Archive for the ‘Hate Crimes’ Category

Groups: Hate crimes on rise in Ukraine (updated)

Hate crimes are on the rise in Ukraine, a group of human rights organizations said Wednesday. AP Groups: Hate crimes on rise in Ukraine (updated) Yesterday at 19:40 | Associated PressHate crimes are on the rise in Ukraine, a group of human rights organizations said Wednesday, amid calls to boycott European Championship matches here because of a threat of racially motivated abuse.

Ukraine, which is a co-host of Euro 2012 along with neighboring Poland, has been rocked by accusations of racism and a recent call by a former England footballer to not attend matches here because fans might return “in a coffin.” Days before the tournament started, the BBC broadcast footage of racist and violent incidents at recent club matches in Ukraine, including host city Kharkiv.

Authorities have responded angrily to the suggestions that the country is inherently racist. Officials have vowed that all fans would we greeted here with open arms. UEFA’s tournament director in Kiev, Markiyan Lubkivskyi, said Tuesday there have been no reports of racial abuse during the four group matches played in Ukraine so far.

But a recent study of racism and xenophobia conducted by the Eurasian Jewish Congress shows that the number of hate crimes rose from 37 in 2009 to 48 in 2011, including an attack in 2010 that was lethal.

“Without a doubt, racism exists in Ukraine,” said Maksym Butkevych, of No Borders, a Kiev-based advocacy group. He cautioned that racism wasn’t a widespread practice affecting the daily lives of the majority of Ukrainians, but said racial and ethnic intolerance among Ukrainians was growing.

“We are seeing a rise in such sentiments and views and this is a worrisome tendency,” Butkevych said.

Yevhen Zakharov, head of the Kharkiv Rights Group, a leading rights organization in Ukraine, said that the rise in xenophobic sentiments can be attributed to a severe economic crisis that has shaken the country in recent years, leading people to blame others for their hardships.

“The level of aggression in society has risen. People look for enemies and they find them not in themselves but around them,” Zakharov said.

The activists said that authorities rarely punish the perpetrators of hate crimes and often write off such attacks as mere hooliganism because they are harder to prove and victims are often scared to report them, fearing retribution from the attackers and further racially motivated abuse at the hands of police.

“The standard reaction of a victim is to lie in bed at home and not tell anyone about” the attack, Butkevych said.

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Groups: Hate crimes on rise in Ukraine (updated)

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Groups: Hate crimes on rise in Ukraine

KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — Hate crimes are on the rise in Ukraine, a group of human rights organizations said Wednesday, amid calls to boycott European Championship matches because of the threat of racially motivated abuse.

Ukraine, which is a co-host of Euro 2012 along with neighboring Poland, has been rocked by accusations of racism and a recent call by a former England soccer to not attend matches here because fans might return “in a coffin.” Days before the tournament started, the BBC broadcast footage of racist and violent incidents at recent club matches in Ukraine, including host city Kharkiv.

Authorities have responded angrily to the suggestions that the country is racist. Officials have vowed that all fans would we greeted with open arms. UEFA’s tournament director in Kiev, Markiyan Lubkivskyi, said Tuesday there have been no reports of racial abuse during the four group matches played in Ukraine so far.

But a recent study of racism and xenophobia conducted by the Eurasian Jewish Congress shows that the number of hate crimes rose from 37 in 2009 to 48 in 2011.

“Without a doubt, racism exists in Ukraine,” said Maksym Butkevych, of No Borders, a Kiev-based advocacy group. He cautioned that racism wasn’t a widespread practice affecting the daily lives of the majority of Ukrainians, but said racial and ethnic intolerance among Ukrainians was growing.

“We are seeing a rise in such sentiments and views and this is a worrisome tendency,” Butkevych said.

Yevhen Zakharov, head of the Kharkiv Rights Group, a leading rights organization in Ukraine, said the rise in xenophobic sentiments can be attributed to a severe economic crisis that has shaken the country in recent years, leading people to blame others for their hardships.

“The level of aggression in society has risen. People look for enemies and they find them not in themselves but around them,” Zakharov said.

