in Chicago and John Bishop in Iowa.[11] The years 1966 and 1967 were in many ways the apogee of Rockwell’s fame and organization.[11] Famously, he was interviewed by Playboy magazine, an event that stirred controversy within the ranks.[11][12] At the time Rockwell had about 500 followers.[4] Before he could fully implement party reforms, Rockwell was assassinated on August 25, 1967 by a disgruntled follower, John Patler, who was part of a splinter group.[4] An assassination attempt was made on Rockwell on June 28, 1967. As Rockwell returned from shopping, he drove into the long driveway of the “Stormtrooper barracks” located in Arlington’s Dominion Hills subdivision and found it blocked by a felled tree and brush. Rockwell assumed that it was another prank by local teens. As a party member cleared the obstruction, two shots were fired at Rockwell from behind one of the swastika-embossed brick driveway pillars. One of the shots ricocheted off the car, right next to his head. Leaping from the car, Rockwell pursued the gunman. On June 30, Rockwell petitioned the Arlington County Circuit Court for a gun permit; no action was ever taken on his request. On August 25, 1967, while leaving the Econowash laundromat at the Dominion Hills Shopping Center, an assassin, hiding on the roof of the building, fired two bullets into Rockwell’s car through the windshield. One missed, the other hit his chest and ruptured his heart. His car slowly rolled backwards to a stop and Rockwell staggered out of the front passenger side door of the car, stood briefly while pointing upward at the strip mall’s rooftop where the shots had come from, and then collapsed on the pavement. He was pronounced dead at the scene.[7][13] Rockwell’s assailant was John Patler, a former ANP/NSWPP member whom Rockwell had ejected from the party for allegedly trying to introduce Marxist doctrine into the party’s platforms. Rockwell’s deputy commander, Matt Koehl, a staunch Hitlerist, assumed the leadership role after a party council agreed that he should retain command. Koehl continued some of Rockwells reforms such as emphasizing the prospect of a future all-white society, and toning down public denigration of non-whites. Koehl retained the swastika-festooned party literature and the pseudo-Nazi uniforms of the party’s “Storm Troopers” which were modeled on those worn by the Nazi Party’s Sturmabteilung. In 1968, Koehl moved the party to a new headquarters on 2507 North Franklin Road, clearly visible from Arlington’s main thoroughfare, Wilson Boulevard. He also established a printing press, a “George Lincoln Rockwell Memorial Book Store”, and member living quarters on property nearby.[citation needed] The party began to experience ideological divisions among its followers as it entered the 1970s. In 1970, member Frank Collin, who was himself secretly the son of a Jewish father, broke away from the group and founded the National Socialist Party of America in Chicago, which became famous for its attempt to march through Skokie, Illinois, home to many Holocaust survivors. This led to the United States Supreme Court case, National Socialist Party of America v. Village of Skokie. Other dissatisfied members of the NSWPP chose to support William Luther Pierce, and formed the National Alliance in 1974.[citation needed] Further membership erosion occurred as Koehl, drawing heavily upon the teachings of Hitlerian mystic Savitri Devi, began to suggest that National Socialism was more akin to a religious movement than a political one. He espoused the belief that Adolf Hitler was the gift of an inscrutable divine providence sent to rescue the white race from decadence and gradual extinction caused by a declining birth rate and miscegenation. Hitler’s death in 1945 was viewed as a type of martyrdom; a voluntary, Christ-like self-sacrifice, that looked forward to a spiritual resurrection of National Socialism at a later date when the Aryan race would need it the most. These esoteric beliefs led to disputes with the World Union of National Socialists, which Rockwell had founded and whose leader, Danish neo-Nazi Povl Riis-Knudsen, had been appointed by Koehl. Undaunted, Koehl continued to recast the party as a new religion in formation. Public rallies were gradually phased out in favor of low-key gatherings in private venues. On Labor Day 1979, in a highly unpopular move for some members, Koehl disbanded the party’s paramilitary “Storm Troopers”.[citation needed] The Koehl organization is now known as the New Order and it operates so far from the public spotlight that few of today’s neo-Nazis are aware of its existence or know that it is the linear descendant of Rockwell’s original ANP.[citation needed] On November 3, 1979, some members of the NSWPP and a Ku Klux Klan group attacked a Communist Workers’ Party protest march in Greensboro, North Carolina. The alliance of neo-Nazis and Klansmen shot and killed five marchers. Forty Klansmen and neo-Nazis were involved in the shootings with sixteen Klansmen and neo-Nazis being arrested. The six strongest cases were brought to trial first, but the two criminal trials resulted in the acquittal of the defendants by all-white juries. However, in a 1985 civil lawsuit, the survivors won a $350,000 judgment against the city, the Klansmen, and the neo-Nazis for violating the civil rights of the demonstrators. The shootings became known as the “Greensboro Massacre”.[citation needed] Since the late 1960s, there have been a number of small groups that have used the name “American Nazi Party”. Explanatory notes Citations Bibliography Further reading

