Archive for the ‘Heidi Beirich’ Category

University of Maryland Fatal Stabbing Investigated by FBI as … – NBCNews.com

Richard Spencer speaks at the Texas A&M University campus Dec. 6, 2016, in College Station, Texas. David J. Phillip / AP file

Advocates told NBC News that although authorities were still investigating the specifics of this case, bias incidents and enlistment by groups espousing such ideologies has been increasing in American schools, especially after the contentious 2016 presidential election.

Jonathan Greenblatt, the executive director of the Anti-Defamation League, told NBC News that Collins’ murder was “appalling and deeply disturbing.”

“This also comes on the heels of an increased tempo of recruiting on college campuses by white supremacists,” he said.

Greenblatt said the groups had not been highly engaged in college campuses in years past, “but this year has been different.” He added that members of groups espousing racist ideology had also increasingly turned to social media to recruit people or terrorize their victims.

The

Heidi Beirich, director of Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project, told NBC News that the group had also noticed an increase in such incidents.

“We’ve seen a rise in bias incidents from hate speech and everything leading up to attacks on people, both in the K-12 section and on college campuses,” she said.

Although the group began tracking the data much more thoroughly after the election, in its most recent report chronicling bias incidents the group tracked a total of 1,863 reported cases from Nov. 9 through March 31, including 614 that took place on school grounds. The SPLC said 330 of those incidents took place on college campuses and 284 took places in schools grades K-12.

The group also tracked 178 “white nationalist flyer” incidents, with 87 percent of those cases taking place on college campuses.

Beirich also said the group had found that “increasingly people are getting radicalized online,” citing convicted Charleston church killer Dylann Roof as one example. Roof

When asked about the feeling on campus following the allegations in Collins’ murder, and the incident involving the noose last month, Mitchell said Sunday there was a “tension” at the school.

“Well, I think there’s not only tension on this campus, but campuses throughout the United States,” he said.

“We’re part of America and America is seeing tension. We see it here and we’re doing our best to combat that with our student body,” he added.

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May 23, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

The woman tracking hate in America – ABC News

For Heidi Beirich, director of the nations premiere hate-monitoring publication, the political ascension of Donald Trump brought with it the rise of some dangerous ideas that she has spent years denouncing.

He sanctioned them. He made them mainstream, said Beirich. In fact, Trump is the biggest mainstreaming-of-hate person weve ever had.

At the Southern Poverty Law Center, Beirich has built a career on hate. She has spent decades studying it in all of its forms, tracking its manifestations and calling it out by name when possible. Her group, the Intelligence Project, publishes both a Hatewatch blog and the award-winning Intelligence Report the countrys leading periodical monitoring extremist, right-wing groups in America. To maintain her expertise, she spends hours each day immersing herself in their world.

Its a lot of hours on websites, or reading publications these organizations put out, said Beirich. And then we have to make a hard call. You know, we dont want to name groups willy nilly as hate groups because thats a hell of a thing to say about somebody.

During our conversation, Beirich opened up about the roots of her interest in this kind of work an emotionally-exhausting and dangerous enterprise that can draw the ire of the same groups shes tracking. As a teenager in northern California, Beirich saw firsthand the devastating effects local neo-Nazi groups had on her circle of friends, some of whom were pulled in by what she calls “magnetic” messaging.

Some committed violent acts, in the name of ideology, and ended up in prison. Families, Beirich says, were torn apart. Thirty years later, shes watched the messages, tactics and targets of groups shift over time. As America evolves, Beirich says, so have its hate groups, both in style and scope.

In the February 2017 issue of the Intelligence Report, the SPLC reported that the number of hate groups rose to 917 in 2016, up from 892 in 2015; the most dramatic growth was the anti-Muslim hate groups, which rose from 34 in 2015 to 101 in 2016.

I think sometimes Americans forget that this country was founded on white supremacy, said Beirich. This country is very soon going to have no majority population. We cant live and be successful as a democracy if we have civil strife like this. Its a really bad thing for our future.

Beirich is among those who weren’t convinced by Trump’s “stop it” line, delivered during a television interview in which he was pressed about supporters committing acts of violence. She saw his February 2016 condemnation of a wave of anti-Semitic threats — after weeks of criticism for his failure to address them — as “too little, too late.”

Theres no simple answers but it would be nice if it started from the top, to say this stuff is bad, she said. Weve been through these scenarios before. And what makes it better is taking a stand for civil rights and equality.

Check out the full conversation on this weeks episode of Uncomfortable.

Download and subscribe to the “Uncomfortable” podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, and ABC News podcasts.

Beirich was interviewed as part of a series called “Uncomfortable,” hosted by Amna Nawaz, that offers in-depth and honest conversations with influential figures about issues dividing America.

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The woman tracking hate in America – ABC News

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May 17, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

El Daily Stormer: Neo-Nazi website is now in Spanish, too – Redwood Times

How does a leading neo-Nazi website that has railed against Hispanic immigrants expand its audience beyond a loyal base of U.S. white supremacists? By publishing a Spanish-language edition, of course.

