Archive for the ‘Heidi Beirich’ Category

Nation and World briefs for May 17 – Hawaii Tribune Herald

Nation and World briefs for May 17
Hawaii Tribune Herald
Hate sites have realized that the U.S. has no monopoly on white nationalists and other far-right extremists, says Heidi Beirich, director of the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project. Others, such as Stormfront, already created

and more »

See the rest here:

Nation and World briefs for May 17 – Hawaii Tribune Herald

Fair Usage Law

May 17, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton … but not slaves – Durham Herald Sun


Durham Herald Sun
Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton … but not slaves
Durham Herald Sun
You're essentially giving money to push historical narratives that we haven't heard since the Klan era in the 1920s, said Heidi Beirich, director of the hate-watching Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. The museum perseveres in a

and more »

See the article here:

Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton … but not slaves – Durham Herald Sun

Fair Usage Law

May 13, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Pagan worship group scrutinized in prison – Sioux Falls Argus Leader

Jody Hadley, an Asatru kindred leader, discusses what Asatru is. (Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader)

Sam Lopez takes part in an Asatru study group Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Sioux Falls. Asatru is a pagan Norse religion. The group meets every other Wednesday.(Photo: Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader)Buy Photo

When Jody Hadley arrived at the South Dakota State Penitentiary in 2003 on a kidnapping charge, he wasnt an especially nice guy.

But the man who’d once held an elderly Worthing couple hostage and stolen their car said he learned a lot about morality in the 12 years that passed before his release.

Most of it came from Asatru, an ancient pagan religion whose modern adherents send prayers to Odin, Thor or Freya and abide by principles called the Nine Noble Virtues, among them honor, courage, fidelity, discipline and perseverance.

Without it, Hadley suspects he’d have remained rudderless.

Asatru helped me become a better person. When I first went to prison, I was a dirtbag. I lied, I was a thief, Hadley told Argus Leader Media this week. Because of Asatru, I am an honorable man.

Hadley founded the Asatru religious group at the penitentiary that still meets, although its relationship with the prison hasn’t always been cordial.

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Last week, Hadley heard that correctional officers found a copy of a white supremacist essay called 88 Precepts inside a member’s cell.

The discovery led the Department of Corrections to shut down the groups study meetings, at least temporarily. The DOC reinstated meetings this week.

That upset Hadley and Sam Lopez, an Asatru practitioner from Sioux Falls whose son practicesin prison.

Asatru is not about racism, Lopez said.

More Hult:Coddling inmates with technology? Readers react to tablet story

One idiot does not a community make, said Lopez.

Neither of them are particularly surprised about the development, though.

Asatru and its offshoots have drawn neo-nazis and white supremacists for years, particularly behind prison walls.

The author of 88 Precepts, now-deceased white supremacist and convicted racketeer David Lane, latched on to a version of the Nordic religion called Wotanism, Lane preferredWotan as both a stand-in for Odin and an acronym for Will of the Aryan Nation.

The extremist embrace of paganism has forced regular worshipers into asteady struggle for legitimacy, according to Heidi Beirich of theSouthern Poverty Law Center.

They do oftentimes get caught in a box where people think theyre all racists, and its not true, said Beirich, whose organization tracks hate groups in the U.S. Its quite unfair. A lot of these pagan religious are pretty progressive.

Prison officials are often at the center of the controversy. Hate-related speech and paraphernalia are barred prison, but courts have generally ruled that religion is protected in prison by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

More:Jackley: Facebook video ‘warranted a law enforcement response’

Its not uncommon for inmates with racist views to sue for the right to meet as a group by organizing as a religious group.

Prisons struggle with this all the time, Beirich said.

DOC spokesman Michael Winder did not offer details on the incident itself, but said only that the group is under investigation for potential violations of prison policy.

While individual members are not currently permitted to meet as a group, they are all permitted, and are encouraged, to practice their faith on an individual basis, Winder said last week. Those members who are ultimately found to have not violated policy will be permitted to meet again as a group.

Items of religious significance in the center of a table during an Asatru study group Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Sioux Falls. Asatru is a pagan Norse religion. The group meets every other Wednesday. (Photo: Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader)

On Thursday, Winder said the group’s right to meet had been reinstated.

Hadley said Asatru and Native American groups commonly sparredwith prison officials over rituals, group meetings and religious artifacts during his time behind bars.

Much of the Asatru trouble has to do with pagan symbols that now stand-in as symbols of racism in the modern imagination, he said. Long before the swastika was adopted by Nazi Germany, Hadley said, it served as a pagan signifier.

Hadley was once questioned in prison about a Thors hammer tattoo on his chest, for example.

The hammer symbol is also ancient in origin, but extremists wear it today. Ryan Giroux, awhite supremacist sentenced to life plus 83 years in prison for a shooting spree in Mesa, Arizona, has the hammer tattooed on his chin.

Readers’ Watchdog: Leash law ticket perplexes snake lover

Hadleys tattoo has nothing to do with racism, he said, and he had to convince the DOC as much. The situation was frustrating, he said.

They tried to write me up for gang activity, even though I was the only one who had it, said Hadley.

Hadley and Lopez both say the Sioux Falls group offers rehabilitative value for inmates.

It really is building community for these guys, so when they get out, it makes it easier for them to do well and harder to screw up, Lopez said.

Hadley said hes proof of that. He went from a man who didnt think twice about stealing from his own family to one who holds his family in high regard, and that he wouldnt have without spiritual influence.

I ran that group for 10 years, Hadley said. I always stressed that its about loving who you are where you come from, not hating other people for who they are and where they come from.

John Hult is the Reader’s Watchdog reporter for Argus Leader Media. Contact him with questions and concerns at 605-331-2301, 605-370-8617. You can tweet him @ArgusJHult or find him on Facebook at Facebook.com/ArgusReadersWatchdog

Read or Share this story: http://www.argusleader.com/story/news/2017/05/11/state-prison-suspends-pagan-worship-group/318094001/

Read the original here:

Pagan worship group scrutinized in prison – Sioux Falls Argus Leader

Fair Usage Law

May 12, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Hate Groups Continue to Spread Warnings that Blacks Are …

The racist statements attributed to accused murderer Dylann Roof in South Carolina are echoes of widely-spread and repeated messages out of white supremacist central, an expert on hate groups told ABC News.

Roof told his victims, You all rape women and youre taking over the country, according to Sylvia Johnson, who spoke to a survivor after the shooting. Johnson, whose cousin was the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the pastor killed in the attack, told ABC News David Muir that Roof then added, I have to do what I have to do.