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KALW Almanac: Thu. March 9, 2017 – KALW

Today Thursday, 9th of March of 2017 is the 68th day of the year.There are 297 days remaining until the end of the year.607 days until mid-term elections.1335 days until the next scheduled presidential election.The sun will rise this morning in San Francisco at 6:28and the sun will set this evening at 6:12.Today we will have 11 hours and 44 minutes of daylight. The solar transit will be at 12:20 mid-day. The first low tide was at 2:43 early this morning and the next low tide will be at 3:26 this afternoon. The first high tide will be at 8:50 this morning and the next high tide at 10:25 tonight The Moon is 89.7% illuminated; a Waxing Gibbous moon Moon Direction: 293.99 WNW Moon Altitude: -6.03 Moon Distance: 235282 mi The Next Full Moon will be Sunday Mar 12, 2017 at 7:53 am and our Next New Moon: Mar 27, 2017 at 7:57 pm Next Moonrise: Today at 3:31 pm Amerigo Vespucci Day Bang-Clang Day Barbie Day False Teeth Day Get Over It Day Joe Franklin Day Nametag Day National Crabmeat Day National Meatball Day Panic Day Popcorn Lovers Day World Kidney Day It’s also… Teachers’ Day or Eid Al Mo-a-lim (Lebanon) If today is your birthday… 1454 Amerigo Vespucci, Italian cartographer and explorer (d. 1512) 1824 Amasa Leland Stanford, American businessman and politician, founded Stanford University (d. 1893) 1890 Vyacheslav Molotov, Russian politician and diplomat, Soviet Minister of Foreign Affairs (d. 1986) 1892 Vita Sackville-West, English author, poet, and gardener (d. 1962) 1902 Will Geer, American actor (d. 1978) 1910 Samuel Barber, American pianist and composer (d. 1981) 1918 George Lincoln Rockwell, American sailor and politician, founded the American Nazi Party (d. 1967) 1918 Mickey Spillane, American crime novelist (d. 2006) 1926 Joe Franklin, American radio and television host (d. 2015) 1930 Ornette Coleman, American saxophonist, violinist, trumpet player, and composer (d. 2015) 1934 Yuri Gagarin, Russian colonel, pilot, and astronaut (d. 1968) 1942 John Cale, Welsh singer-songwriter, viola player, and producer 1954 Bobby Sands, PIRA volunteer; Irish republican; abstentionist MP (d. 1981) 1964 Juliette Binoche, French actress 1979 Oscar Isaac, Guatemalan-American actor 1987 Bow Wow, American rapper, actor, and television host On this day in history 1796 Napolon Bonaparte marries his first wife, Josphine de Beauharnais. 1842 Giuseppe Verdi’s third opera, Nabucco, receives its premire performance in Milan; its success establishes Verdi as one of Italy’s foremost opera writers. 1842 The first documented discovery of gold in California occurs at Rancho San Francisco, six years before the California Gold Rush. 1916 Mexican Revolution: Pancho Villa leads nearly 500 Mexican raiders in an attack against the border town of Columbus, New Mexico. 1933 Great Depression: President Franklin D. Roosevelt submits the Emergency Banking Act to Congress, the first of his New Deal policies. 1954 CBS television broadcasts the See It Now episode, “A Report on Senator Joseph McCarthy”, hosted by Edward R Murrow and produced by Fred Friendly. 1959 The Barbie doll makes its debut at the American International Toy Fair in New York. 1961 Sputnik 9 successfully launches, carrying a human dummy nicknamed Ivan Ivanovich, and demonstrating that Soviet Union was ready to begin human spaceflight. 1997 Comet HaleBopp: Observers in China, Mongolia and eastern Siberia are treated to a rare double feature as an eclipse permits Hale-Bopp to be seen during the day. 2011 Space Shuttle Discovery makes its final landing after 39 flights.

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