Archive for the ‘Hate Crimes’ Category

5 Teens Facing With Hate Crimes For Vandalizing Roseville Schools – CBS Sacramento

August 21, 2017 12:50 AM

ROSEVILLE (CBS13) Five teenage boys are in custody on hate crime chargesfor vandalizing two schools in Roseville with racist and hate-filled messages that included swastikas, the KKK symbol, and the N-word.

The graffiti has been cleaned up at both schools, but Roseville police say the graffiti was so vulgar and so derogatory that they believe it was it done to instill fear into those going to school and those who live nearby.

You are just speechless. You just cant believe it. Its just disgusting.

Thats how Kevin Schumacher, the lead custodian at Buljan Middle School, described the graffiti. He was the first to discover it as he came to work Sunday morning.

Roseville police say the teenage boys, all of whom are white, broke into the school around 1 a.m. on Sunday through a door that was being repaired. That got them into the gym, which they vandalized with a fire extinguisher. They then went onto to graffiti the locker room and a back office, breaking windows and stealing a cash box.

(They) spray-painted hateful things and some derogatory things on the portables in the back, explained Lt. Doug Blake with Roseville PD. He said the graffiti was significant and extensive, as well as incredibly offensive.

If you saw on face-value what was painted here. I think it is sufficient in and of itself to say it was one of the worst crimes, something that we just dont tolerate on any level, said Lt. Blake, who said they also found what was described as Northern Hispanic-type gang tagging.

Lt. Blake says the five juveniles do not live in the area. They were identified by police based on previous police encounters.

Based on that previous experience, (an) officer decided to go see if those kids may have been involved, or knew who could have been involved, something along those lines, and then one thing lead to another, and we got them in custody, explained Lt. Blake.

Police found some of the stolen property at the home where the kids were staying, the spray cans used and even paint on their hands.

But for Schumacher, who had spent the whole cleaning up the campus, he says his bigger concern is that the racist messages came from young kids.

Where are they getting this from? asked Schumacher.

The five suspects were booked into juvenile hall forvandalism, conspiracy, burglary and hate crime charges.

Police say they will now try to figure out their motive.

With five suspects we dont know, and with some marginal cooperation, its going to be really tough for us to get down to the bottom of this, what they were doing, why they were doing it and what they sought to achieve, admitted Lt. Blake.

Read the original:

5 Teens Facing With Hate Crimes For Vandalizing Roseville Schools – CBS Sacramento

Fair Usage Law

August 21, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Britain to Treat Internet Hate Crime as Seriously as Offline Offenses – Voice of America

Online abuse will be treated as seriously as offline offences, Britain’s prosecution service said on Monday in new guidance on handling hate crimes.

The rules – which included guidelines on helping disabled and bisexual victims – were meant to encourage more people to come forward and press courts to impose longer sentences, the Crown Prosecution Service said.

“This is a crime that’s under-reported. Sometimes people feel that they just have to put up with it … That’s absolutely not the case,” Alison Saunders, the director of public prosecutions, told the BBC.

The new advice was in response to the growth of social media, the CPS said. There have been several high-profile instances of successful prosecutions of people who had abused lawmakers and other public figures online.

Read the original post:

Britain to Treat Internet Hate Crime as Seriously as Offline Offenses – Voice of America

Fair Usage Law

August 21, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Documenting Hate News Index: Google Uses AI to Track Hate … – Fortune

Many observers and commentators were shocked by the violence that erupted at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend. But “incidents of hate are actually all too common” in the U.S., according to the journalism nonprofit ProPublica , which has launched a tool to help Americans better understand that reality.

The Documenting Hate News Index , built in partnership with Googles News Lab and the data visualization studio Pitch Interactive, collects news reports on hate incidents and makes them searchable by name, topic, and date.

The site is certainly eye-opening, and grim.

More than just a list, the site allows hate-related stories to be browsed by date, and shows fluctuations in overall reports of hate crimes over time. Astonishingly, while the violence in Charlottesville captured headlines, last weekend was not a peak for U.S. hate crimes a much broader wave crested in late May, when crimes included two fatalities in an anti-Muslim attack in Portland, a teacher ripping off a young students hijab, and the killing of a young black Army lieutenant by a white supremacist .

Get Data Sheet , Fortunes technology newsletter.

