Archive for the ‘Hate Crimes’ Category

Explaining the rise in hate crimes against Muslims in the US – SFGate – SFGate

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

Brian Levin, California State University San Bernardino

(THE CONVERSATION) Hate crimes against Muslims have been on the rise. The murder of two samaritans for aiding two young women who were facing a barrage of anti-Muslim slurs on a Portland train is among the latest examples of brazen acts of anti-Islamic hatred.

Earlier in 2017, a mosque in Victoria, Texas was burned to the ground by an alleged anti-Muslim bigot. And just last year, members of a small extremist group called The Crusaders plotted a bombing bloodbath at a residential housing complex for Somali-Muslim immigrants in Garden City, Kansas.

I have analyzed hate crime for two decades at California State University-San Bernardinos Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism. And I have found that the rhetoric politicians use after terrorist attacks is correlated closely to sharp increases and decreases in hate crimes.

Since 1992 (following the promulgation of the Hate Crime Statistics Act of 1990), the FBI has annually tabulated hate crime data voluntarily submitted from state and territorial reporting agencies. A hate crime is defined as a criminal offense motivated by either race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender or gender identity.

According to the FBIs data, hate crimes against Muslims reported to police surged immediately following the terror attacks of 9/11. There were 481 crimes reported against Muslims in 2001, up from 28 the year before. However, from 2002 until 2014, the number of anti-Muslim crimes receded to a numerical range between 105 to 160 annually. This number was still several times higher than their pre-9/11 levels.

It should be noted that other government data, such as the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which relies on almost 200,000 residential crime surveys, as opposed to police reports, show severe official undercounting of hate crime. These studies, based on respondents answers to researchers, indicate a far higher annual average of hate crime 250,000 nationally with over half stating that they never reported such offenses to police.

FBI data show that in 2015 there were 257 hate crimes against Muslims the highest level since 2001 and a surge of 67 percent over the previous year.

As I noted in a prepared statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee in May 2017, this was the second-highest number of anti-Muslim hate crimes since FBI record-keeping began in 1992. Not only did anti-Muslim crime cases rise numerically in 2015, they also grew as a percentage of all hate crime. They now account for 4.4 percent of all reported hate crime even though Muslims are estimated to be only 1 percent of the population.

At our center, we analyzed even more recent disturbing trends related to hate crimes. Based on the latest available police data for 2016 from 25 of the nations largest cities and counties, we found a 6 percent increase in all hate crimes, with over half of the places at a multi-year high. In particular, hate crimes against Muslims had increased in six of the seven places that provided more detailed breakdowns.

We also observed a spike in such crime following certain events.

In 2015, for example, we found 45 incidents of anti-Muslim crime in the United States in the four weeks following the November 13 Paris terror attack.

Just under half of these occurred after December 2, when the San Bernardino terror attack took place. Of those, 15 took place in the five days following then-candidate Donald Trumps proposal of December 7, seeking to indefinitely ban all Muslims from entering the United States.

In contrast, as I observed in my prepared statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee, after an initial sharp spike following the 9/11 attacks, sociologist James Nolan and I found that there was a drop in hate crimes after President George W. Bush delivered a speech promoting tolerance on Sept. 17, 2001.

Other groups too, have found similar spikes in anti-Muslim hatred: The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), for example, noted that from the month of the presidential election, through Dec. 12, 2016, there was a spike in hate incidents against many minority groups. The SPLC found that the third most frequently targeted group after immigrants and African-Americans were Muslims. And just this month the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a Muslim advocacy group, reported 72 instances of harassment and 69 hate crimes that had occurred between April and June 2017.

Prejudicial stereotypes that broadly paint Muslims in a negative light are quite pervasive.

From 2002 to 2014, the number of respondents who stated that Islam was more likely to encourage violence doubled from 25 percent to 50 percent, according to Pew research. A June 2016 Reuters/Ipsos online poll found that 37 percent of Americans had a somewhat or very unfavorable view of Islam, topped only by antipathy for atheism at 38 percent.

The latest polls also show how Muslims are feared and distrusted as a group in America. While most Americans do not believe that Muslims living in the U.S. support extremism, these views vary widely by age, level of education and partisan affiliation: Almost half of those 65 and older believe that Muslims in America support extremism, whereas only few college-educated adults do so.

Interestingly, current polls also show that when people personally know someone who is a Muslim, the bias is much less. This confirms what psychology scholar Gordon Allport concludes in his seminal book, The Nature of Prejudice, that meaningful contact with those who are different is crucial for reducing hatred.

Indeed, before we can truly say love thy neighbor(s), we need to know and understand them.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article here: http://theconversation.com/explaining-the-rise-in-hate-crimes-against-muslims-in-the-us-80304.