The Daily Stormer infamous for orchestrating internet harassment campaigns by its “Troll Army” of readers recently launched El Daily Stormer as a “news portal” tailoring its racist, anti-Semitic content for readers in Spain and Latin America.

Andrew Auernheimer, a notorious computer hacker and internet troll who writes for the English-language site, says the Spanish edition fits their mission to spread Hitlerism across the world.

“We want our message to reach millions more people,” he said in a telephone interview.

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Hate sites have realized that the U.S. has no monopoly on white nationalists and other far-right extremists, says Heidi Beirich, director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project. Others, such as Stormfront, already created multilingual forums.

“The white supremacist movement has really viewed itself as past borders, reaching out to white people in other countries,” Beirich said.

The law center represents a Montana real estate agent who sued The Daily Stormer’s founder, Andrew Anglin, last month for unleashing an anti-Semitic “campaign of terror” against her family.

Anonymous trolls bombarded Tanya Gersh’s family with hateful and threatening messages after Anglin published the family’s personal information in a December post that accused Gersh and other Jewish residents of Whitefish, Montana, of engaging in an “extortion racket” against the mother of white nationalist Richard Spencer.

Anglin’s site takes its name from Der Strmer, a newspaper that published Nazi propaganda. It includes sections called “Jewish Problem” and “Race War.”

El Daily Stormer titles its anti-Semitic section “Judiadas,” an offensive term with roots in medieval Spain, where it was invoked to justify genocidal attacks on Jews.

The Spanish site also includes appeals for donations and unpaid articles, and a forum where people complain about Chile and Argentina filling up with “negros,” referring to people from Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay.

Auernheimer, known online as “weev,” said a team of volunteers is writing original content for the Spanish-language site. The site’s appeal for unpaid collaborators says being a dissident “has never been a lucrative activity,” and that it is looking for writers “willing to risk everything for the survival of our race.”

“We have a big Spanish-speaking population on our forums, so it was an easy direction to branch out into,” he said.

About 40 percent of The Daily Stormer’s 3.2 million unique monthly visitors are in the U.S.; the Spanish edition has added fewer than 10,000 since its recent launch, Auernheimer said.

Surpassing Stormfront as the top U.S. hate site hasn’t been a financial boon for The Daily Stormer, which calls itself “100 percent reader-supported.” Anglin complained in January that a Ukrainian advertising company had banned them, leaving an Australian electrician as the site’s only advertiser.

“We don’t have revenue commensurate with a publication of our size,” Auernheimer said.

___

Associated Press writer Mike Warren in Atlanta contributed to this report.

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May 17, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

AP News in Brief at 6:04 am EDT – Miami Herald


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AP News in Brief at 6:04 am EDT
Miami Herald
Hate sites have realized that the U.S. has no monopoly on white nationalists and other far-right extremists, says Heidi Beirich, director of the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project. Others, such as Stormfront, already created
Trump revealed highly classified information to Russian foreign minister and ambassadorWashington Post
Israel Said to Be Source of Secret Intelligence Trump Gave to RussiansNew York Times

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AP News in Brief at 6:04 am EDT – Miami Herald

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May 17, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Nation and World briefs for May 17 – Hawaii Tribune Herald

Nation and World briefs for May 17
Hawaii Tribune Herald
Hate sites have realized that the U.S. has no monopoly on white nationalists and other far-right extremists, says Heidi Beirich, director of the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project. Others, such as Stormfront, already created

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Nation and World briefs for May 17 – Hawaii Tribune Herald

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Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton … but not slaves – Durham Herald Sun


Durham Herald Sun
Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton … but not slaves
Durham Herald Sun
You're essentially giving money to push historical narratives that we haven't heard since the Klan era in the 1920s, said Heidi Beirich, director of the hate-watching Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. The museum perseveres in a

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Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton … but not slaves – Durham Herald Sun

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May 13, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Pagan worship group scrutinized in prison – Sioux Falls Argus Leader

Jody Hadley, an Asatru kindred leader, discusses what Asatru is. (Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader)

Sam Lopez takes part in an Asatru study group Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Sioux Falls. Asatru is a pagan Norse religion. The group meets every other Wednesday.(Photo: Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader)Buy Photo

When Jody Hadley arrived at the South Dakota State Penitentiary in 2003 on a kidnapping charge, he wasnt an especially nice guy.

But the man who’d once held an elderly Worthing couple hostage and stolen their car said he learned a lot about morality in the 12 years that passed before his release.

Most of it came from Asatru, an ancient pagan religion whose modern adherents send prayers to Odin, Thor or Freya and abide by principles called the Nine Noble Virtues, among them honor, courage, fidelity, discipline and perseverance.

Without it, Hadley suspects he’d have remained rudderless.