Roof has not been tied to any organized hate group, but his alleged statements track almost word-for-word with hate messages posted on line by white supremacist groups, according to Heidi Beirich, Intelligence Project Director at the Southern Poverty Law Center, who studies such groups.

We don’t know what the connections are between the shooter and these groups, but the fact of the matter is the words that he spoke in that church, if they’re accurate, the way they’ve been reported, sound like they come right out of white supremacist central, Beirich said. In fact, the shooter’s comments about you’re raping people is probably the most common racist statement ever said against black men in the United States. This idea that black men are raping white women. It goes to the heart of white supremacist thinking.

In a photo posted on Facebook, Roof is seen wearing a jacket with the flags of Apartheid-era South Africa and Rhodesia eras when those respective African nations were ruled by a white minority and accused of brutal oppression of the black majority. Such outdated flags are commonly seen in online propaganda postings by extremist groups.

Thursday law enforcement officers were seen removing computers and boxes of evidences from residences where Roof had recently stayed. And while so far there is no indication that Roof was anything but a lone actor, law enforcement sources told ABC News that Roofs computers and cellphones will be studied for possible connections to hate groups or other individuals.

The Southern Poverty Law Center lists 19 hate groups in South Carolina — all but two, it says, are related to the white supremacist movement.

Beirich noted that one group, the Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC), which bills itself as a conservative activist group, has a section on its website dedicated to the victims of white violence in America – white people allegedly killed by black people.

There is no white supremacist [web]site that you go on today that is not going to have as its number one topic of discussion this issue, Beirich said.

After the shooting, the CofCC posted a message saying the organization was deeply saddened by the massacre.

The loss of nine lives is devastating. It cost [sic] also have severe consequences in terms of race relations in the U.S. in general, South Carolina in particular, the group said. We pray, for the sake of all Americans, that there will not be an escalation of racial tension.

On the more general white nationalist internet message boards, a similar sentiment of sympathy was common, but it could not drown out allegations that the killing was a false flag operation somehow orchestrated by gun-control supporters, or the feeling by others that while the killing was bad, black crime was worse.

Others went further, simply cheering on the carnage.

I hereby nominate this man [Roof] for the 2015 Nobel peace prize, one poster said. More power to the guy. Just imagine the situation if all white men were like this. We would have eternal peace.

President Obama today addressed what he called “lingering” racism that is “poisoning the minds of young people.”

The apparent motivations of the shooter remind us that racism remains a blight that we have to combat together,” the president said. “We have made great progress but we have to be vigilant because its still lingering and when it’s poisoning the minds of young people it betrays our ideals and it tears our democracy apart.

Beirich said the internet has become a breeding ground for such beliefs.

The internet is a gold mine for white supremacists in terms of messaging, just like it is for everybody else, she said. Unfortunately, there are fragile-minded folks who get exposed to this stuff and sometimes commit acts of violence. Maybe that happened here. Well have to wait and see what more comes out.

Roof has been charged with nine counts of murder and possession of a firearm during a violent crime. He has not pleaded, but a law enforcement source told ABC News today that he confessed to the crime.

Read more from the original source:

Hate Groups Continue to Spread Warnings that Blacks Are …

Fair Usage Law

May 10, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

President Trump freezes money to fight hate groups – WTSP 10 News

Mark Rivera, WTSP 11:20 PM. EDT May 08, 2017

U.S. President Donald Trump, center, listens during a press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, May 4, 2017. (Photo: Bloomberg, 2017 Bloomberg Finance LP)

ST. PETERSBURG We’ve been talking to you for a week about a new office President Trump opened.

It’s supposed to track crimes committed by undocumented immigrants and help their victims.

But it could be doing something that hurts a lot of innocent people.

Nightside reporter Mark Rivera spoke to the southern poverty law center about the VOICE office and if it will help hate groups.

There’s no question that the VOICE office is trying to make it look like immigrants equal bad, said Southern Poverty Law Center hate group expert Heidi Beirich. The idea of highlighting immigrant crime is one that comes right out of the white nationalist playbook.

I want to introduce you to someone.

Chuck Leek spent more than 20 years as part of the white supremacist movement.

Part of the whole skinhead thing was physical violence. I spent some time in prison for assault with a deadly weapon, Beirich said.

Now, Leek is part of this group. Life After Hate. It’s a nationwide network of former white supremacists.

They are dedicated to educating young people against joining right wing terror groups and encouraging white supremacists to leave the movement.

The white supremacist movement is far more active in the last six months than I have seen it in the last 10 or 12 years, Leek said.

Life After Hate was one of more than 30 organizations President Obama tapped to get $0 million dollars of federal money to help combat violent extremists.

Thats to fight the kind of people who want all immigrants out – neo-nazis – people you would generally say you don’t want to be around.

But here’s the data I uncovered from the Anti-Defamation League tonight.

Out of 70 times from 2009 to 2016 when an extremist shot at police – about 60 of them were extreme right wing Americans. Only about 10 of them were Islamic extremists.

That means 84% of ideologically motivated attacks were by white supremacists and other homegrown extremists.

So, money to fight white supremacy can potentially do a lot of good. Take it from a guy who lived it.

If one person gets their mind changed, it might be worth it. If that one person had been Dylan Roofor the Oklahoma City Bomber…, Leek said.

I want to talk to you about hate and extremism. If you’ve ever been involved in a movement that was called a hate group and you got out? Let me know.

Head to our 10News WTSP Facebook page. Get in touch. Let’s talk.

(CBS New contributed to this report)

2017 WTSP-TV

Read more here:

President Trump freezes money to fight hate groups – WTSP 10 News

Fair Usage Law

May 9, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Trump Focuses on Islamist Extremism Guts Programs Countering White Supremacy – Forward

In the past six months, Life After Hate, an organization devoted to reforming violent extremists, mainly members of white supremacy groups, has seen a spike in calls. The number of inquires from people reaching out to seek help for their loved ones reached an all time high.

Given the last election cycle, people have much greater awareness and a lot more concern to violent extremism, said Tony McAleer, the groups co-founder and board chair. The display of white nationalism hate groups supporting the Trump campaign, he explained, brought attention to the issue and led some to seek help for friends involved in these organization.

Life After Hate was about to expand its operation by launching a program that would proactively seek out violent extremists through the Internet and reach out to them to offer help. But the $400,000 government grant for the program, awarded in the final weeks of the Obama administration, never arrived and no explanation was provided. Nothing but crickets, said McAleer, who, like other grantees waiting for their funds, had heard that the Trump administration decided to put a hold on the funds.