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Explaining the rise in hate crimes against Muslims in the US – SFGate – SFGate

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Officials question decision to release possible hate crime defendants – News 12 Hudson Valley

PEEKSKILL –

Officials are questioning a city court judges decision to release two men on their own recognizance following their arrests in connection with at least two weekend assaults and robberies being investigated as possible hate crimes.

Her conduct is so outrageous, says Mayor Frank Catalina regarding city court Judge Melissa Lohr. It calls into question her judgment and her competence.

Catalina went on to say that he believes Judge Lohr has a bias against police officers.

He tells News 12 there are also allegations on social media that one or more of the defendants may have dated the judge’s daughter.

While News 12 is told all of the suspects are now behind bars on other charges, Judge Lohr denied that she acted improperly and insists that she released the men based on the information she had at the time.

Meanwhile, Mayor Catalina says he has started an assistance fund for the assault victims and is asking the public to stop by City Hall to make donations to pay for their medical expenses.

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Officials question decision to release possible hate crime defendants – News 12 Hudson Valley

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Explaining the rise in hate crimes against Muslims in the US – San Francisco Chronicle

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

Brian Levin, California State University San Bernardino

(THE CONVERSATION) Hate crimes against Muslims have been on the rise. The murder of two samaritans for aiding two young women who were facing a barrage of anti-Muslim slurs on a Portland train is among the latest examples of brazen acts of anti-Islamic hatred.

Earlier in 2017, a mosque in Victoria, Texas was burned to the ground by an alleged anti-Muslim bigot. And just last year, members of a small extremist group called The Crusaders plotted a bombing bloodbath at a residential housing complex for Somali-Muslim immigrants in Garden City, Kansas.

I have analyzed hate crime for two decades at California State University-San Bernardinos Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism. And I have found that the rhetoric politicians use after terrorist attacks is correlated closely to sharp increases and decreases in hate crimes.

Since 1992 (following the promulgation of the Hate Crime Statistics Act of 1990), the FBI has annually tabulated hate crime data voluntarily submitted from state and territorial reporting agencies. A hate crime is defined as a criminal offense motivated by either race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender or gender identity.

According to the FBIs data, hate crimes against Muslims reported to police surged immediately following the terror attacks of 9/11. There were 481 crimes reported against Muslims in 2001, up from 28 the year before. However, from 2002 until 2014, the number of anti-Muslim crimes receded to a numerical range between 105 to 160 annually. This number was still several times higher than their pre-9/11 levels.

It should be noted that other government data, such as the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which relies on almost 200,000 residential crime surveys, as opposed to police reports, show severe official undercounting of hate crime. These studies, based on respondents answers to researchers, indicate a far higher annual average of hate crime 250,000 nationally with over half stating that they never reported such offenses to police.

FBI data show that in 2015 there were 257 hate crimes against Muslims the highest level since 2001 and a surge of 67 percent over the previous year.

As I noted in a prepared statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee in May 2017, this was the second-highest number of anti-Muslim hate crimes since FBI record-keeping began in 1992. Not only did anti-Muslim crime cases rise numerically in 2015, they also grew as a percentage of all hate crime. They now account for 4.4 percent of all reported hate crime even though Muslims are estimated to be only 1 percent of the population.

At our center, we analyzed even more recent disturbing trends related to hate crimes. Based on the latest available police data for 2016 from 25 of the nations largest cities and counties, we found a 6 percent increase in all hate crimes, with over half of the places at a multi-year high. In particular, hate crimes against Muslims had increased in six of the seven places that provided more detailed breakdowns.

We also observed a spike in such crime following certain events.

In 2015, for example, we found 45 incidents of anti-Muslim crime in the United States in the four weeks following the November 13 Paris terror attack.

Just under half of these occurred after December 2, when the San Bernardino terror attack took place. Of those, 15 took place in the five days following then-candidate Donald Trumps proposal of December 7, seeking to indefinitely ban all Muslims from entering the United States.

In contrast, as I observed in my prepared statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee, after an initial sharp spike following the 9/11 attacks, sociologist James Nolan and I found that there was a drop in hate crimes after President George W. Bush delivered a speech promoting tolerance on Sept. 17, 2001.

Other groups too, have found similar spikes in anti-Muslim hatred: The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), for example, noted that from the month of the presidential election, through Dec. 12, 2016, there was a spike in hate incidents against many minority groups. The SPLC found that the third most frequently targeted group after immigrants and African-Americans were Muslims. And just this month the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a Muslim advocacy group, reported 72 instances of harassment and 69 hate crimes that had occurred between April and June 2017.

Prejudicial stereotypes that broadly paint Muslims in a negative light are quite pervasive.

From 2002 to 2014, the number of respondents who stated that Islam was more likely to encourage violence doubled from 25 percent to 50 percent, according to Pew research. A June 2016 Reuters/Ipsos online poll found that 37 percent of Americans had a somewhat or very unfavorable view of Islam, topped only by antipathy for atheism at 38 percent.