Asatru helped me become a better person. When I first went to prison, I was a dirtbag. I lied, I was a thief, Hadley told Argus Leader Media this week. Because of Asatru, I am an honorable man.

Hadley founded the Asatru religious group at the penitentiary that still meets, although its relationship with the prison hasn’t always been cordial.

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Last week, Hadley heard that correctional officers found a copy of a white supremacist essay called 88 Precepts inside a member’s cell.

The discovery led the Department of Corrections to shut down the groups study meetings, at least temporarily. The DOC reinstated meetings this week.

That upset Hadley and Sam Lopez, an Asatru practitioner from Sioux Falls whose son practicesin prison.

Asatru is not about racism, Lopez said.

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One idiot does not a community make, said Lopez.

Neither of them are particularly surprised about the development, though.

Asatru and its offshoots have drawn neo-nazis and white supremacists for years, particularly behind prison walls.

The author of 88 Precepts, now-deceased white supremacist and convicted racketeer David Lane, latched on to a version of the Nordic religion called Wotanism, Lane preferredWotan as both a stand-in for Odin and an acronym for Will of the Aryan Nation.

The extremist embrace of paganism has forced regular worshipers into asteady struggle for legitimacy, according to Heidi Beirich of theSouthern Poverty Law Center.

They do oftentimes get caught in a box where people think theyre all racists, and its not true, said Beirich, whose organization tracks hate groups in the U.S. Its quite unfair. A lot of these pagan religious are pretty progressive.

Prison officials are often at the center of the controversy. Hate-related speech and paraphernalia are barred prison, but courts have generally ruled that religion is protected in prison by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

More:Jackley: Facebook video ‘warranted a law enforcement response’

Its not uncommon for inmates with racist views to sue for the right to meet as a group by organizing as a religious group.

Prisons struggle with this all the time, Beirich said.

DOC spokesman Michael Winder did not offer details on the incident itself, but said only that the group is under investigation for potential violations of prison policy.

While individual members are not currently permitted to meet as a group, they are all permitted, and are encouraged, to practice their faith on an individual basis, Winder said last week. Those members who are ultimately found to have not violated policy will be permitted to meet again as a group.

Items of religious significance in the center of a table during an Asatru study group Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Sioux Falls. Asatru is a pagan Norse religion. The group meets every other Wednesday. (Photo: Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader)

On Thursday, Winder said the group’s right to meet had been reinstated.

Hadley said Asatru and Native American groups commonly sparredwith prison officials over rituals, group meetings and religious artifacts during his time behind bars.

Much of the Asatru trouble has to do with pagan symbols that now stand-in as symbols of racism in the modern imagination, he said. Long before the swastika was adopted by Nazi Germany, Hadley said, it served as a pagan signifier.

Hadley was once questioned in prison about a Thors hammer tattoo on his chest, for example.

The hammer symbol is also ancient in origin, but extremists wear it today. Ryan Giroux, awhite supremacist sentenced to life plus 83 years in prison for a shooting spree in Mesa, Arizona, has the hammer tattooed on his chin.

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Hadleys tattoo has nothing to do with racism, he said, and he had to convince the DOC as much. The situation was frustrating, he said.

They tried to write me up for gang activity, even though I was the only one who had it, said Hadley.

Hadley and Lopez both say the Sioux Falls group offers rehabilitative value for inmates.

It really is building community for these guys, so when they get out, it makes it easier for them to do well and harder to screw up, Lopez said.

Hadley said hes proof of that. He went from a man who didnt think twice about stealing from his own family to one who holds his family in high regard, and that he wouldnt have without spiritual influence.

I ran that group for 10 years, Hadley said. I always stressed that its about loving who you are where you come from, not hating other people for who they are and where they come from.

John Hult is the Reader’s Watchdog reporter for Argus Leader Media. Contact him with questions and concerns at 605-331-2301, 605-370-8617. You can tweet him @ArgusJHult or find him on Facebook at Facebook.com/ArgusReadersWatchdog

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May 12, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Hate Groups Continue to Spread Warnings that Blacks Are …

The racist statements attributed to accused murderer Dylann Roof in South Carolina are echoes of widely-spread and repeated messages out of white supremacist central, an expert on hate groups told ABC News.

Roof told his victims, You all rape women and youre taking over the country, according to Sylvia Johnson, who spoke to a survivor after the shooting. Johnson, whose cousin was the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the pastor killed in the attack, told ABC News David Muir that Roof then added, I have to do what I have to do.

Roof has not been tied to any organized hate group, but his alleged statements track almost word-for-word with hate messages posted on line by white supremacist groups, according to Heidi Beirich, Intelligence Project Director at the Southern Poverty Law Center, who studies such groups.

We don’t know what the connections are between the shooter and these groups, but the fact of the matter is the words that he spoke in that church, if they’re accurate, the way they’ve been reported, sound like they come right out of white supremacist central, Beirich said. In fact, the shooter’s comments about you’re raping people is probably the most common racist statement ever said against black men in the United States. This idea that black men are raping white women. It goes to the heart of white supremacist thinking.

