Archive for the ‘Golden Dawn’ Category

Refugees protest outside German embassy in Athens – Deutsche Welle

Refugees protest outside German embassy in Athens
Deutsche Welle
Golden Dawn seeks to exploit Greek refugee crisis 19.02.2016. The neofascist Golden Dawn party has returned to the national spotlight, stoking tensions over the creation of refugee hot spots and reception centers in Greece. Pavlos Zafiropoulos reports

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Refugees protest outside German embassy in Athens – Deutsche Welle

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August 3, 2017   Posted in: Golden Dawn  Comments Closed

Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF) Ichimoku Levels Point to Negative Stock Momentum – Evergreen Caller

Shares of Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF) opened the last session at 0.2000, touching a high of 0.2100 and a low of 0.2000 , yielding a change of0.00. The latest reading places the stock below the Ichimoku cloud which indicates negative momentum and a potential sellsignal for the equity.

The Ichimoku cloud is a favorite technical indicator used primarily in Asian markets. The cloud is one of the only indicators that is both forward and backward looking. The cloud produces better levels of support and resistance and is a breakout traders best friend. The cloud is also one of the easiest indicators to use. Any trader, regardless of skill level or expertise, can use the cloud to quickly and efficiently analyze any product on any time frame. The cloud shines in the fact that it can be universally applied to any trading plan by any trader.

It is a type of chart used in technical analysis to display support and resistance, momentum, and trend in one view. TenkanSen and KijunSen are similar to moving averages and analyzed in relationship to one another. When the shorter term indicator, TenkanSen, rises above the longer term indicator, KijunSen, the securities trend is typically positive. When TenkanSen falls below KijunSen, the securities trend is typically negative. TenkanSen and KijunSen as a group are then analyzed in relationship to the Cloud, which is composed of the area between Senkou A and Senkou B.A multi-faceted indicator designed to give support/resistance levels, trend direction, and entry/exit points of varying strengths. General theory behind this indicator states that if price action is above the cloud, the overall trend is bullish, and if below the cloud, the overall trend is bearish. There are also moving averages (the Tenkan and Kijun lines) which act like the MACD crossover signals with the Tenkan crossing from underneath the Kijun as a bullish signal, while crossing overhead giving a bearish signal.

It is no secret that most investors have the best of intentions when diving into the equity markets. Making sound, informed decisions can help the investor make the most progress when dealing with the markets. Often times, investors may think they have everything in order, but they still come out on the losing end. Investors may need to figure out ways to keep emotion out of stock picking. Sometimes trading on emotions can lead to poor results. Making hasty decisions and not paying attention to the correct data can lead to poor performing portfolios in the long-term.

Checking on some popular technical levels, Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF) has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of -64.85. The CCI technical indicator can be employed to help figure out if a stock is entering overbought or oversold territory. CCI may also be used to help discover divergences that may signal reversal moves. A CCI closer to +100 may provide an overbought signal, and a CCI near -100 may provide an oversold signal.

Tracking other technical indicators, the 14-day RSI is presently standing at 43.11, the 7-day sits at 39.93, and the 3-day is resting at 28.38 for Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF). The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a highly popular technical indicator. The RSI is computed base on the speed and direction of a stocks price movement. The RSI is considered to be an internal strength indicator, not to be confused with relative strength which is compared to other stocks and indices. The RSI value will always move between 0 and 100. One of the most popular time frames using RSI is the 14-day.

Moving averages have the ability to be used as a powerful indicator for technical stock analysis. Following multiple time frames using moving averages can help investors figure out where the stock has been and help determine where it may be possibly going. The simple moving average is a mathematical calculation that takes the average price (mean) for a given amount of time. Currently, the 7-day moving average is sitting at 0.23.

Lets take a further look at the Average Directional Index or ADX. The ADX measures the strength or weakness of a particular trend. Investors and traders may be looking to figure out if a stock is trending before employing a specific trading strategy. The ADX is typically used along with the Plus Directional Indicator (+DI) and Minus Directional Indicator (-DI) which point to the direction of the trend. The 14-day ADX for Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF) is currently at 21.91. In general, and ADX value from 0-25 would represent an absent or weak trend. A value of 25-50 would support a strong trend. A value of 50-75 would signify a very strong trend, and a value of 75-100 would point to an extremely strong trend.

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Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF) Ichimoku Levels Point to Negative Stock Momentum – Evergreen Caller

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July 30, 2017   Posted in: Golden Dawn  Comments Closed

Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) Moves Below Ichimoku Cloud – Evergreen Caller

Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) shares opened the last session at 0.26, touching a high of 0.26 and a low of 0.26 , yielding a change of-0.005. The latest reading places the stock belowthe Ichimoku cloud which indicates negative momentum and a potential sell signal.

The Ichimoku Cloud was originally called the Ichimoku Kinko Hyo. Where Ichimoku means one glance,Kinko balance and Hyo chart. Thus the full translation could best be described as one glance balanced chart. Originally developed by Goichi Hosada pre WWII, a newspaper journalist (published in 1969) who wanted to develop an Uber-indicator that could provide the trader with various levels of support/resistance, entry/exit points, direction of the trend, and strength of the signal.

The most basic theory of this indicator is that if the price is above the cloud, the overall trend is bullish while below the cloud is bearish, and in the cloud is non-biased or unclear. Lastly, when the price is above the cloud, then the top of the cloud will act as a general support level, and when price is below, the cloud base will act as resistance. But remember the cloud has thickness, and thus resistance does as well, which by making these thicker reduces the risk of a false breakout.

Investors might be looking into the magic eight ball trying to project where the stock market will be heading over the next few months. Some analysts believe that the market is ready to take a bearish turn, but others believe that there is still room for stocks to shoot higher. When the markets do have a sell-off, investors may be tempted to sell winners before they give up previous profits. Sometimes this may be justified, but other times this type of panic selling can cause investors to just have to repurchase shares at a higher price after the recovery. Keeping tabs on the underlying company fundamental data can help provide the investor with a better idea of whether to hold on to a stock or let it go.

Another popular tool among technical stock analysts is the moving average. Moving averages are considered to be lagging indicators that simply take the average price of a stock over a specific period of time. Moving averages can be very useful for identifying peaks and troughs. They may also be used to help the trader figure out proper support and resistance levels for the stock. Currently, the 200-day MA is sitting at 0.29, and the 50-day is 0.28.

The 14-day ADX for Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) is currently at 15.78. In general, and ADX value from 0-25 would represent an absent or weak trend. A value of 25-50 would support a strong trend. A value of 50-75 would signify a very strong trend, and a value of 75-100 would point to an extremely strong trend. Checking in on some other technical levels, the 14-day RSI is currently at 45.59, the 7-day stands at 44.64, and the 3-day is sitting at 40.35. The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a momentum oscillator that measures the speed and change of stock price movements. The RSI was developed by J. Welles Wilder, and it oscillates between 0 and 100. Generally, the RSI is considered to be oversold when it falls below 30 and overbought when it heads above 70. RSI can be used to detect general trends as well as finding divergences and failure swings.

At the time of writing, Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of -84.03. Developed by Donald Lambert, the CCI is a versatile tool that may be used to help spot an emerging trend or provide warning of extreme conditions. CCI generally measures the current price relative to the average price level over a specific time period. CCI is relatively high when prices are much higher than average, and relatively low when prices are much lower than the average. Investors may be watching other technical indicators such as the Williams Percent Range or Williams %R. The Williams %R is a momentum indicator that helps measure oversold and overbought levels. This indicator compares the closing price of a stock in relation to the highs and lows over a certain time period. A common look back period is 14 days. Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V)s Williams %R presently stands at -62.50. The Williams %R oscillates in a range from 0 to -100. A reading between 0 and -20 would indicate an overbought situation. A reading from -80 to -100 would indicate an oversold situation.

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Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) Moves Below Ichimoku Cloud – Evergreen Caller

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July 30, 2017   Posted in: Golden Dawn  Comments Closed

THINGS TO DO – July 29, 2017 – Allied News

THINGS TO DO

AGRICULTURE

The Mercer County 4-H Roundup will be Monday, July 31, through Friday, Aug. 4, at the 4-H Park on Route 19, Coolspring Township. The event is free to the public and open to all ages. Activities include food and nutrition judging, dairy cattle fitting contest, livestock shows and sales, exhibits, competitions, fundraisers, and more. Info: Call the Mercer County Extension Office at 724-662-3141.

BLOOD DRIVES

The American Red Cross is experiencing a critical, summer shortage of blood and platelet donations. Those who donate through Aug. 31 will be emailed a $5 Target eGiftCard. They are hosting these blood drives:

Noon to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 3, at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 3325 Morefield Road, Hermitage.

10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 4, at Cooper’s Lake, 148 Currie Road, Worth Township, Butler County.

10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 7 at Cooper’s Lake,148 Currie Road, Worth Township, Butler County.

Eligible blood donors are urged to schedule a donation today by using the Red Cross Blood Donor app, visiting redcrossblood.org or calling 1-800-REDCROSS (1-800-733-2767).

You can complete the RapidPass health history at redcrossblood.org/rapidpass. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

Central Blood Bank, which supplies all blood products for patients at Grove City Medical Center, Pine Township, is in need of blood and blood products. The hospital and Central Blood Bank are hosting a community blood drive from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 15, in the hospital’s education center. Donors must be at least 17 years old and weigh a minimum of 110 pounds. Most medications are acceptable, and donations can be made every 56 days. Walk-ins are welcome until 3 p.m. Aug. 15, and donors can pre-register by calling 724-450-7191.

BUS TRIPS

The Stoneboro Celebration Committee is sponsoring a bus trip to the Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh on Thursday, Aug. 17. The bus leave Anderson Coach and Travel, Greenville, at 8 a.m.; Conneaut Lake Golden Dawn at 8:30 a.m.; Meadville K-Mart at 9 a.m.; and Stoneboro Fire Hall at 9:30 a.m. The bus leaves the casino at 5 p.m. Cost is $30, which includes $20 in free play. Reservations and payments are due by Sunday, Aug. 13, to William Everall, P.O. Box 293, Stoneboro, PA 16153. Info: Call 724-376-2206. Another bus trip is being planned for Wednesday, Oct. 11, to Niagara Falls, N.Y.

CONCERTS

The Mercer Art Commission hosts the Brown Bag Concert Series on the Courthouse Square in Mercer from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Aug. 30. Lunch will be sold for $5. For more information, visit “The Mercer Art Commission” on Facebook.