The latest polls also show how Muslims are feared and distrusted as a group in America. While most Americans do not believe that Muslims living in the U.S. support extremism, these views vary widely by age, level of education and partisan affiliation: Almost half of those 65 and older believe that Muslims in America support extremism, whereas only few college-educated adults do so.

Interestingly, current polls also show that when people personally know someone who is a Muslim, the bias is much less. This confirms what psychology scholar Gordon Allport concludes in his seminal book, The Nature of Prejudice, that meaningful contact with those who are different is crucial for reducing hatred.

Indeed, before we can truly say love thy neighbor(s), we need to know and understand them.

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article here: http://theconversation.com/explaining-the-rise-in-hate-crimes-against-muslims-in-the-us-80304.

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Explaining the rise in hate crimes against Muslims in the US – San Francisco Chronicle

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Organizers to rally against hate crimes in Anne Arundel County … – ABC2 News

A rally against hate crimes in Anne Arundel County is scheduled on Wednesday.

The Caucus of African-American Leaders will gather at 11 a.m. at the Civil Rights Foot Soldiers Memorial across from the Arundel Center in Annapolis to march to the courthouse in an effort to call attention to the “noose” cases that will be heard at that court, organizers said.

Back in May, two 19-year-old men were arrested and charged with a hate crime after a teacher found a noose hanging on a light fixture in front of Crofton Middle School.

Police identified the suspects, Conner Prout and John Haverman, using surveillance video.

RELATED: Two men facing hate crime charges after noose found at middle school

Anne Arundel County Public Schools have been in the spotlight over the last few years with racially charged events occurring including the hacking of school computers, in which anti-Semitic epithets were left, organizers said in a news release. The Wednesday, July 19th demonstration is to call attention to hate crimes in the county. Demonstrators will be carrying anti noose placards.

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Organizers to rally against hate crimes in Anne Arundel County … – ABC2 News

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Group Says Hate Crimes Against Muslims Increasing in US (VIDEO) – Newsy

An advocacy group says anti-Muslim hate crimes and religious discriminationappear to be rising in 2017.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations has tracked anti-Muslim incidents since 2013. But the group says this year could be the worst yet.

CAIR says in the first half of 2017, hate crimes against Muslims wereup 91 percentcompared with the same time last year. And it says religious discrimination incidents against Muslims in that period were up 24 percent.

Government data also shows hate crimes against Muslims havebeen risingin recent years. The most recentFBI dataavailable shows anti-Muslim crimesfrom 2014-15rose more than any other hate crime that year.

Related StoryA Grant Is Finding And Funding Muslims To Tell Humanizing Stories

But for the communities affected, it’s more than just stats.

“There’s absolute, incredible, incredible anger. There’s incredible fear. There’s incredible concern that these things, which have continued to happen ever since, especially since the last year’s election season, that it’s going to continue to happen,” said Hatem Abudayyeh, executive director of Arab American Action Network in Chicago.

But also, there is solidarity and camaraderie.

“But the most important takeaway is that it’s not only the Muslim community that’s being targeted right now. There is a chance and a really important moment for us to come together with our brothers and our sisters in the Latino community, other indigenous communities,” said community organizer Reema Ahmad.

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Group Says Hate Crimes Against Muslims Increasing in US (VIDEO) – Newsy

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Under Trump, Anti-Muslim Hate Crimes Have Increased at an … – Newsweek

There were more than 940 reports of potentialbiasincidents involving the targeting of Muslims between April and June, according to a report released by the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) on Monday. Of those, the organization determined 451 stemmed from anti-Muslim bias, which contributed to a 91 percent increase in anti-Muslim hate crimes during the first half of the year as compared to the same time period in 2016.

Nonviolent and nonthreatening instances of harassment accounted for 16 percent of the incidents involving Muslims between April 1 and June 30, while outright hate crimesin which violence or a physical altercation was involvedaccounted for 15 percent. Incidents in which Muslims were inappropriately targeted by the FBI made up 12 percent of cases.

People were targeted at their places of residence in 17 percent of the reports, while 14 percent involved Muslim who were on walking the streets or driving their cars. Another 13 percent faced anti-Muslim biaswhile flying or traveling by bus or train. About 33 percent of incidents took place at a mosque or Islamic center, and 9 percent occurred at schools.

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Of the incidents reported, CAIR identified triggeringfactors for 358, including a victims ethnicity or national origin32 percentand preconceived notions of a victim being a Muslim20 percent. Fifteen percent of incidents were triggered by the presence of a headscarf or hijab. Forty-six percent of the people targeted were from Middle Eastern and North African countries.

Of the number of crimes identified to be based on anti-Muslim bias, the CAIR report said 126 had been investigated by federal agencies between April 1 and June 30.

