Archive for the ‘Hitler’ Category

Scindia likens Shivraj Singh govt to ‘Hitler’s rule’ – Daily News & Analysis

Stating that the death of five farmers in police firing in Mandsaur was a blot on the Shivraj Singh Chouhan government, Congress leader Jyotiraditya Scindia today equated the BJP regime in Madhya Pradesh to the “Hitler’s rule”.

“The police firing on farmers agitating for getting right price for their produce and waiver of loans, which resulted in the death of the five of them is a blot on the head of Shivraj Singh’s government. It appears that Hitler’s rule is prevailing in the state. Chouhan has no right to remain in power,” Scindia told reporters at the Indore Press Club.

“It is a matter of shame that instead of meeting grieving farmers’ families, the chief minister staged a nautanki (drama) in Bhopal in the name fast. By announcing hefty compensation for them, the Chouhan government tried to trivialise invaluable human lives through money,” he alleged.

Scindia, who also met injured farmers at the government M Y Hospital here said, “I am totally shattered with their ordeal. They alleged that after the firing, police dragged them on the roads and also took away money and mobile phones from their pockets.”

The former union minister claimed that police have termed nearly 700 agitating farmers as anti-social elements and have registered cases against them while it has not yet filed a case against those policemen, who ordered to open fire at the protesters.

He alleged that the state government was just hushing up the matter in the name of probe. “The policemen in Khaki dress should not consider themselves as god,” he remarked.

The senior Congress leader also denied allegations that his party had added fuel to the agitation.

“Congress has no role in the farmers’ agitation. We always follow the path of non-violence shown by Mahatma Gandhi,” he said.

Targeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi, he said that nearly 65 crore people are dependent on agriculture in the country, but the government has hiked the rates of power and diesel, which has increased the cost of cultivation, forcing the farmers to commit suicide.

Scindia also announced to stage 72-hour ‘satyagraha’ in support of the farmers at Bhopal from June 14.

(This article has not been edited by DNA’s editorial team and is auto-generated from an agency feed.)

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Scindia likens Shivraj Singh govt to ‘Hitler’s rule’ – Daily News & Analysis

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June 12, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Why Hitler’s Most Powerful Battleship Ever Refused to Sink – The National Interest Online (blog)

On May 24, southwest of Iceland,BismarckandPrinzEugentangled with the battleship HMSPrince of Walesand the agingbattlecruiserHMSHood. Trading armored protection for speed,Hoods designers had left it dangerously exposed to enemy fire. Hits from the German task force ignited an ammunition fire that raged out of control onHood. Within ten minutes a titanic explosion shook the Denmark Strait as the fire reached the aft magazine.Hoodbroke in half and sank, taking 1,418 men with it.

Bismarck, despite its stunning victory, had not emerged from the battle unscathed. Hit three times byPrince of Wales, it lost some of its fuel supply to seawater contamination, sustained damage to its propulsion, and suffered a nine-degree list to port. Its captain, desperate to get away from the site of the battle and a slowly coalescing Royal Navy force eager for revenge, refused to slow down to allow damage control to effect repairs.

On May 23, 1941, the Battleship Bismarckwas on a roll. The largest and most powerful ship in the German Navy, the mightyBismarckhad broken out into the Atlantic Ocean, sunk a Royal Navybattlecruiser, badly damaged a battleship and was poised to add its guns to a naval blockade that threatened to strangle Great Britain.

Ninety-six hours later, heavily damaged, the battleship was on the bottom of the North Atlantic.Bismarcks swift reversal of fortune was the result of a heroic effort by the Royal Navy to hunt down and destroy the battlewagon, and avenge the more than 1,400 Royal Navy personnel killed in the Denmark Strait.

The German battleshipBismarckwas the the pride of theKriegsmarine, Nazi Germanys naval service. Construction began in 1936, and the ship was commissioned in April 1940. It and its sister ship,Tirpitz, were 821 feet long and displaced fifty thousand tons, making them by far the largest warships ever built by Germany. Despite its size, twelve Wagner steam boilers made it capable of a fast thirty knots.

Like any battlewagon,Bismarcks firepower lay in its main gun batteries.Bismarckhad eight fifteen-inch guns in four large turrets, each capable of hurling a 1,800-pound armor-piercing, capped projectile 21.75 miles. This gave it the ability to penetrate 16.5 inches of armor at eleven miles.

The relatively small size of Germanys World War II navy made it incapable of taking on the British and French navies head-on. Instead, theKriegsmarinewas given a much more limited role, of shepherding invasion fleets and cutting off the flow of commerce to Great Britain. On May 18, 1941,Bismarckand its escort, the heavy cruiserPrinzEugen, embarked on OperationRheinbung, a campaign to sink Allied shipping in the North Atlantic and knock Britain out of the war.

On May 24, southwest of Iceland,BismarckandPrinzEugentangled with the battleship HMSPrince of Walesand the agingbattlecruiserHMSHood. Trading armored protection for speed,Hoods designers had left it dangerously exposed to enemy fire. Hits from the German task force ignited an ammunition fire that raged out of control onHood. Within ten minutes a titanic explosion shook the Denmark Strait as the fire reached the aft magazine.Hoodbroke in half and sank, taking 1,418 men with it.

Bismarck, despite its stunning victory, had not emerged from the battle unscathed. Hit three times byPrince of Wales, it lost some of its fuel supply to seawater contamination, sustained damage to its propulsion, and suffered a nine-degree list to port. Its captain, desperate to get away from the site of the battle and a slowly coalescing Royal Navy force eager for revenge, refused to slow down to allow damage control to effect repairs.

Bismarcks captain was correct. The Royal Navy was assembling a large force to sink it, and indeed had ordered every ship in the area to join in the search to find it. The much larger Royal Navy was able to assemble a force of six battleships and battlecruisers, two aircraft carriers, thirteen cruisers, and twenty-one destroyers to huntBismarck. Unfortunately, many of the larger ships were of World War I vintage, and could not catch up with the wounded, but still fastBismarck.

AlthoughBismarckoutclassed nearly all the heavy capital ships that chased it, naval aviation was another matter. The German task forces location was betrayed by oil leaking from the battleship and the aircraft carrier HMSVictoriouswas sent to slow it down. An air strike by six Fairey Fulmar carrier-based fighters and nine Fairey Swordfish carrier torpedo bombers managed a single hit onBismarck. The torpedo explosion did minor damage, but the evasive maneuvers conducted byBismarcks captain to evade the torpedo attack caused even more damage, slowing the mighty battleship to sixteen knots.

Although it was eventually able to get back up to twenty-eight knots, the temporary loss of its speed advantage allowed a Royal Navy task force, Force H, to catch up to it. Established to take the place of the surrendered French Navy in the western Mediterranean, Force H was based at Gibraltar. It consisted of the aircraft carrier HMSArk Royal, the battlecruiserRenownand a light cruiser.

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Why Hitler’s Most Powerful Battleship Ever Refused to Sink – The National Interest Online (blog)

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June 12, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

The Scientist and the Fascist – The Atlantic

In September 1930, Germany held its first national elections since the Great Crash of 1929, and the National Socialists won a stunning tally: 6,400,000 votes10 times their total just two years beforeand 107 seats. They were now the second largest party in the Reichstag. The word Nazi no longer evoked images of the madhouse, as one commentator wrote. Suddenly the party was almost respectable.

Even so, it still seemed to many as if Hitlers support was tenuous. For Albert Einstein, Hitlers sudden rush to prominence confirmed his historic distrust of the German body politic. But at this time, he did not see Hitler or National Socialism as a lasting danger. Asked in December of 1930 what to make of the new force in German politics, he answered that I do not enjoy Herr Hitlers acquaintance. He is living on the empty stomach of Germany. As soon as economic conditions improve, he will no longer be important. Initially, he felt that no action at all would be needed to bring Hitler low. He reaffirmed for a Jewish organization that the momentarily desperate economic situation and the chronic childish disease of the Republic were to blame for the Nazi success. Solidarity of the Jews, I believe, is always called for, he wrote, but any special reaction to the election results would be quite inappropriate.

Einstein should have been rightthe evidence for the fragility of Hitlers support over the next two years makes for frustrating, bitter, what-if history. But even if he had persuasive reasons for believing that Hitler would not last, the election results reaffirmed the urgency of his core political stand. Even if he underestimated Hitler (as so many Germans did then), he still recognized the need to act to counter the more general pathology of which Hitlers rise was a symptom.