In a photo posted on Facebook, Roof is seen wearing a jacket with the flags of Apartheid-era South Africa and Rhodesia eras when those respective African nations were ruled by a white minority and accused of brutal oppression of the black majority. Such outdated flags are commonly seen in online propaganda postings by extremist groups.

Thursday law enforcement officers were seen removing computers and boxes of evidences from residences where Roof had recently stayed. And while so far there is no indication that Roof was anything but a lone actor, law enforcement sources told ABC News that Roofs computers and cellphones will be studied for possible connections to hate groups or other individuals.

The Southern Poverty Law Center lists 19 hate groups in South Carolina — all but two, it says, are related to the white supremacist movement.

Beirich noted that one group, the Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC), which bills itself as a conservative activist group, has a section on its website dedicated to the victims of white violence in America – white people allegedly killed by black people.

There is no white supremacist [web]site that you go on today that is not going to have as its number one topic of discussion this issue, Beirich said.

After the shooting, the CofCC posted a message saying the organization was deeply saddened by the massacre.

The loss of nine lives is devastating. It cost [sic] also have severe consequences in terms of race relations in the U.S. in general, South Carolina in particular, the group said. We pray, for the sake of all Americans, that there will not be an escalation of racial tension.

On the more general white nationalist internet message boards, a similar sentiment of sympathy was common, but it could not drown out allegations that the killing was a false flag operation somehow orchestrated by gun-control supporters, or the feeling by others that while the killing was bad, black crime was worse.

Others went further, simply cheering on the carnage.

I hereby nominate this man [Roof] for the 2015 Nobel peace prize, one poster said. More power to the guy. Just imagine the situation if all white men were like this. We would have eternal peace.

President Obama today addressed what he called “lingering” racism that is “poisoning the minds of young people.”

The apparent motivations of the shooter remind us that racism remains a blight that we have to combat together,” the president said. “We have made great progress but we have to be vigilant because its still lingering and when it’s poisoning the minds of young people it betrays our ideals and it tears our democracy apart.

Beirich said the internet has become a breeding ground for such beliefs.

The internet is a gold mine for white supremacists in terms of messaging, just like it is for everybody else, she said. Unfortunately, there are fragile-minded folks who get exposed to this stuff and sometimes commit acts of violence. Maybe that happened here. Well have to wait and see what more comes out.

Roof has been charged with nine counts of murder and possession of a firearm during a violent crime. He has not pleaded, but a law enforcement source told ABC News today that he confessed to the crime.

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May 10, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

President Trump freezes money to fight hate groups – WTSP 10 News

Mark Rivera, WTSP 11:20 PM. EDT May 08, 2017

U.S. President Donald Trump, center, listens during a press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, May 4, 2017. (Photo: Bloomberg, 2017 Bloomberg Finance LP)

ST. PETERSBURG We’ve been talking to you for a week about a new office President Trump opened.

It’s supposed to track crimes committed by undocumented immigrants and help their victims.

But it could be doing something that hurts a lot of innocent people.

Nightside reporter Mark Rivera spoke to the southern poverty law center about the VOICE office and if it will help hate groups.

There’s no question that the VOICE office is trying to make it look like immigrants equal bad, said Southern Poverty Law Center hate group expert Heidi Beirich. The idea of highlighting immigrant crime is one that comes right out of the white nationalist playbook.

I want to introduce you to someone.

Chuck Leek spent more than 20 years as part of the white supremacist movement.

Part of the whole skinhead thing was physical violence. I spent some time in prison for assault with a deadly weapon, Beirich said.

Now, Leek is part of this group. Life After Hate. It’s a nationwide network of former white supremacists.

They are dedicated to educating young people against joining right wing terror groups and encouraging white supremacists to leave the movement.

The white supremacist movement is far more active in the last six months than I have seen it in the last 10 or 12 years, Leek said.

Life After Hate was one of more than 30 organizations President Obama tapped to get $0 million dollars of federal money to help combat violent extremists.

Thats to fight the kind of people who want all immigrants out – neo-nazis – people you would generally say you don’t want to be around.

But here’s the data I uncovered from the Anti-Defamation League tonight.

Out of 70 times from 2009 to 2016 when an extremist shot at police – about 60 of them were extreme right wing Americans. Only about 10 of them were Islamic extremists.

That means 84% of ideologically motivated attacks were by white supremacists and other homegrown extremists.

So, money to fight white supremacy can potentially do a lot of good. Take it from a guy who lived it.

If one person gets their mind changed, it might be worth it. If that one person had been Dylan Roofor the Oklahoma City Bomber…, Leek said.

I want to talk to you about hate and extremism. If you’ve ever been involved in a movement that was called a hate group and you got out? Let me know.

Head to our 10News WTSP Facebook page. Get in touch. Let’s talk.