Although the CAIR report did not cite President Donald Trumps rhetoric towardMuslims as a factor in the increased anti-Muslim bias in the U.S., a previous report conducted by researchers at California State Universitys Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism found that biascrimes against various minorities and religious groups were up some 20 percent since Trumps election win in November. The majority of the crimes documented were against Muslims and individuals recognized as belonging to the LGBTcommunity.

On multiple occasions during his campaign, Trump made harshstatements regarding Islamic terrorists and promoted a stronger vetting system to identify immigrants with ties to radical ideology.

About 3.3 million people in the United States are Muslim, according to a Pew Research Center report released in May.

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Under Trump, Anti-Muslim Hate Crimes Have Increased at an … – Newsweek

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What We Knowand Don’t KnowAbout Hate Crimes in America – Pacific Standard


Pacific Standard
What We Knowand Don't KnowAbout Hate Crimes in America
Pacific Standard
Documenting Hate is an attempt to overcome the inadequate data collection on hate crimes and bias incidents in America. We've been compiling incident reports from civil rights groups, as well as news reports, social media. and law enforcement records.

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What We Knowand Don’t KnowAbout Hate Crimes in America – Pacific Standard

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Spikes In Hate Crimes Surge In Montgomery County, Around Maryland – CBS Baltimore / WJZ

July 16, 2017 6:37 PM

BALTIMORE (WJZ) Police say they are seeing a spike in bias incidents, which has become a troubling trend in Montgomery County. It comes after several hate-related crimes throughout Maryland in the last year.

Graffiti reading Trump Nation. Whites only defaced a church in Silver Spring.

James Jackson from Baltimore was charged with murder as an act of terrorism in New York. Police say he stabbed his victim to death because he was African American.

And in Anne Arundel county, two teens face hate crime charges after surveillance video caught them placing a noose at Crofton Middle School.

Last week, a grand jury in Prince Georges County indicted Sean Urbanski in the murder of Richard CollinsIII. The FBI is looking at that murder as a hate crime.

And in Montgomery County, police say the number of bias incidents has jumped up 83 percent.

From January 1 to June 30 of this year, Montgomery County Police has had 67 reported cases of what we call bias incidents. During that same period last year, we had 37 incidents reported, saysRick Goodale, with Montgomery County Police.

Thats why Montgomery County officials say theyre taking every bias report seriously but they cant do it alone.

It requires the involvement of not only the police, schools, parents, community leaders, it takes all of us to solve these problems, says Goodale.

A majority of the bias incidents were in high schools and middle schools.

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Spikes In Hate Crimes Surge In Montgomery County, Around Maryland – CBS Baltimore / WJZ

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July 18, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Let’s put a stop to hate crimes – Youngstown Vindicator

Published: Tue, July 18, 2017 @ 12:00 a.m.

By Kiki Monifa

Tribune News Service

A few months ago, I was walking with my partner in the Jack London Square area of Oakland, Calif., when we were approached by five men in their late 20s or early 30s. One of them yelled, Dyke! and another asked, What are you two, a couple of lesbians?

They surrounded us, and we were afraid. I replied, Yes, but you say that as if that is a bad thing. I heard laughter. Im not sure from whom. Fortunately, the group walked away.

As a black lesbian, I have had the N-word hurled at me more times than I care to remember. Ditto for the B-word. And when I weighed 200 pounds more, I was insulted based on my weight, a physical disability.

It did not occur to me to report any of these incidents as hate crimes. Thats not surprising. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, more than half of hate crimes go unreported.

Hate crimes and incidents may be predicated on race, religion, disability, gender identity or immigrant status. They can range from property crimes to murder. And they are on the rise.

According to a report by the California Department of Justice released July 3, hate crimes in California rose more than 11 percent from 2015 to 2016, to a total of 931 incidents. Race-related hate crimes were up more than 20 percent.

And its happening all over the country. California is an amplified version of whats going on nationally, said professor Brian Levin, the director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino.

Political climate

Its not surprising that hate crimes have increased, given the current political climate. Politicians have emboldened white-supremacist groups and stoked fears about immigrants and Muslims.

In the week after the 2016 presidential election, the Southern Poverty Law Center documented more than 700 reports of hateful incidents of harassment around the country. The Council on American-Islamic Relations documented a 57 percent increase in anti-Muslim incidents in 2016 over 2015.

Recently, a Mississippi man became the first person prosecuted under the Hate Crimes Prevention Act, for the 2015 murder of a transgender teenaged girl. He shocked her with a stun gun, stabbed her and bashed her head with a hammer.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, responding to the recent report showing a rise in hate crimes, said in a statement, When someone commits a crime motivated by hate, it is not just an attack on one innocent person, but an attack on the entire state and our communities.

Americans need to recognize the danger to our society posed by hate crimes and hateful behavior and work toward tolerance and acceptance. Lives depend on it.