The Mercer Community Band hosts the 40th season of its community concerts on Mercer’s Courthouse Square Friday nights through Aug. 11. Ice cream socials are hosted by local organizations and run 6 to 9 p.m.; musical guests play at 6 p.m., and the Mercer Community Band performs at 7:30 p.m. Admission is free. Rain location is Mercer High School auditorium, 545 W. Butler St. Info: Visit www.mercercommunityband.com

The Butler County Symphony summer lunch concerts are at noon on Wednesdays through Sept. 27 at the Symphony office in Butler. Concerts will also be broadcast to Diamond Park. This year’s series is dedicated to the memory of musician and friend Bruce Cunningham.

ETC.

The Portersville Steam Show is 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 3, through Sunday, Aug. 6, at the Portersville Steam Show Grounds, 1512 Perry Highway, Portersville. There will be a vintage village, farm animals, train rides, steam engines, flea market, crafts, food, kids’ activities, and more. Info: Call 724-285-7038 or visit www.portersvillesteamshow.org

Slippery Rock Area Parks and Recreation offers a variety of summer programs, camps and activities for kids and teens. Info: Call 724-794-8180, or visit slipperyrockpark-rec.org

FAIRS AND FESTIVALS

The “In Harmony” Heritage Music Festival is 10 a.m. today, July 29, at the Harmonist Barn, 303 Mercer St., Harmony, and 11 a.m. at the Mennonite Meetinghouse on Wise Road. Enjoy a variety of heritage music during the event, sponsored by Historic Harmony. There will also be a beer garden with local brews and wine tastings, food, a kids’ tent, and dance lessons.

Weekend passes for all concerts are $10. Harmony Museum members, seniors and youth pay $7. Children 5 and under are free. Visit InHarmonyFestival.com for more information. Tickets can be purchased at the event or online through eventbrite.com

The Volant Potter Fest is 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, July 29, in Volant. The village celebrates Harry Potter and will transform into Diagon Alley for a day of entertainment, shopping, activities, Potter-themed food and treats, wands, kids’ crafts, character meet-and-greet, and more.

Register for the “Fantastic drinks and where to find them” Family trail at Knockin Noggin Cidery and Winery by calling 724-704-0662. For more information about the festival, call Special-Teas, Etc. at 724-533-2629, or visit the Facebook event page at tinyurl.com/volantpotterfest

The 47th annual Jefferson Township Fair runs Tuesday, Aug. 8, through Saturday, Aug. 12, at the fairgrounds, 7409 Lamor Road. Enjoy livestock, truck and semi pulls, rides, games, homemade dinners, fair food, and more. Admission and parking are free; fees apply to grandstand events and rides. Info: Visit jeffersontwpfair.com or call 724-662-3310.

FUNDRAISERS

The Butler County Chamber of Commerce is hosting the 23rd annual Ladies’ Golf Outing on Wednesday, Aug. 2, at the Conley Resort, 740 Pittsburgh Road, Butler. Registration starts at 10 a.m. with an 11 a.m. shotgun start and includes a round of golf, brunch, beverages, contests, cocktail hour, dinner, prizes and awards. Cost is $90 per person or $340 per foursome. A gold foursome in $425 and includes tee sponsorship. Ladies’ League members will receive a 10 percent discount on fees. Info: Call the chamber at 724-283-2222 or email Jennifer@ButlerCountyChamber.com

The fourth annual Miles for McKeever 5K Trail Race and Hike is 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 2, in the scenic woodlands of the McKeever Environmental Learning Center, 55 McKeever Lane, Lake Township. Kids 10 and under can participate in a free half-mile fun run that starts at 6:30 p.m.

Cost is $20, and registration will be accepted until Wednesday morning. Refreshments and snacks will be provided, and there will be awards. Packet pickup and late registration is 4:30 to 6:45 p.m. in the dining hall. Proceeds will be used for education materials and trail maintenance at McKeever. Info: Visit www.mckeever.org or email julie@mckeever.org

Slippery Rock Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Team hosts the annual Tiny Davis Memorial Golf Outing on Saturday, Aug. 5, at Oakview Golf Club, 160 Ralston Road, Slippery Rock. Registration starts at noon, shotgun start is 1 p.m. The four-player scramble includes 18 holes, carts, snacks, refreshments, catered dinner, prizes, $10,000 hole-in-one contest and more. Cost is $300 per foursome. Register by Friday, July 28, by emailing srfiregolf@gmail.com or calling 724-794-3817. Proceeds benefit the fire company and rescue team.

The Western PA Ride for Kids is Sunday, Aug. 6, at Seneca Valley High School, 128 Seneca School Road, Harmony. Join the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation with any make or model of street legal motorcycle. Event is rain or shine; registration starts at 8:30 a.m., ride at 10:30 a.m. Raise money to T-shirts and jackets, and enter to win a new Honda motorcycle. Info: Visit www.rideforkids.org

The Conneaut Lake Area Historical Society hosts the second annual Paddlefest on Sunday, Aug. 6. All skills levels are welcome to join the event, which covers a 3-mile course starting at Fireman’s Beach, heading west into Huidekoper Bay, around Goat Island, and back to the beach. Cost is $30 and proceeds benefit the Society’s museum, artifacts and community outreach. Info and registration: Call 814-724-9841 or visit www.conneautlakehistory.com

The Friends of the Grove City Community Library is hosting the annual used book sale at the library, 125 W. Main St., Grove City. It will be open to the public Monday, Aug. 7, through Saturday, Aug. 19, during regular library hours. All proceeds benefit the library.

A book sale preview is 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 6; ticket holders will have early access to the sale, and can enjoy live music by Rich Samsa, light refreshments, raffles, and a coupon for one free bag of books during the second week of the sale. Tickets are $10 a person; kids under 12 are free; and the family rate is $15. Tickets will be sold at the door. Info: Call Friends member Debbie Loughry at 724-967-4082.

Join the Munnell Run Farm Foundation and the Mercer County Conservation District for a 3D Archery Shoot 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 12. The shoots are held rain or shine at the Farm, 753 Greenville Road, Coolspring Township. Cost is $10 a person, or $5 for ages 12 and under. There will be two different 3D target courses, a practice area, and door prize raffles. Info: Call 724-662-2242 and ask for Jacqueline or Larissa.

Moraine State Park, Portersville, offers Watercolor Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 16 at the Owlet Gift Shop on McDanel’s North Shore. Join the Moraine Preservation Fund volunteers for a watercolor workshop for adults. All skill levels are welcome. Participants are welcome to bring their own painting supplies, which will be provided if necessary. Cost is a $5 donation. Info and reservations: Call 724-368-9185.

The Plantation Park Campers Association Bocce League is hosting the third annual Bocce/ Corn Hole Tournament Aug. 26 at the camping facility, 734 Wilson Avenue, Mercer. Proceeds will benefit Pennsylvania Wounded Warriors, Inc. Gates will open at 9 a.m. and tournament play begins at 10 a.m. Aug. 26. Teams must register and pay entry fee at least one week in advance. For details contact Chairman Joe Rizzo at jriz35@hotmail.com. A $20 entry fee is asked of all participants and spectators will be asked for a $5 donation at the gate. Food is included for everyone. There will be other games and an American Auction with an array of baskets and prizes available.

KIDS’ STUFF

Register now for the Mercer County Conservation District’s “Children’s Summer Discovery” programs. Classes run from 8 to 11:30 a.m. on Tuesdays at Munnell Run Farm, Coolspring Township: Aug. 1 and 15. There’s story time, outdoor adventures, snacks, crafts, and more. Register by the Friday prior to the class. Cost is $5 per class. Info: Call 724-662-2242 and ask for Jacqueline or Larissa.

LIBRARY EVENTS

Mercer Area Library hosts these programs and events:

Geocache Find Week, Sunday, July 30, through Saturday, Aug. 5. Complete a geocache challenge on your own time, and register for prizes. Contact the library for details.

A book sale cart is located next to the main entrance. There are hardcover and paperback books, many of them brand new.

“Don’t look down” is the theme for this year’s Mercer Area Friends of the Library fundraiser to replace some carpeting in the library. Flooring is being sold for $10 a square, and they can be done in memory or in honor of someone. The Friends have committed to match the first $5,000 in donations. Get a donation form at the circulation desk.

The Friends of the Library hosts these events: Basket raffle drawing in August; meetings at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 13 and Dec. 6 at the library; third annual wine tasting Nov. 4; and book sale and luncheon in the fall.

Mercer Area Library is at 110 E. Venango St., Mercer. It is open 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. For more information, call 724-662-4233, email mercerarealibrary@zoominternet.net or visit mercerarealibrary.org

OUTDOORS

Jennings Environmental Education Center, 2951 Prospect Road, Brady Township, hosts these events:

Celebrate the Bloom, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. today, July 29. Enjoy walks, workshops, demonstrations, bonfire, local food, artisans vendors and entertainment. Admission is free. Info: Call 724-794-6011 or visit www.celebratethebloom.wordpress.com

Jennings Prairie Walks, 2 p.m. Sundays July 30 and Aug. 6. Meet in the prairie parking area. Explore the unique prairie ecosystem at Jennings. The hot, midsummer weather will bring the spectacular blazing star and other prairie flowers to peak bloom during late July and early August.

REUNIONS

The Lavina Williams Eakin and William John Eakin Family Reunion is 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 5, at the Clintonville pavilion. Election of officers will be held.

The annual O’Conner Family Reunion is at noon Sunday, Aug. 6, at Grove City Memorial Park. Lunch starts at 1 p.m. Please bring a covered dish and a dessert or fruit to share. Bring your own plates and utensils. Cold drinks and coffee will be provided. There will also be bingo, and games for all ages. Bring a wrapped gift for bingo prizes. Bring a non-perishable food item for the “Feed an O’Conner” food box, and an item for the raffle ticket sale, which funds the reunions. Info: Call Joyce Buchanan at 724-287-5299.