The threat of German rearmament, along with a resurgence of militarism across the European continent spurred Einstein to act. Germany had been almost completely disarmed by the Versailles Treaty after World War I. Its army could total no more than 100,000 men; its forces were denied most heavy weapons; it could not build an air force; its warships had to meet strict tonnage and armament restrictions. Evasion of these terms had been the rule almost from the start.

This rearming barely a decade after a conflict that ought to have inoculated Germany against the contagion of battle-lust forever, was intolerable to Einstein. In response, he advocated mass rejection of compulsory military service by young men throughout Europea campaign that had become a major pillar of pacifist politics after the war. Every thoughtful, well-meaning, and conscientious human being, he wrote in January 1928 in a letter to Londons No More War movement, should assume, in time of peace, the solemn and unconditional obligation not to participate in any war for any reason.

He grew more insistent as time passed. In the spring of 1929, he wrote that the people themselves must take the initiative to see to it that they will never again be led to slaughter. To expect protection from their governments is folly. During the next several months 1930, driven by the rise of militant nationalism across Europe, Einsteins level of urgency and passion grew. War had become an absolute anathema to him: I would rather be torn limb from limb, he wrote, than take part in such an ugly business.

By late 1932, Einstein abandoned the last of his hopesor illusionsthat a more or less democratic German society could survive economic collapse and the Nazis deliberate sabotage of civic life.

The Nazi setbacks in the November elections produced a brief moment of hope. Several quite acute political observers, including Einsteins friend Kessler, thought that the Nazi losses marked the beginning of the end. But the moment evaporated, destroyed by Chancellor Fritz von Papens vacuous incompetence and Hitlers relentless pursuit of power. Einstein had spoken at home and abroad against the collective surrender to unreason he saw around him. He had written, campaigned, served on committees, encouraged others, raised money when he could. But by late 1932, the end had clearly come.

From very early in his life, Einstein gave hints of a deep-seated streak of fatalism. It never prevented him from acting, from behaving as if what he sought to do could influence events. But the countervailing strain was always there, the perception that the apparently unique spark of any one human life must ultimately vanish into the vastness of the cosmos. The previous year, 1931, bound for California, he experienced a storm at sea. He wrote in his travel diary that the sea has a look of indescribable grandeur, especially when the sun falls on it. One feels as if one is dissolved and merged into nature. Even more than usual, one feels the insignificance of the individual and it makes one happy.

Insignificantand hence autonomous, free to do what one had to do. In the end, Einstein simply left the stage. On December 12, Albert and Elsa Einstein set out from Berlin for the United States. A photograph taken at the entrance of the train station shows an ordinary travelers tableau. Elsa looks a little worried, harried; she could be thinking about the luggage, or perhaps, more seriously, about her daughter Ilse, who was ailing. Einsteins face is unrevealing, almost grim. The overall impression is of impatience, a desire to be done with photography and catch their train. There is no way to read the image, except with hindsight, as the end of an era.

Before they reached the train station, Einstein and Elsa had to close up their house at Caputh. They may have paused at the door to Einsteins study or on the porch, looking down the sweep of lawn to the lake, visible then through the leafless trees. There might have been a glance round the back of the house, a survey of windows shut and doors latched, and then in and out again, carrying their bags. One of them locked the doorprobably Elsa, the master of all practical matters in the Einstein household. Finally, when nothing remained to be done, they walked away from the house. Einstein spoke. Take a good look, he told Elsa. You will never see it again.

* * *

In exile, Einstein rethought his core political beliefs and the moral reasoning that underpinned them. Being Einstein, he was faster to the conclusions that shift forced on him than almost all of his contemporaries.

On January 30, 1933, as Hitler took the oath as Chancellor of a republic about to become a Reich, Albert Einstein was safely out of reach in Pasadena. For the moment, there was little overt danger. Well treated by his American friends, he could be positively playful, even trying his hand at bicycling. The famous photograph of Einstein atop his two-wheeler was taken that February. He leans over, his front wheel a little askew. He seems a trifle unsteady but he grins hugely; life is pleasant in southern California.

Even after Hitler consolidated his hold, Einstein restrained himself for a while. Early in February, he even wrote to the Prussian Academy to discuss salary matters, fully as if he intended to resume work in Berlin later that year. But any illusions he may have had shattered almost immediately thereafter. On February 27, the Reichstag in Berlin burned to the ground. The crackdown on the left began immediately, with the SA and the SS competing to arrest and brutalize any perceived threat to the Reich.

By coincidence, the same day that Reichstag burned, Einstein wrote to his quondam mistress, Margarete Lenbach. He told her that I dare not enter Germany because of Hitler. The day before he left Pasadena, bound eventually for Belgium, he launched his first public attack against Germanys new regime. As long as I have any choice in the matter, I shall live only in a country where civil liberty, tolerance, and equality of all citizens before the law prevail. The completion of the syllogism was simpleThese conditions do not exist in Germany at the present timeand would not, Einstein implied, as long as the current regime remained in power.

Hitlers government reacted swiftly and bitterly to Einsteins charges. The Vlkicsher Beobachter published a series of attacks on him, and more mainstream papers followed suit. One headline read Good News of EinsteinHe Is Not Coming Back! over an article condemning this puffed-up bit of vanity [who] dared to sit in judgment on Germany without knowing what is going on herematters that forever must remain incomprehensible to a man who was never a German in our eyes and who declares himself to be a Jew and nothing but a Jew. A pamphlet that surfaced some months later reprinted Einsteins photograph in a collection of enemies of Nazi Germany, over the caption, Not Yet Hanged.

Such harassment did not touch Einstein very deeply. The sharpest blows came not from the Nazis themselves but from those who had once formed his chief reason for being in Berlin, his fellow members of the Prussian Academy. While still at sea on the way to Belgium, Einstein drafted his letter of resignation from the Academy, and on arrival he gave it to the German legation, along with his renunciation of German citizenship.

Subsequent events revealed the depth to which the rot had spread. Hitlers government ordered the Prussian Academy to begin the process of expelling Einstein from its midst. His resignation caught the government by surprise. Enraged that he had quit before he could be fired, the minister in charge demanded a proclamation from the Academy condemning its erstwhile hero. The draft statement declared that we have no reason to regret Einsteins resignation. The Academy is aghast at his foreign agitation. Einsteins old friend Max von Laue was horrified at the idea that the Academy might issue such a document, and he spoke against the proposal at an extraordinary meeting on April 6. Only one of the 14 members present supported him. Even Haber, the converted Jew and Einsteins close friend, voted with the majority.

Habers action was bad. Max Planck disgraced himself. Einstein had written to Planck to refute privately the charge that he had spread rumors against Germany, telling him that he spoke now only to combat what was clearly a Nazi war of extermination against my Jewish brethren. Planck answered Einstein in a letter that identified both Jewishness and National Socialism as ideologies that cannot co-exist. He deplored both and emphasized his loyalty to Germany, no matter who was in charge. It is greatly to be regretted, he said at the Academy meeting, that Mr. Einstein through his political behavior himself rendered his continued membership in the Academy impossible. Einsteins politics were to blame, not those of a German government that had chosen to destroy him.

Throughout the summer of 1933, Einstein sounded his warning about Hitler wherever he could. In September he visited Winston Churchill, then firmly in political exilebut while Churchill did not require much persuasion to view Hitler as a menace, he had no influence to bring to bear. Later that month, Einsteins frustration became more obvious. I cannot understand the passive response of the whole civilized world to this modern barbarism, he told one interviewer. Does the world not see that Hitler is aiming at war?

That contained hints of the tectonic shift that had overtaken Einsteins core political passion. By the time he spoke, he was no longer a pacifist. In September he had announced his change of heart in a letter to a Belgian war resister published in The New York Times. Until quite recently we in Europe could assume that personal war resistance constituted an effective attack on militarism, he began. But circumstances alter cases, and now, in the heart of Europe lies a power, Germany, that is obviously pushing towards war with all available means. For Einstein, even deeply held principles had to bend to the pressure of an overwhelming threat. I should not, in the present circumstances, refuse military service, he concluded. Rather I should enter such service cheerfully in the belief that I would thereby be helping to save European civilization.