(CBS New contributed to this report)

2017 WTSP-TV

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University of Maryland Fatal Stabbing Investigated by FBI as … – NBCNews.com

Richard Spencer speaks at the Texas A&M University campus Dec. 6, 2016, in College Station, Texas. David J. Phillip / AP file Advocates told NBC News that although authorities were still investigating the specifics of this case, bias incidents and enlistment by groups espousing such ideologies has been increasing in American schools, especially after the contentious 2016 presidential election. Jonathan Greenblatt, the executive director of the Anti-Defamation League, told NBC News that Collins’ murder was “appalling and deeply disturbing.” “This also comes on the heels of an increased tempo of recruiting on college campuses by white supremacists,” he said. Greenblatt said the groups had not been highly engaged in college campuses in years past, “but this year has been different.” He added that members of groups espousing racist ideology had also increasingly turned to social media to recruit people or terrorize their victims. The Heidi Beirich, director of Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project, told NBC News that the group had also noticed an increase in such incidents. “We’ve seen a rise in bias incidents from hate speech and everything leading up to attacks on people, both in the K-12 section and on college campuses,” she said. Although the group began tracking the data much more thoroughly after the election, in its most recent report chronicling bias incidents the group tracked a total of 1,863 reported cases from Nov. 9 through March 31, including 614 that took place on school grounds. The SPLC said 330 of those incidents took place on college campuses and 284 took places in schools grades K-12. The group also tracked 178 “white nationalist flyer” incidents, with 87 percent of those cases taking place on college campuses. Beirich also said the group had found that “increasingly people are getting radicalized online,” citing convicted Charleston church killer Dylann Roof as one example. Roof When asked about the feeling on campus following the allegations in Collins’ murder, and the incident involving the noose last month, Mitchell said Sunday there was a “tension” at the school. “Well, I think there’s not only tension on this campus, but campuses throughout the United States,” he said. “We’re part of America and America is seeing tension. We see it here and we’re doing our best to combat that with our student body,” he added.

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May 23, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

The woman tracking hate in America – ABC News

For Heidi Beirich, director of the nations premiere hate-monitoring publication, the political ascension of Donald Trump brought with it the rise of some dangerous ideas that she has spent years denouncing. He sanctioned them. He made them mainstream, said Beirich. In fact, Trump is the biggest mainstreaming-of-hate person weve ever had. At the Southern Poverty Law Center, Beirich has built a career on hate. She has spent decades studying it in all of its forms, tracking its manifestations and calling it out by name when possible. Her group, the Intelligence Project, publishes both a Hatewatch blog and the award-winning Intelligence Report the countrys leading periodical monitoring extremist, right-wing groups in America. To maintain her expertise, she spends hours each day immersing herself in their world. Its a lot of hours on websites, or reading publications these organizations put out, said Beirich. And then we have to make a hard call. You know, we dont want to name groups willy nilly as hate groups because thats a hell of a thing to say about somebody. During our conversation, Beirich opened up about the roots of her interest in this kind of work an emotionally-exhausting and dangerous enterprise that can draw the ire of the same groups shes tracking. As a teenager in northern California, Beirich saw firsthand the devastating effects local neo-Nazi groups had on her circle of friends, some of whom were pulled in by what she calls “magnetic” messaging. Some committed violent acts, in the name of ideology, and ended up in prison. Families, Beirich says, were torn apart. Thirty years later, shes watched the messages, tactics and targets of groups shift over time. As America evolves, Beirich says, so have its hate groups, both in style and scope. In the February 2017 issue of the Intelligence Report, the SPLC reported that the number of hate groups rose to 917 in 2016, up from 892 in 2015; the most dramatic growth was the anti-Muslim hate groups, which rose from 34 in 2015 to 101 in 2016. I think sometimes Americans forget that this country was founded on white supremacy, said Beirich. This country is very soon going to have no majority population. We cant live and be successful as a democracy if we have civil strife like this. Its a really bad thing for our future. Beirich is among those who weren’t convinced by Trump’s “stop it” line, delivered during a television interview in which he was pressed about supporters committing acts of violence. She saw his February 2016 condemnation of a wave of anti-Semitic threats — after weeks of criticism for his failure to address them — as “too little, too late.” Theres no simple answers but it would be nice if it started from the top, to say this stuff is bad, she said. Weve been through these scenarios before. And what makes it better is taking a stand for civil rights and equality. Check out the full conversation on this weeks episode of Uncomfortable. Download and subscribe to the “Uncomfortable” podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Stitcher, and ABC News podcasts. Beirich was interviewed as part of a series called “Uncomfortable,” hosted by Amna Nawaz, that offers in-depth and honest conversations with influential figures about issues dividing America.