It is more than a mere bureaucratic mishap. Experts in the field believe that withholding the funds is part of a broader policy of the Trump administration to redefine violent extremism and reshape government policy for dealing with the problem, focusing exclusively on violent Islamic extremism while eliminating programs aimed at violent white nationalists.

Their people talk about terrorism only in the context of Islamic extremism, said Heidi Beirich, director of the intelligence project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. It seems pretty clear that Trump doesnt care about other types of extremism.

But existing data on violent extremism in the U.S. does not support the Trump administrations narrow approach to the problem.

An analysis prepared by START, a national consortium for the study of terrorism, supported by the Department of Homeland Security and based at the University of Maryland, looked at Islamist and far-right homicides in the U.S. in the past 15 years. The study excluded two outliers – the 9/11 terror attacks and the Oklahoma City bombing, and found that far-right extremists have killed more than double the people than Islamist extremists – 272 compared to 130. To focus solely on Islamist extremism is to ignore the murders perpetrated by the extreme far right and their place in a constantly changing threat environment, concluded a February 2017 research paper compiled by scholars affiliated with START.

Its probably short-sighted to only focus on Islamist extremists, said Peter Weinberger who heads the counter violent extremism program at START. He noted that not only do the numbers show the danger of far-right extremism, but also that dealing with extremists from the right could provide tools and information to help counter Islamist extremism.

The Obama administration, though in a belated fashion, recognized a more inclusive view of violent extremism, coining the acronym CVE, for Countering Violent Extremism. In doing so, the administration effectively eliminated the ideological motivation of the violent extremists groups and thus bundled together far-right white supremacists with Al-Qaeda and ISIS inspired Islamists.

To advance the battle against violent extremism, the Department of Homeland Security announced in 2016 a $10 million grant initiative for programs taking a communal approach to CVE and offering means of identifying violent extremists, preparing for dealing with the problem, and preventing Americans from joining these organizations. The grant program offered a broad definition of CVE, stating that it refers to acts of violence carried out by a range of individuals or groups that are motivated by an extremist ideology.

In January, days before the change of administration in Washington, DHS announced the 31 CVE programs that had won federal grants. Most of them focused on Islamist extremist threats.

Life After Hate was among the few dealing with both Islamists and far-right violent extremists. Joining forces with a technology company, the group proposed a plan for identifying individuals involved in violent extremism and reaching out to them in an effort to draw them out of these groups. But the $400,000 grant, which should have been disbursed within 30 days of the announcement, was not provided, nor was any explanation for the delay or any official word on whether the grant will ever be delivered. The group is now reaching out to private donors and has already landed a $50,000 contribution from NFL star Colin Kaepernick.

McAleer knows first hand how difficult it is to leave violent extremist groups. He was a member of the White Arian Resistance, helped recruit skinheads, and was the manager of a racist rock band. After the birth of his child, McAleer decided to turn his back on the far-right groups he was affiliated with and to open a new page in his life, but the powerful network of support they provided made it ever more difficult. Eventually it was a Jewish therapist who brought him out. He heard my story and said: you know I was born Jewish, and here he was, helping a person who hated Jews all his life, McAleer recalled.

Organizations working to reform violent extremists are based on a European model which was originally designed to rehabilitate former neo-Nazis and is being used in recent years to bring back into society Europeans who were drawn to ISIS. We know that the most effective people to bring these people out are formers, said Weinberger, so its important we create a critical mass of people who can do it. This is key from a perspective of national security.

However, recent changes in the way the administration views violent extremism and the hold on grants, may slow down the process of creating this critical mass.

During the presidential transition period, advisers to Trump began looking into the Obama administrations CVE work. A team headed by Katharine Gorka, wife of Trumps counterterrorism adviser Sebastian Gorka, reached out to DHS and the State Department and asked for names of employees working on the issue. The transition team suggested defining the mission as countering radical Islamist extremism rather than countering violent extremism, a shift indicative of the narrower focus the new administration has chosen.

A formal policy has not been adopted thus far, but the hold put on CVE grants could signal that such policy is in the works.

The Department of Homeland Security did not respond to inquires from the Forward on this issue.

Contact Nathan Guttman at guttman@forward.com or on Twitter @nathanguttman

Go here to see the original:

Trump Focuses on Islamist Extremism Guts Programs Countering White Supremacy – Forward

Fair Usage Law

May 7, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton – not slaves – Jackson Hole News&Guide

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) Schoolchildren who visit the First White House of the Confederacy learn that its famous former resident, President Jefferson Davis, was the leader of a heroic resistance who was held by his Negroes in genuine affection as well as highest esteem.

Such ideas, once mainstream Southern thought, have largely been abandoned by historians. But they are still part of the message at this state-supported museum in Alabamas capital city that hosts thousands of grade-school students from different ethnic backgrounds on field trips every year.

Some critics say presenting discredited notions about the Confederacy at the antebellum home where Davis lived in the early months of the Civil War helps perpetuate a skewed version of the past and shouldnt be supported by Alabama tax dollars.

Youre essentially giving money to push historical narratives that we havent heard since the Klan era in the 1920s, said Heidi Beirich, director of the hate-watching Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center.

The museum perseveres in a newer era, when many Confederate memorials across the South are being re-evaluated. South Carolina lowered the Confederate flag at the state Capitol after a 2015 mass murder at a black church in Charleston. And last month, New Orleans officials took down a 35-foot granite obelisk that honored whites who tried to topple a biracial Reconstruction government installed in New Orleans after the Civil War.

On a recent trip to the Montgomery museum, fourth-graders from rural Wilcox County in southern Alabama trudged up a nearly 200-year-old staircase and into the Relic Room, where a painting of Gen. Robert E. Lee hangs amid the four flags of the Confederacy.

Tour guide Robert Wieland told the children the room was formerly called a shrine.

The pupils heard about the importance of the Souths cotton economy and learned how to spin raw clumps of the stuff onto wooden spools but were told little about the slaves whose forced labor drove the textile industry.

Selma Democratic state Sen. Hank Sanders said the house, which in recent years cost Alabama taxpayers more than $100,000 a year to operate, presents a history that ignores African-Americans.

Excerpt from:

Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton – not slaves – Jackson Hole News&Guide

Fair Usage Law

May 7, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

SPLCs Heidi Beirich Admits Diversity Causes Social Decay

Andrew Anglin Daily Stormer May 28, 2016

American Renaissance has a great article up by Linda Preston, detailing the events of an anti-racist meeting she attended in Washington, D.C.