The culmination of Einsteins commitment to defeat Hitler by whatever means necessary came in 1939 and 1940, when he sent his two letters to President Roosevelt about the possibility of the United States building an atomic bomb. In late 1938, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman, two scientists still working in Berlin, were wrestling with some novel results from a series of experiments in which they bombarded uranium with a newly discovered subatomic particle, the neutron. Lise Meitner, Hahns former collaborator, and her nephew Otto Frisch, both exiles from Hitlers Germany, met at Christmas in the Swedish village of Kunglv and together they identified the process the Berliners had observed: neutrons striking uranium atoms had sparked nuclear fission, the violent destruction of atomic nuclei in which both energy and more neutrons are released. The result was published several months before wartime secrecy would have rung the curtain down. Every competent physicist who heard the news realized that the fact that each fission event could release more neutrons, raised the possibility of a chain reaction, the new neutrons splitting more atoms in an escalating cascade. The next step was obvious even to the newspapers. As early as the spring of 1939, The Washington Post reported that nuclear fission could lead to weapons powerful enough to destroy everything over two square miles of ground.

In the first months after the fission experiments became public knowledge, however, Einstein had not paid much attention. During the summer of 1939, however, Szilard came to visit him at his summer house on Long Island, accompanied by his fellow physicists Eugene Wigner and Edward Teller. The three migr Hungarians laid out the principle of the chain reaction, and then told Einstein of the interest the Germans were already showing in the use of uranium as a weapon. That was enough to persuade him to sign his first letter, in which he urged the president to consider the possibility of creating atomic weapons. Roosevelt replied in mid-October, saying that he had set up a committee to investigate Einsteins suggestions. Nothing much happenedno surprise, given the initial committee budget of $6,000 for its first year of operationso Szilard got Einstein to try again. In March, 1940, he sent his second letter to Roosevelt, urging him to give greater impetus to the effort because, Einstein wrote, Since the outbreak of the war, interest in uranium has intensified in Germany. I have now learned that research there is carried out in great secrecy.

Despite his attempt at presidential lobbying, and contrary to the often repeated fable that he was somehow the creator of the atom bomb, Einstein had next to nothing to do with the invention of nuclear weapons. The significance of his letters to Roosevelt was not the results they failed to achieve, but what they reveal about Einsteins own political evolution. Until 1932, he had argued as fervently as he could that no civilized man should permit the state to order him to kill.

In the end, the use of Americas bombs deeply saddened him. On hearing of the attack on Hiroshima he is reported to have said Oj WegWoe is me. He later said that had I known that the Germans would not succeed in producing an atomic bomb, I would not have lifted a finger. After the war ended, Einstein became one of the founding forces in the scientists anti-nuclear movement. The last public act of his life was to add his name to a manifesto drafted by Bertrand Russell that called for global nuclear disarmament. But he never wavered in the basic argument he had made in the summer of 1933: Hitler was a deadly poison. He had to be neutralized. No greater goals could be contemplated until Hitler and Germany had been utterly defeated. Once he reached that conclusion, he followed it through to its ultimate destination: the bomb itself.

This article has been adapted from Thomas Levensons book, Einstein in Berlin.

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The Scientist and the Fascist – The Atlantic

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June 11, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

A Life Without Parole Sentence not the Death Penalty for Hitler – City Watch

DEATH PENALTY POLITICS-In a blood-thirsty columnclamoring for faster executions in the United States, John Steele Gordon, a writer specializing in financial and business history, asserts: Had Hitler been captured alive, would anyone have suggested life without parole?

Yes. Me. I would have.

Knowing the exorbitant costs of capital punishment on our judicial system and on our identity as civilized, compassionate, peaceful, justice-loving people had I been alive at the time, I would have recommended a life without parole sentence and not the death penalty for Hitler.

And Im Jewish. Both my parents come from Jewish families; before immigrating to the United States, my paternal grandparents were Jews from Poland and my maternal grandparents were Jews from Germany. My paternal grandfather, Denis Cooper, even fought for the United States Army against Hitler. (He came to the United States around 1938, working and attending George Washington University Law School at night. Once the war broke out, he joined the Army and his duties were wide-ranging; they included interrogating captured Germans, assisting liberated towns in reestablishing local governments, and participating in various de-Nazification efforts. Near the end of the war, my grandfather once captured a small group of German officers by walking into their office and introducing himself as Captain Cooper of the United States Army; then he informed them that they could either surrender to him or wait and surrender to the Russians.)

But Jewish or not, one need not linger long on Gordons hyperbolic Hitler-hypothesis undergirding much of his screed to know that its off-base. As horrific as their crimes have been, theres never been a prisoner on death row in the United States that has ever committed atrocities on the scale of Hitler and there never will be. The crimes of inmates on death row may be demonic in description but, despite the unsubtle attempts of Gordon and other death penalty proponents to cast them as such, death row inmates are not otherworldly demons. As I have written elsewhere, for example, when we talk about a backlog of death row inmates, we are not talking about curtailing an exploding population of coyotes. We are talking about a population of human beings, many of whom suffer from serious mental illness, a frequent byproduct of a childhood where poverty, abuse, violence, and neglect were the norm.

Gordons tenuous reliance on an imagined what if Hitler had been captured alive scenario to argue for expedited state-killing is also undercut by his erroneous claim that the history of the death penalty is one of ever-decreasing cruelty [and] spectacle. As a backdrop for his repugnant and incorrect supposition that lethal injection is humane and not a sick freak show, Gordon reminds us in macabre and disturbingly longing fashion that: The Romans, like all ancient peoples, put criminals to death, and for even petty offenses; Many of the condemned were dispatched by wild animals in the arena; [o]thers were crucified; beheading, hanging, drawing and quartering, and burning at the stake were all common punishments.

Gordon completely ignores the grisly horror of the big jab or stainless steel ride which Ive described in pieces like The death penalty in Alabama: Whats it really like?, Alabamas last execution may have burned a man alive, and When will the United States stop tinkering with the machinery of death? Heck, just last month I wrote a column demanding to know, Is Alabama hiding evidence it tortured its citizens? Guided by an op-ed entitled, The drugs we use for executions can cause immense pain and suffering by David Waisel, an associate professor of anesthesia at Harvard Medical School, I pointed specifically to the lethal injections of Christopher Brooks on January 21, 2016, and that of Ronald Bert Smith on December 8, 2016, as being based on publicly available information botched executions.

But Alabama just executed Tommy Arthur on May 25, right around the witching hour and before the expiration of his death warrant and everything went just dandy, swimmingly and according to protocol or so Alabamas Department of Corrections, John Steele Gordon and perhaps, even you, dear reader might say?

Perhaps. But, maybe the excruciating, cruel and unusual pain Arthur felt and the resultant torment on his body as the lethal drugs saturated his system was sanitized from public view by way of a chemical straightjacket?

Or, maybe, as I wrote after Christopher Brooks troubled execution which at the time was also rosily reported as having gone smoothly perhaps Alabama just got lucky this time? Hard to say, isnt it? As executions around the country demonstrate, killing another human being, even when done by the state, is hardly an exact science.

State-sponsored killing was horrific under the Romans, it was horrific under Hitler, and its horrific now, on any level, in modern times.

Still, the nation and Alabamas rattlesnake rodeo operation continues. In fact, its in high gear with the countrys and Alabamas next execution (and possibly torturous event) just around the corner the execution of Robert Melson scheduled for June 8.

(About the Author: Stephen Cooper is a former D.C. public defender who worked as an assistant federal public defender in Alabama between 2012 and 2015. He has contributed to numerous magazines and newspapers in the United States and overseas. He writes full-time and lives in Woodland Hills, California. Follow him on Twitter @SteveCooperEsq.) Prepped for CityWatch by Linda Abrams.

-cw

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A Life Without Parole Sentence not the Death Penalty for Hitler – City Watch

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June 9, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

EDITORIAL: Trump is not Hitler – The Northwest Florida Daily News

Donald Trump is a lot of things, but hes not Adolf Hitler.

While perusing social media for news tips on a daily basis, we see a lot of nonsensical things. Many of them are political in nature. Most recently, photos of Adolf Hitler beside President Trump have caught our attention.

Fascism has come to America! one meme proclaims.

Heil Trump! blasts another one, referencing the Nazi salute Heil Hitler!

Lets get one thing straight. Trump is our legitimately elected president. He is a family man and a successful global business leader. He isnt a homicidal maniac. To make such ludicrous comparisons is not only an insult to our nations highest office, but to the millions who died under Hitlers tyrannical reign.

We have seen people on social media many of whom we highly respect be caught up in this sensationalism to try and categorize Donald Trump as someone who wants to take over our nation and lead us into fascism.

They spend hours and hours each day sharing rumors about how Trump is going to lock everyone up and throw away the key if we dont step in line and follow his orders.

Whats happening to these good folks? What is making them believe such crazy notions? We honestly dont know, but it scares us.

And dont get us wrong, we dont support all of President Trumps policies. We think he is brash and often says things before thinking about them. And his Twitter account must go. But he is the president, and that office deserves respect from the American people, whether you agree with Trump or not.