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El Daily Stormer: Neo-Nazi website is now in Spanish, too – Redwood Times

How does a leading neo-Nazi website that has railed against Hispanic immigrants expand its audience beyond a loyal base of U.S. white supremacists? By publishing a Spanish-language edition, of course. The Daily Stormer infamous for orchestrating internet harassment campaigns by its “Troll Army” of readers recently launched El Daily Stormer as a “news portal” tailoring its racist, anti-Semitic content for readers in Spain and Latin America. Andrew Auernheimer, a notorious computer hacker and internet troll who writes for the English-language site, says the Spanish edition fits their mission to spread Hitlerism across the world. “We want our message to reach millions more people,” he said in a telephone interview. Advertisement Hate sites have realized that the U.S. has no monopoly on white nationalists and other far-right extremists, says Heidi Beirich, director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project. Others, such as Stormfront, already created multilingual forums. “The white supremacist movement has really viewed itself as past borders, reaching out to white people in other countries,” Beirich said. The law center represents a Montana real estate agent who sued The Daily Stormer’s founder, Andrew Anglin, last month for unleashing an anti-Semitic “campaign of terror” against her family. Anonymous trolls bombarded Tanya Gersh’s family with hateful and threatening messages after Anglin published the family’s personal information in a December post that accused Gersh and other Jewish residents of Whitefish, Montana, of engaging in an “extortion racket” against the mother of white nationalist Richard Spencer. Anglin’s site takes its name from Der Strmer, a newspaper that published Nazi propaganda. It includes sections called “Jewish Problem” and “Race War.” El Daily Stormer titles its anti-Semitic section “Judiadas,” an offensive term with roots in medieval Spain, where it was invoked to justify genocidal attacks on Jews. The Spanish site also includes appeals for donations and unpaid articles, and a forum where people complain about Chile and Argentina filling up with “negros,” referring to people from Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay. Auernheimer, known online as “weev,” said a team of volunteers is writing original content for the Spanish-language site. The site’s appeal for unpaid collaborators says being a dissident “has never been a lucrative activity,” and that it is looking for writers “willing to risk everything for the survival of our race.” “We have a big Spanish-speaking population on our forums, so it was an easy direction to branch out into,” he said. About 40 percent of The Daily Stormer’s 3.2 million unique monthly visitors are in the U.S.; the Spanish edition has added fewer than 10,000 since its recent launch, Auernheimer said. Surpassing Stormfront as the top U.S. hate site hasn’t been a financial boon for The Daily Stormer, which calls itself “100 percent reader-supported.” Anglin complained in January that a Ukrainian advertising company had banned them, leaving an Australian electrician as the site’s only advertiser. “We don’t have revenue commensurate with a publication of our size,” Auernheimer said. ___ Associated Press writer Mike Warren in Atlanta contributed to this report.

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AP News in Brief at 6:04 am EDT – Miami Herald

News18 AP News in Brief at 6:04 am EDT Miami Herald Hate sites have realized that the U.S. has no monopoly on white nationalists and other far-right extremists, says Heidi Beirich , director of the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project. Others, such as Stormfront, already created … Trump revealed highly classified information to Russian foreign minister and ambassador Washington Post Israel Said to Be Source of Secret Intelligence Trump Gave to Russians New York Times all 2,115 news articles »

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May 17, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Nation and World briefs for May 17 – Hawaii Tribune Herald

Nation and World briefs for May 17 Hawaii Tribune Herald Hate sites have realized that the U.S. has no monopoly on white nationalists and other far-right extremists, says Heidi Beirich , director of the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project. Others, such as Stormfront, already created … and more »

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May 17, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton … but not slaves – Durham Herald Sun

Durham Herald Sun Alabama history tour covers Civil War, cotton … but not slaves Durham Herald Sun You're essentially giving money to push historical narratives that we haven't heard since the Klan era in the 1920s, said Heidi Beirich , director of the hate-watching Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. The museum perseveres in a … and more »

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May 13, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Pagan worship group scrutinized in prison – Sioux Falls Argus Leader