Grove City High School class of 1972 will hold their 45th class reunion on Saturday, Aug. 19. They are updating class information. Please notify us of any changes to status, email and home addresses as soon as possible. Please email information to: Carol Bryer Maxwell at cmaxwell@zoominternet.net or Mary Jo Bryer Palmer at emjpalmer@zoominternet.net

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THINGS TO DO – July 29, 2017 – Allied News

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July 30, 2017   Posted in: Golden Dawn  Comments Closed

Barbara Jean Fusco – Ellwood City Ledger

Barbara Jean Fusco, 64, of 602 Palo Alto Drive, Perry Township, passed away in her residence on Tuesday, July 25, 2017, after her battle with cancer.

Born in Beaver Falls, Barbara was the daughter of the late John and Boneda Cox Searfoss. She married Jim G. Fusco, Jr. on August 12, 1995. Barb was a 1970 graduate of Beaver Falls High School and she retired from Loccisano’s Golden Dawn where she was a deli manager. Barb was active with the Girl Scouts during the 1980’s. She was an avid reader and she loved yard sales, but most of all, she loved her family.

Barb is survived by her husband, Jim, at home; a daughter and son-in-law, Bobbie Jo and Brian Pino of Volant, Pa.; a son, Robert Searfoss and his fianc, Kevin Polchar of Pittsburgh; two grandchildren, Brianna and Collin Callahan; a brother, John “Joe” Searfoss, and a sister-in-law, Ruth Searfoss.

In addition to her parents, Barbara was preceded in death by a daughter, Christina Callahan; a brother, Charles Searfoss, and two sisters, Carol Gosseck and Shirley Shoaf.

Friends and family will be received in Barb’s home on Thursday, July 27, 2017, from 1 to 5 p.m.

Memorial contributions can be made in Barb’s name to the American Cancer Society.

Arrangements were entrusted to the JOSEPH A. TOMON JR. FUNERAL HOME & CREMATORY, 97 Grim Ave., Ellport.

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Barbara Jean Fusco – Ellwood City Ledger

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Exploring the river beaches and extraordinary wildlife of Brazil’s alternative Amazon – Wanderlust

Alex Robinson discovers a land of rhythmic cities, wild archipelagos and the Tapajs a white-sand wonder unlike anywhere else in Brazil. On his way he encounters capybara and river dolphins

The trees parted at the top of the ridge and Alter do Cho lay at our feet. The rainforest gently dropped to a lagoon crowned with a lush hill and spanned by twin back-to-back half-moon bays of snow-soft white sand. Wooden fishing boats bobbed on the horizon and the long sweep of Ponta do Cururu beach stretched into the water like white silk on ultramarine.

Inland, the wall of dark green trees ran unbroken by roads or cities for 2,500 kilometres. The floral scents of the forest mixed with the warm air wafting in from the bays, islands and beaches. This could have been the coast of Thailand, but I was actually on the banks of a Brazilian river the Tapajs a clearwater tributary of the Amazon set deep in lowland tropical forest.

Beach at Alter do Cho (Alex Robinson)

While most travellers access the forest from the Andes through Peru or Ecuador Id chosen to visit a very different stretch, closer to the rivers mouth in Brazil, where vast waterways flowed as wide as small seas. On TV, the Amazon was always being wandered by sweaty, insect-baffled explorers with thick trousers tucked into their socks, but with new flights bringing this region within easy reach, I wanted to see an alternative side to this legendary river: balmy, beach-lined and bug-free.

My flight had brought me to Belm, the capital of Amazon-Brazils Par state. From above, its cluster of jagged concrete spires appeared almost overrun by great swathes of forest, except where a huge chocolate-brown river dotted with tankers scythed through the green. Stepping off the plane, the air hit me immediately: aromatic, as warm as melting butter and energised by the hot, bright sunlight. Welcome to the Amazon, said my guide, Gelderson.

We drove through streets of handsome colonial houses lined with towering mango trees and flowering jacarandas, stopping to drop my bags at the hotel before walking down to the riverfront. Here, a glass-fronted restaurant complex had taken over an old quayside warehouse that was, in turn, watched over by an ancient Portuguese fort, its battlements punctured with rusted cannons.

The Amazon is cities, too, Gelderson insisted, and promised a crash course in Belms urban culture. Lets start with the food, he smiled. The tacaca (prawn soup) that arrived was spiced with jambu leaves and tangy with tucupi, a sauce made from manioc juice and highly toxic if not prepared correctly. It tingled in the mouth like popping candy.

The tambaqui that followed was succulent like steak and had none of that muddy flavour you often get with river fish. I washed it down with sweet bacuri juice, made from an Amazon fruit unique to the forests around Belm.

After eating, we wandered incense-filled baroque churches, admired the Renaissance Italian paintings in the lavish rubber-boom-era Opera House and browsed street stalls where forest Amerindians sold bracelets woven with coloured seeds as hard as mountain pebbles. We made our way to the wrought-iron market hall of Ver-o-Peso, inspired by the Belle poque architecture of Gustave Eiffel.

The rising city of Belm (Alex Robinson)

I stood and watched the men unloading baskets of blackcurrant-dark palm berries and tiger-striped catfish from double-decker wooden riverboats. Night arrived with the cracking of thunder. We drank ice-cold beer at the Ziggy hostel club late into the evening, until the 70-something Dona Onete arrived on stage in her wheelchair, a wicked ear-to-ear grin on her face and a band of exuberant musicians for company. Then no one could keep still.

No meio do piti, eu fui cantar carimb (Surrounded by the smell of river fish, I went to sing carimb) she sang, as old men spun wasp-waisted teenagers around in skirt-flying swirls.

Her carimb a samba-like rhythm unique to northern Brazil, named after the drum that sets its tempo beat long into the night. L no Ver-o-Peso, urubu sobrevoando (Down at the Ver-o-Peso market as a vulture flew overhead).

I woke late the following morning and the day seemed to pass in a haze of food, music and dance. But then it was time to leave the city and head into the wild. At the airport, Gelderson pressed a bottle of rum filled with jambu leaves into my hands. Youve had a taste of the urban Amazon, he reminded me, as good as his word. Remember what youre missing and come back soon.

The plane climbed and we followed the course of the great river, a glinting artery of reflected sunlight surrounded by endless green. A billion lush stems were broken only by the splashes of colour from solitary flowering trees, flecked rose-pink ibis and soaring black-and-white king vultures.

If Belm had been a city, Alter do Cho (half an hours drive from Santarm airport) was barely a hamlet. It also sat sleepily at the mouth of one of the Amazons greatest tributaries: the Tapajs. It was here that my guide, Arkus, who looked as fit and tanned as a Californian surfer, showed me round. It took less than five minutes to see the main plaza but an hour to climb to the outlook and soak in its beauty; the view across the river bays, beaches and islands was more than reward. I drifted to sleep that night serenaded by the music of singing cicadas and tree frogs, eager to dive into nature the following day.

In golden dawn light, we walked to the riverfront and stopped at a two-storey riverboat with a polished mahogany galley and swinging hammocks. Arkus introduced me to its captain, Taketomei, a fifty-something man, slim, toned and burnt a fierce nut-brown by the Amazon sun. His father was one of thousands of Japanese economic migrants to have come to the Brazilian Amazon between the First and Second World Wars to trade; there were still whole towns here, like Tom-Au, that were almost entirely Japanese, he told me.

Capybara (Alex Robinson)

Other passengers joined us onboard: a couple from So Paulo and a local carimb dancer, Eliane, who had long black hair and fierce dark eyes set in an oval face. As we set out across the clear blue river, Eliane explained that she was a Boror Amerindian.

We are a new tribe, she told me, her fierce expression warming to a smile, made up of the fragments of many nations who came together at Alter do Cho less than one hundred years ago.

Taketomeis mother was also an Amazon tribeswoman, I learned. His parents had fallen in love over a basket of traded vegetables, he said, and, as a boy, he had cruised all the rivers of the Amazon, from the Javari on the distant Peruvian border to the river mouth at Belm, selling groceries to caboclo peasants (indigenous people of mixed African or European descent) and Amerindian villagers.

It took us around an hour to cross the 15km-wide Tapajs. We saw river turtles and bubble-gum-pink dolphins as well as snowy-white egrets wading in the shallows, little fish in their beaks. Then we moored on a broad beach that stretched for kilometres along the river, backed by forest. Time to swim, said Eliane, now dressed in a bikini and sporting a sun hat and glasses. I hesitated. What about piranhas?

She and Arkus laughed gently. Nothing will bite you here. There arent even mosquitoes on the Tapajs. And they headed along the fluffy talcum-powder beach and splashed into the water.

We spent the afternoon walking trails in the national forest reserve, wandering past towering kapok trees, the roots of which looked like flying buttresses. Capuchin monkeys looked curiously down at us from the branches, and iridescent manakin birds as small and fleet as a wren flitted through the understorey. I saw how the local community tapped rubber from the forest, scoring the trees with a metal claw, allowing the sap to collect in a cup before moulding it into sheets and hanging it out to dry like T-shirts on a clothing-line.

Monkey in branches of a tree (Alex Robinson)

I spent the next few days exploring the wilds around the village.

I woke in the morning light to canoe through flooded forest, watching kingfishers dart and fishing eagles glide. I saw dolphins playing at sunset off the tip of the 2km-long Ponta do Cururu beach and, after dark, Arkus and I searched the trees with torches for sloths and night monkeys, their eyes as big and shiny as ten-pence pieces.

My last evening here was spent at a beach barbecue at one of the remote lagoons, a short boat-ride from Alter do Cho. As the sun set, a guitar and drums were pulled out and people danced the carimb with hula hoops. Then Arkus built a fire on the sand with driftwood and cooked a freshly caught Surubim catfish on a mesh griddle. The succulent fish came with freshly squashed acai juice and pulpy, tart cupuau fruit. In the boat on the way back, it was as if we were floating on the Milky Way, the starry sky mirrored in the glassy Tapajs water.

Id sampled Amazon culture and seen the mossie-free bar beaches, but now I yearned for the Amazon of TV mythology: insects and entangled vines, snakes and crocodiles. And what better way to get close to it than by staying in a floating jungle lodge, bobbing on a tributary just off the Amazon itself?

It took a few hours to get there first flying to Manaus, and then taking a jeep and speedboat to Pedro Netos Amazon Eco Adventures lodge on the Urubu River. With Pedro pointing out a wealth of wildlife along the way, we spied metre-long macaws shrieking overhead, black-collared hawks roosting in the trees and a troop of howler monkeys delicately plucking leaves.