According to Google News Labs announcement , the site uses machine learning specifically, Googles Natural Language API to understand both the content of news reports about hate crimes, and subtler things like intent and sentiment. That means it can detect stories about events “suggestive of hate crime, bias, or abuse” and track the frequency of particular names, places, and more general keywords like “businessman” and “nationalists.”

Currently, “Donald Trump” is the highest-ranking keyword associated with incidents of hate.

The project is important because, according to ProPublicas larger Documenting Hate project, there is no reliable national database of hate crimes. The Index is primarily intended to help journalists, researchers, and civil rights organizations get a broader view on the national situation.

More:

Documenting Hate News Index: Google Uses AI to Track Hate … – Fortune

Fair Usage Law

August 20, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Google Launches Hate Crime Tracking Tool, Omits Conservative Websites – The Daily Caller

Google and ProPublica have created a new tool that tracks hate crimes throughout the United States.

Google News Lab is developing a new tool powered by machine learning, titled by Documenting Hate News Ending, which tracks every hate crime reported across 50 states using data collected from February 2017 onward.

The tool is being developed as part of the Documenting Hate project, which was launched this January by ProPublica. It is supported by news and other digital media organizations, universities, and civil rights groups, including the Southern Poverty Law Center.

The tool features a list of articles harvested from various, largely left-leaning websites, including HuffPost, BuzzFeed, Mic, Think Progress, and even pro-Antifa publication Unicorn Booty. It runs Google News stories and filters them through Googles natural language analysis tools to confine the results to America.

High-profile conservative websites like Fox News have little to no presence on the tool.

According to TechCrunch, Google is using the project as a starting point for documenting and studying hate crimes. The publication claims that despite the fact that the FBI documents hate crimes, crimes committed at the local and state-level are overlooked because they fail to report their own incidents, making the data incomplete at best.

The feed is generated from news articles that cover events suggestive of hate crime, bias or abuse such as anti-semitic graffiti or local court reports about incidents, says Gogle News Lab Data editor Simon Rogers. And we are monitoring it to look out for errant stories that slip in, i.e., searches for phrases that just include the word hate it hasnt happened yet but we will be paying close attention.

Theres no word yet on how debunked hate crimes and hoaxes are filtered through the system.

Ian Miles Cheong is a journalist and outspoken media critic. You can reach him through social media at@stillgray on Twitterand onFacebook.

See the original post:

Google Launches Hate Crime Tracking Tool, Omits Conservative Websites – The Daily Caller

Fair Usage Law

August 20, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Backers of Indiana hate crime law planning renewed push – South Bend Tribune

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Supporters of establishing a hate crimes law in Indiana say they hope their push will overcome longstanding opposition in the Legislature following the deadly violence at a rally of white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The Anti-Defamation League lists Indiana as one of just five states without laws against crimes motivated by biases, such as race, gender, religion and sexual orientation. Proposals to establish such a law in Indiana have repeatedly failed over the past decade.

Sen. Lonnie Randolph, a Democrat from East Chicago, said he believed that should change after the violence last weekend.

“What happened in Charlottesville, Virginia, was a tragedy,” said Randolph, who represents a largely minority legislative district. “I’m hopeful that maybe that incident could spark something in a lot of areas in the country and here in Indiana where it’s abundantly clear that we need hate-crime legislation.”

Some lawmakers in Indiana’s Republican-dominated Legislature have opposed adopting a hate crimes law, saying the motivation for a crime shouldn’t change how a person is punished. Conservative groups argue the measure could be a step toward allowing the government to punish people for their beliefs.

Republican House Speaker Brian Bosma said Indiana judges can consider motivation in criminal sentencings, but said he believed state law should recognize such factors.

“I think it’s time to label what we have now as hate crimes legislation to dispel, really, the misconception that that cannot be considered by a judge in sentencing, because it can be,” Bosma said this week.

Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane said he was encouraged by Bosma’s stance.

“Indiana needs to put their foot down and actively condemn these heinous acts,” the Democrat from Anderson said.

The Indiana Senate approved a bill in 2016 that would have allowed judges to impose tougher sentences for bias crimes, but the House never took action. The bill’s sponsor, Republican Sen. Sue Glick of LaGrange, withdrew it during this year’s legislative session, saying proposed amendments threatened to gut its provisions.

Lake County Prosecutor Bernard Carter said he’s always been in favor of a hate crime statute.

“If someone is convicted of a hate crime they should be known as a hate crime individual,” he told the Post-Tribune. “We need to have those individuals labeled when they’re convicted, just like we want sexual predators to register so they’re known.”