The whole thing is well worth your time, but the best part is a quote from the SPLCs Heidi Beirich:

What we know from sociological research is that when a neighborhood diversifies people retreat to their homes, they hunker down. You have to really take serious positive work in rapidly changing demographic areas, to not result in either social breakdown or other problems. Its a big issue for the United States. On its own, its not gonna happen.

As Preston notes, she is apparently referring to the work of Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam. Putnam used the term hunkering down in reference to the deleterious social consequences of ethnic diversity.

Wikipedia:

In recent years, Putnam has been engaged in a comprehensive study of the relationship between trust within communities and their ethnic diversity. His conclusion based on over 40 cases and 30,000 people within the United States is that, other things being equal, more diversity in a community is associated with less trust both between and within ethnic groups. Although limited to American data, it puts into question both the contact hypothesis and conflict theory in inter-ethnic relations. According to conflict theory, distrust between the ethnic groups will rise with diversity, but not within a group. In contrast, contact theory proposes that distrust will decline as members of different ethnic groups get to know and interact with each other. Putnam describes people of all races, sex, socioeconomic statuses, and ages as hunkering down, avoiding engagement with their local communityboth among different ethnic groups and within their own ethnic group. Even when controlling for income inequality and crime rates, two factors which conflict theory states should be the prime causal factors in declining inter-ethnic group trust, more diversity is still associated with less communal trust.

Lowered trust in areas with high diversity is also associated with:

The fact that a key figure in the aggressive movement for forcing diversity down the throats of Americans would admit that all of the known consequences of diversity are negative is incredibly funny. And scary.

Theres only one possible final outcome of diversity. It doesnt matter how anyone feels about it. Its a matter of science.

One would have almost hoped that a pro-diversity change agent would be unaware of Putnams research into the disastrous consequences of this trend. Or at least claim that the research is invalid for whatever reason.

But no. She is saying we know this causes society to collapse, so we really have to force it if we want to make it happen.

If we know something is negative, why would we want to force it on the people?

Why is this never explained or even discussed?

What is the purpose of diversity?

Diversity in Action: The Islamic Colony of Calais, France

Ostensibly, the goal of diversity is to alleviate third world poverty, something which White people are collectively blamed for. However, even if we accept that Whites are responsible for third world poverty and are thus morally obligated to pay for the lives of all the worlds brown people, there are several glaring problems with the idea that mass immigration is the way to deal with this moral responsibility.

There are 3 billion non-Whites living in poverty in the third world. You couldnt possibly bring all of these people into White countries.

At the rate we are importing these people now a rate which is higher than any other point in history we arent even making a dent in their population growth. That is, even with the massive numbers of people we are allowing into our countries, these people are breeding so quickly that the numbers of those living in poverty in the third world are expanding rapidly. It is not physically possible for us to end third world poverty through mass immigration.

Roy Beck of the anti-immigration group Numbers USA explained this situation with gumballs better than I ever could with words.

Clearly, the well-being of poor brown people would be better served through financial aid programs to their countries.

However, then it becomes an issue of managing the distribution of the wealth we are transferring to them, as well as ensuring that it is allocated to infrastructure, education and so on.

Right now, most of the aid money sent to third world is stolen and squandered by the political ruling class in these countries. So you would have to send in White people to oversee these projects.

The perhaps difficult but nonetheless glaring conclusion is that if our goal is to help third world non-Whites, the most logical thing would be to reinstate colonialism.

The neo-liberal United Nations system is really just a broken form of colonialism anyway. We are dictating policy to these countries through these various organizations, but the policy simply isnt carried out or is carried out inefficiently.

They never had it better.

So: if the goal is to allocate White resources into ensuring that brown people are not poor, you can work it all through logically, based on the data. And everyone would come to the same conclusion, which is that colonialism is the best solution.

And yet, this is not discussed. None of it is ever discussed. It is just yes, diversity is destroying you, and it isnt doing anything to alleviate third world poverty, but you have to have it or we will call you mean names.

As such, one can only come to the conclusion that the goal of diversity has nothing to do with helping brown people. The goal is to destroy White societies, and ultimately to exterminate the White race.

If we are honest with ourselves, and honest with the data, there is no other conclusion we can come to.

View original post here:

SPLCs Heidi Beirich Admits Diversity Causes Social Decay

Fair Usage Law

May 5, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

EDITORIAL Twisting the facts about the Civil War | Editorials … – Observer-Reporter

Though most have no doubt moved on it has been 152 years, after all some folks in the South clearly are still fighting the Civil War.

You have those who give the Confederate flag equal footing with the stars and stripes, and the removal of Civil War monuments continues to draw bands of protesters.

In Alabama, it appears children still are being indoctrinated to honor the memory of the Confederacy. According to a recent Associated Press report, thousands of schoolchildren are taken every year to visit the First White House of the Confederacy in Montgomery, where they learn that its famous former resident, President Jefferson Davis, was leader of a heroic resistance and was held by his Negroes in genuine affection as well as highest esteem.

Since Davis Negroes have long since passed, we have no way of assessing their true feelings about the man who enslaved them, but we certainly question putting romantic notions into schoolchildrens heads when it comes to the Confederacy.

Said Heidi Beirich, who directs the hate-watching Intelligence Project at Southern Poverty Law Center, Youre essentially giving money to push historical narratives that we havent heard since the Klan era in the 1920s.

The AP said on a recent visit to the museum, fourth-graders from a rural school in southern Alabama heard about the importance of the Souths cotton economy and learned how to spin raw clumps of the stuff onto wooden spools, but were told little about the slaves whose forced labor drove the textile industry.

State Sen. Hank Sanders, a Selma Democrat, said the house is costing taxpayers more than $100,000 a year to operate, and is presenting a skewed version of history that ignores African-Americans.

What I would like to see is the whole story be told from all sides, he told the AP.

But the museum, and its take on history, has its supporters.

One of them is Mary Dix, who helps to manage a collection of about 100,000 Davis-related documents. She calls him a good person who was morally opposed to slavery but thought its abolition would destroy the Souths economy. And she told the AP theres even solid evidence Davis made nice with a man-servant over cigars during a trip into the Midwestern frontier.

So, you see, Jeff Davis wasnt a racist. He had a black friend! In fact, he held black folks in such high regard he was laying the groundwork for them to be productive, full-fledged citizens of the Confederate States of America. So says a pamphlet available at the Confederate White House, which tells us that Davis believed whites were preparing their African friends for freedom by submitting them to Anglo-Saxon culture and Christianity. Never mind that they had their own culture and spiritual beliefs before they were abducted from their homelands.