During the presidents joint address to Congress earlier this year, many Democrats refused to stand or clap for anything he said. Even when he talked about making America great and strong again, they sat on their hands, refusing to acknowledge that he was even talking.

Cry babies.

How can anyone be against wanting to make our country great again, we ask? And those who say we are already great are correct. We ARE a great nation, but we have many areas on which to improve. We believe our military needs bolstering. We believe our infrastructure needs updates. We believe that America must come first. When we have millions who are homeless, elderly who cannot afford medications and children starving in the streets, how can we justify spending billions overseas?

These are some of Trumps ideas that we can get behind without even batting an eye.

We remain baffled at how so many Americans have such a hatred for Donald Trump and his ideas to make America great again.

Give the man a chance to succeed before tearing him down.

And stop comparing him to Hitler.

This guest editorial is from The Commercial in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, a Daily News sister paper with GateHouse Media.

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EDITORIAL: Trump is not Hitler – The Northwest Florida Daily News

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June 9, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

‘Hitler bell’ in German village sparks controversy – Deutsche Welle

For decades, the bells at Herxheim am Berg’s oldest church have been ringing in Christmas, Easter and confirmation services. The recent revelation that one of those chimes comes from a Nazi-era relic is making some in the area, situated in the western state of Rhineland-Palatinate, very uncomfortable.

The bronze bell in question, which is over 80 years old, is inscribed with a swastika and the phrase: “Everything for the Fatherland – Adolf Hitler.”

The town website details the history of St. Jacob’s Church, from it’s founding in 1014 to the celebration of its 1,000th anniversary in 2014.

One timeline entry notes that in August 1934, the village school teacher set fire to the church and that by December of the same year, three new bells were placed in the tower.

The “Hitler bell” was one of them, but the website doesn’t mention the swastika or the Nazi inscription. Considering that the bell is ensconced behind thick stone in the belfry, it’s likely that visitors to the town are completely unaware of its presence.

Backlash over continued use

A former organist at the church, Sigrid Peters, only recently learned of the bell’s inscription and is calling for it to be switched off immediately.

The ‘Hitler bell’ is ensconced behind thick stone in the tower at St. Jacob’s Church

“It can’t happen that a baby is baptized and a bell with the words ‘everything for the Fatherland’ is chiming,” she told news agency DPA.

She was also disturbed by the fact that numerous couples around the state of Rhineland-Palatinate come to the picturesque church to get married every year. “They don’t know at all” about the bell, Peters said.

Bell ‘wasn’t a problem before’

The Mayor of Herxheim am Berg, Ronald Becker, told DW that the existence of the bell is common knowledge around the village.

According to Becker, “it was already widely known” among local residents that a bell bearing the name “Adolf Hitler” existed within the stone steeple of the town’s ancient church.

Becker says he doesn’t see a problem with the bell and has the ‘backing of the town’

Becker, who has been mayor for three years, was concise when asked whether or not the bell was problematic.

“There wasn’t a problem before and there won’t be a problem with it in the future, either,” he said.

Becker noted that bell was a “historic relic,” but that it was important to understand and respect the history surrounding it.

The mayoralso dismissed some proposed solutions to classify the bell as a WWII memorial or to install a plaque, informing visitors of the Nazi-inscribed bell’s presence.

He said he doesn’t want Herxheim am Berg to become “a cult site” where people – most likely of the far-wing persuasion – visit the church for the “wrong reasons.”

Since this particular bell doesn’t belong to the church, but rather to the municipality of Herxheim am Berg, politics will ultimately decide the bell’s future. And Becker sees no need to remove it.

“I have the backing of the town,” he explained, adding that Herxheim am Berg’s nearly 800 residents “support me.”

“It is closed in the church tower and it will remain so,” Becker said.

The villa on Berlin’s Wannsee lake was pivotal in planning the Holocaust. 15 members of the Nazi government and the SS Schutzstaffel met here on January 20, 1942 to plan what became known as the “Final Solution,” the deportation and extermination of all Jews in German-occupied territory. In 1992, the villa where the Wannsee Conference was held was turned into a memorial and museum.

The Nazi regime opened the first concentration camp in Dauchau not far from Munich. Just a few weeks after Adolf Hitler came to power it was used by the paramilitary SS “Schutzstaffel” to imprison, torture and kill political opponents to the regime. Dachau also served as a prototype and model for the other Nazi camps that followed.

Nuremberg hosted the biggest Nazi party propaganda rallies from 1933 until the start of the Second World War. The annual Nazi party congress as well as rallies with as many as 200,000 participants took place on the 11-km (4.25 square miles) area. Today, the unfinished Congress Hall building serves as a documentation center and a museum.

The Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Lower Saxony was initially established as a prisoner of war camp before becoming a concentration camp. Prisoners too sick to work were brought here from other concentration camps, so many also died of disease. One of the 50,000 killed here was Anne Frank, a Jewish girl who gained international fame posthumously after her diary was published.

The Bendlerblock building in Berlin was the headquarters of a military resistance group. On July 20, 1944, a group of Wehrmacht officers around Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg carried out an assassination attempt on Adolf Hitler that failed. The leaders of the conspiracy were summarily shot the same night in the courtyard of the Bendlerblock, which is today the German Resistance Memorial Center.

From 1941 people with physical and mental disabilities were killed at a psychiatric hospital in Hadamar in Hesse. Declared “undesirables” by the Nazis, some 15,000 people were murdered here by asphyxiation with carbon monoxide or by being injected with lethal drug overdoses. Across Germany some 70,000 were killed as part of the Nazi-euthanasia program. Today Hadamar is a memorial to those victims.

Located next to the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin’s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe was inaugurated sixty years after the end of World War II on May 10, 2005, and opened to the public two days later. Architect Peter Eisenman created a field with 2,711 concrete slabs. An attached underground “Place of Information” holds the names of all known Jewish Holocaust victims.

Not too far from the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, another concrete memorial honors the thousands of homosexuals persecuted by the Nazis between 1933 and 1945. The four-meter high monument, which has a window showing alternately a film of two men or two women kissing, was inaugurated in Berlin’s Tiergarten on May 27, 2008.

Opposite the Reichstag parliament building in Berlin, a park inaugurated in 2012 serves as a memorial to the 500,000 Sinti and Roma people killed by the Nazi regime. Around a memorial pool the poem “Auschwitz” by Roma poet Santino Spinelli is written in English, Germany and Romani: “gaunt face, dead eyes, cold lips, quiet, a broken heart, out of breath, without words, no tears.”

In the 1990s, the artist Gunther Demnig began a project to confront Germany’s Nazi past. Brass-covered concrete cubes were placed in front of the former houses of Nazi victims, providing details on the person as well as the dates of deportation and death, if known. More than 45,000 “Stolpersteine” have been laid in 18 countries in Europe – it’s the world’s largest decentralized Holocaust memorial.

Right next to the “Fhrerbau” where Adolf Hitler had his office, the headquarters of the Nazi Party in Germany were based in the “Brown House” in Munich. A white cube now occupies its former location. A new “Documentation Center for the History of National Socialism” opened on April 30, 2015, 70 years after the liberation of the Nazi regime, uncovering further dark chapters of history.

Author: Max Zander, Ille Simon

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‘Hitler bell’ in German village sparks controversy – Deutsche Welle

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Don’t Worry, Norm Macdonald Fans: ‘Hitler’s Dog’ Was Submitted For Emmy Consideration – Decider


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Don't Worry, Norm Macdonald Fans: 'Hitler's Dog' Was Submitted For Emmy Consideration
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Whether or not that happened again over the weekend remains unclear; what we do know, however, is that Macdonald did delete a tweet that was lightly critical of Netflix, which is the home of his most recent standup special Norm Macdonald: Hitler's Dog, …

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"Secret Hitler" board game adds Trump administration booster pack – Boing Boing

Secret Hitler is a social deduction game that seems to be a variation on games like Werewolf and Mafia. The design, by artist Mackenzie Schubert, is beautiful.

The majority of players are liberals. If they can learn to trust each other, they have enough votes to control the table and win the game. But some players are fascists. They will say whatever it takes to get elected, enact their agenda, and blame others for the fallout. The liberals must work together to discover the truth before the fascists install their cold-blooded leader and win the game.

They just introduced new cards “featuring Donald Trump and prominent members of his administration,” also drawn by Schubert.

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Brett Gaylor writes, As part of the Mozilla Privacy Arcade project in this years Global Sprint, Mozilla is inviting activists, artists, designers, educators, gamers, storytellers, and technologists of all backgrounds to invent new privacy-themed adventures for the role playing game Cryptomancer.