Read more:

Backers of Indiana hate crime law planning renewed push – South Bend Tribune

Fair Usage Law

August 20, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Google and ProPublica team up to build a national hate crime … – TechCrunch

Few things are certain in 2017s fraught national climate, but hate certainly doesnt look to be going away. In partnership with ProPublica, Google News Lab is launching a new tool to track hate crimes across America. Powered by machine learning, the Documenting Hate News Index will track reported hate crimes across all 50 states, collecting data from February 2017 onward.

Data visualization studio Pitch Interactive helped craft the index, which collects Google News results and filters them through Googles natural language analysis to extract geographic and contextual information. Because they are not catalogued in any kind of formal national database, afact that inspired the creation of the index to begin with, Google calls the project a starting point for the documentation and study of hate crimes. While the FBI is legally required to document hate crimes at the federal level, state and local authorities often fail to report their own incidents, making the data incomplete at best.

It is one of the first visualisations to use machine learning to generate its content using the Google Natural Language API, which analyses text and extracts information about people, places, and events, Google News Lab Data editor Simon Rogers writes in the announcement. In this case, it helps reporters by digging out locations, names and other useful data from the 3,000-plus news reports the feed is updated every day, and goes back to February 2017.

The initiative is a data-rich new arm of the Documenting Hate project which collects and verifies hate incidents reported by both individual contributors and by news organizations. The Hate News Index will keep an eye out for false positives (casual uses of the word hate for example), striking a responsible balance between machine learning and human curation on a very sensitive subject. Hate events will be mapped onto a calendar in the user interface, though users can also use a keyword search or browse through algorithmic suggestions. For anyone whod like to take the data in a new direction, Google will open sourced its data set, making it available through GitHub.

The projects hope is that journalists can harness its combination of visualized data and news indexing to report more effectively on the aggregate data and incidents that might otherwise fall through the cracks.

Visit link:

Google and ProPublica team up to build a national hate crime … – TechCrunch

Fair Usage Law

August 19, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

After two years of declines, reported hate crimes were up in Minnesota last year – MinnPost (blog)

Early on a Saturday morning this month, just as members of the local Muslim community were gathering for the first prayer of the day, their Bloomington mosque was bombed.

No one was hurt, but the incident still under investigation by the FBI, but which many suspect was driven by anti-Islamic hatred adds to a string of incidents that have Minnesota’s Muslim community on edge.

After two years of declines, hate crime incidents reported to authorities in Minnesota increased from 96 in 2015 to 122 in 2016, according to the state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. There were 98 reported incidents in 2014 and 154 in 2013.

By law, Minnesota police departments are required to report crimes believed to be motivated by hatred toward race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, sex, age, disability or sexual orientation. The state first started collecting hate crime data, also known as bias crime, in 1989.

But because such crimes are notoriously underreported the majority of hate crimes are missing from official data, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics the statistics dont tell the whole story in Minnesota.

For those hate crimes that are reported, however, the states data offer a picture of who perpetrates them, who’s targeted, and where and how they happen.

Most often-reported were anti-race incidents (58 victims), followed by anti-religion (30), anti-ethnicity (19) and anti-sexual orientation (15).

Victims of reported hate incidents by year, 2009-2016

Source: Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

The most commonly targeted groups in 2016 were African Americans and Muslims. Compared to the year prior, 2016 saw an increase in recorded anti-religion hate incidents, from 15 in 2015 to 26 in 2016.

Nearly three in ten recorded hate incidents were simple assault, an attempt to cause serious harm to another person. More than a quarter of reported incidents were vandalism, and another quarter-plus were intimidation.

2016 reported hate incidents by offense

Source: Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

As for the medium used in hate-motivated crimes, the most common was verbal abuse, followed by bodily harm and graffiti.

2016 reported hate crimes by situation type

Source: Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

Six in ten hate crime perpetrators were male and the gender of three in ten was unknown. 42 percent of offenders were white; 33 percent were of unknown race; 23 percent were black and 2 percent were Asian. The data did not include ethnicity, such as Hispanic, Latino or Arab.

2016 detailed hate crime motivation

Source: Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

Nationally, the number of hate crimes reported has also seen an uptick. In 2015, the most recent year available, the FBI reported 5,850 hate crime incidents nationally, a 7 percent increase over 2014.

The Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil rights organization that tracks hate groups, has also reported an uptick in active in hate groups. In Minnesota, the SPLC lists 10, including Neo-Nazi, Ku Klux Klan, anti-Muslim, black separatist and Christian identity groups. City Pages reported on efforts to shut down a neo-Nazi metal record label in the Twin Cities this week.

The increases in hate groups and hate crimes coincide with what some racial and religious groups say are heightened vitriol against them in national rhetoric and in their communities. But the numbers themselves should be taken with a grain of salt, said James Nolan, a professor of sociology at West Virginia University who studies hate crimes. Hate crime statistics are only as good as the reporting methods, which is to say, they can vary a lot.

Theres a few reasons the numbers tend to be a bit squishy: In the first place, whether or not hate crimes are reported depends on whether victims of crimes feel comfortable reporting them which they often dont. The accuracy of reports also depends on police attitudes and training surrounding hate crime.

In studying police departments, Nolan found that in some cases, officers didnt think of crimes directed at people because of race, religion, sexual orientation or other groups as hate crimes. Other times, officers were hesitant to report crimes motivated by bias as hate crimes because of the attention doing so could draw.

Sometimes they feel like what might be a destruction of property or a minor assault, if you call it a hate crime, it politicizes it. It makes it a big deal, they have to make sure they cross all the ts and dot all the is, he said.

Raising awareness about the need to report hate incidents is critical, said Steve Hunegs, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas. But he acknowledged that with the number of groups keeping track of hate incidents, where to report can be confusing.

In addition to police, organizations such as the Southern Poverty Law Center, the JCRC and the Coalition on American-Islamic Relations all track hate incidents (CAIR recently launched an app to streamline the process). In partnership with national nonprofit news website ProPublica and newsrooms throughout the country, Minnesota Public Radio is collecting information on hate incidents. The reporting form can be found here.

Sometimes, Hunegs said, the motive in hate incidents is clear: last year, a University of Minnesota student walked into the dorm room of a Jewish student who wore a yarmulke and wrote anti-Semitic messages on his whiteboard. But in another incident, a person reported their neighbor took down a Nazi flag they claimed not to have known was offensive immediately when confronted about it.

To try to navigate around this issue of underreporting, we always encourage people to call us or contact us or email us if theres anything questionable, Hunegs said.

Go here to see the original:

After two years of declines, reported hate crimes were up in Minnesota last year – MinnPost (blog)

Fair Usage Law

August 19, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

DOJ secures guilty plea in attempted hate crime attack on Florida synagogue – CNN International

The timing of Justice Department’s announcement of James Gonzalo Medina’s guilty plea struck a chord during a week plagued by the aftermath of deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend.

The FBI launched an investigation into Medina in 2016 after authorities learned he had expressed anti-Semitic views with associates and discussed plans to attack the Aventura Turnberry Jewish Center in southern Florida, according to court filings.

Authorities say Medina scoped out the synagogue for potential vulnerabilities, told a confidential source that a Jewish holiday would be a “good day” to carry out the bomb attack, and then later procured what he believed to be an explosive device from an undercover agent.

“When asked whether he knew that if the attack succeeded, that people may have died, (Medina) responded, ‘whatever happens,'” prosecutors said in the complaint.

“Acts of bigotry and hatred are evil and have no place in our society,” Sessions said in a statement Wednesday announcing the guilty plea in Medina’s case. “One of the top priorities of this Department of Justice is reducing violent crime, and you can be sure that this includes hate crime. We will not tolerate this repugnant lawlessness, and we will be vigilant in prosecuting hate crime offenders to the fullest extent of the law.”

While Sessions’ critics point to his previous opposition to the federal Matthew Shepard Hate Crimes Prevention Act as a senator, he has vowed as attorney general to prosecute bias-motivated crime with vigor.

The department has secured at least 15 indictments in federal hate crime cases since President Donald Trump took office in January.

Federal prosecutors also charged at least one Israeli-American suspect in April for his alleged involvement in a series of bomb threats against Jewish community centers, and Sessions said that the Justice Department’s “investigation into these acts as possible hate crimes continues.”

“No person should have to fear being violently attacked because of who they are, what they believe, or how they worship,” Sessions said at a hate crimes summit hosted by DOJ in June. “Hate crimes are not only violent attacks on our fellow citizens; they are an attack on our country’s most fundamental principles. We have a duty to make sure that all Americans can live their lives without fear.”