We arrived at dusk and I quickly slapped on the repellent, almost pleased to see mosquitoes. After a hearty supper of rice, beans and river fish, Pedro bustled me into a metal launch and we headed out in search of crocodiles and caiman. The riverbanks were bursting with life.

Tall tiger herons and tiny, delicate jacanas that looked like elongated moorhens stalked the mud, and the air was vibrant with the call of frogs and insects. Pedro shined a bright lamp and caught red eyes drifting across the water. We moved closer and found a caiman as big as a man frozen in the light. It disappeared under the murky surface with a rapid whip of its tail. Over the next few days, I saw boa constrictors, toucans and otters, capybara (sheep-sized guinea pigs) and piranhas, which we pulled gnashing from the river on fishing line baited with giblets. But Pedro saved the most spectacular sight of all for my last day.

The Negro meets the Amazon (Alex Robinson)

We took a scenic flight out of Manaus and headed over the Rio Negro another of the Amazons tributaries for Anavilhanas, the worlds largest archipelago of river islands. Below us, thousands of green streaks dotted its black water; then we circled back downstream to where the Negro met the Amazon in a swirl of tan and black waters. Divided by different water densities, the rivers flowed side by side, without mixing, to form one huge stream that snaked into the distance. Boats dotted the water and hundreds of tributaries trickled from the forest, stretching as far as I could see in every direction, to every horizon.

It was then that I realised I had barely dipped a toe in the Brazilian Amazon. Id seen vibrant jungle cities, vast beach-fringed rivers, tributaries teeming with wildlife, sweeping archipelagos and the magnificent sight of two rivers flowing into one. It was more than I would have experienced had I visited on a typical excursion from one of the Andean countries, yet there was so much more to see. Brazils Amazon covers an area half as big as India again.

Over the horizon were country-sized wetlands and tabletop mountain ranges as large as Britain, savannahs, giant waterfalls and hundreds more rivers bigger than the greatest in Europe. Like the carimb singer Id seen on my first night in Belm, it had succeeded in pulling off that rarest of dramatic feats: it had left me wanting more.

In Belm, the author travelled with Gelderson Pinheiros Rumo Norte Expeditions, who also run trips throughout the Amazon. In Alter do Cho, guide Arkus Rodrigues is available for hiking and river trips (arkusrodrigues@hotmail.com, +55 93 991 494174; from 25pp). Amazon Eco Adventures run three-day trips on the Urubu River (contact company for pricing).

Main image: Beach at Alter do Cho (Alex Robinson)

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Exploring the river beaches and extraordinary wildlife of Brazil’s alternative Amazon – Wanderlust

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Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V)’s RCI Heading Towards a Potential Reversal – FLBC News

Shares of Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) are nearing some key technical levels as the Rank Correlation indicator has trending higher over the past few sessions, nearing potential overbought territory. Crossing the 80 mark would suggestthat a chance of a reversal is increasing.

The Rank Correlation Index (RCI) is based on an analysis algorithm by Charles Spearman. It uses a combination of price change data and time change data to identify potential changes in market sentiment, thereby exposing turning points. Zero crossings are seen as buy and sell signals, with tops and bottoms yielding overbought and oversold information.

While traders are taking a second look at how shares of Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) have been performing lately, we can examine some additional key indicators. A favorite tool among technical stock analysts is the moving average. Moving averages are considered to be lagging indicators that simply take the average price of a stock over a specific period of time. Moving averages can be very useful for identifying peaks and troughs. They may also be used to help the trader figure out proper support and resistance levels for the stock. Currently, the 200-day MA is sitting at 0.29, and the 50-day is 0.28.

The 14-day ADX for Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) is currently at 14.94. In general, and ADX value from 0-25 would represent an absent or weak trend. A value of 25-50 would support a strong trend. A value of 50-75 would signify a very strong trend, and a value of 75-100 would point to an extremely strong trend. Checking in on some other technical levels, the 14-day RSI is currently at 48.02, the 7-day stands at 48.96, and the 3-day is sitting at 46.64. The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a momentum oscillator that measures the speed and change of stock price movements. The RSI was developed by J. Welles Wilder, and it oscillates between 0 and 100. Generally, the RSI is considered to be oversold when it falls below 30 and overbought when it heads above 70. RSI can be used to detect general trends as well as finding divergences and failure swings.

At the time of writing, Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of 13.23. Developed by Donald Lambert, the CCI is a versatile tool that may be used to help spot an emerging trend or provide warning of extreme conditions. CCI generally measures the current price relative to the average price level over a specific time period. CCI is relatively high when prices are much higher than average, and relatively low when prices are much lower than the average. Investors may be watching other technical indicators such as the Williams Percent Range or Williams %R. The Williams %R is a momentum indicator that helps measure oversold and overbought levels. This indicator compares the closing price of a stock in relation to the highs and lows over a certain time period. A common look back period is 14 days. Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V)s Williams %R presently stands at -37.50. The Williams %R oscillates in a range from 0 to -100. A reading between 0 and -20 would indicate an overbought situation. A reading from -80 to -100 would indicate an oversold situation.

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Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V)’s RCI Heading Towards a Potential Reversal – FLBC News

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University of Auckland takes lectures to the pub, following international trend – Stuff.co.nz

SHANI WILLIAMS

Last updated15:14, July 24 2017

CHRIS SKELTON/STUFF

Golden Dawn manager Nick Harrison will be raising his glass to knowledge on August 29.

Auckland academics are ditching the lecture theatre for the city’s bars.

The University of Auckland will send 20 academics to lecture at 10 Auckland bars as a part of a worldwide initiative next month.

The event, called “Raising the Bar”, aims to make education a greater part of the city’s culture by giving the community the chance to engage with leading academics in a friendly, accessible and laid back atmosphere.

The initiative originated in New York in 2015 and is designed to break down the perception that higher education deepens socioeconomic inequality by pushing away prospective students.

READ MORE: Placebo effect likely behind Te Kiri Gold testimonials, Dr Siouxsie Wiles says

Raising the Bar quickly spread to Melbourne, Sydney, San Francisco, London, Hong Kong and now Auckland.

University of Auckland director of alumni relations and development Mark Bentley said the lecture topics would reflect the younger “Ted Talk generation”.

The sessions, being held on August 29, would be fascinating, quick and informative, he said.

Topics will range from life among robots, why terrorists want to kill us, imagining a world without prisons and the brain of sharks.

Bentley said pubs had been host to great conversations for as long as they had existed.

“Pubs are not about alcohol, they are about friendship and good conversations and we are glad we can continue and expand that worthy tradition,” he said.

It is expected more than 1500 Aucklanders will attend the event, with a few locations selling out 24 hours after tickets were released on Friday.

Thomas Gregory, who will talk about the human cost of drone strikes at Tom Tom Bar and Eatery, said lecturing in a pub was a dream gig but a little nerve-racking too.

“If students get bored of my lectures they usually just sneak out early or twiddle with their phones – but a room full of rowdy punters could be interesting,” he said.

Well-known academics such as microbiologist Siouxie Wiles andsociologist Tracey McIntoshwill also present.

The selected bars are in close proximity to one another so attendees may be able to visit up to two lectures on the night.

Golden Dawn manager Nicolas Harrison said events like Raising the Bar were a perfect way for bars to contribute more to the community than just supplying alcohol.

Other locations include Sweat Shop, Birdcage Bar and Fort Street Union.

Registrations opened on July 20 and the public are urged to get in early to secure a bar stool.

For a full list of speakers, topics and venues or to register visit rtbevent.com/auckland

-Stuff

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University of Auckland takes lectures to the pub, following international trend – Stuff.co.nz

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Buy, Sell or Hold? A Look at What the Technicals Are Saying About Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) – Sheridan Daily

Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) is on traders radar as the shares have moved above the MACD Histogram line, indicating a bullish trend. Shares recently touched0.275 on a recent bid.

The MACD is calculated by subtracting the value of a 26-day exponential moving average from a 12-day exponential moving average. A 9-day dotted exponential moving average of the MACD (the signal line) is then plotted on top of the MACD. Taking a step further,the MACD-Histogram, which was developed by Thomas Aspray in 1986, measures the distance between MACD and its signal line (the 9-day EMA of MACD).

Like MACD, the MACD-Histogram is also an oscillator that fluctuates above and below the zero line. Aspray developed the MACD-Histogram to anticipate signal line crossovers in MACD. Because MACD uses moving averages and moving averages lag price, signal line crossovers can come late and affect the reward-to-risk ratio of a trade. Bullish or bearish divergences in the MACD-Histogram can alert chartists to an imminent signal line crossover in MACD.

Investors may be taking a look at some additional technical numbers on shares of Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V). The 14-day RSI is currently spotted at 48.02, the 7-day is at 48.96, and the 3-day is sitting at 46.64. The RSI, or Relative Strength Index, is a widely used technical momentum indicator that compares price movement over time. The RSI was created by J. Welles Wilder who was striving to measure whether or not a stock was overbought or oversold. The RSI may be useful for spotting abnormal price activity and volatility. The RSI oscillates on a scale from 0 to 100. The normal reading of a stock will fall in the range of 30 to 70. A reading over 70 would indicate that the stock is overbought, and possibly overvalued. A reading under 30 may indicate that the stock is oversold, and possibly undervalued.

In terms of CCI levels, Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) currently has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of 13.23. Investors and traders may use this indicator to help spot price reversals, price extremes, and the strength of a trend. Many investors will use the CCI in conjunction with other indicators when evaluating a trade. The CCI may be used to spot if a stock is entering overbought (+100) and oversold (-100) territory. The 14-day ADX is 14.94. Many technical chart analysts believe that an ADX reading over 25 would suggest a strong trend. A level under 20 would indicate no trend, and a reading from 20-25 would suggest that there is no clear trend signal. The ADX is typically plotted along with two other directional movement indicator lines, the Plus Directional Indicator (+DI) and Minus Directional Indicator (-DI). Some analysts believe that the ADX is one of the best trend strength indicators available.

Investors may be studying other technical indicators like the Williams Percent Range or Williams %R. The Williams %R is a momentum indicator that helps measure oversold and overbought levels. This indicator compares the closing price of a stock in relation to the highs and lows over a certain time period. A common look back period is 14 days. Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V)s Williams %R presently stands at -37.50. The Williams %R oscillates in a range from 0 to -100. A reading between 0 and -20 would indicate an overbought situation. A reading from -80 to -100 would indicate an oversold situation. Looking at some moving average levels on shares of Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V), the 200-day is at 0.29, the 50-day is 0.28, and the 7-day is sitting at 0.28. Moving averages can help identify trends and price reversals. They may also be used to help spot support and resistance levels. Moving averages are considered to be lagging indicators meaning that they confirm trends. A certain stock may be considered to be on an uptrend if trading above a moving average and the average is sloping upward. On the other side, a stock may be considered to be in a downtrend if trading below the moving average and sloping downward.