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Games for the Many sends us Put on Your Corbyn Face, A web game where you are challenged to match the emotions of a photo Jeremy Corbyn. Possibly the first web game you play with empathy and emotion.

Apple makes it hard to not use iCloud, at least for a few things. Since their cloud storage is baked so deeply into iOS, using iTunes on the desktop to manually move files and backup your device can sometimes feel like an awkward step backwards. To give your iPhone more flexibility to manage large files []

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Adolf Hitler – Military Leader, Dictator – Biography.com

Military Leader, Dictator(18891945)

Adolf Hitler was the leader of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. He initiated fascist policies that led to World War II and the deaths of at least 11 million people, including the mass murder of an estimated 6 million Jews.

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Those who want to live, let them fight, and those who do not want to fight in this world of eternal struggle do not deserve to live.

We can never forget that everything Hitler did in Germany was ‘legal.’ (Martin Luther King Jr.)

It is not truth that matters, but victory.

History shows that all conquerors who have allowed their subject races to carry arms have prepared their own downfall by so doing.

Any alliance whose purpose is not the intention to wage war is senseless and useless.

All propaganda has to be popular and has to accommodate itself to the comprehension of the least intelligent of those whom it seeks to reach.

We will meet propaganda with propaganda, terror with terror, and violence with violence.

By shrewd and constant application of propaganda, heaven can be presented to the people as hell and, vice versa, the wretchedest existence as a paradise.

And what nonsense it is to aspire to a Heaven to which, according to the Church’s own teaching, only those have entry who have made a complete failure of life on earth!

But there’s one thing I can predict to eaters of meat, that the world of the future will be vegetarian!

Strength lies not in defense but in attack.

I don’t see much future for the Americans. In my view, it’s a decayed country.

Germany will either be a world power or will not be at all.

I go the way that Providence dictates with the assurance of a sleepwalker.

If you want to shine like sun first you have to burn like it.

Adolf Hitler

Born in Austria in 1889, Adolf Hitler rose to power in German politics as leader of the National Socialist German Workers Party, also known as the Nazi Party. Hitler was chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945, serving as dictator for the bulk of his time in power. His policies precipitated World War II and led to the genocide known as the Holocaust, which resulted in the deathsof some 6 million Jews and another 5 million noncombatants.With defeat on the horizon, Hitler committed suicide with wife Eva Braun on April 30, 1945, in his Berlin bunker.

Dictator Adolf Hitler was born in Braunau am Inn, Austria, on April 20, 1889, and was the fourth of six children born to Alois Hitler and Klara Polzl. As a child, Hitler clashed frequently with his emotionally harsh father, who also didn’t approve of his son’s later interest in fine art as a career. Following the death of his younger brother, Edmund, in 1900, Hitler became detached and introverted. He also showed an early interest in German nationalism, rejecting the authority of Austria-Hungary. This nationalism would become the motivating force of Hitler’s life.

Alois died suddenly in 1903. Two years later, Adolf’s mother allowed her son to drop out of school. After her death in December 1907, he moved to Vienna and worked as a casual laborer and watercolor painter. Hitler applied to the Academy of Fine Arts twice and was rejected both times. Lacking money outside of an orphan’s pension and funds from selling postcards, he stayed in homeless shelters. Hitler later pointed to these years as the time when he first cultivated his anti-Semitism, though there is some debate about this account.

In 1913, Hitler relocated to Munich. At the outbreak of World War I, he applied to serve in the German army. He was accepted in August 1914, though he was still an Austrian citizen. Although Hitler spent much of his time away from the front lines (with some reports that his recollections of his time on the field were generally exaggerated), he was present at a number of significant battles and was wounded at the Somme. He was decorated for bravery, receiving the Iron Cross First Class and the Black Wound Badge.

Hitler became embittered over the collapse of the war effort. The experience reinforced his passionate German patriotism, and he was shocked by Germany’s surrender in 1918. Like other German nationalists, he purportedly believed that the German army had been betrayed by civilian leaders and Marxists. He found the Treaty of Versailles degrading, particularly the demilitarization of the Rhineland and the stipulation that Germany accept responsibility for starting the war.

After World War I, Hitler returned to Munich and continued to work for the military as an intelligence officer. While monitoring the activities of the German Workers Party (DAP), Hitler adopted many of the anti-Semitic, nationalist and anti-Marxist ideas of partyfounder Anton Drexler. Hitler joined the DAP in September 1919.

To increase its appeal, the DAP changed its name to the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), often abbreviated to Nazi. Hitler personally designed the party banner, appropriating theswastika symbol and placing it in a white circle on a red background. He soon gained notoriety for his vitriolic speeches against the Treaty of Versailles, rival politicians, Marxists and Jews. In 1921, Hitler replaced Drexler as NSDAP chairman.

Hitler’s fervid beer-hall speeches began attracting regular audiences. Early followers included army captain Ernst Rohm, the head of the Nazi paramilitary organization the Sturmabteilung (SA), which protected meetings and frequently attacked political opponents.

On November 8, 1923, Hitler and the SA stormed a public meetingfeaturing Bavarian prime minister Gustav Kahr at a large beer hall in Munich. Hitler announced that the national revolution had begun and declared the formation of a new government. After a short struggle that led to several deaths, the coup known as the “Beer Hall Putsch” failed.

Hitler was arrested and tried for high treason. He served nine monthsin prison, during which time he dictated most of the first volume of Mein Kampf (“My Struggle”) to his deputy, Rudolf Hess. A work of propaganda and falsehoods, the book laid out Hitler’s plans for transforming German society into one based on race.

With millions unemployed, the Great Depression in Germany provided a political opportunity for Hitler. Germans were ambivalent to the parliamentary republic and increasingly open to extremist options. In 1932, Hitler ran against 84-year-old Paul von Hindenburg for the presidency. Hitler came in second in both rounds of the election, garnering more than 36 percent of the vote in the final count. The resultsestablished Hitler as a strong force in German politics. Hindenburg reluctantly agreed to appoint Hitler as chancellor in order to promote political balance.

Hitler used his position as chancellor to form a de facto legal dictatorship. The Reichstag Fire Decree, announced after a suspicious fire at parliament, suspended basic rights and allowed detention without trial. Hitler also engineered the passage of the Enabling Act, which gave his cabinet full legislative powers for a period of four years and allowed for deviations from the constitution.

Having achieved full control over the legislative and executive branches of government, Hitler and his political allies embarked on a systematic suppression of the remaining political opposition. By the end of June, the other parties had been intimidated into disbanding. On July 14, 1933, Hitler’s Nazi Party was declared the only legal political party in Germany. In October of that year, Hitler ordered Germany’s withdrawal from the League of Nations.

Military opposition was also punished. The demands of the SA for more political and military power led to the Night of the Long Knives, which took place from June 30 to July 2, 1934. Rohm, a perceived rival, and other SA leaders, along with a number of Hitler’s political enemies, were rounded up and shot.

The day before Hindenburg’s death in August 1934, the cabinet had enacted a law abolishing the office of president, combining its powers with those of the chancellor. Hitler thus became head of state as well as head of government and was formally named leader and chancellor. As head of state, Hitler became supreme commander of the armed forces.

From 1933 until the start of the war in 1939, Hitler and his Nazi regime instituted hundreds of laws and regulations to restrict and exclude Jews in society. The Anti-Semitic laws were issued throughout all levels of government, making good on the Nazis pledge to persecute Jews if the party came to power. On April 1, 1933, Hitler implemented a national boycott of Jewish businesses, followed by the introduction of the Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service” of April 7, 1933, which was one of the first laws to persecute Jews by excluding them from state service. This was a Nazi implementation of the Aryan Paragraph, a clause calling for the exclusion of Jews and non-Aryans from organizations, employment and eventually all aspects of public life.

In April 1933, additional legislation furthered the persecution of Jews including laws restricting the number of Jewish students at schools and universities,limiting Jews working in medical and legal professions, and revoking the licenses of Jewish tax consultants. In April 1933, the Main Office for Press and Propaganda of the German Student Union called for “Action Against the Un-German Spirit, prompting students to burn more than 25,000 Un-German books, ushering in an era of censorship and Nazi propaganda.In 1934, Jewish actors were forbidden from performing in film or in the theater.

On September 15, 1935, the Reichstag introduced the Nuremberg Laws which defined a “Jew” as anyone with three or four grandparents who were Jewish, regardless of whether the person considered themselves Jewish or observed the religion. The Nuremberg Laws also set forth the “Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honour,” which banned marriage between non-Jewish and Jewish Germans; and the Reich Citizenship Law, which deprived “non-Aryans” of the benefits of German citizenship.