Jody Hadley, an Asatru kindred leader, discusses what Asatru is. (Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader) Sam Lopez takes part in an Asatru study group Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Sioux Falls. Asatru is a pagan Norse religion. The group meets every other Wednesday.(Photo: Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader)Buy Photo When Jody Hadley arrived at the South Dakota State Penitentiary in 2003 on a kidnapping charge, he wasnt an especially nice guy. But the man who’d once held an elderly Worthing couple hostage and stolen their car said he learned a lot about morality in the 12 years that passed before his release. Most of it came from Asatru, an ancient pagan religion whose modern adherents send prayers to Odin, Thor or Freya and abide by principles called the Nine Noble Virtues, among them honor, courage, fidelity, discipline and perseverance. Without it, Hadley suspects he’d have remained rudderless. Asatru helped me become a better person. When I first went to prison, I was a dirtbag. I lied, I was a thief, Hadley told Argus Leader Media this week. Because of Asatru, I am an honorable man. Hadley founded the Asatru religious group at the penitentiary that still meets, although its relationship with the prison hasn’t always been cordial. Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Last week, Hadley heard that correctional officers found a copy of a white supremacist essay called 88 Precepts inside a member’s cell. The discovery led the Department of Corrections to shut down the groups study meetings, at least temporarily. The DOC reinstated meetings this week. That upset Hadley and Sam Lopez, an Asatru practitioner from Sioux Falls whose son practicesin prison. Asatru is not about racism, Lopez said. More Hult:Coddling inmates with technology? Readers react to tablet story One idiot does not a community make, said Lopez. Neither of them are particularly surprised about the development, though. Asatru and its offshoots have drawn neo-nazis and white supremacists for years, particularly behind prison walls. The author of 88 Precepts, now-deceased white supremacist and convicted racketeer David Lane, latched on to a version of the Nordic religion called Wotanism, Lane preferredWotan as both a stand-in for Odin and an acronym for Will of the Aryan Nation. The extremist embrace of paganism has forced regular worshipers into asteady struggle for legitimacy, according to Heidi Beirich of theSouthern Poverty Law Center. They do oftentimes get caught in a box where people think theyre all racists, and its not true, said Beirich, whose organization tracks hate groups in the U.S. Its quite unfair. A lot of these pagan religious are pretty progressive. Prison officials are often at the center of the controversy. Hate-related speech and paraphernalia are barred prison, but courts have generally ruled that religion is protected in prison by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. More:Jackley: Facebook video ‘warranted a law enforcement response’ Its not uncommon for inmates with racist views to sue for the right to meet as a group by organizing as a religious group. Prisons struggle with this all the time, Beirich said. DOC spokesman Michael Winder did not offer details on the incident itself, but said only that the group is under investigation for potential violations of prison policy. While individual members are not currently permitted to meet as a group, they are all permitted, and are encouraged, to practice their faith on an individual basis, Winder said last week. Those members who are ultimately found to have not violated policy will be permitted to meet again as a group. Items of religious significance in the center of a table during an Asatru study group Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Sioux Falls. Asatru is a pagan Norse religion. The group meets every other Wednesday. (Photo: Joe Ahlquist / Argus Leader) On Thursday, Winder said the group’s right to meet had been reinstated. Hadley said Asatru and Native American groups commonly sparredwith prison officials over rituals, group meetings and religious artifacts during his time behind bars. Much of the Asatru trouble has to do with pagan symbols that now stand-in as symbols of racism in the modern imagination, he said. Long before the swastika was adopted by Nazi Germany, Hadley said, it served as a pagan signifier. Hadley was once questioned in prison about a Thors hammer tattoo on his chest, for example. The hammer symbol is also ancient in origin, but extremists wear it today. Ryan Giroux, awhite supremacist sentenced to life plus 83 years in prison for a shooting spree in Mesa, Arizona, has the hammer tattooed on his chin. Readers’ Watchdog: Leash law ticket perplexes snake lover Hadleys tattoo has nothing to do with racism, he said, and he had to convince the DOC as much. The situation was frustrating, he said. They tried to write me up for gang activity, even though I was the only one who had it, said Hadley. Hadley and Lopez both say the Sioux Falls group offers rehabilitative value for inmates. It really is building community for these guys, so when they get out, it makes it easier for them to do well and harder to screw up, Lopez said. Hadley said hes proof of that. He went from a man who didnt think twice about stealing from his own family to one who holds his family in high regard, and that he wouldnt have without spiritual influence. I ran that group for 10 years, Hadley said. I always stressed that its about loving who you are where you come from, not hating other people for who they are and where they come from. John Hult is the Reader’s Watchdog reporter for Argus Leader Media. Contact him with questions and concerns at 605-331-2301, 605-370-8617. You can tweet him @ArgusJHult or find him on Facebook at Facebook.com/ArgusReadersWatchdog Read or Share this story: http://www.argusleader.com/story/news/2017/05/11/state-prison-suspends-pagan-worship-group/318094001/

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May 12, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