Kiki Monifa of Oakland, Calif., is editor-in-chief of Arise 2.0, a digital global publication focusing on news, issues and opinions impacting the LGBTQ of color community. She wrote this for Progressive Media Project, a source of liberal commentary on domestic and international issues; it is affiliated with The Progressive magazine. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Let’s put a stop to hate crimes – Youngstown Vindicator

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Explaining the rise in hate crimes against Muslims in the US – SFGate – SFGate

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Brian Levin, California State University San Bernardino (THE CONVERSATION) Hate crimes against Muslims have been on the rise. The murder of two samaritans for aiding two young women who were facing a barrage of anti-Muslim slurs on a Portland train is among the latest examples of brazen acts of anti-Islamic hatred. Earlier in 2017, a mosque in Victoria, Texas was burned to the ground by an alleged anti-Muslim bigot. And just last year, members of a small extremist group called The Crusaders plotted a bombing bloodbath at a residential housing complex for Somali-Muslim immigrants in Garden City, Kansas. I have analyzed hate crime for two decades at California State University-San Bernardinos Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism. And I have found that the rhetoric politicians use after terrorist attacks is correlated closely to sharp increases and decreases in hate crimes. Since 1992 (following the promulgation of the Hate Crime Statistics Act of 1990), the FBI has annually tabulated hate crime data voluntarily submitted from state and territorial reporting agencies. A hate crime is defined as a criminal offense motivated by either race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender or gender identity. According to the FBIs data, hate crimes against Muslims reported to police surged immediately following the terror attacks of 9/11. There were 481 crimes reported against Muslims in 2001, up from 28 the year before. However, from 2002 until 2014, the number of anti-Muslim crimes receded to a numerical range between 105 to 160 annually. This number was still several times higher than their pre-9/11 levels. It should be noted that other government data, such as the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which relies on almost 200,000 residential crime surveys, as opposed to police reports, show severe official undercounting of hate crime. These studies, based on respondents answers to researchers, indicate a far higher annual average of hate crime 250,000 nationally with over half stating that they never reported such offenses to police. FBI data show that in 2015 there were 257 hate crimes against Muslims the highest level since 2001 and a surge of 67 percent over the previous year. As I noted in a prepared statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee in May 2017, this was the second-highest number of anti-Muslim hate crimes since FBI record-keeping began in 1992. Not only did anti-Muslim crime cases rise numerically in 2015, they also grew as a percentage of all hate crime. They now account for 4.4 percent of all reported hate crime even though Muslims are estimated to be only 1 percent of the population. At our center, we analyzed even more recent disturbing trends related to hate crimes. Based on the latest available police data for 2016 from 25 of the nations largest cities and counties, we found a 6 percent increase in all hate crimes, with over half of the places at a multi-year high. In particular, hate crimes against Muslims had increased in six of the seven places that provided more detailed breakdowns. We also observed a spike in such crime following certain events. In 2015, for example, we found 45 incidents of anti-Muslim crime in the United States in the four weeks following the November 13 Paris terror attack. Just under half of these occurred after December 2, when the San Bernardino terror attack took place. Of those, 15 took place in the five days following then-candidate Donald Trumps proposal of December 7, seeking to indefinitely ban all Muslims from entering the United States. In contrast, as I observed in my prepared statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee, after an initial sharp spike following the 9/11 attacks, sociologist James Nolan and I found that there was a drop in hate crimes after President George W. Bush delivered a speech promoting tolerance on Sept. 17, 2001. Other groups too, have found similar spikes in anti-Muslim hatred: The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), for example, noted that from the month of the presidential election, through Dec. 12, 2016, there was a spike in hate incidents against many minority groups. The SPLC found that the third most frequently targeted group after immigrants and African-Americans were Muslims. And just this month the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a Muslim advocacy group, reported 72 instances of harassment and 69 hate crimes that had occurred between April and June 2017. Prejudicial stereotypes that broadly paint Muslims in a negative light are quite pervasive. From 2002 to 2014, the number of respondents who stated that Islam was more likely to encourage violence doubled from 25 percent to 50 percent, according to Pew research. A June 2016 Reuters/Ipsos online poll found that 37 percent of Americans had a somewhat or very unfavorable view of Islam, topped only by antipathy for atheism at 38 percent. The latest polls also show how Muslims are feared and distrusted as a group in America. While most Americans do not believe that Muslims living in the U.S. support extremism, these views vary widely by age, level of education and partisan affiliation: Almost half of those 65 and older believe that Muslims in America support extremism, whereas only few college-educated adults do so. Interestingly, current polls also show that when people personally know someone who is a Muslim, the bias is much less. This confirms what psychology scholar Gordon Allport concludes in his seminal book, The Nature of Prejudice, that meaningful contact with those who are different is crucial for reducing hatred. Indeed, before we can truly say love thy neighbor(s), we need to know and understand them. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article here: http://theconversation.com/explaining-the-rise-in-hate-crimes-against-muslims-in-the-us-80304.