The activists said authorities rarely punish the perpetrators of hate crimes and often write off such attacks as mere hooliganism because they are harder to prove and victims are often scared to report them, fearing retribution from the attackers and more racially motivated abuse at the hands of police.

“The standard reaction of a victim is to lie in bed at home and not tell anyone about” the attack, Butkevych said.

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Groups: Hate crimes on rise in Ukraine

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Activists stage rally in Springfield against hate crimes; police make another arrest

SPRINGFIELD Community activists joined Springfield city and school officials at a rally Wednesday to speak out against racial intimidation.

The event was prompted by an incident in which a black teenager said he was walking downtown on Memorial Day when a group of strangers all of whom are white threatened and chased him while shouting racial slurs.

I am outraged, because every child in this community deserves to feel safe, Springfield School District Superintendent Nancy Golden told a group of about 50 people who gathered Wednesday afternoon outside City Hall for a rally organized by the Community Alliance of Lane County.

Afterward, a number of rally attendees took to the streets and asked downtown business owners to post Hate Free Zone leaflets in their windows.

The rally and leafleting took place a few hours after police announced that they had made a fifth arrest in connection with the hate crime case.

Officers on Tuesday night arrested 19-year-old Brandon James Ricker on charges of attempted first-degree intimidation, hindering prosecution and evidence tampering.

Police said Ricker admitted to officers that he had interfered with their investigation into the Memorial Day incident.

While Ricker a senior at Thurston High School was not among the group that allegedly targeted the 15-year-old Eugene boy, police interviewed him last week while trying to track down the other suspects.

After speaking with investigators, Ricker disregarded their directions to keep quiet and instead advised 22-year-old Eugene resident Matthew Booster to flee the area because authorities were looking for him, police said.

Ricker subsequently deleted a series of text messages that he and Booster had exchanged, police said.

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Activists stage rally in Springfield against hate crimes; police make another arrest

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Youngsters band together to tackle hate crime on Great Yarmouth estate

Youngsters will be heading onto the streets of Great Yarmouth to help tackle hate crime, including racist and homophobic graffiti

Lucy Clapham Friday, June 8, 2012 8:12 AM

A BAND of aspiring young role models have formed an alliance to tackle hate crimes in their area and help smash the stereotype surrounding their age group.

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The group of 11 – 16 year olds from the Halfway House area of Great Yarmouth are preparing to head out into their community to tackle problems such as bullying and racist and homophobic graffiti, which have been on the rise on the estate in recent years, after coming together to form an action group.

They are also receiving training to become peer mentors in a bid to educate the next generation about the impact hate crimes can have and to provide support to those who have been victim to incidents such as bullying.

The youngsters work is being spearheaded by the Claydon Pavilion Community Association, which was keen to do some preventative work to stop the issues escalating, along with YMCA Norfolk and the borough council, and has been kick started by a Home Office grant of around 45,000.

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Springfield Rallies Against Hate Crimes

June 6, 2012

By Chris Curtis

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. — In light of hate crime allegations in Springfield, the community is fighting back against hate and racism by hosting a rally.

The Community Alliance of Lane County (CALC) teamed up with the Springfield Alliance for Equality and Respect and Back to Back: Allies for Human Dignity to counter possible hate activity in the city.

A group of about 50 people joined the three groups at the Springfield Public Library to take a stand and fight back against hate crimes and racism.

CALC Executive Director Kori Rodley says even after Wednesday’s event, the work is far from over.

“Unfortunately the work isn’t done. We want to think the Civil Rights Act and everything like that is over, but it’s not. The work isn’t done, so we have to keep up with it, and we have to–as a community–pay attention,” Rodley said.

Immediately after the rally, supporters walked the neighborhoods of Springfield passing out leaflets and sharing anti-hate and anti-racism information.

The groups will host another rally Saturday, June 9 at noon at the Eugene Public Library.

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Springfield Rallies Against Hate Crimes

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Judge rejects Amish defendants' challenge

The religious beliefs of victims of alleged beard- and hair-cutting attacks in Ohio Amish country are what matters in the case, not those of the defendants, a federal judge ruled Thursday in rejecting the defendants challenges of the federal hate crimes law.