See original here:

DOJ secures guilty plea in attempted hate crime attack on Florida synagogue – CNN International

Fair Usage Law

August 18, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Durham school board cites Charlottesville deadly protest, condemns … – Durham Herald Sun


Durham Herald Sun
Durham school board cites Charlottesville deadly protest, condemns …
Durham Herald Sun
The Durham Public Schools Board of Education has adopted a resolution condemning hate speech, hate crimes and violence in the service of hatred.

and more »

Continue reading here:

Durham school board cites Charlottesville deadly protest, condemns … – Durham Herald Sun

Fair Usage Law

August 18, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

5 Teens Facing With Hate Crimes For Vandalizing Roseville Schools – CBS Sacramento

August 21, 2017 12:50 AM ROSEVILLE (CBS13) Five teenage boys are in custody on hate crime chargesfor vandalizing two schools in Roseville with racist and hate-filled messages that included swastikas, the KKK symbol, and the N-word. The graffiti has been cleaned up at both schools, but Roseville police say the graffiti was so vulgar and so derogatory that they believe it was it done to instill fear into those going to school and those who live nearby. You are just speechless. You just cant believe it. Its just disgusting. Thats how Kevin Schumacher, the lead custodian at Buljan Middle School, described the graffiti. He was the first to discover it as he came to work Sunday morning. Roseville police say the teenage boys, all of whom are white, broke into the school around 1 a.m. on Sunday through a door that was being repaired. That got them into the gym, which they vandalized with a fire extinguisher. They then went onto to graffiti the locker room and a back office, breaking windows and stealing a cash box. (They) spray-painted hateful things and some derogatory things on the portables in the back, explained Lt. Doug Blake with Roseville PD. He said the graffiti was significant and extensive, as well as incredibly offensive. If you saw on face-value what was painted here. I think it is sufficient in and of itself to say it was one of the worst crimes, something that we just dont tolerate on any level, said Lt. Blake, who said they also found what was described as Northern Hispanic-type gang tagging. Lt. Blake says the five juveniles do not live in the area. They were identified by police based on previous police encounters. Based on that previous experience, (an) officer decided to go see if those kids may have been involved, or knew who could have been involved, something along those lines, and then one thing lead to another, and we got them in custody, explained Lt. Blake. Police found some of the stolen property at the home where the kids were staying, the spray cans used and even paint on their hands. But for Schumacher, who had spent the whole cleaning up the campus, he says his bigger concern is that the racist messages came from young kids. Where are they getting this from? asked Schumacher. The five suspects were booked into juvenile hall forvandalism, conspiracy, burglary and hate crime charges. Police say they will now try to figure out their motive. With five suspects we dont know, and with some marginal cooperation, its going to be really tough for us to get down to the bottom of this, what they were doing, why they were doing it and what they sought to achieve, admitted Lt. Blake.

Fair Usage Law

August 21, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Britain to Treat Internet Hate Crime as Seriously as Offline Offenses – Voice of America

Online abuse will be treated as seriously as offline offences, Britain’s prosecution service said on Monday in new guidance on handling hate crimes. The rules – which included guidelines on helping disabled and bisexual victims – were meant to encourage more people to come forward and press courts to impose longer sentences, the Crown Prosecution Service said. “This is a crime that’s under-reported. Sometimes people feel that they just have to put up with it … That’s absolutely not the case,” Alison Saunders, the director of public prosecutions, told the BBC. The new advice was in response to the growth of social media, the CPS said. There have been several high-profile instances of successful prosecutions of people who had abused lawmakers and other public figures online.

Fair Usage Law

August 21, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Documenting Hate News Index: Google Uses AI to Track Hate … – Fortune

Many observers and commentators were shocked by the violence that erupted at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend. But “incidents of hate are actually all too common” in the U.S., according to the journalism nonprofit ProPublica , which has launched a tool to help Americans better understand that reality. The Documenting Hate News Index , built in partnership with Googles News Lab and the data visualization studio Pitch Interactive, collects news reports on hate incidents and makes them searchable by name, topic, and date. The site is certainly eye-opening, and grim. More than just a list, the site allows hate-related stories to be browsed by date, and shows fluctuations in overall reports of hate crimes over time. Astonishingly, while the violence in Charlottesville captured headlines, last weekend was not a peak for U.S. hate crimes a much broader wave crested in late May, when crimes included two fatalities in an anti-Muslim attack in Portland, a teacher ripping off a young students hijab, and the killing of a young black Army lieutenant by a white supremacist . Get Data Sheet , Fortunes technology newsletter. According to Google News Labs announcement , the site uses machine learning specifically, Googles Natural Language API to understand both the content of news reports about hate crimes, and subtler things like intent and sentiment. That means it can detect stories about events “suggestive of hate crime, bias, or abuse” and track the frequency of particular names, places, and more general keywords like “businessman” and “nationalists.” Currently, “Donald Trump” is the highest-ranking keyword associated with incidents of hate. The project is important because, according to ProPublicas larger Documenting Hate project, there is no reliable national database of hate crimes. The Index is primarily intended to help journalists, researchers, and civil rights organizations get a broader view on the national situation.