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Officials question decision to release possible hate crime defendants – News 12 Hudson Valley

PEEKSKILL – Officials are questioning a city court judges decision to release two men on their own recognizance following their arrests in connection with at least two weekend assaults and robberies being investigated as possible hate crimes. Her conduct is so outrageous, says Mayor Frank Catalina regarding city court Judge Melissa Lohr. It calls into question her judgment and her competence. Catalina went on to say that he believes Judge Lohr has a bias against police officers. He tells News 12 there are also allegations on social media that one or more of the defendants may have dated the judge’s daughter. While News 12 is told all of the suspects are now behind bars on other charges, Judge Lohr denied that she acted improperly and insists that she released the men based on the information she had at the time. Meanwhile, Mayor Catalina says he has started an assistance fund for the assault victims and is asking the public to stop by City Hall to make donations to pay for their medical expenses.

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Explaining the rise in hate crimes against Muslims in the US – San Francisco Chronicle

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Brian Levin, California State University San Bernardino (THE CONVERSATION) Hate crimes against Muslims have been on the rise. The murder of two samaritans for aiding two young women who were facing a barrage of anti-Muslim slurs on a Portland train is among the latest examples of brazen acts of anti-Islamic hatred. Earlier in 2017, a mosque in Victoria, Texas was burned to the ground by an alleged anti-Muslim bigot. And just last year, members of a small extremist group called The Crusaders plotted a bombing bloodbath at a residential housing complex for Somali-Muslim immigrants in Garden City, Kansas. I have analyzed hate crime for two decades at California State University-San Bernardinos Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism. And I have found that the rhetoric politicians use after terrorist attacks is correlated closely to sharp increases and decreases in hate crimes. Since 1992 (following the promulgation of the Hate Crime Statistics Act of 1990), the FBI has annually tabulated hate crime data voluntarily submitted from state and territorial reporting agencies. A hate crime is defined as a criminal offense motivated by either race, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender or gender identity. According to the FBIs data, hate crimes against Muslims reported to police surged immediately following the terror attacks of 9/11. There were 481 crimes reported against Muslims in 2001, up from 28 the year before. However, from 2002 until 2014, the number of anti-Muslim crimes receded to a numerical range between 105 to 160 annually. This number was still several times higher than their pre-9/11 levels. It should be noted that other government data, such as the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which relies on almost 200,000 residential crime surveys, as opposed to police reports, show severe official undercounting of hate crime. These studies, based on respondents answers to researchers, indicate a far higher annual average of hate crime 250,000 nationally with over half stating that they never reported such offenses to police. FBI data show that in 2015 there were 257 hate crimes against Muslims the highest level since 2001 and a surge of 67 percent over the previous year. As I noted in a prepared statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee in May 2017, this was the second-highest number of anti-Muslim hate crimes since FBI record-keeping began in 1992. Not only did anti-Muslim crime cases rise numerically in 2015, they also grew as a percentage of all hate crime. They now account for 4.4 percent of all reported hate crime even though Muslims are estimated to be only 1 percent of the population. At our center, we analyzed even more recent disturbing trends related to hate crimes. Based on the latest available police data for 2016 from 25 of the nations largest cities and counties, we found a 6 percent increase in all hate crimes, with over half of the places at a multi-year high. In particular, hate crimes against Muslims had increased in six of the seven places that provided more detailed breakdowns. We also observed a spike in such crime following certain events. In 2015, for example, we found 45 incidents of anti-Muslim crime in the United States in the four weeks following the November 13 Paris terror attack. Just under half of these occurred after December 2, when the San Bernardino terror attack took place. Of those, 15 took place in the five days following then-candidate Donald Trumps proposal of December 7, seeking to indefinitely ban all Muslims from entering the United States. In contrast, as I observed in my prepared statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee, after an initial sharp spike following the 9/11 attacks, sociologist James Nolan and I found that there was a drop in hate crimes after President George W. Bush delivered a speech promoting tolerance on Sept. 17, 2001. Other groups too, have found similar spikes in anti-Muslim hatred: The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), for example, noted that from the month of the presidential election, through Dec. 12, 2016, there was a spike in hate incidents against many minority groups. The SPLC found that the third most frequently targeted group after immigrants and African-Americans were Muslims. And just this month the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a Muslim advocacy group, reported 72 instances of harassment and 69 hate crimes that had occurred between April and June 2017. Prejudicial stereotypes that broadly paint Muslims in a negative light are quite pervasive. From 2002 to 2014, the number of respondents who stated that Islam was more likely to encourage violence doubled from 25 percent to 50 percent, according to Pew research. A June 2016 Reuters/Ipsos online poll found that 37 percent of Americans had a somewhat or very unfavorable view of Islam, topped only by antipathy for atheism at 38 percent. The latest polls also show how Muslims are feared and distrusted as a group in America. While most Americans do not believe that Muslims living in the U.S. support extremism, these views vary widely by age, level of education and partisan affiliation: Almost half of those 65 and older believe that Muslims in America support extremism, whereas only few college-educated adults do so. Interestingly, current polls also show that when people personally know someone who is a Muslim, the bias is much less. This confirms what psychology scholar Gordon Allport concludes in his seminal book, The Nature of Prejudice, that meaningful contact with those who are different is crucial for reducing hatred. Indeed, before we can truly say love thy neighbor(s), we need to know and understand them. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article here: http://theconversation.com/explaining-the-rise-in-hate-crimes-against-muslims-in-the-us-80304.