Hitler’s eugenic policies also targeted children with physical and developmental disabilities, and later authorized a euthanasia program for disabled adults. His regime also persecuted homosexuals, arresting an estimated 100,000 men from 1933 to 1945, some of whom were imprisoned or sent to concentration camps. At the camps, gay prisonerswere forced to wear pink triangles to identify their homosexuality, which Nazis considered a crime and a disease.

Hitler also promoted anti-smoking campaigns across the country. These campaigns stemmed from Hitler’s self-imposed dietary restrictions, which included abstinence from alcohol and meat. Fueled by fanaticism over what he believed was a superior Aryan race, he encouraged Germans to keep their bodies pure of any intoxicating or unclean substance.

In 1936, Hitler and his regime muted their Anti-Semitic rhetoric and actions when Germanyhosted the Winter and Summer Olympic Games, in an effort toavoid criticism on the world stage and a negative impact on tourism. However, after the Olympics, the Nazi persecution of Jews intensified with the continued “Aryanization” of Jewish businesses, which involved the firing of Jewish workers and takeover by non-Jewish owners.

In 1938, Hitler, along with several other European leaders, signed the Munich Agreement. The treaty ceded the Sudetenland districts to Germany, reversing part of the Versailles Treaty. As a result of the summit, Hitler was named Time magazine’s Man of the Year for 1938. This diplomatic win only whetted his appetite for a renewed German dominance.

The Nazis continued to segregate Jews from German society, banning them from public school, universities, theaters, sports events and “Aryan” zones. Jewish doctors were also barred from treating “Aryan” patients. Jews were required to carry identity cards and, in the fall of 1938, Jewish people had to have their passports stamped with a “J.”

On November 9 and 10, 1938, a wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms swept Germany, Austria and parts of the Sudetenland. Nazis destroyed synagogues, vandalized Jewish homes, schools and businesses, and close to 100 Jews were murdered. Called Kristallnacht, the “Night of Crystal” or the “Night of Broken Glass,” referring to the broken glass left in the wake of the destruction, the pogroms escalated the Nazi persecution of Jews to another level of brutality and violence. Almost 30,000 Jewish men were arrested and sent to concentration camps, signaling more horrors to come.

On September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland. In response, Britain and France declared war on Germany two days later. Between 1939 and 1945, Nazis and their collaborators were responsible for the deaths of at least 1 million noncombatants, including about six million Jews, representing two-thirds of the Jewish population in Europe. As part of Hitler’s “Final Solution,” the genocide enacted by the regime would come to be known as the Holocaust.

Deaths and mass executions took place in concentration and extermination camps such as Auschwitz-Birkenau, Bergen-Belsen, Dachau and Treblinka, among many others. Other persecuted groups included Poles, communists, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses and trade unionists.Prisoners were used as forced laborers for SS construction projects, and in some instances they were forced to build and expand concentration camps. They were subject to starvation, torture and horrific brutalities, including having to endure gruesome and painful medical experiments. Hitler probably never visited the concentration camps and did not speak publicly about the mass killings, but Germans documented the atrocities committed at the campson paper and infilms.

Hitler escalated his military activities in 1940, invading Norway, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Belgium. By July, Hitler ordered bombing raids on the United Kingdom, with the goal of invasion. Germanys formal alliance with Japan and Italy, known collectively as the Axis powers, was agreed upon toward the end of September to deter the United States from supporting and protecting the British.

On June 22, 1941, Hitler violated the 1939 non-aggression pact with Joseph Stalin, sending a massive army of German troops into the Soviet Union. The invading force seized a huge area of Russia before Hitler temporarily halted the invasion and diverted forces to encircle Leningrad and Kiev. The pause allowed the Red Army to regroup and conduct a counteroffensive attack, and the German advance was stopped outside Moscow in December 1941.

On December 7, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Honoring the alliance with Japan, Hitler was now at war against the Allied powers, a coalition that included Britain, the world’s largest empire, led by Prime Minister Winston Churchill; the United States, the world’s greatest financial power, led by President Franklin D. Roosevelt; and the Soviet Union,which had the world’s largest army, commanded by Stalin.

Though initially hoping that he could play the Allies off of one another, Hitler’s military judgment became increasingly erratic, and the Axis powers could not sustain his aggressive and expansive war. In late 1942, German forces failed to seize the Suez Canal, leading to the loss of German control over North Africa. The German army also suffered defeats at the Battle of Stalingrad (1942-43), seen as a turning point in the war, and the Battle of Kursk (1943). On June 6, 1944, on what would come to be known as D-Day, the Western Allied armies landed in northern France. As a result of these significant setbacks, many German officers concluded that defeat was inevitable and that Hitler’s continued rule would result in the destruction of the country. Organized efforts to assassinate the dictator gained traction, and opponents came close in 1944 withthe notorious July Plot,though it ultimately proved unsuccessful.

By early 1945, Hitler realized that Germany was going to lose the war. The Soviets had driven the German army back into Western Europe and the Allies were advancing into Germany from the west. At midnight, going into April 29, 1945, Hitler married his girlfriend, Eva Braun, in a small civil ceremony in his Berlin bunker. Around this time, Hitler was informed of the executionof Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. Afraid of falling into the hands of enemy troops, Hitler and Braun committed suicide the day after their wedding, on April 30, 1945. Their bodies were carried to abombed-out areaoutside ofthe Reich Chancellery, where they were burned.

Berlin fell on May 2, 1945. Five days later, on May 7, 1945, Germany surrendered unconditionally to the Allies.

Hitler’s political programs had brought about a world war, leaving behind a devastated and impoverished Eastern and Central Europe, including Germany. His policies inflicted human suffering on an unprecedented scale and resulted in the death of tens of millions of people, including more than 20 million in the Soviet Union and six million Jews in Europe. Hitler’s defeat marked the end of Germany’s dominance in European history and the defeat of fascism. A new ideological global conflict, the Cold War, emerged in the aftermath of the devastating violence of World War II.

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Scindia likens Shivraj Singh govt to ‘Hitler’s rule’ – Daily News & Analysis

Stating that the death of five farmers in police firing in Mandsaur was a blot on the Shivraj Singh Chouhan government, Congress leader Jyotiraditya Scindia today equated the BJP regime in Madhya Pradesh to the “Hitler’s rule”. “The police firing on farmers agitating for getting right price for their produce and waiver of loans, which resulted in the death of the five of them is a blot on the head of Shivraj Singh’s government. It appears that Hitler’s rule is prevailing in the state. Chouhan has no right to remain in power,” Scindia told reporters at the Indore Press Club. “It is a matter of shame that instead of meeting grieving farmers’ families, the chief minister staged a nautanki (drama) in Bhopal in the name fast. By announcing hefty compensation for them, the Chouhan government tried to trivialise invaluable human lives through money,” he alleged. Scindia, who also met injured farmers at the government M Y Hospital here said, “I am totally shattered with their ordeal. They alleged that after the firing, police dragged them on the roads and also took away money and mobile phones from their pockets.” The former union minister claimed that police have termed nearly 700 agitating farmers as anti-social elements and have registered cases against them while it has not yet filed a case against those policemen, who ordered to open fire at the protesters. He alleged that the state government was just hushing up the matter in the name of probe. “The policemen in Khaki dress should not consider themselves as god,” he remarked. The senior Congress leader also denied allegations that his party had added fuel to the agitation. “Congress has no role in the farmers’ agitation. We always follow the path of non-violence shown by Mahatma Gandhi,” he said. Targeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi, he said that nearly 65 crore people are dependent on agriculture in the country, but the government has hiked the rates of power and diesel, which has increased the cost of cultivation, forcing the farmers to commit suicide. Scindia also announced to stage 72-hour ‘satyagraha’ in support of the farmers at Bhopal from June 14. (This article has not been edited by DNA’s editorial team and is auto-generated from an agency feed.)