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Buy, Sell or Hold? A Look at What the Technicals Are Saying About Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) – Sheridan Daily

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Refugees protest outside German embassy in Athens – Deutsche Welle

Refugees protest outside German embassy in Athens Deutsche Welle Golden Dawn seeks to exploit Greek refugee crisis 19.02.2016. The neofascist Golden Dawn party has returned to the national spotlight, stoking tensions over the creation of refugee hot spots and reception centers in Greece. Pavlos Zafiropoulos reports … and more »

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Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF) Ichimoku Levels Point to Negative Stock Momentum – Evergreen Caller

Shares of Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF) opened the last session at 0.2000, touching a high of 0.2100 and a low of 0.2000 , yielding a change of0.00. The latest reading places the stock below the Ichimoku cloud which indicates negative momentum and a potential sellsignal for the equity. The Ichimoku cloud is a favorite technical indicator used primarily in Asian markets. The cloud is one of the only indicators that is both forward and backward looking. The cloud produces better levels of support and resistance and is a breakout traders best friend. The cloud is also one of the easiest indicators to use. Any trader, regardless of skill level or expertise, can use the cloud to quickly and efficiently analyze any product on any time frame. The cloud shines in the fact that it can be universally applied to any trading plan by any trader. It is a type of chart used in technical analysis to display support and resistance, momentum, and trend in one view. TenkanSen and KijunSen are similar to moving averages and analyzed in relationship to one another. When the shorter term indicator, TenkanSen, rises above the longer term indicator, KijunSen, the securities trend is typically positive. When TenkanSen falls below KijunSen, the securities trend is typically negative. TenkanSen and KijunSen as a group are then analyzed in relationship to the Cloud, which is composed of the area between Senkou A and Senkou B.A multi-faceted indicator designed to give support/resistance levels, trend direction, and entry/exit points of varying strengths. General theory behind this indicator states that if price action is above the cloud, the overall trend is bullish, and if below the cloud, the overall trend is bearish. There are also moving averages (the Tenkan and Kijun lines) which act like the MACD crossover signals with the Tenkan crossing from underneath the Kijun as a bullish signal, while crossing overhead giving a bearish signal. It is no secret that most investors have the best of intentions when diving into the equity markets. Making sound, informed decisions can help the investor make the most progress when dealing with the markets. Often times, investors may think they have everything in order, but they still come out on the losing end. Investors may need to figure out ways to keep emotion out of stock picking. Sometimes trading on emotions can lead to poor results. Making hasty decisions and not paying attention to the correct data can lead to poor performing portfolios in the long-term. Checking on some popular technical levels, Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF) has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of -64.85. The CCI technical indicator can be employed to help figure out if a stock is entering overbought or oversold territory. CCI may also be used to help discover divergences that may signal reversal moves. A CCI closer to +100 may provide an overbought signal, and a CCI near -100 may provide an oversold signal. Tracking other technical indicators, the 14-day RSI is presently standing at 43.11, the 7-day sits at 39.93, and the 3-day is resting at 28.38 for Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF). The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a highly popular technical indicator. The RSI is computed base on the speed and direction of a stocks price movement. The RSI is considered to be an internal strength indicator, not to be confused with relative strength which is compared to other stocks and indices. The RSI value will always move between 0 and 100. One of the most popular time frames using RSI is the 14-day. Moving averages have the ability to be used as a powerful indicator for technical stock analysis. Following multiple time frames using moving averages can help investors figure out where the stock has been and help determine where it may be possibly going. The simple moving average is a mathematical calculation that takes the average price (mean) for a given amount of time. Currently, the 7-day moving average is sitting at 0.23. Lets take a further look at the Average Directional Index or ADX. The ADX measures the strength or weakness of a particular trend. Investors and traders may be looking to figure out if a stock is trending before employing a specific trading strategy. The ADX is typically used along with the Plus Directional Indicator (+DI) and Minus Directional Indicator (-DI) which point to the direction of the trend. The 14-day ADX for Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GDMRF) is currently at 21.91. In general, and ADX value from 0-25 would represent an absent or weak trend. A value of 25-50 would support a strong trend. A value of 50-75 would signify a very strong trend, and a value of 75-100 would point to an extremely strong trend.

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July 30, 2017   Posted in: Golden Dawn  Comments Closed

Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) Moves Below Ichimoku Cloud – Evergreen Caller

Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) shares opened the last session at 0.26, touching a high of 0.26 and a low of 0.26 , yielding a change of-0.005. The latest reading places the stock belowthe Ichimoku cloud which indicates negative momentum and a potential sell signal. The Ichimoku Cloud was originally called the Ichimoku Kinko Hyo. Where Ichimoku means one glance,Kinko balance and Hyo chart. Thus the full translation could best be described as one glance balanced chart. Originally developed by Goichi Hosada pre WWII, a newspaper journalist (published in 1969) who wanted to develop an Uber-indicator that could provide the trader with various levels of support/resistance, entry/exit points, direction of the trend, and strength of the signal. The most basic theory of this indicator is that if the price is above the cloud, the overall trend is bullish while below the cloud is bearish, and in the cloud is non-biased or unclear. Lastly, when the price is above the cloud, then the top of the cloud will act as a general support level, and when price is below, the cloud base will act as resistance. But remember the cloud has thickness, and thus resistance does as well, which by making these thicker reduces the risk of a false breakout. Investors might be looking into the magic eight ball trying to project where the stock market will be heading over the next few months. Some analysts believe that the market is ready to take a bearish turn, but others believe that there is still room for stocks to shoot higher. When the markets do have a sell-off, investors may be tempted to sell winners before they give up previous profits. Sometimes this may be justified, but other times this type of panic selling can cause investors to just have to repurchase shares at a higher price after the recovery. Keeping tabs on the underlying company fundamental data can help provide the investor with a better idea of whether to hold on to a stock or let it go. Another popular tool among technical stock analysts is the moving average. Moving averages are considered to be lagging indicators that simply take the average price of a stock over a specific period of time. Moving averages can be very useful for identifying peaks and troughs. They may also be used to help the trader figure out proper support and resistance levels for the stock. Currently, the 200-day MA is sitting at 0.29, and the 50-day is 0.28. The 14-day ADX for Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) is currently at 15.78. In general, and ADX value from 0-25 would represent an absent or weak trend. A value of 25-50 would support a strong trend. A value of 50-75 would signify a very strong trend, and a value of 75-100 would point to an extremely strong trend. Checking in on some other technical levels, the 14-day RSI is currently at 45.59, the 7-day stands at 44.64, and the 3-day is sitting at 40.35. The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a momentum oscillator that measures the speed and change of stock price movements. The RSI was developed by J. Welles Wilder, and it oscillates between 0 and 100. Generally, the RSI is considered to be oversold when it falls below 30 and overbought when it heads above 70. RSI can be used to detect general trends as well as finding divergences and failure swings. At the time of writing, Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of -84.03. Developed by Donald Lambert, the CCI is a versatile tool that may be used to help spot an emerging trend or provide warning of extreme conditions. CCI generally measures the current price relative to the average price level over a specific time period. CCI is relatively high when prices are much higher than average, and relatively low when prices are much lower than the average. Investors may be watching other technical indicators such as the Williams Percent Range or Williams %R. The Williams %R is a momentum indicator that helps measure oversold and overbought levels. This indicator compares the closing price of a stock in relation to the highs and lows over a certain time period. A common look back period is 14 days. Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V)s Williams %R presently stands at -62.50. The Williams %R oscillates in a range from 0 to -100. A reading between 0 and -20 would indicate an overbought situation. A reading from -80 to -100 would indicate an oversold situation.

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THINGS TO DO – July 29, 2017 – Allied News