Bernard Simelton, president of the Alabama chapter of the NAACP, seems to hit the nail on the head when he says, Its certainly a part of history that doesnt deserve a positive reflection. It is akin to recognizing and celebrating the Holocaust.

We firmly believe schoolchildren should be well-versed in American history, but they shouldnt be subjected to a state-sanctioned-and-promoted, carefully curated whitewashing of one of the most terrible and destructive periods in our nations past.

Read the rest here:

EDITORIAL Twisting the facts about the Civil War | Editorials … – Observer-Reporter

Fair Usage Law

May 5, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Nation and World briefs for May 17 – Hawaii Tribune Herald

Nation and World briefs for May 17 Hawaii Tribune Herald Hate sites have realized that the U.S. has no monopoly on white nationalists and other far-right extremists, says Heidi Beirich , director of the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project. Others, such as Stormfront, already created … and more »

Fair Usage Law

May 17, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton … but not slaves – Durham Herald Sun

Durham Herald Sun Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton … but not slaves Durham Herald Sun You're essentially giving money to push historical narratives that we haven't heard since the Klan era in the 1920s, said Heidi Beirich , director of the hate-watching Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. The museum perseveres in a … and more »

Fair Usage Law

May 13, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Pagan worship group scrutinized in prison – Sioux Falls Argus Leader

Jody Hadley, an Asatru kindred leader, discusses what Asatru is. (Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader) Sam Lopez takes part in an Asatru study group Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Sioux Falls. Asatru is a pagan Norse religion. The group meets every other Wednesday.(Photo: Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader)Buy Photo When Jody Hadley arrived at the South Dakota State Penitentiary in 2003 on a kidnapping charge, he wasnt an especially nice guy. But the man who’d once held an elderly Worthing couple hostage and stolen their car said he learned a lot about morality in the 12 years that passed before his release. Most of it came from Asatru, an ancient pagan religion whose modern adherents send prayers to Odin, Thor or Freya and abide by principles called the Nine Noble Virtues, among them honor, courage, fidelity, discipline and perseverance. Without it, Hadley suspects he’d have remained rudderless. Asatru helped me become a better person. When I first went to prison, I was a dirtbag. I lied, I was a thief, Hadley told Argus Leader Media this week. Because of Asatru, I am an honorable man. Hadley founded the Asatru religious group at the penitentiary that still meets, although its relationship with the prison hasn’t always been cordial. Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Last week, Hadley heard that correctional officers found a copy of a white supremacist essay called 88 Precepts inside a member’s cell. The discovery led the Department of Corrections to shut down the groups study meetings, at least temporarily. The DOC reinstated meetings this week. That upset Hadley and Sam Lopez, an Asatru practitioner from Sioux Falls whose son practicesin prison. Asatru is not about racism, Lopez said. More Hult:Coddling inmates with technology? Readers react to tablet story One idiot does not a community make, said Lopez. Neither of them are particularly surprised about the development, though. Asatru and its offshoots have drawn neo-nazis and white supremacists for years, particularly behind prison walls. The author of 88 Precepts, now-deceased white supremacist and convicted racketeer David Lane, latched on to a version of the Nordic religion called Wotanism, Lane preferredWotan as both a stand-in for Odin and an acronym for Will of the Aryan Nation. The extremist embrace of paganism has forced regular worshipers into asteady struggle for legitimacy, according to Heidi Beirich of theSouthern Poverty Law Center. They do oftentimes get caught in a box where people think theyre all racists, and its not true, said Beirich, whose organization tracks hate groups in the U.S. Its quite unfair. A lot of these pagan religious are pretty progressive. Prison officials are often at the center of the controversy. Hate-related speech and paraphernalia are barred prison, but courts have generally ruled that religion is protected in prison by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. More:Jackley: Facebook video ‘warranted a law enforcement response’ Its not uncommon for inmates with racist views to sue for the right to meet as a group by organizing as a religious group. Prisons struggle with this all the time, Beirich said. DOC spokesman Michael Winder did not offer details on the incident itself, but said only that the group is under investigation for potential violations of prison policy. While individual members are not currently permitted to meet as a group, they are all permitted, and are encouraged, to practice their faith on an individual basis, Winder said last week. Those members who are ultimately found to have not violated policy will be permitted to meet again as a group. Items of religious significance in the center of a table during an Asatru study group Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Sioux Falls. Asatru is a pagan Norse religion. The group meets every other Wednesday. (Photo: Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader) On Thursday, Winder said the group’s right to meet had been reinstated. Hadley said Asatru and Native American groups commonly sparredwith prison officials over rituals, group meetings and religious artifacts during his time behind bars. Much of the Asatru trouble has to do with pagan symbols that now stand-in as symbols of racism in the modern imagination, he said. Long before the swastika was adopted by Nazi Germany, Hadley said, it served as a pagan signifier. Hadley was once questioned in prison about a Thors hammer tattoo on his chest, for example. The hammer symbol is also ancient in origin, but extremists wear it today. Ryan Giroux, awhite supremacist sentenced to life plus 83 years in prison for a shooting spree in Mesa, Arizona, has the hammer tattooed on his chin. Readers’ Watchdog: Leash law ticket perplexes snake lover Hadleys tattoo has nothing to do with racism, he said, and he had to convince the DOC as much. The situation was frustrating, he said. They tried to write me up for gang activity, even though I was the only one who had it, said Hadley. Hadley and Lopez both say the Sioux Falls group offers rehabilitative value for inmates. It really is building community for these guys, so when they get out, it makes it easier for them to do well and harder to screw up, Lopez said. Hadley said hes proof of that. He went from a man who didnt think twice about stealing from his own family to one who holds his family in high regard, and that he wouldnt have without spiritual influence. I ran that group for 10 years, Hadley said. I always stressed that its about loving who you are where you come from, not hating other people for who they are and where they come from. John Hult is the Reader’s Watchdog reporter for Argus Leader Media. Contact him with questions and concerns at 605-331-2301, 605-370-8617. You can tweet him @ArgusJHult or find him on Facebook at Facebook.com/ArgusReadersWatchdog Read or Share this story: http://www.argusleader.com/story/news/2017/05/11/state-prison-suspends-pagan-worship-group/318094001/

Fair Usage Law

May 12, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Hate Groups Continue to Spread Warnings that Blacks Are …