Fair Usage Law

August 20, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Google Launches Hate Crime Tracking Tool, Omits Conservative Websites – The Daily Caller

Google and ProPublica have created a new tool that tracks hate crimes throughout the United States. Google News Lab is developing a new tool powered by machine learning, titled by Documenting Hate News Ending, which tracks every hate crime reported across 50 states using data collected from February 2017 onward. The tool is being developed as part of the Documenting Hate project, which was launched this January by ProPublica. It is supported by news and other digital media organizations, universities, and civil rights groups, including the Southern Poverty Law Center. The tool features a list of articles harvested from various, largely left-leaning websites, including HuffPost, BuzzFeed, Mic, Think Progress, and even pro-Antifa publication Unicorn Booty. It runs Google News stories and filters them through Googles natural language analysis tools to confine the results to America. High-profile conservative websites like Fox News have little to no presence on the tool. According to TechCrunch, Google is using the project as a starting point for documenting and studying hate crimes. The publication claims that despite the fact that the FBI documents hate crimes, crimes committed at the local and state-level are overlooked because they fail to report their own incidents, making the data incomplete at best. The feed is generated from news articles that cover events suggestive of hate crime, bias or abuse such as anti-semitic graffiti or local court reports about incidents, says Gogle News Lab Data editor Simon Rogers. And we are monitoring it to look out for errant stories that slip in, i.e., searches for phrases that just include the word hate it hasnt happened yet but we will be paying close attention. Theres no word yet on how debunked hate crimes and hoaxes are filtered through the system. Ian Miles Cheong is a journalist and outspoken media critic. You can reach him through social media at@stillgray on Twitterand onFacebook.

Fair Usage Law

August 20, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Backers of Indiana hate crime law planning renewed push – South Bend Tribune

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Supporters of establishing a hate crimes law in Indiana say they hope their push will overcome longstanding opposition in the Legislature following the deadly violence at a rally of white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia. The Anti-Defamation League lists Indiana as one of just five states without laws against crimes motivated by biases, such as race, gender, religion and sexual orientation. Proposals to establish such a law in Indiana have repeatedly failed over the past decade. Sen. Lonnie Randolph, a Democrat from East Chicago, said he believed that should change after the violence last weekend. “What happened in Charlottesville, Virginia, was a tragedy,” said Randolph, who represents a largely minority legislative district. “I’m hopeful that maybe that incident could spark something in a lot of areas in the country and here in Indiana where it’s abundantly clear that we need hate-crime legislation.” Some lawmakers in Indiana’s Republican-dominated Legislature have opposed adopting a hate crimes law, saying the motivation for a crime shouldn’t change how a person is punished. Conservative groups argue the measure could be a step toward allowing the government to punish people for their beliefs. Republican House Speaker Brian Bosma said Indiana judges can consider motivation in criminal sentencings, but said he believed state law should recognize such factors. “I think it’s time to label what we have now as hate crimes legislation to dispel, really, the misconception that that cannot be considered by a judge in sentencing, because it can be,” Bosma said this week. Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane said he was encouraged by Bosma’s stance. “Indiana needs to put their foot down and actively condemn these heinous acts,” the Democrat from Anderson said. The Indiana Senate approved a bill in 2016 that would have allowed judges to impose tougher sentences for bias crimes, but the House never took action. The bill’s sponsor, Republican Sen. Sue Glick of LaGrange, withdrew it during this year’s legislative session, saying proposed amendments threatened to gut its provisions. Lake County Prosecutor Bernard Carter said he’s always been in favor of a hate crime statute. “If someone is convicted of a hate crime they should be known as a hate crime individual,” he told the Post-Tribune. “We need to have those individuals labeled when they’re convicted, just like we want sexual predators to register so they’re known.”