THINGS TO DO AGRICULTURE The Mercer County 4-H Roundup will be Monday, July 31, through Friday, Aug. 4, at the 4-H Park on Route 19, Coolspring Township. The event is free to the public and open to all ages. Activities include food and nutrition judging, dairy cattle fitting contest, livestock shows and sales, exhibits, competitions, fundraisers, and more. Info: Call the Mercer County Extension Office at 724-662-3141. BLOOD DRIVES The American Red Cross is experiencing a critical, summer shortage of blood and platelet donations. Those who donate through Aug. 31 will be emailed a $5 Target eGiftCard. They are hosting these blood drives: Noon to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 3, at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 3325 Morefield Road, Hermitage. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 4, at Cooper’s Lake, 148 Currie Road, Worth Township, Butler County. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 7 at Cooper’s Lake,148 Currie Road, Worth Township, Butler County. Eligible blood donors are urged to schedule a donation today by using the Red Cross Blood Donor app, visiting redcrossblood.org or calling 1-800-REDCROSS (1-800-733-2767). You can complete the RapidPass health history at redcrossblood.org/rapidpass. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross. Central Blood Bank, which supplies all blood products for patients at Grove City Medical Center, Pine Township, is in need of blood and blood products. The hospital and Central Blood Bank are hosting a community blood drive from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 15, in the hospital’s education center. Donors must be at least 17 years old and weigh a minimum of 110 pounds. Most medications are acceptable, and donations can be made every 56 days. Walk-ins are welcome until 3 p.m. Aug. 15, and donors can pre-register by calling 724-450-7191. BUS TRIPS The Stoneboro Celebration Committee is sponsoring a bus trip to the Rivers Casino in Pittsburgh on Thursday, Aug. 17. The bus leave Anderson Coach and Travel, Greenville, at 8 a.m.; Conneaut Lake Golden Dawn at 8:30 a.m.; Meadville K-Mart at 9 a.m.; and Stoneboro Fire Hall at 9:30 a.m. The bus leaves the casino at 5 p.m. Cost is $30, which includes $20 in free play. Reservations and payments are due by Sunday, Aug. 13, to William Everall, P.O. Box 293, Stoneboro, PA 16153. Info: Call 724-376-2206. Another bus trip is being planned for Wednesday, Oct. 11, to Niagara Falls, N.Y. CONCERTS The Mercer Art Commission hosts the Brown Bag Concert Series on the Courthouse Square in Mercer from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Aug. 30. Lunch will be sold for $5. For more information, visit “The Mercer Art Commission” on Facebook. The Mercer Community Band hosts the 40th season of its community concerts on Mercer’s Courthouse Square Friday nights through Aug. 11. Ice cream socials are hosted by local organizations and run 6 to 9 p.m.; musical guests play at 6 p.m., and the Mercer Community Band performs at 7:30 p.m. Admission is free. Rain location is Mercer High School auditorium, 545 W. Butler St. Info: Visit www.mercercommunityband.com The Butler County Symphony summer lunch concerts are at noon on Wednesdays through Sept. 27 at the Symphony office in Butler. Concerts will also be broadcast to Diamond Park. This year’s series is dedicated to the memory of musician and friend Bruce Cunningham. ETC. The Portersville Steam Show is 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 3, through Sunday, Aug. 6, at the Portersville Steam Show Grounds, 1512 Perry Highway, Portersville. There will be a vintage village, farm animals, train rides, steam engines, flea market, crafts, food, kids’ activities, and more. Info: Call 724-285-7038 or visit www.portersvillesteamshow.org Slippery Rock Area Parks and Recreation offers a variety of summer programs, camps and activities for kids and teens. Info: Call 724-794-8180, or visit slipperyrockpark-rec.org FAIRS AND FESTIVALS The “In Harmony” Heritage Music Festival is 10 a.m. today, July 29, at the Harmonist Barn, 303 Mercer St., Harmony, and 11 a.m. at the Mennonite Meetinghouse on Wise Road. Enjoy a variety of heritage music during the event, sponsored by Historic Harmony. There will also be a beer garden with local brews and wine tastings, food, a kids’ tent, and dance lessons. Weekend passes for all concerts are $10. Harmony Museum members, seniors and youth pay $7. Children 5 and under are free. Visit InHarmonyFestival.com for more information. Tickets can be purchased at the event or online through eventbrite.com The Volant Potter Fest is 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, July 29, in Volant. The village celebrates Harry Potter and will transform into Diagon Alley for a day of entertainment, shopping, activities, Potter-themed food and treats, wands, kids’ crafts, character meet-and-greet, and more. Register for the “Fantastic drinks and where to find them” Family trail at Knockin Noggin Cidery and Winery by calling 724-704-0662. For more information about the festival, call Special-Teas, Etc. at 724-533-2629, or visit the Facebook event page at tinyurl.com/volantpotterfest The 47th annual Jefferson Township Fair runs Tuesday, Aug. 8, through Saturday, Aug. 12, at the fairgrounds, 7409 Lamor Road. Enjoy livestock, truck and semi pulls, rides, games, homemade dinners, fair food, and more. Admission and parking are free; fees apply to grandstand events and rides. Info: Visit jeffersontwpfair.com or call 724-662-3310. FUNDRAISERS The Butler County Chamber of Commerce is hosting the 23rd annual Ladies’ Golf Outing on Wednesday, Aug. 2, at the Conley Resort, 740 Pittsburgh Road, Butler. Registration starts at 10 a.m. with an 11 a.m. shotgun start and includes a round of golf, brunch, beverages, contests, cocktail hour, dinner, prizes and awards. Cost is $90 per person or $340 per foursome. A gold foursome in $425 and includes tee sponsorship. Ladies’ League members will receive a 10 percent discount on fees. Info: Call the chamber at 724-283-2222 or email Jennifer@ButlerCountyChamber.com The fourth annual Miles for McKeever 5K Trail Race and Hike is 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 2, in the scenic woodlands of the McKeever Environmental Learning Center, 55 McKeever Lane, Lake Township. Kids 10 and under can participate in a free half-mile fun run that starts at 6:30 p.m. Cost is $20, and registration will be accepted until Wednesday morning. Refreshments and snacks will be provided, and there will be awards. Packet pickup and late registration is 4:30 to 6:45 p.m. in the dining hall. Proceeds will be used for education materials and trail maintenance at McKeever. Info: Visit www.mckeever.org or email julie@mckeever.org Slippery Rock Volunteer Fire Company and Rescue Team hosts the annual Tiny Davis Memorial Golf Outing on Saturday, Aug. 5, at Oakview Golf Club, 160 Ralston Road, Slippery Rock. Registration starts at noon, shotgun start is 1 p.m. The four-player scramble includes 18 holes, carts, snacks, refreshments, catered dinner, prizes, $10,000 hole-in-one contest and more. Cost is $300 per foursome. Register by Friday, July 28, by emailing srfiregolf@gmail.com or calling 724-794-3817. Proceeds benefit the fire company and rescue team. The Western PA Ride for Kids is Sunday, Aug. 6, at Seneca Valley High School, 128 Seneca School Road, Harmony. Join the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation with any make or model of street legal motorcycle. Event is rain or shine; registration starts at 8:30 a.m., ride at 10:30 a.m. Raise money to T-shirts and jackets, and enter to win a new Honda motorcycle. Info: Visit www.rideforkids.org The Conneaut Lake Area Historical Society hosts the second annual Paddlefest on Sunday, Aug. 6. All skills levels are welcome to join the event, which covers a 3-mile course starting at Fireman’s Beach, heading west into Huidekoper Bay, around Goat Island, and back to the beach. Cost is $30 and proceeds benefit the Society’s museum, artifacts and community outreach. Info and registration: Call 814-724-9841 or visit www.conneautlakehistory.com The Friends of the Grove City Community Library is hosting the annual used book sale at the library, 125 W. Main St., Grove City. It will be open to the public Monday, Aug. 7, through Saturday, Aug. 19, during regular library hours. All proceeds benefit the library. A book sale preview is 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 6; ticket holders will have early access to the sale, and can enjoy live music by Rich Samsa, light refreshments, raffles, and a coupon for one free bag of books during the second week of the sale. Tickets are $10 a person; kids under 12 are free; and the family rate is $15. Tickets will be sold at the door. Info: Call Friends member Debbie Loughry at 724-967-4082. Join the Munnell Run Farm Foundation and the Mercer County Conservation District for a 3D Archery Shoot 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 12. The shoots are held rain or shine at the Farm, 753 Greenville Road, Coolspring Township. Cost is $10 a person, or $5 for ages 12 and under. There will be two different 3D target courses, a practice area, and door prize raffles. Info: Call 724-662-2242 and ask for Jacqueline or Larissa. Moraine State Park, Portersville, offers Watercolor Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 16 at the Owlet Gift Shop on McDanel’s North Shore. Join the Moraine Preservation Fund volunteers for a watercolor workshop for adults. All skill levels are welcome. Participants are welcome to bring their own painting supplies, which will be provided if necessary. Cost is a $5 donation. Info and reservations: Call 724-368-9185. The Plantation Park Campers Association Bocce League is hosting the third annual Bocce/ Corn Hole Tournament Aug. 26 at the camping facility, 734 Wilson Avenue, Mercer. Proceeds will benefit Pennsylvania Wounded Warriors, Inc. Gates will open at 9 a.m. and tournament play begins at 10 a.m. Aug. 26. Teams must register and pay entry fee at least one week in advance. For details contact Chairman Joe Rizzo at jriz35@hotmail.com. A $20 entry fee is asked of all participants and spectators will be asked for a $5 donation at the gate. Food is included for everyone. There will be other games and an American Auction with an array of baskets and prizes available. KIDS’ STUFF Register now for the Mercer County Conservation District’s “Children’s Summer Discovery” programs. Classes run from 8 to 11:30 a.m. on Tuesdays at Munnell Run Farm, Coolspring Township: Aug. 1 and 15. There’s story time, outdoor adventures, snacks, crafts, and more. Register by the Friday prior to the class. Cost is $5 per class. Info: Call 724-662-2242 and ask for Jacqueline or Larissa. LIBRARY EVENTS Mercer Area Library hosts these programs and events: Geocache Find Week, Sunday, July 30, through Saturday, Aug. 5. Complete a geocache challenge on your own time, and register for prizes. Contact the library for details. A book sale cart is located next to the main entrance. There are hardcover and paperback books, many of them brand new. “Don’t look down” is the theme for this year’s Mercer Area Friends of the Library fundraiser to replace some carpeting in the library. Flooring is being sold for $10 a square, and they can be done in memory or in honor of someone. The Friends have committed to match the first $5,000 in donations. Get a donation form at the circulation desk. The Friends of the Library hosts these events: Basket raffle drawing in August; meetings at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 13 and Dec. 6 at the library; third annual wine tasting Nov. 4; and book sale and luncheon in the fall. Mercer Area Library is at 110 E. Venango St., Mercer. It is open 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. For more information, call 724-662-4233, email mercerarealibrary@zoominternet.net or visit mercerarealibrary.org OUTDOORS Jennings Environmental Education Center, 2951 Prospect Road, Brady Township, hosts these events: Celebrate the Bloom, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. today, July 29. Enjoy walks, workshops, demonstrations, bonfire, local food, artisans vendors and entertainment. Admission is free. Info: Call 724-794-6011 or visit www.celebratethebloom.wordpress.com Jennings Prairie Walks, 2 p.m. Sundays July 30 and Aug. 6. Meet in the prairie parking area. Explore the unique prairie ecosystem at Jennings. The hot, midsummer weather will bring the spectacular blazing star and other prairie flowers to peak bloom during late July and early August. REUNIONS The Lavina Williams Eakin and William John Eakin Family Reunion is 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 5, at the Clintonville pavilion. Election of officers will be held. The annual O’Conner Family Reunion is at noon Sunday, Aug. 6, at Grove City Memorial Park. Lunch starts at 1 p.m. Please bring a covered dish and a dessert or fruit to share. Bring your own plates and utensils. Cold drinks and coffee will be provided. There will also be bingo, and games for all ages. Bring a wrapped gift for bingo prizes. Bring a non-perishable food item for the “Feed an O’Conner” food box, and an item for the raffle ticket sale, which funds the reunions. Info: Call Joyce Buchanan at 724-287-5299. Grove City High School class of 1972 will hold their 45th class reunion on Saturday, Aug. 19. They are updating class information. Please notify us of any changes to status, email and home addresses as soon as possible. Please email information to: Carol Bryer Maxwell at cmaxwell@zoominternet.net or Mary Jo Bryer Palmer at emjpalmer@zoominternet.net