The defendants, who include 16 members of an eastern Ohio breakaway Amish group, argued the alleged attacks last fall werent hate crimes but internal church disciplinary matters not involving anti-Amish bias. The defendants also argued that the federal hate crime law violates their First Amendment rights of religious expression.

U.S. District Court Judge Dan Polster said the defendants use of the First Amendment claim was offensive, given that the Constitution allows the defendants to maintain their religious beliefs and practices, which are so different from the beliefs and practices of most Americans.

In fact, violent acts of the kind charged in the superseding indictment are designed to punish individuals who exercise their religious beliefs, or to chill others from doing so, he wrote.

Polster noted that First Amendment rights exempt the Amish from certain requirements of citizens, such as jury service.

Attorney Dean Carro argued earlier this year that the alleged intrareligious actions arent covered by federal law.

The actions are not alleged to have been taken out of prejudice or hatred against the Amish religion, Carro, who represents defendant Lester Miller, wrote in a March filing. Rather, the alleged acts are doctrine-based Old Order Amish beliefs.

Those beliefs relate to punishment for a variety of sins, Carro added, and as such arent subject to federal authority. Messages were left for Carro seeking comment Thursday.

Polster also rejected this argument, saying nothing in the law limits its reach to acts of violence perpetrated by members of one religious group against another.

By the Defendants logic, a violent assault by a Catholic on a Protestant, or a Sunni Muslim on a Shiite Muslim, or an Orthodox Jew on a non-Orthodox Jew, would not be prohibited by this statute, Polster wrote.

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Judge rejects Amish defendants' challenge

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Judge rejects Amish hate crime challenge

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The religious beliefs of victims of alleged beard- and hair-cutting attacks in Ohio Amish country are what matters in the case, not those of the defendants, a federal judge ruled Thursday in rejecting the defendants’ challenges of the federal hate crimes law.

The defendants, who include 16 members of an eastern Ohio breakaway Amish group, argued the alleged attacks last fall weren’t hate crimes but internal church disciplinary matters not involving anti-Amish bias. The defendants also argued that the federal hate crime law violates their First Amendment rights of religious expression.

U.S. District Court Judge Dan Polster said the defendants’ use of the First Amendment claim was offensive, given that the Constitution allows the defendants “to maintain their religious beliefs and practices, which are so different from the beliefs and practices of most Americans.”

“In fact, violent acts of the kind charged in the superseding indictment are designed to punish individuals who exercise their religious beliefs, or to chill others from doing so,” he wrote.

Polster noted that First Amendment rights exempt the Amish from certain requirements of citizens, such as jury service.

Attorney Dean Carro argued earlier this year that the alleged “intrareligious actions” aren’t covered by federal law.

“The actions are not alleged to have been taken out of prejudice or hatred against the Amish religion,” Carro, who represents defendant Lester Miller, wrote in a March filing. “Rather, the alleged acts are doctrine-based Old Order Amish beliefs.”

Those beliefs relate to punishment for a variety of sins, Carro added, and as such aren’t subject to federal authority. Messages were left for Carro seeking comment Thursday.

Polster also rejected this argument, saying nothing in the law limits its reach to acts of violence perpetrated by members of one religious group against another.

“By the Defendants’ logic, a violent assault by a Catholic on a Protestant, or a Sunni Muslim on a Shiite Muslim, or an Orthodox Jew on a non-Orthodox Jew, would not be prohibited by this statute,” Polster wrote.

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CHILLING HATE CRIMES VIDEO ! – YouTube.flv – Video


30-05-2012 01:35 HATE CRIMES As our countries darken so does our future. If we want less ignorance, poverty, disease, crime & a brighter world – it takes a WHITER world.

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CHILLING HATE CRIMES VIDEO ! – YouTube.flv – Video

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Ticket reseller gets probation for hate crime

HARTFORD, Conn.The former chief executive officer for ticket reseller TicketNework Inc. has been given two years of probation for using a racial slur during an altercation with a bouncer outside an Academy Awards party.

The Hartford Courant reports ( http://cour.at/KTjZoI) that Donald Vaccaro was accepted Tuesday into the state’s Accelerated Rehabilitation program, which allows first-time offenders to have their criminal history wiped clean once they successfully complete their probation.