Fair Usage Law

August 20, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Google and ProPublica team up to build a national hate crime … – TechCrunch

Few things are certain in 2017s fraught national climate, but hate certainly doesnt look to be going away. In partnership with ProPublica, Google News Lab is launching a new tool to track hate crimes across America. Powered by machine learning, the Documenting Hate News Index will track reported hate crimes across all 50 states, collecting data from February 2017 onward. Data visualization studio Pitch Interactive helped craft the index, which collects Google News results and filters them through Googles natural language analysis to extract geographic and contextual information. Because they are not catalogued in any kind of formal national database, afact that inspired the creation of the index to begin with, Google calls the project a starting point for the documentation and study of hate crimes. While the FBI is legally required to document hate crimes at the federal level, state and local authorities often fail to report their own incidents, making the data incomplete at best. It is one of the first visualisations to use machine learning to generate its content using the Google Natural Language API, which analyses text and extracts information about people, places, and events, Google News Lab Data editor Simon Rogers writes in the announcement. In this case, it helps reporters by digging out locations, names and other useful data from the 3,000-plus news reports the feed is updated every day, and goes back to February 2017. The initiative is a data-rich new arm of the Documenting Hate project which collects and verifies hate incidents reported by both individual contributors and by news organizations. The Hate News Index will keep an eye out for false positives (casual uses of the word hate for example), striking a responsible balance between machine learning and human curation on a very sensitive subject. Hate events will be mapped onto a calendar in the user interface, though users can also use a keyword search or browse through algorithmic suggestions. For anyone whod like to take the data in a new direction, Google will open sourced its data set, making it available through GitHub. The projects hope is that journalists can harness its combination of visualized data and news indexing to report more effectively on the aggregate data and incidents that might otherwise fall through the cracks.

Fair Usage Law

August 19, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

After two years of declines, reported hate crimes were up in Minnesota last year – MinnPost (blog)

Early on a Saturday morning this month, just as members of the local Muslim community were gathering for the first prayer of the day, their Bloomington mosque was bombed. No one was hurt, but the incident still under investigation by the FBI, but which many suspect was driven by anti-Islamic hatred adds to a string of incidents that have Minnesota’s Muslim community on edge. After two years of declines, hate crime incidents reported to authorities in Minnesota increased from 96 in 2015 to 122 in 2016, according to the state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension. There were 98 reported incidents in 2014 and 154 in 2013. By law, Minnesota police departments are required to report crimes believed to be motivated by hatred toward race, religion, ethnicity, national origin, sex, age, disability or sexual orientation. The state first started collecting hate crime data, also known as bias crime, in 1989. But because such crimes are notoriously underreported the majority of hate crimes are missing from official data, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics the statistics dont tell the whole story in Minnesota. For those hate crimes that are reported, however, the states data offer a picture of who perpetrates them, who’s targeted, and where and how they happen. Most often-reported were anti-race incidents (58 victims), followed by anti-religion (30), anti-ethnicity (19) and anti-sexual orientation (15). Victims of reported hate incidents by year, 2009-2016 Source: Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension The most commonly targeted groups in 2016 were African Americans and Muslims. Compared to the year prior, 2016 saw an increase in recorded anti-religion hate incidents, from 15 in 2015 to 26 in 2016. Nearly three in ten recorded hate incidents were simple assault, an attempt to cause serious harm to another person. More than a quarter of reported incidents were vandalism, and another quarter-plus were intimidation. 2016 reported hate incidents by offense Source: Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension As for the medium used in hate-motivated crimes, the most common was verbal abuse, followed by bodily harm and graffiti. 2016 reported hate crimes by situation type Source: Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension Six in ten hate crime perpetrators were male and the gender of three in ten was unknown. 42 percent of offenders were white; 33 percent were of unknown race; 23 percent were black and 2 percent were Asian. The data did not include ethnicity, such as Hispanic, Latino or Arab. 2016 detailed hate crime motivation Source: Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension Nationally, the number of hate crimes reported has also seen an uptick. In 2015, the most recent year available, the FBI reported 5,850 hate crime incidents nationally, a 7 percent increase over 2014. The Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil rights organization that tracks hate groups, has also reported an uptick in active in hate groups. In Minnesota, the SPLC lists 10, including Neo-Nazi, Ku Klux Klan, anti-Muslim, black separatist and Christian identity groups. City Pages reported on efforts to shut down a neo-Nazi metal record label in the Twin Cities this week. The increases in hate groups and hate crimes coincide with what some racial and religious groups say are heightened vitriol against them in national rhetoric and in their communities. But the numbers themselves should be taken with a grain of salt, said James Nolan, a professor of sociology at West Virginia University who studies hate crimes. Hate crime statistics are only as good as the reporting methods, which is to say, they can vary a lot. Theres a few reasons the numbers tend to be a bit squishy: In the first place, whether or not hate crimes are reported depends on whether victims of crimes feel comfortable reporting them which they often dont. The accuracy of reports also depends on police attitudes and training surrounding hate crime. In studying police departments, Nolan found that in some cases, officers didnt think of crimes directed at people because of race, religion, sexual orientation or other groups as hate crimes. Other times, officers were hesitant to report crimes motivated by bias as hate crimes because of the attention doing so could draw. Sometimes they feel like what might be a destruction of property or a minor assault, if you call it a hate crime, it politicizes it. It makes it a big deal, they have to make sure they cross all the ts and dot all the is, he said. Raising awareness about the need to report hate incidents is critical, said Steve Hunegs, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas. But he acknowledged that with the number of groups keeping track of hate incidents, where to report can be confusing. In addition to police, organizations such as the Southern Poverty Law Center, the JCRC and the Coalition on American-Islamic Relations all track hate incidents (CAIR recently launched an app to streamline the process). In partnership with national nonprofit news website ProPublica and newsrooms throughout the country, Minnesota Public Radio is collecting information on hate incidents. The reporting form can be found here. Sometimes, Hunegs said, the motive in hate incidents is clear: last year, a University of Minnesota student walked into the dorm room of a Jewish student who wore a yarmulke and wrote anti-Semitic messages on his whiteboard. But in another incident, a person reported their neighbor took down a Nazi flag they claimed not to have known was offensive immediately when confronted about it. To try to navigate around this issue of underreporting, we always encourage people to call us or contact us or email us if theres anything questionable, Hunegs said.