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July 30, 2017   Posted in: Golden Dawn  Comments Closed

Barbara Jean Fusco – Ellwood City Ledger

Barbara Jean Fusco, 64, of 602 Palo Alto Drive, Perry Township, passed away in her residence on Tuesday, July 25, 2017, after her battle with cancer. Born in Beaver Falls, Barbara was the daughter of the late John and Boneda Cox Searfoss. She married Jim G. Fusco, Jr. on August 12, 1995. Barb was a 1970 graduate of Beaver Falls High School and she retired from Loccisano’s Golden Dawn where she was a deli manager. Barb was active with the Girl Scouts during the 1980’s. She was an avid reader and she loved yard sales, but most of all, she loved her family. Barb is survived by her husband, Jim, at home; a daughter and son-in-law, Bobbie Jo and Brian Pino of Volant, Pa.; a son, Robert Searfoss and his fianc, Kevin Polchar of Pittsburgh; two grandchildren, Brianna and Collin Callahan; a brother, John “Joe” Searfoss, and a sister-in-law, Ruth Searfoss. In addition to her parents, Barbara was preceded in death by a daughter, Christina Callahan; a brother, Charles Searfoss, and two sisters, Carol Gosseck and Shirley Shoaf. Friends and family will be received in Barb’s home on Thursday, July 27, 2017, from 1 to 5 p.m. Memorial contributions can be made in Barb’s name to the American Cancer Society. Arrangements were entrusted to the JOSEPH A. TOMON JR. FUNERAL HOME & CREMATORY, 97 Grim Ave., Ellport.

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Exploring the river beaches and extraordinary wildlife of Brazil’s alternative Amazon – Wanderlust

Alex Robinson discovers a land of rhythmic cities, wild archipelagos and the Tapajs a white-sand wonder unlike anywhere else in Brazil. On his way he encounters capybara and river dolphins The trees parted at the top of the ridge and Alter do Cho lay at our feet. The rainforest gently dropped to a lagoon crowned with a lush hill and spanned by twin back-to-back half-moon bays of snow-soft white sand. Wooden fishing boats bobbed on the horizon and the long sweep of Ponta do Cururu beach stretched into the water like white silk on ultramarine. Inland, the wall of dark green trees ran unbroken by roads or cities for 2,500 kilometres. The floral scents of the forest mixed with the warm air wafting in from the bays, islands and beaches. This could have been the coast of Thailand, but I was actually on the banks of a Brazilian river the Tapajs a clearwater tributary of the Amazon set deep in lowland tropical forest. Beach at Alter do Cho (Alex Robinson) While most travellers access the forest from the Andes through Peru or Ecuador Id chosen to visit a very different stretch, closer to the rivers mouth in Brazil, where vast waterways flowed as wide as small seas. On TV, the Amazon was always being wandered by sweaty, insect-baffled explorers with thick trousers tucked into their socks, but with new flights bringing this region within easy reach, I wanted to see an alternative side to this legendary river: balmy, beach-lined and bug-free. My flight had brought me to Belm, the capital of Amazon-Brazils Par state. From above, its cluster of jagged concrete spires appeared almost overrun by great swathes of forest, except where a huge chocolate-brown river dotted with tankers scythed through the green. Stepping off the plane, the air hit me immediately: aromatic, as warm as melting butter and energised by the hot, bright sunlight. Welcome to the Amazon, said my guide, Gelderson. We drove through streets of handsome colonial houses lined with towering mango trees and flowering jacarandas, stopping to drop my bags at the hotel before walking down to the riverfront. Here, a glass-fronted restaurant complex had taken over an old quayside warehouse that was, in turn, watched over by an ancient Portuguese fort, its battlements punctured with rusted cannons. The Amazon is cities, too, Gelderson insisted, and promised a crash course in Belms urban culture. Lets start with the food, he smiled. The tacaca (prawn soup) that arrived was spiced with jambu leaves and tangy with tucupi, a sauce made from manioc juice and highly toxic if not prepared correctly. It tingled in the mouth like popping candy. The tambaqui that followed was succulent like steak and had none of that muddy flavour you often get with river fish. I washed it down with sweet bacuri juice, made from an Amazon fruit unique to the forests around Belm. After eating, we wandered incense-filled baroque churches, admired the Renaissance Italian paintings in the lavish rubber-boom-era Opera House and browsed street stalls where forest Amerindians sold bracelets woven with coloured seeds as hard as mountain pebbles. We made our way to the wrought-iron market hall of Ver-o-Peso, inspired by the Belle poque architecture of Gustave Eiffel. The rising city of Belm (Alex Robinson) I stood and watched the men unloading baskets of blackcurrant-dark palm berries and tiger-striped catfish from double-decker wooden riverboats. Night arrived with the cracking of thunder. We drank ice-cold beer at the Ziggy hostel club late into the evening, until the 70-something Dona Onete arrived on stage in her wheelchair, a wicked ear-to-ear grin on her face and a band of exuberant musicians for company. Then no one could keep still. No meio do piti, eu fui cantar carimb (Surrounded by the smell of river fish, I went to sing carimb) she sang, as old men spun wasp-waisted teenagers around in skirt-flying swirls. Her carimb a samba-like rhythm unique to northern Brazil, named after the drum that sets its tempo beat long into the night. L no Ver-o-Peso, urubu sobrevoando (Down at the Ver-o-Peso market as a vulture flew overhead). I woke late the following morning and the day seemed to pass in a haze of food, music and dance. But then it was time to leave the city and head into the wild. At the airport, Gelderson pressed a bottle of rum filled with jambu leaves into my hands. Youve had a taste of the urban Amazon, he reminded me, as good as his word. Remember what youre missing and come back soon. The plane climbed and we followed the course of the great river, a glinting artery of reflected sunlight surrounded by endless green. A billion lush stems were broken only by the splashes of colour from solitary flowering trees, flecked rose-pink ibis and soaring black-and-white king vultures. If Belm had been a city, Alter do Cho (half an hours drive from Santarm airport) was barely a hamlet. It also sat sleepily at the mouth of one of the Amazons greatest tributaries: the Tapajs. It was here that my guide, Arkus, who looked as fit and tanned as a Californian surfer, showed me round. It took less than five minutes to see the main plaza but an hour to climb to the outlook and soak in its beauty; the view across the river bays, beaches and islands was more than reward. I drifted to sleep that night serenaded by the music of singing cicadas and tree frogs, eager to dive into nature the following day. In golden dawn light, we walked to the riverfront and stopped at a two-storey riverboat with a polished mahogany galley and swinging hammocks. Arkus introduced me to its captain, Taketomei, a fifty-something man, slim, toned and burnt a fierce nut-brown by the Amazon sun. His father was one of thousands of Japanese economic migrants to have come to the Brazilian Amazon between the First and Second World Wars to trade; there were still whole towns here, like Tom-Au, that were almost entirely Japanese, he told me. Capybara (Alex Robinson) Other passengers joined us onboard: a couple from So Paulo and a local carimb dancer, Eliane, who had long black hair and fierce dark eyes set in an oval face. As we set out across the clear blue river, Eliane explained that she was a Boror Amerindian. We are a new tribe, she told me, her fierce expression warming to a smile, made up of the fragments of many nations who came together at Alter do Cho less than one hundred years ago. Taketomeis mother was also an Amazon tribeswoman, I learned. His parents had fallen in love over a basket of traded vegetables, he said, and, as a boy, he had cruised all the rivers of the Amazon, from the Javari on the distant Peruvian border to the river mouth at Belm, selling groceries to caboclo peasants (indigenous people of mixed African or European descent) and Amerindian villagers. It took us around an hour to cross the 15km-wide Tapajs. We saw river turtles and bubble-gum-pink dolphins as well as snowy-white egrets wading in the shallows, little fish in their beaks. Then we moored on a broad beach that stretched for kilometres along the river, backed by forest. Time to swim, said Eliane, now dressed in a bikini and sporting a sun hat and glasses. I hesitated. What about piranhas? She and Arkus laughed gently. Nothing will bite you here. There arent even mosquitoes on the Tapajs. And they headed along the fluffy talcum-powder beach and splashed into the water. We spent the afternoon walking trails in the national forest reserve, wandering past towering kapok trees, the roots of which looked like flying buttresses. Capuchin monkeys looked curiously down at us from the branches, and iridescent manakin birds as small and fleet as a wren flitted through the understorey. I saw how the local community tapped rubber from the forest, scoring the trees with a metal claw, allowing the sap to collect in a cup before moulding it into sheets and hanging it out to dry like T-shirts on a clothing-line. Monkey in branches of a tree (Alex Robinson) I spent the next few days exploring the wilds around the village. I woke in the morning light to canoe through flooded forest, watching kingfishers dart and fishing eagles glide. I saw dolphins playing at sunset off the tip of the 2km-long Ponta do Cururu beach and, after dark, Arkus and I searched the trees with torches for sloths and night monkeys, their eyes as big and shiny as ten-pence pieces. My last evening here was spent at a beach barbecue at one of the remote lagoons, a short boat-ride from Alter do Cho. As the sun set, a guitar and drums were pulled out and people danced the carimb with hula hoops. Then Arkus built a fire on the sand with driftwood and cooked a freshly caught Surubim catfish on a mesh griddle. The succulent fish came with freshly squashed acai juice and pulpy, tart cupuau fruit. In the boat on the way back, it was as if we were floating on the Milky Way, the starry sky mirrored in the glassy Tapajs water. Id sampled Amazon culture and seen the mossie-free bar beaches, but now I yearned for the Amazon of TV mythology: insects and entangled vines, snakes and crocodiles. And what better way to get close to it than by staying in a floating jungle lodge, bobbing on a tributary just off the Amazon itself? It took a few hours to get there first flying to Manaus, and then taking a jeep and speedboat to Pedro Netos Amazon Eco Adventures lodge on the Urubu River. With Pedro pointing out a wealth of wildlife along the way, we spied metre-long macaws shrieking overhead, black-collared hawks roosting in the trees and a troop of howler monkeys delicately plucking leaves. We arrived at dusk and I quickly slapped on the repellent, almost pleased to see mosquitoes. After a hearty supper of rice, beans and river fish, Pedro bustled me into a metal launch and we headed out in search of crocodiles and caiman. The riverbanks were bursting with life. Tall tiger herons and tiny, delicate jacanas that looked like elongated moorhens stalked the mud, and the air was vibrant with the call of frogs and insects. Pedro shined a bright lamp and caught red eyes drifting across the water. We moved closer and found a caiman as big as a man frozen in the light. It disappeared under the murky surface with a rapid whip of its tail. Over the next few days, I saw boa constrictors, toucans and otters, capybara (sheep-sized guinea pigs) and piranhas, which we pulled gnashing from the river on fishing line baited with giblets. But Pedro saved the most spectacular sight of all for my last day. The Negro meets the Amazon (Alex Robinson) We took a scenic flight out of Manaus and headed over the Rio Negro another of the Amazons tributaries for Anavilhanas, the worlds largest archipelago of river islands. Below us, thousands of green streaks dotted its black water; then we circled back downstream to where the Negro met the Amazon in a swirl of tan and black waters. Divided by different water densities, the rivers flowed side by side, without mixing, to form one huge stream that snaked into the distance. Boats dotted the water and hundreds of tributaries trickled from the forest, stretching as far as I could see in every direction, to every horizon. It was then that I realised I had barely dipped a toe in the Brazilian Amazon. Id seen vibrant jungle cities, vast beach-fringed rivers, tributaries teeming with wildlife, sweeping archipelagos and the magnificent sight of two rivers flowing into one. It was more than I would have experienced had I visited on a typical excursion from one of the Andean countries, yet there was so much more to see. Brazils Amazon covers an area half as big as India again. Over the horizon were country-sized wetlands and tabletop mountain ranges as large as Britain, savannahs, giant waterfalls and hundreds more rivers bigger than the greatest in Europe. Like the carimb singer Id seen on my first night in Belm, it had succeeded in pulling off that rarest of dramatic feats: it had left me wanting more. In Belm, the author travelled with Gelderson Pinheiros Rumo Norte Expeditions, who also run trips throughout the Amazon. In Alter do Cho, guide Arkus Rodrigues is available for hiking and river trips (arkusrodrigues@hotmail.com, +55 93 991 494174; from 25pp). Amazon Eco Adventures run three-day trips on the Urubu River (contact company for pricing). Main image: Beach at Alter do Cho (Alex Robinson)