The racist statements attributed to accused murderer Dylann Roof in South Carolina are echoes of widely-spread and repeated messages out of white supremacist central, an expert on hate groups told ABC News. Roof told his victims, You all rape women and youre taking over the country, according to Sylvia Johnson, who spoke to a survivor after the shooting. Johnson, whose cousin was the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the pastor killed in the attack, told ABC News David Muir that Roof then added, I have to do what I have to do. Roof has not been tied to any organized hate group, but his alleged statements track almost word-for-word with hate messages posted on line by white supremacist groups, according to Heidi Beirich, Intelligence Project Director at the Southern Poverty Law Center, who studies such groups. We don’t know what the connections are between the shooter and these groups, but the fact of the matter is the words that he spoke in that church, if they’re accurate, the way they’ve been reported, sound like they come right out of white supremacist central, Beirich said. In fact, the shooter’s comments about you’re raping people is probably the most common racist statement ever said against black men in the United States. This idea that black men are raping white women. It goes to the heart of white supremacist thinking. In a photo posted on Facebook, Roof is seen wearing a jacket with the flags of Apartheid-era South Africa and Rhodesia eras when those respective African nations were ruled by a white minority and accused of brutal oppression of the black majority. Such outdated flags are commonly seen in online propaganda postings by extremist groups. Thursday law enforcement officers were seen removing computers and boxes of evidences from residences where Roof had recently stayed. And while so far there is no indication that Roof was anything but a lone actor, law enforcement sources told ABC News that Roofs computers and cellphones will be studied for possible connections to hate groups or other individuals. The Southern Poverty Law Center lists 19 hate groups in South Carolina — all but two, it says, are related to the white supremacist movement. Beirich noted that one group, the Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC), which bills itself as a conservative activist group, has a section on its website dedicated to the victims of white violence in America – white people allegedly killed by black people. There is no white supremacist [web]site that you go on today that is not going to have as its number one topic of discussion this issue, Beirich said. After the shooting, the CofCC posted a message saying the organization was deeply saddened by the massacre. The loss of nine lives is devastating. It cost [sic] also have severe consequences in terms of race relations in the U.S. in general, South Carolina in particular, the group said. We pray, for the sake of all Americans, that there will not be an escalation of racial tension. On the more general white nationalist internet message boards, a similar sentiment of sympathy was common, but it could not drown out allegations that the killing was a false flag operation somehow orchestrated by gun-control supporters, or the feeling by others that while the killing was bad, black crime was worse. Others went further, simply cheering on the carnage. I hereby nominate this man [Roof] for the 2015 Nobel peace prize, one poster said. More power to the guy. Just imagine the situation if all white men were like this. We would have eternal peace. President Obama today addressed what he called “lingering” racism that is “poisoning the minds of young people.” The apparent motivations of the shooter remind us that racism remains a blight that we have to combat together,” the president said. “We have made great progress but we have to be vigilant because its still lingering and when it’s poisoning the minds of young people it betrays our ideals and it tears our democracy apart. Beirich said the internet has become a breeding ground for such beliefs. The internet is a gold mine for white supremacists in terms of messaging, just like it is for everybody else, she said. Unfortunately, there are fragile-minded folks who get exposed to this stuff and sometimes commit acts of violence. Maybe that happened here. Well have to wait and see what more comes out. Roof has been charged with nine counts of murder and possession of a firearm during a violent crime. He has not pleaded, but a law enforcement source told ABC News today that he confessed to the crime.

Fair Usage Law

May 10, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

President Trump freezes money to fight hate groups – WTSP 10 News

Mark Rivera, WTSP 11:20 PM. EDT May 08, 2017 U.S. President Donald Trump, center, listens during a press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, May 4, 2017. (Photo: Bloomberg, 2017 Bloomberg Finance LP) ST. PETERSBURG We’ve been talking to you for a week about a new office President Trump opened. It’s supposed to track crimes committed by undocumented immigrants and help their victims. But it could be doing something that hurts a lot of innocent people. Nightside reporter Mark Rivera spoke to the southern poverty law center about the VOICE office and if it will help hate groups. There’s no question that the VOICE office is trying to make it look like immigrants equal bad, said Southern Poverty Law Center hate group expert Heidi Beirich. The idea of highlighting immigrant crime is one that comes right out of the white nationalist playbook. I want to introduce you to someone. Chuck Leek spent more than 20 years as part of the white supremacist movement. Part of the whole skinhead thing was physical violence. I spent some time in prison for assault with a deadly weapon, Beirich said. Now, Leek is part of this group. Life After Hate. It’s a nationwide network of former white supremacists. They are dedicated to educating young people against joining right wing terror groups and encouraging white supremacists to leave the movement. The white supremacist movement is far more active in the last six months than I have seen it in the last 10 or 12 years, Leek said. Life After Hate was one of more than 30 organizations President Obama tapped to get $0 million dollars of federal money to help combat violent extremists. Thats to fight the kind of people who want all immigrants out – neo-nazis – people you would generally say you don’t want to be around. But here’s the data I uncovered from the Anti-Defamation League tonight. Out of 70 times from 2009 to 2016 when an extremist shot at police – about 60 of them were extreme right wing Americans. Only about 10 of them were Islamic extremists. That means 84% of ideologically motivated attacks were by white supremacists and other homegrown extremists. So, money to fight white supremacy can potentially do a lot of good. Take it from a guy who lived it. If one person gets their mind changed, it might be worth it. If that one person had been Dylan Roofor the Oklahoma City Bomber…, Leek said. I want to talk to you about hate and extremism. If you’ve ever been involved in a movement that was called a hate group and you got out? Let me know. Head to our 10News WTSP Facebook page. Get in touch. Let’s talk. (CBS New contributed to this report) 2017 WTSP-TV

Fair Usage Law

May 9, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Trump Focuses on Islamist Extremism Guts Programs Countering White Supremacy – Forward