Fair Usage Law

August 19, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

DOJ secures guilty plea in attempted hate crime attack on Florida synagogue – CNN International

The timing of Justice Department’s announcement of James Gonzalo Medina’s guilty plea struck a chord during a week plagued by the aftermath of deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. The FBI launched an investigation into Medina in 2016 after authorities learned he had expressed anti-Semitic views with associates and discussed plans to attack the Aventura Turnberry Jewish Center in southern Florida, according to court filings. Authorities say Medina scoped out the synagogue for potential vulnerabilities, told a confidential source that a Jewish holiday would be a “good day” to carry out the bomb attack, and then later procured what he believed to be an explosive device from an undercover agent. “When asked whether he knew that if the attack succeeded, that people may have died, (Medina) responded, ‘whatever happens,'” prosecutors said in the complaint. “Acts of bigotry and hatred are evil and have no place in our society,” Sessions said in a statement Wednesday announcing the guilty plea in Medina’s case. “One of the top priorities of this Department of Justice is reducing violent crime, and you can be sure that this includes hate crime. We will not tolerate this repugnant lawlessness, and we will be vigilant in prosecuting hate crime offenders to the fullest extent of the law.” While Sessions’ critics point to his previous opposition to the federal Matthew Shepard Hate Crimes Prevention Act as a senator, he has vowed as attorney general to prosecute bias-motivated crime with vigor. The department has secured at least 15 indictments in federal hate crime cases since President Donald Trump took office in January. Federal prosecutors also charged at least one Israeli-American suspect in April for his alleged involvement in a series of bomb threats against Jewish community centers, and Sessions said that the Justice Department’s “investigation into these acts as possible hate crimes continues.” “No person should have to fear being violently attacked because of who they are, what they believe, or how they worship,” Sessions said at a hate crimes summit hosted by DOJ in June. “Hate crimes are not only violent attacks on our fellow citizens; they are an attack on our country’s most fundamental principles. We have a duty to make sure that all Americans can live their lives without fear.”

Fair Usage Law

August 18, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Durham school board cites Charlottesville deadly protest, condemns … – Durham Herald Sun

Durham Herald Sun Durham school board cites Charlottesville deadly protest, condemns … Durham Herald Sun The Durham Public Schools Board of Education has adopted a resolution condemning hate speech, hate crimes and violence in the service of hatred. and more »

Fair Usage Law

August 18, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."