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Why Hitler’s Most Powerful Battleship Ever Refused to Sink – The National Interest Online (blog)

On May 24, southwest of Iceland,BismarckandPrinzEugentangled with the battleship HMSPrince of Walesand the agingbattlecruiserHMSHood. Trading armored protection for speed,Hoods designers had left it dangerously exposed to enemy fire. Hits from the German task force ignited an ammunition fire that raged out of control onHood. Within ten minutes a titanic explosion shook the Denmark Strait as the fire reached the aft magazine.Hoodbroke in half and sank, taking 1,418 men with it. Bismarck, despite its stunning victory, had not emerged from the battle unscathed. Hit three times byPrince of Wales, it lost some of its fuel supply to seawater contamination, sustained damage to its propulsion, and suffered a nine-degree list to port. Its captain, desperate to get away from the site of the battle and a slowly coalescing Royal Navy force eager for revenge, refused to slow down to allow damage control to effect repairs. On May 23, 1941, the Battleship Bismarckwas on a roll. The largest and most powerful ship in the German Navy, the mightyBismarckhad broken out into the Atlantic Ocean, sunk a Royal Navybattlecruiser, badly damaged a battleship and was poised to add its guns to a naval blockade that threatened to strangle Great Britain. Ninety-six hours later, heavily damaged, the battleship was on the bottom of the North Atlantic.Bismarcks swift reversal of fortune was the result of a heroic effort by the Royal Navy to hunt down and destroy the battlewagon, and avenge the more than 1,400 Royal Navy personnel killed in the Denmark Strait. The German battleshipBismarckwas the the pride of theKriegsmarine, Nazi Germanys naval service. Construction began in 1936, and the ship was commissioned in April 1940. It and its sister ship,Tirpitz, were 821 feet long and displaced fifty thousand tons, making them by far the largest warships ever built by Germany. Despite its size, twelve Wagner steam boilers made it capable of a fast thirty knots. Like any battlewagon,Bismarcks firepower lay in its main gun batteries.Bismarckhad eight fifteen-inch guns in four large turrets, each capable of hurling a 1,800-pound armor-piercing, capped projectile 21.75 miles. This gave it the ability to penetrate 16.5 inches of armor at eleven miles. The relatively small size of Germanys World War II navy made it incapable of taking on the British and French navies head-on. Instead, theKriegsmarinewas given a much more limited role, of shepherding invasion fleets and cutting off the flow of commerce to Great Britain. On May 18, 1941,Bismarckand its escort, the heavy cruiserPrinzEugen, embarked on OperationRheinbung, a campaign to sink Allied shipping in the North Atlantic and knock Britain out of the war. On May 24, southwest of Iceland,BismarckandPrinzEugentangled with the battleship HMSPrince of Walesand the agingbattlecruiserHMSHood. Trading armored protection for speed,Hoods designers had left it dangerously exposed to enemy fire. Hits from the German task force ignited an ammunition fire that raged out of control onHood. Within ten minutes a titanic explosion shook the Denmark Strait as the fire reached the aft magazine.Hoodbroke in half and sank, taking 1,418 men with it. Bismarck, despite its stunning victory, had not emerged from the battle unscathed. Hit three times byPrince of Wales, it lost some of its fuel supply to seawater contamination, sustained damage to its propulsion, and suffered a nine-degree list to port. Its captain, desperate to get away from the site of the battle and a slowly coalescing Royal Navy force eager for revenge, refused to slow down to allow damage control to effect repairs. Bismarcks captain was correct. The Royal Navy was assembling a large force to sink it, and indeed had ordered every ship in the area to join in the search to find it. The much larger Royal Navy was able to assemble a force of six battleships and battlecruisers, two aircraft carriers, thirteen cruisers, and twenty-one destroyers to huntBismarck. Unfortunately, many of the larger ships were of World War I vintage, and could not catch up with the wounded, but still fastBismarck. AlthoughBismarckoutclassed nearly all the heavy capital ships that chased it, naval aviation was another matter. The German task forces location was betrayed by oil leaking from the battleship and the aircraft carrier HMSVictoriouswas sent to slow it down. An air strike by six Fairey Fulmar carrier-based fighters and nine Fairey Swordfish carrier torpedo bombers managed a single hit onBismarck. The torpedo explosion did minor damage, but the evasive maneuvers conducted byBismarcks captain to evade the torpedo attack caused even more damage, slowing the mighty battleship to sixteen knots. Although it was eventually able to get back up to twenty-eight knots, the temporary loss of its speed advantage allowed a Royal Navy task force, Force H, to catch up to it. Established to take the place of the surrendered French Navy in the western Mediterranean, Force H was based at Gibraltar. It consisted of the aircraft carrier HMSArk Royal, the battlecruiserRenownand a light cruiser.

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The Scientist and the Fascist – The Atlantic