Hate Groups Continue to Spread Warnings that Blacks Are …

The racist statements attributed to accused murderer Dylann Roof in South Carolina are echoes of widely-spread and repeated messages out of white supremacist central, an expert on hate groups told ABC News. Roof told his victims, You all rape women and youre taking over the country, according to Sylvia Johnson, who spoke to a survivor after the shooting. Johnson, whose cousin was the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the pastor killed in the attack, told ABC News David Muir that Roof then added, I have to do what I have to do. Roof has not been tied to any organized hate group, but his alleged statements track almost word-for-word with hate messages posted on line by white supremacist groups, according to Heidi Beirich, Intelligence Project Director at the Southern Poverty Law Center, who studies such groups. We don’t know what the connections are between the shooter and these groups, but the fact of the matter is the words that he spoke in that church, if they’re accurate, the way they’ve been reported, sound like they come right out of white supremacist central, Beirich said. In fact, the shooter’s comments about you’re raping people is probably the most common racist statement ever said against black men in the United States. This idea that black men are raping white women. It goes to the heart of white supremacist thinking. In a photo posted on Facebook, Roof is seen wearing a jacket with the flags of Apartheid-era South Africa and Rhodesia eras when those respective African nations were ruled by a white minority and accused of brutal oppression of the black majority. Such outdated flags are commonly seen in online propaganda postings by extremist groups. Thursday law enforcement officers were seen removing computers and boxes of evidences from residences where Roof had recently stayed. And while so far there is no indication that Roof was anything but a lone actor, law enforcement sources told ABC News that Roofs computers and cellphones will be studied for possible connections to hate groups or other individuals. The Southern Poverty Law Center lists 19 hate groups in South Carolina — all but two, it says, are related to the white supremacist movement. Beirich noted that one group, the Council of Conservative Citizens (CofCC), which bills itself as a conservative activist group, has a section on its website dedicated to the victims of white violence in America – white people allegedly killed by black people. There is no white supremacist [web]site that you go on today that is not going to have as its number one topic of discussion this issue, Beirich said. After the shooting, the CofCC posted a message saying the organization was deeply saddened by the massacre. The loss of nine lives is devastating. It cost [sic] also have severe consequences in terms of race relations in the U.S. in general, South Carolina in particular, the group said. We pray, for the sake of all Americans, that there will not be an escalation of racial tension. On the more general white nationalist internet message boards, a similar sentiment of sympathy was common, but it could not drown out allegations that the killing was a false flag operation somehow orchestrated by gun-control supporters, or the feeling by others that while the killing was bad, black crime was worse. Others went further, simply cheering on the carnage. I hereby nominate this man [Roof] for the 2015 Nobel peace prize, one poster said. More power to the guy. Just imagine the situation if all white men were like this. We would have eternal peace. President Obama today addressed what he called “lingering” racism that is “poisoning the minds of young people.” The apparent motivations of the shooter remind us that racism remains a blight that we have to combat together,” the president said. “We have made great progress but we have to be vigilant because its still lingering and when it’s poisoning the minds of young people it betrays our ideals and it tears our democracy apart. Beirich said the internet has become a breeding ground for such beliefs. The internet is a gold mine for white supremacists in terms of messaging, just like it is for everybody else, she said. Unfortunately, there are fragile-minded folks who get exposed to this stuff and sometimes commit acts of violence. Maybe that happened here. Well have to wait and see what more comes out. Roof has been charged with nine counts of murder and possession of a firearm during a violent crime. He has not pleaded, but a law enforcement source told ABC News today that he confessed to the crime.

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May 10, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed

President Trump freezes money to fight hate groups – WTSP 10 News

Mark Rivera, WTSP 11:20 PM. EDT May 08, 2017 U.S. President Donald Trump, center, listens during a press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, May 4, 2017. (Photo: Bloomberg, 2017 Bloomberg Finance LP) ST. PETERSBURG We’ve been talking to you for a week about a new office President Trump opened. It’s supposed to track crimes committed by undocumented immigrants and help their victims. But it could be doing something that hurts a lot of innocent people. Nightside reporter Mark Rivera spoke to the southern poverty law center about the VOICE office and if it will help hate groups. There’s no question that the VOICE office is trying to make it look like immigrants equal bad, said Southern Poverty Law Center hate group expert Heidi Beirich. The idea of highlighting immigrant crime is one that comes right out of the white nationalist playbook. I want to introduce you to someone. Chuck Leek spent more than 20 years as part of the white supremacist movement. Part of the whole skinhead thing was physical violence. I spent some time in prison for assault with a deadly weapon, Beirich said. Now, Leek is part of this group. Life After Hate. It’s a nationwide network of former white supremacists. They are dedicated to educating young people against joining right wing terror groups and encouraging white supremacists to leave the movement. The white supremacist movement is far more active in the last six months than I have seen it in the last 10 or 12 years, Leek said. Life After Hate was one of more than 30 organizations President Obama tapped to get $0 million dollars of federal money to help combat violent extremists. Thats to fight the kind of people who want all immigrants out – neo-nazis – people you would generally say you don’t want to be around. But here’s the data I uncovered from the Anti-Defamation League tonight. Out of 70 times from 2009 to 2016 when an extremist shot at police – about 60 of them were extreme right wing Americans. Only about 10 of them were Islamic extremists. That means 84% of ideologically motivated attacks were by white supremacists and other homegrown extremists. So, money to fight white supremacy can potentially do a lot of good. Take it from a guy who lived it. If one person gets their mind changed, it might be worth it. If that one person had been Dylan Roofor the Oklahoma City Bomber…, Leek said. I want to talk to you about hate and extremism. If you’ve ever been involved in a movement that was called a hate group and you got out? Let me know. Head to our 10News WTSP Facebook page. Get in touch. Let’s talk. (CBS New contributed to this report) 2017 WTSP-TV

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May 9, 2017   Posted in: Heidi Beirich  Comments Closed


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