In the past six months, Life After Hate, an organization devoted to reforming violent extremists, mainly members of white supremacy groups, has seen a spike in calls. The number of inquires from people reaching out to seek help for their loved ones reached an all time high. Given the last election cycle, people have much greater awareness and a lot more concern to violent extremism, said Tony McAleer, the groups co-founder and board chair. The display of white nationalism hate groups supporting the Trump campaign, he explained, brought attention to the issue and led some to seek help for friends involved in these organization. Life After Hate was about to expand its operation by launching a program that would proactively seek out violent extremists through the Internet and reach out to them to offer help. But the $400,000 government grant for the program, awarded in the final weeks of the Obama administration, never arrived and no explanation was provided. Nothing but crickets, said McAleer, who, like other grantees waiting for their funds, had heard that the Trump administration decided to put a hold on the funds. It is more than a mere bureaucratic mishap. Experts in the field believe that withholding the funds is part of a broader policy of the Trump administration to redefine violent extremism and reshape government policy for dealing with the problem, focusing exclusively on violent Islamic extremism while eliminating programs aimed at violent white nationalists. Their people talk about terrorism only in the context of Islamic extremism, said Heidi Beirich, director of the intelligence project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. It seems pretty clear that Trump doesnt care about other types of extremism. But existing data on violent extremism in the U.S. does not support the Trump administrations narrow approach to the problem. An analysis prepared by START, a national consortium for the study of terrorism, supported by the Department of Homeland Security and based at the University of Maryland, looked at Islamist and far-right homicides in the U.S. in the past 15 years. The study excluded two outliers – the 9/11 terror attacks and the Oklahoma City bombing, and found that far-right extremists have killed more than double the people than Islamist extremists – 272 compared to 130. To focus solely on Islamist extremism is to ignore the murders perpetrated by the extreme far right and their place in a constantly changing threat environment, concluded a February 2017 research paper compiled by scholars affiliated with START. Its probably short-sighted to only focus on Islamist extremists, said Peter Weinberger who heads the counter violent extremism program at START. He noted that not only do the numbers show the danger of far-right extremism, but also that dealing with extremists from the right could provide tools and information to help counter Islamist extremism. The Obama administration, though in a belated fashion, recognized a more inclusive view of violent extremism, coining the acronym CVE, for Countering Violent Extremism. In doing so, the administration effectively eliminated the ideological motivation of the violent extremists groups and thus bundled together far-right white supremacists with Al-Qaeda and ISIS inspired Islamists. To advance the battle against violent extremism, the Department of Homeland Security announced in 2016 a $10 million grant initiative for programs taking a communal approach to CVE and offering means of identifying violent extremists, preparing for dealing with the problem, and preventing Americans from joining these organizations. The grant program offered a broad definition of CVE, stating that it refers to acts of violence carried out by a range of individuals or groups that are motivated by an extremist ideology. In January, days before the change of administration in Washington, DHS announced the 31 CVE programs that had won federal grants. Most of them focused on Islamist extremist threats. Life After Hate was among the few dealing with both Islamists and far-right violent extremists. Joining forces with a technology company, the group proposed a plan for identifying individuals involved in violent extremism and reaching out to them in an effort to draw them out of these groups. But the $400,000 grant, which should have been disbursed within 30 days of the announcement, was not provided, nor was any explanation for the delay or any official word on whether the grant will ever be delivered. The group is now reaching out to private donors and has already landed a $50,000 contribution from NFL star Colin Kaepernick. McAleer knows first hand how difficult it is to leave violent extremist groups. He was a member of the White Arian Resistance, helped recruit skinheads, and was the manager of a racist rock band. After the birth of his child, McAleer decided to turn his back on the far-right groups he was affiliated with and to open a new page in his life, but the powerful network of support they provided made it ever more difficult. Eventually it was a Jewish therapist who brought him out. He heard my story and said: you know I was born Jewish, and here he was, helping a person who hated Jews all his life, McAleer recalled. Organizations working to reform violent extremists are based on a European model which was originally designed to rehabilitate former neo-Nazis and is being used in recent years to bring back into society Europeans who were drawn to ISIS. We know that the most effective people to bring these people out are formers, said Weinberger, so its important we create a critical mass of people who can do it. This is key from a perspective of national security. However, recent changes in the way the administration views violent extremism and the hold on grants, may slow down the process of creating this critical mass. During the presidential transition period, advisers to Trump began looking into the Obama administrations CVE work. A team headed by Katharine Gorka, wife of Trumps counterterrorism adviser Sebastian Gorka, reached out to DHS and the State Department and asked for names of employees working on the issue. The transition team suggested defining the mission as countering radical Islamist extremism rather than countering violent extremism, a shift indicative of the narrower focus the new administration has chosen. A formal policy has not been adopted thus far, but the hold put on CVE grants could signal that such policy is in the works. The Department of Homeland Security did not respond to inquires from the Forward on this issue. Contact Nathan Guttman at guttman@forward.com or on Twitter @nathanguttman

Fair Usage Law

May 7, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton – not slaves – Jackson Hole News&Guide

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) Schoolchildren who visit the First White House of the Confederacy learn that its famous former resident, President Jefferson Davis, was the leader of a heroic resistance who was held by his Negroes in genuine affection as well as highest esteem. Such ideas, once mainstream Southern thought, have largely been abandoned by historians. But they are still part of the message at this state-supported museum in Alabamas capital city that hosts thousands of grade-school students from different ethnic backgrounds on field trips every year. Some critics say presenting discredited notions about the Confederacy at the antebellum home where Davis lived in the early months of the Civil War helps perpetuate a skewed version of the past and shouldnt be supported by Alabama tax dollars. Youre essentially giving money to push historical narratives that we havent heard since the Klan era in the 1920s, said Heidi Beirich, director of the hate-watching Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. The museum perseveres in a newer era, when many Confederate memorials across the South are being re-evaluated. South Carolina lowered the Confederate flag at the state Capitol after a 2015 mass murder at a black church in Charleston. And last month, New Orleans officials took down a 35-foot granite obelisk that honored whites who tried to topple a biracial Reconstruction government installed in New Orleans after the Civil War. On a recent trip to the Montgomery museum, fourth-graders from rural Wilcox County in southern Alabama trudged up a nearly 200-year-old staircase and into the Relic Room, where a painting of Gen. Robert E. Lee hangs amid the four flags of the Confederacy. Tour guide Robert Wieland told the children the room was formerly called a shrine. The pupils heard about the importance of the Souths cotton economy and learned how to spin raw clumps of the stuff onto wooden spools but were told little about the slaves whose forced labor drove the textile industry. Selma Democratic state Sen. Hank Sanders said the house, which in recent years cost Alabama taxpayers more than $100,000 a year to operate, presents a history that ignores African-Americans.