Vaccaro, of Glastonbury, was charged intimidation based on bigotry or bias and several misdemeanors after the Feb. 27 encounter.

A bouncer told police Vaccaro addressed him with a racial slur while being escorted from a party after a woman complained the 49-year-old executive had fondled her. The arrest warrant said his speech was slightly slurred, leading an officer to believe he was “mildly intoxicated.”

Vaccaro took an indefinite leave from the South Windsor ticket-reselling company after his arrest and said his actions didn’t reflect his values.

The arrest led TicketNetwork Inc. to withdraw from the state’s highly touted “First Five” initiative. That program was established to give state tax credits to the first five businesses investing $25 million in Connecticut and creating 200 jobs over five years.

TicketNetwork was the third company to win incentives, announcing last summer up to $7.75 million in loans in exchange for keeping 292 jobs, creating at least 200 full-time jobs in two years and possibly up to 600 over the next 10 years.

Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Ticket reseller gets probation for hate crime

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Groups: Hate crimes on rise in Ukraine (updated)

Hate crimes are on the rise in Ukraine, a group of human rights organizations said Wednesday. AP Groups: Hate crimes on rise in Ukraine (updated) Yesterday at 19:40 | Associated PressHate crimes are on the rise in Ukraine, a group of human rights organizations said Wednesday, amid calls to boycott European Championship matches here because of a threat of racially motivated abuse

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Groups: Hate crimes on rise in Ukraine

KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — Hate crimes are on the rise in Ukraine, a group of human rights organizations said Wednesday, amid calls to boycott European Championship matches because of the threat of racially motivated abuse. Ukraine, which is a co-host of Euro 2012 along with neighboring Poland, has been rocked by accusations of racism and a recent call by a former England soccer to not attend matches here because fans might return “in a coffin.” Days before the tournament started, the BBC broadcast footage of racist and violent incidents at recent club matches in Ukraine, including host city Kharkiv. Authorities have responded angrily to the suggestions that the country is racist.

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Activists stage rally in Springfield against hate crimes; police make another arrest

SPRINGFIELD Community activists joined Springfield city and school officials at a rally Wednesday to speak out against racial intimidation.

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Youngsters band together to tackle hate crime on Great Yarmouth estate

Youngsters will be heading onto the streets of Great Yarmouth to help tackle hate crime, including racist and homophobic graffiti Lucy Clapham Friday, June 8, 2012 8:12 AM A BAND of aspiring young role models have formed an alliance to tackle hate crimes in their area and help smash the stereotype surrounding their age group. To send a link to this page to a friend, simply enter their email address below. The message will include the name and email address you gave us when you signed up.

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Springfield Rallies Against Hate Crimes

June 6, 2012 By Chris Curtis SPRINGFIELD, Ore. — In light of hate crime allegations in Springfield, the community is fighting back against hate and racism by hosting a rally

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Judge rejects Amish defendants' challenge

The religious beliefs of victims of alleged beard- and hair-cutting attacks in Ohio Amish country are what matters in the case, not those of the defendants, a federal judge ruled Thursday in rejecting the defendants challenges of the federal hate crimes law. The defendants, who include 16 members of an eastern Ohio breakaway Amish group, argued the alleged attacks last fall werent hate crimes but internal church disciplinary matters not involving anti-Amish bias. The defendants also argued that the federal hate crime law violates their First Amendment rights of religious expression.

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Judge rejects Amish hate crime challenge

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The religious beliefs of victims of alleged beard- and hair-cutting attacks in Ohio Amish country are what matters in the case, not those of the defendants, a federal judge ruled Thursday in rejecting the defendants’ challenges of the federal hate crimes law. The defendants, who include 16 members of an eastern Ohio breakaway Amish group, argued the alleged attacks last fall weren’t hate crimes but internal church disciplinary matters not involving anti-Amish bias. The defendants also argued that the federal hate crime law violates their First Amendment rights of religious expression

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CHILLING HATE CRIMES VIDEO ! – YouTube.flv – Video




30-05-2012 01:35 HATE CRIMES As our countries darken so does our future.

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Ticket reseller gets probation for hate crime

HARTFORD, Conn.The former chief executive officer for ticket reseller TicketNework Inc.

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