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July 20, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Organizers to rally against hate crimes in Anne Arundel County … – ABC2 News

A rally against hate crimes in Anne Arundel County is scheduled on Wednesday. The Caucus of African-American Leaders will gather at 11 a.m. at the Civil Rights Foot Soldiers Memorial across from the Arundel Center in Annapolis to march to the courthouse in an effort to call attention to the “noose” cases that will be heard at that court, organizers said. Back in May, two 19-year-old men were arrested and charged with a hate crime after a teacher found a noose hanging on a light fixture in front of Crofton Middle School. Police identified the suspects, Conner Prout and John Haverman, using surveillance video. RELATED: Two men facing hate crime charges after noose found at middle school Anne Arundel County Public Schools have been in the spotlight over the last few years with racially charged events occurring including the hacking of school computers, in which anti-Semitic epithets were left, organizers said in a news release. The Wednesday, July 19th demonstration is to call attention to hate crimes in the county. Demonstrators will be carrying anti noose placards.

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July 19, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Group Says Hate Crimes Against Muslims Increasing in US (VIDEO) – Newsy

An advocacy group says anti-Muslim hate crimes and religious discriminationappear to be rising in 2017. The Council on American-Islamic Relations has tracked anti-Muslim incidents since 2013. But the group says this year could be the worst yet. CAIR says in the first half of 2017, hate crimes against Muslims wereup 91 percentcompared with the same time last year. And it says religious discrimination incidents against Muslims in that period were up 24 percent. Government data also shows hate crimes against Muslims havebeen risingin recent years. The most recentFBI dataavailable shows anti-Muslim crimesfrom 2014-15rose more than any other hate crime that year. Related StoryA Grant Is Finding And Funding Muslims To Tell Humanizing Stories But for the communities affected, it’s more than just stats. “There’s absolute, incredible, incredible anger. There’s incredible fear. There’s incredible concern that these things, which have continued to happen ever since, especially since the last year’s election season, that it’s going to continue to happen,” said Hatem Abudayyeh, executive director of Arab American Action Network in Chicago. But also, there is solidarity and camaraderie. “But the most important takeaway is that it’s not only the Muslim community that’s being targeted right now. There is a chance and a really important moment for us to come together with our brothers and our sisters in the Latino community, other indigenous communities,” said community organizer Reema Ahmad.

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July 19, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Under Trump, Anti-Muslim Hate Crimes Have Increased at an … – Newsweek

There were more than 940 reports of potentialbiasincidents involving the targeting of Muslims between April and June, according to a report released by the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) on Monday. Of those, the organization determined 451 stemmed from anti-Muslim bias, which contributed to a 91 percent increase in anti-Muslim hate crimes during the first half of the year as compared to the same time period in 2016. Nonviolent and nonthreatening instances of harassment accounted for 16 percent of the incidents involving Muslims between April 1 and June 30, while outright hate crimesin which violence or a physical altercation was involvedaccounted for 15 percent. Incidents in which Muslims were inappropriately targeted by the FBI made up 12 percent of cases. People were targeted at their places of residence in 17 percent of the reports, while 14 percent involved Muslim who were on walking the streets or driving their cars. Another 13 percent faced anti-Muslim biaswhile flying or traveling by bus or train. About 33 percent of incidents took place at a mosque or Islamic center, and 9 percent occurred at schools. Daily Emails and Alerts – Get the best of Newsweek delivered to your inbox Of the incidents reported, CAIR identified triggeringfactors for 358, including a victims ethnicity or national origin32 percentand preconceived notions of a victim being a Muslim20 percent. Fifteen percent of incidents were triggered by the presence of a headscarf or hijab. Forty-six percent of the people targeted were from Middle Eastern and North African countries. Of the number of crimes identified to be based on anti-Muslim bias, the CAIR report said 126 had been investigated by federal agencies between April 1 and June 30. Although the CAIR report did not cite President Donald Trumps rhetoric towardMuslims as a factor in the increased anti-Muslim bias in the U.S., a previous report conducted by researchers at California State Universitys Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism found that biascrimes against various minorities and religious groups were up some 20 percent since Trumps election win in November. The majority of the crimes documented were against Muslims and individuals recognized as belonging to the LGBTcommunity. On multiple occasions during his campaign, Trump made harshstatements regarding Islamic terrorists and promoted a stronger vetting system to identify immigrants with ties to radical ideology. About 3.3 million people in the United States are Muslim, according to a Pew Research Center report released in May.