Fair Usage Law

May 7, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

SPLCs Heidi Beirich Admits Diversity Causes Social Decay

Andrew Anglin Daily Stormer May 28, 2016 American Renaissance has a great article up by Linda Preston, detailing the events of an anti-racist meeting she attended in Washington, D.C. The whole thing is well worth your time, but the best part is a quote from the SPLCs Heidi Beirich: What we know from sociological research is that when a neighborhood diversifies people retreat to their homes, they hunker down. You have to really take serious positive work in rapidly changing demographic areas, to not result in either social breakdown or other problems. Its a big issue for the United States. On its own, its not gonna happen. As Preston notes, she is apparently referring to the work of Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam. Putnam used the term hunkering down in reference to the deleterious social consequences of ethnic diversity. Wikipedia: In recent years, Putnam has been engaged in a comprehensive study of the relationship between trust within communities and their ethnic diversity. His conclusion based on over 40 cases and 30,000 people within the United States is that, other things being equal, more diversity in a community is associated with less trust both between and within ethnic groups. Although limited to American data, it puts into question both the contact hypothesis and conflict theory in inter-ethnic relations. According to conflict theory, distrust between the ethnic groups will rise with diversity, but not within a group. In contrast, contact theory proposes that distrust will decline as members of different ethnic groups get to know and interact with each other. Putnam describes people of all races, sex, socioeconomic statuses, and ages as hunkering down, avoiding engagement with their local communityboth among different ethnic groups and within their own ethnic group. Even when controlling for income inequality and crime rates, two factors which conflict theory states should be the prime causal factors in declining inter-ethnic group trust, more diversity is still associated with less communal trust. Lowered trust in areas with high diversity is also associated with: The fact that a key figure in the aggressive movement for forcing diversity down the throats of Americans would admit that all of the known consequences of diversity are negative is incredibly funny. And scary. Theres only one possible final outcome of diversity. It doesnt matter how anyone feels about it. Its a matter of science. One would have almost hoped that a pro-diversity change agent would be unaware of Putnams research into the disastrous consequences of this trend. Or at least claim that the research is invalid for whatever reason. But no. She is saying we know this causes society to collapse, so we really have to force it if we want to make it happen. If we know something is negative, why would we want to force it on the people? Why is this never explained or even discussed? What is the purpose of diversity? Diversity in Action: The Islamic Colony of Calais, France Ostensibly, the goal of diversity is to alleviate third world poverty, something which White people are collectively blamed for. However, even if we accept that Whites are responsible for third world poverty and are thus morally obligated to pay for the lives of all the worlds brown people, there are several glaring problems with the idea that mass immigration is the way to deal with this moral responsibility. There are 3 billion non-Whites living in poverty in the third world. You couldnt possibly bring all of these people into White countries. At the rate we are importing these people now a rate which is higher than any other point in history we arent even making a dent in their population growth. That is, even with the massive numbers of people we are allowing into our countries, these people are breeding so quickly that the numbers of those living in poverty in the third world are expanding rapidly. It is not physically possible for us to end third world poverty through mass immigration. Roy Beck of the anti-immigration group Numbers USA explained this situation with gumballs better than I ever could with words. Clearly, the well-being of poor brown people would be better served through financial aid programs to their countries. However, then it becomes an issue of managing the distribution of the wealth we are transferring to them, as well as ensuring that it is allocated to infrastructure, education and so on. Right now, most of the aid money sent to third world is stolen and squandered by the political ruling class in these countries. So you would have to send in White people to oversee these projects. The perhaps difficult but nonetheless glaring conclusion is that if our goal is to help third world non-Whites, the most logical thing would be to reinstate colonialism. The neo-liberal United Nations system is really just a broken form of colonialism anyway. We are dictating policy to these countries through these various organizations, but the policy simply isnt carried out or is carried out inefficiently. They never had it better. So: if the goal is to allocate White resources into ensuring that brown people are not poor, you can work it all through logically, based on the data. And everyone would come to the same conclusion, which is that colonialism is the best solution. And yet, this is not discussed. None of it is ever discussed. It is just yes, diversity is destroying you, and it isnt doing anything to alleviate third world poverty, but you have to have it or we will call you mean names. As such, one can only come to the conclusion that the goal of diversity has nothing to do with helping brown people. The goal is to destroy White societies, and ultimately to exterminate the White race. If we are honest with ourselves, and honest with the data, there is no other conclusion we can come to.

Fair Usage Law

May 5, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

EDITORIAL Twisting the facts about the Civil War | Editorials … – Observer-Reporter

Though most have no doubt moved on it has been 152 years, after all some folks in the South clearly are still fighting the Civil War. You have those who give the Confederate flag equal footing with the stars and stripes, and the removal of Civil War monuments continues to draw bands of protesters. In Alabama, it appears children still are being indoctrinated to honor the memory of the Confederacy. According to a recent Associated Press report, thousands of schoolchildren are taken every year to visit the First White House of the Confederacy in Montgomery, where they learn that its famous former resident, President Jefferson Davis, was leader of a heroic resistance and was held by his Negroes in genuine affection as well as highest esteem. Since Davis Negroes have long since passed, we have no way of assessing their true feelings about the man who enslaved them, but we certainly question putting romantic notions into schoolchildrens heads when it comes to the Confederacy. Said Heidi Beirich, who directs the hate-watching Intelligence Project at Southern Poverty Law Center, Youre essentially giving money to push historical narratives that we havent heard since the Klan era in the 1920s. The AP said on a recent visit to the museum, fourth-graders from a rural school in southern Alabama heard about the importance of the Souths cotton economy and learned how to spin raw clumps of the stuff onto wooden spools, but were told little about the slaves whose forced labor drove the textile industry. State Sen. Hank Sanders, a Selma Democrat, said the house is costing taxpayers more than $100,000 a year to operate, and is presenting a skewed version of history that ignores African-Americans. What I would like to see is the whole story be told from all sides, he told the AP. But the museum, and its take on history, has its supporters. One of them is Mary Dix, who helps to manage a collection of about 100,000 Davis-related documents. She calls him a good person who was morally opposed to slavery but thought its abolition would destroy the Souths economy. And she told the AP theres even solid evidence Davis made nice with a man-servant over cigars during a trip into the Midwestern frontier. So, you see, Jeff Davis wasnt a racist. He had a black friend! In fact, he held black folks in such high regard he was laying the groundwork for them to be productive, full-fledged citizens of the Confederate States of America. So says a pamphlet available at the Confederate White House, which tells us that Davis believed whites were preparing their African friends for freedom by submitting them to Anglo-Saxon culture and Christianity. Never mind that they had their own culture and spiritual beliefs before they were abducted from their homelands. Bernard Simelton, president of the Alabama chapter of the NAACP, seems to hit the nail on the head when he says, Its certainly a part of history that doesnt deserve a positive reflection. It is akin to recognizing and celebrating the Holocaust. We firmly believe schoolchildren should be well-versed in American history, but they shouldnt be subjected to a state-sanctioned-and-promoted, carefully curated whitewashing of one of the most terrible and destructive periods in our nations past.

Fair Usage Law

May 5, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."