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Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V)’s RCI Heading Towards a Potential Reversal – FLBC News

Shares of Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) are nearing some key technical levels as the Rank Correlation indicator has trending higher over the past few sessions, nearing potential overbought territory. Crossing the 80 mark would suggestthat a chance of a reversal is increasing. The Rank Correlation Index (RCI) is based on an analysis algorithm by Charles Spearman. It uses a combination of price change data and time change data to identify potential changes in market sentiment, thereby exposing turning points. Zero crossings are seen as buy and sell signals, with tops and bottoms yielding overbought and oversold information. While traders are taking a second look at how shares of Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) have been performing lately, we can examine some additional key indicators. A favorite tool among technical stock analysts is the moving average. Moving averages are considered to be lagging indicators that simply take the average price of a stock over a specific period of time. Moving averages can be very useful for identifying peaks and troughs. They may also be used to help the trader figure out proper support and resistance levels for the stock. Currently, the 200-day MA is sitting at 0.29, and the 50-day is 0.28. The 14-day ADX for Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) is currently at 14.94. In general, and ADX value from 0-25 would represent an absent or weak trend. A value of 25-50 would support a strong trend. A value of 50-75 would signify a very strong trend, and a value of 75-100 would point to an extremely strong trend. Checking in on some other technical levels, the 14-day RSI is currently at 48.02, the 7-day stands at 48.96, and the 3-day is sitting at 46.64. The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is a momentum oscillator that measures the speed and change of stock price movements. The RSI was developed by J. Welles Wilder, and it oscillates between 0 and 100. Generally, the RSI is considered to be oversold when it falls below 30 and overbought when it heads above 70. RSI can be used to detect general trends as well as finding divergences and failure swings. At the time of writing, Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of 13.23. Developed by Donald Lambert, the CCI is a versatile tool that may be used to help spot an emerging trend or provide warning of extreme conditions. CCI generally measures the current price relative to the average price level over a specific time period. CCI is relatively high when prices are much higher than average, and relatively low when prices are much lower than the average. Investors may be watching other technical indicators such as the Williams Percent Range or Williams %R. The Williams %R is a momentum indicator that helps measure oversold and overbought levels. This indicator compares the closing price of a stock in relation to the highs and lows over a certain time period. A common look back period is 14 days. Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V)s Williams %R presently stands at -37.50. The Williams %R oscillates in a range from 0 to -100. A reading between 0 and -20 would indicate an overbought situation. A reading from -80 to -100 would indicate an oversold situation.

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University of Auckland takes lectures to the pub, following international trend – Stuff.co.nz

SHANI WILLIAMS Last updated15:14, July 24 2017 CHRIS SKELTON/STUFF Golden Dawn manager Nick Harrison will be raising his glass to knowledge on August 29. Auckland academics are ditching the lecture theatre for the city’s bars. The University of Auckland will send 20 academics to lecture at 10 Auckland bars as a part of a worldwide initiative next month. The event, called “Raising the Bar”, aims to make education a greater part of the city’s culture by giving the community the chance to engage with leading academics in a friendly, accessible and laid back atmosphere. The initiative originated in New York in 2015 and is designed to break down the perception that higher education deepens socioeconomic inequality by pushing away prospective students. READ MORE: Placebo effect likely behind Te Kiri Gold testimonials, Dr Siouxsie Wiles says Raising the Bar quickly spread to Melbourne, Sydney, San Francisco, London, Hong Kong and now Auckland. University of Auckland director of alumni relations and development Mark Bentley said the lecture topics would reflect the younger “Ted Talk generation”. The sessions, being held on August 29, would be fascinating, quick and informative, he said. Topics will range from life among robots, why terrorists want to kill us, imagining a world without prisons and the brain of sharks. Bentley said pubs had been host to great conversations for as long as they had existed. “Pubs are not about alcohol, they are about friendship and good conversations and we are glad we can continue and expand that worthy tradition,” he said. It is expected more than 1500 Aucklanders will attend the event, with a few locations selling out 24 hours after tickets were released on Friday. Thomas Gregory, who will talk about the human cost of drone strikes at Tom Tom Bar and Eatery, said lecturing in a pub was a dream gig but a little nerve-racking too. “If students get bored of my lectures they usually just sneak out early or twiddle with their phones – but a room full of rowdy punters could be interesting,” he said. Well-known academics such as microbiologist Siouxie Wiles andsociologist Tracey McIntoshwill also present. The selected bars are in close proximity to one another so attendees may be able to visit up to two lectures on the night. Golden Dawn manager Nicolas Harrison said events like Raising the Bar were a perfect way for bars to contribute more to the community than just supplying alcohol. Other locations include Sweat Shop, Birdcage Bar and Fort Street Union. Registrations opened on July 20 and the public are urged to get in early to secure a bar stool. For a full list of speakers, topics and venues or to register visit rtbevent.com/auckland -Stuff

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Buy, Sell or Hold? A Look at What the Technicals Are Saying About Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) – Sheridan Daily

Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) is on traders radar as the shares have moved above the MACD Histogram line, indicating a bullish trend. Shares recently touched0.275 on a recent bid. The MACD is calculated by subtracting the value of a 26-day exponential moving average from a 12-day exponential moving average. A 9-day dotted exponential moving average of the MACD (the signal line) is then plotted on top of the MACD. Taking a step further,the MACD-Histogram, which was developed by Thomas Aspray in 1986, measures the distance between MACD and its signal line (the 9-day EMA of MACD). Like MACD, the MACD-Histogram is also an oscillator that fluctuates above and below the zero line. Aspray developed the MACD-Histogram to anticipate signal line crossovers in MACD. Because MACD uses moving averages and moving averages lag price, signal line crossovers can come late and affect the reward-to-risk ratio of a trade. Bullish or bearish divergences in the MACD-Histogram can alert chartists to an imminent signal line crossover in MACD. Investors may be taking a look at some additional technical numbers on shares of Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V). The 14-day RSI is currently spotted at 48.02, the 7-day is at 48.96, and the 3-day is sitting at 46.64. The RSI, or Relative Strength Index, is a widely used technical momentum indicator that compares price movement over time. The RSI was created by J. Welles Wilder who was striving to measure whether or not a stock was overbought or oversold. The RSI may be useful for spotting abnormal price activity and volatility. The RSI oscillates on a scale from 0 to 100. The normal reading of a stock will fall in the range of 30 to 70. A reading over 70 would indicate that the stock is overbought, and possibly overvalued. A reading under 30 may indicate that the stock is oversold, and possibly undervalued. In terms of CCI levels, Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V) currently has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of 13.23. Investors and traders may use this indicator to help spot price reversals, price extremes, and the strength of a trend. Many investors will use the CCI in conjunction with other indicators when evaluating a trade. The CCI may be used to spot if a stock is entering overbought (+100) and oversold (-100) territory. The 14-day ADX is 14.94. Many technical chart analysts believe that an ADX reading over 25 would suggest a strong trend. A level under 20 would indicate no trend, and a reading from 20-25 would suggest that there is no clear trend signal. The ADX is typically plotted along with two other directional movement indicator lines, the Plus Directional Indicator (+DI) and Minus Directional Indicator (-DI). Some analysts believe that the ADX is one of the best trend strength indicators available. Investors may be studying other technical indicators like the Williams Percent Range or Williams %R. The Williams %R is a momentum indicator that helps measure oversold and overbought levels. This indicator compares the closing price of a stock in relation to the highs and lows over a certain time period. A common look back period is 14 days. Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V)s Williams %R presently stands at -37.50. The Williams %R oscillates in a range from 0 to -100. A reading between 0 and -20 would indicate an overbought situation. A reading from -80 to -100 would indicate an oversold situation. Looking at some moving average levels on shares of Golden Dawn Minerals Inc (GOM.V), the 200-day is at 0.29, the 50-day is 0.28, and the 7-day is sitting at 0.28. Moving averages can help identify trends and price reversals. They may also be used to help spot support and resistance levels. Moving averages are considered to be lagging indicators meaning that they confirm trends. A certain stock may be considered to be on an uptrend if trading above a moving average and the average is sloping upward. On the other side, a stock may be considered to be in a downtrend if trading below the moving average and sloping downward.

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July 25, 2017   Posted in: Golden Dawn  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."