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July 18, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

What We Knowand Don’t KnowAbout Hate Crimes in America – Pacific Standard

Pacific Standard What We Knowand Don't KnowAbout Hate Crimes in America Pacific Standard Documenting Hate is an attempt to overcome the inadequate data collection on hate crimes and bias incidents in America. We've been compiling incident reports from civil rights groups, as well as news reports, social media. and law enforcement records.

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July 18, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Spikes In Hate Crimes Surge In Montgomery County, Around Maryland – CBS Baltimore / WJZ

July 16, 2017 6:37 PM BALTIMORE (WJZ) Police say they are seeing a spike in bias incidents, which has become a troubling trend in Montgomery County. It comes after several hate-related crimes throughout Maryland in the last year. Graffiti reading Trump Nation. Whites only defaced a church in Silver Spring. James Jackson from Baltimore was charged with murder as an act of terrorism in New York. Police say he stabbed his victim to death because he was African American. And in Anne Arundel county, two teens face hate crime charges after surveillance video caught them placing a noose at Crofton Middle School. Last week, a grand jury in Prince Georges County indicted Sean Urbanski in the murder of Richard CollinsIII. The FBI is looking at that murder as a hate crime. And in Montgomery County, police say the number of bias incidents has jumped up 83 percent. From January 1 to June 30 of this year, Montgomery County Police has had 67 reported cases of what we call bias incidents. During that same period last year, we had 37 incidents reported, saysRick Goodale, with Montgomery County Police. Thats why Montgomery County officials say theyre taking every bias report seriously but they cant do it alone. It requires the involvement of not only the police, schools, parents, community leaders, it takes all of us to solve these problems, says Goodale. A majority of the bias incidents were in high schools and middle schools. Follow @CBSBaltimore on Twitter and like WJZ-TV | CBS Baltimore on Facebook Track Weather On The Go With Our App! Your Podcast Network Play.it CBS All Access About Us Ad Choices EEO Reports CBS Television Public File CBS Radio Public File

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July 18, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed

Let’s put a stop to hate crimes – Youngstown Vindicator

Published: Tue, July 18, 2017 @ 12:00 a.m. By Kiki Monifa Tribune News Service A few months ago, I was walking with my partner in the Jack London Square area of Oakland, Calif., when we were approached by five men in their late 20s or early 30s. One of them yelled, Dyke! and another asked, What are you two, a couple of lesbians? They surrounded us, and we were afraid. I replied, Yes, but you say that as if that is a bad thing. I heard laughter. Im not sure from whom. Fortunately, the group walked away. As a black lesbian, I have had the N-word hurled at me more times than I care to remember. Ditto for the B-word. And when I weighed 200 pounds more, I was insulted based on my weight, a physical disability. It did not occur to me to report any of these incidents as hate crimes. Thats not surprising. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, more than half of hate crimes go unreported. Hate crimes and incidents may be predicated on race, religion, disability, gender identity or immigrant status. They can range from property crimes to murder. And they are on the rise. According to a report by the California Department of Justice released July 3, hate crimes in California rose more than 11 percent from 2015 to 2016, to a total of 931 incidents. Race-related hate crimes were up more than 20 percent. And its happening all over the country. California is an amplified version of whats going on nationally, said professor Brian Levin, the director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at Cal State San Bernardino. Political climate Its not surprising that hate crimes have increased, given the current political climate. Politicians have emboldened white-supremacist groups and stoked fears about immigrants and Muslims. In the week after the 2016 presidential election, the Southern Poverty Law Center documented more than 700 reports of hateful incidents of harassment around the country. The Council on American-Islamic Relations documented a 57 percent increase in anti-Muslim incidents in 2016 over 2015. Recently, a Mississippi man became the first person prosecuted under the Hate Crimes Prevention Act, for the 2015 murder of a transgender teenaged girl. He shocked her with a stun gun, stabbed her and bashed her head with a hammer. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, responding to the recent report showing a rise in hate crimes, said in a statement, When someone commits a crime motivated by hate, it is not just an attack on one innocent person, but an attack on the entire state and our communities. Americans need to recognize the danger to our society posed by hate crimes and hateful behavior and work toward tolerance and acceptance. Lives depend on it. Kiki Monifa of Oakland, Calif., is editor-in-chief of Arise 2.0, a digital global publication focusing on news, issues and opinions impacting the LGBTQ of color community. She wrote this for Progressive Media Project, a source of liberal commentary on domestic and international issues; it is affiliated with The Progressive magazine. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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July 18, 2017   Posted in: Hate Crimes  Comments Closed


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