In September 1930, Germany held its first national elections since the Great Crash of 1929, and the National Socialists won a stunning tally: 6,400,000 votes10 times their total just two years beforeand 107 seats. They were now the second largest party in the Reichstag. The word Nazi no longer evoked images of the madhouse, as one commentator wrote. Suddenly the party was almost respectable. Even so, it still seemed to many as if Hitlers support was tenuous. For Albert Einstein, Hitlers sudden rush to prominence confirmed his historic distrust of the German body politic. But at this time, he did not see Hitler or National Socialism as a lasting danger. Asked in December of 1930 what to make of the new force in German politics, he answered that I do not enjoy Herr Hitlers acquaintance. He is living on the empty stomach of Germany. As soon as economic conditions improve, he will no longer be important. Initially, he felt that no action at all would be needed to bring Hitler low. He reaffirmed for a Jewish organization that the momentarily desperate economic situation and the chronic childish disease of the Republic were to blame for the Nazi success. Solidarity of the Jews, I believe, is always called for, he wrote, but any special reaction to the election results would be quite inappropriate. Einstein should have been rightthe evidence for the fragility of Hitlers support over the next two years makes for frustrating, bitter, what-if history. But even if he had persuasive reasons for believing that Hitler would not last, the election results reaffirmed the urgency of his core political stand. Even if he underestimated Hitler (as so many Germans did then), he still recognized the need to act to counter the more general pathology of which Hitlers rise was a symptom. The threat of German rearmament, along with a resurgence of militarism across the European continent spurred Einstein to act. Germany had been almost completely disarmed by the Versailles Treaty after World War I. Its army could total no more than 100,000 men; its forces were denied most heavy weapons; it could not build an air force; its warships had to meet strict tonnage and armament restrictions. Evasion of these terms had been the rule almost from the start. This rearming barely a decade after a conflict that ought to have inoculated Germany against the contagion of battle-lust forever, was intolerable to Einstein. In response, he advocated mass rejection of compulsory military service by young men throughout Europea campaign that had become a major pillar of pacifist politics after the war. Every thoughtful, well-meaning, and conscientious human being, he wrote in January 1928 in a letter to Londons No More War movement, should assume, in time of peace, the solemn and unconditional obligation not to participate in any war for any reason. He grew more insistent as time passed. In the spring of 1929, he wrote that the people themselves must take the initiative to see to it that they will never again be led to slaughter. To expect protection from their governments is folly. During the next several months 1930, driven by the rise of militant nationalism across Europe, Einsteins level of urgency and passion grew. War had become an absolute anathema to him: I would rather be torn limb from limb, he wrote, than take part in such an ugly business. By late 1932, Einstein abandoned the last of his hopesor illusionsthat a more or less democratic German society could survive economic collapse and the Nazis deliberate sabotage of civic life. The Nazi setbacks in the November elections produced a brief moment of hope. Several quite acute political observers, including Einsteins friend Kessler, thought that the Nazi losses marked the beginning of the end. But the moment evaporated, destroyed by Chancellor Fritz von Papens vacuous incompetence and Hitlers relentless pursuit of power. Einstein had spoken at home and abroad against the collective surrender to unreason he saw around him. He had written, campaigned, served on committees, encouraged others, raised money when he could. But by late 1932, the end had clearly come. From very early in his life, Einstein gave hints of a deep-seated streak of fatalism. It never prevented him from acting, from behaving as if what he sought to do could influence events. But the countervailing strain was always there, the perception that the apparently unique spark of any one human life must ultimately vanish into the vastness of the cosmos. The previous year, 1931, bound for California, he experienced a storm at sea. He wrote in his travel diary that the sea has a look of indescribable grandeur, especially when the sun falls on it. One feels as if one is dissolved and merged into nature. Even more than usual, one feels the insignificance of the individual and it makes one happy. Insignificantand hence autonomous, free to do what one had to do. In the end, Einstein simply left the stage. On December 12, Albert and Elsa Einstein set out from Berlin for the United States. A photograph taken at the entrance of the train station shows an ordinary travelers tableau. Elsa looks a little worried, harried; she could be thinking about the luggage, or perhaps, more seriously, about her daughter Ilse, who was ailing. Einsteins face is unrevealing, almost grim. The overall impression is of impatience, a desire to be done with photography and catch their train. There is no way to read the image, except with hindsight, as the end of an era. Before they reached the train station, Einstein and Elsa had to close up their house at Caputh. They may have paused at the door to Einsteins study or on the porch, looking down the sweep of lawn to the lake, visible then through the leafless trees. There might have been a glance round the back of the house, a survey of windows shut and doors latched, and then in and out again, carrying their bags. One of them locked the doorprobably Elsa, the master of all practical matters in the Einstein household. Finally, when nothing remained to be done, they walked away from the house. Einstein spoke. Take a good look, he told Elsa. You will never see it again. * * * In exile, Einstein rethought his core political beliefs and the moral reasoning that underpinned them. Being Einstein, he was faster to the conclusions that shift forced on him than almost all of his contemporaries. On January 30, 1933, as Hitler took the oath as Chancellor of a republic about to become a Reich, Albert Einstein was safely out of reach in Pasadena. For the moment, there was little overt danger. Well treated by his American friends, he could be positively playful, even trying his hand at bicycling. The famous photograph of Einstein atop his two-wheeler was taken that February. He leans over, his front wheel a little askew. He seems a trifle unsteady but he grins hugely; life is pleasant in southern California. Even after Hitler consolidated his hold, Einstein restrained himself for a while. Early in February, he even wrote to the Prussian Academy to discuss salary matters, fully as if he intended to resume work in Berlin later that year. But any illusions he may have had shattered almost immediately thereafter. On February 27, the Reichstag in Berlin burned to the ground. The crackdown on the left began immediately, with the SA and the SS competing to arrest and brutalize any perceived threat to the Reich. By coincidence, the same day that Reichstag burned, Einstein wrote to his quondam mistress, Margarete Lenbach. He told her that I dare not enter Germany because of Hitler. The day before he left Pasadena, bound eventually for Belgium, he launched his first public attack against Germanys new regime. As long as I have any choice in the matter, I shall live only in a country where civil liberty, tolerance, and equality of all citizens before the law prevail. The completion of the syllogism was simpleThese conditions do not exist in Germany at the present timeand would not, Einstein implied, as long as the current regime remained in power. Hitlers government reacted swiftly and bitterly to Einsteins charges. The Vlkicsher Beobachter published a series of attacks on him, and more mainstream papers followed suit. One headline read Good News of EinsteinHe Is Not Coming Back! over an article condemning this puffed-up bit of vanity [who] dared to sit in judgment on Germany without knowing what is going on herematters that forever must remain incomprehensible to a man who was never a German in our eyes and who declares himself to be a Jew and nothing but a Jew. A pamphlet that surfaced some months later reprinted Einsteins photograph in a collection of enemies of Nazi Germany, over the caption, Not Yet Hanged. Such harassment did not touch Einstein very deeply. The sharpest blows came not from the Nazis themselves but from those who had once formed his chief reason for being in Berlin, his fellow members of the Prussian Academy. While still at sea on the way to Belgium, Einstein drafted his letter of resignation from the Academy, and on arrival he gave it to the German legation, along with his renunciation of German citizenship. Subsequent events revealed the depth to which the rot had spread. Hitlers government ordered the Prussian Academy to begin the process of expelling Einstein from its midst. His resignation caught the government by surprise. Enraged that he had quit before he could be fired, the minister in charge demanded a proclamation from the Academy condemning its erstwhile hero. The draft statement declared that we have no reason to regret Einsteins resignation. The Academy is aghast at his foreign agitation. Einsteins old friend Max von Laue was horrified at the idea that the Academy might issue such a document, and he spoke against the proposal at an extraordinary meeting on April 6. Only one of the 14 members present supported him. Even Haber, the converted Jew and Einsteins close friend, voted with the majority. Habers action was bad. Max Planck disgraced himself. Einstein had written to Planck to refute privately the charge that he had spread rumors against Germany, telling him that he spoke now only to combat what was clearly a Nazi war of extermination against my Jewish brethren. Planck answered Einstein in a letter that identified both Jewishness and National Socialism as ideologies that cannot co-exist. He deplored both and emphasized his loyalty to Germany, no matter who was in charge. It is greatly to be regretted, he said at the Academy meeting, that Mr. Einstein through his political behavior himself rendered his continued membership in the Academy impossible. Einsteins politics were to blame, not those of a German government that had chosen to destroy him. Throughout the summer of 1933, Einstein sounded his warning about Hitler wherever he could. In September he visited Winston Churchill, then firmly in political exilebut while Churchill did not require much persuasion to view Hitler as a menace, he had no influence to bring to bear. Later that month, Einsteins frustration became more obvious. I cannot understand the passive response of the whole civilized world to this modern barbarism, he told one interviewer. Does the world not see that Hitler is aiming at war? That contained hints of the tectonic shift that had overtaken Einsteins core political passion. By the time he spoke, he was no longer a pacifist. In September he had announced his change of heart in a letter to a Belgian war resister published in The New York Times. Until quite recently we in Europe could assume that personal war resistance constituted an effective attack on militarism, he began. But circumstances alter cases, and now, in the heart of Europe lies a power, Germany, that is obviously pushing towards war with all available means. For Einstein, even deeply held principles had to bend to the pressure of an overwhelming threat. I should not, in the present circumstances, refuse military service, he concluded. Rather I should enter such service cheerfully in the belief that I would thereby be helping to save European civilization. The culmination of Einsteins commitment to defeat Hitler by whatever means necessary came in 1939 and 1940, when he sent his two letters to President Roosevelt about the possibility of the United States building an atomic bomb. In late 1938, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman, two scientists still working in Berlin, were wrestling with some novel results from a series of experiments in which they bombarded uranium with a newly discovered subatomic particle, the neutron. Lise Meitner, Hahns former collaborator, and her nephew Otto Frisch, both exiles from Hitlers Germany, met at Christmas in the Swedish village of Kunglv and together they identified the process the Berliners had observed: neutrons striking uranium atoms had sparked nuclear fission, the violent destruction of atomic nuclei in which both energy and more neutrons are released. The result was published several months before wartime secrecy would have rung the curtain down. Every competent physicist who heard the news realized that the fact that each fission event could release more neutrons, raised the possibility of a chain reaction, the new neutrons splitting more atoms in an escalating cascade. The next step was obvious even to the newspapers. As early as the spring of 1939, The Washington Post reported that nuclear fission could lead to weapons powerful enough to destroy everything over two square miles of ground. In the first months after the fission experiments became public knowledge, however, Einstein had not paid much attention. During the summer of 1939, however, Szilard came to visit him at his summer house on Long Island, accompanied by his fellow physicists Eugene Wigner and Edward Teller. The three migr Hungarians laid out the principle of the chain reaction, and then told Einstein of the interest the Germans were already showing in the use of uranium as a weapon. That was enough to persuade him to sign his first letter, in which he urged the president to consider the possibility of creating atomic weapons. Roosevelt replied in mid-October, saying that he had set up a committee to investigate Einsteins suggestions. Nothing much happenedno surprise, given the initial committee budget of $6,000 for its first year of operationso Szilard got Einstein to try again. In March, 1940, he sent his second letter to Roosevelt, urging him to give greater impetus to the effort because, Einstein wrote, Since the outbreak of the war, interest in uranium has intensified in Germany. I have now learned that research there is carried out in great secrecy. Despite his attempt at presidential lobbying, and contrary to the often repeated fable that he was somehow the creator of the atom bomb, Einstein had next to nothing to do with the invention of nuclear weapons. The significance of his letters to Roosevelt was not the results they failed to achieve, but what they reveal about Einsteins own political evolution. Until 1932, he had argued as fervently as he could that no civilized man should permit the state to order him to kill. In the end, the use of Americas bombs deeply saddened him. On hearing of the attack on Hiroshima he is reported to have said Oj WegWoe is me. He later said that had I known that the Germans would not succeed in producing an atomic bomb, I would not have lifted a finger. After the war ended, Einstein became one of the founding forces in the scientists anti-nuclear movement. The last public act of his life was to add his name to a manifesto drafted by Bertrand Russell that called for global nuclear disarmament. But he never wavered in the basic argument he had made in the summer of 1933: Hitler was a deadly poison. He had to be neutralized. No greater goals could be contemplated until Hitler and Germany had been utterly defeated. Once he reached that conclusion, he followed it through to its ultimate destination: the bomb itself. This article has been adapted from Thomas Levensons book, Einstein in Berlin.

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June 11, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

A Life Without Parole Sentence not the Death Penalty for Hitler – City Watch

DEATH PENALTY POLITICS-In a blood-thirsty columnclamoring for faster executions in the United States, John Steele Gordon, a writer specializing in financial and business history, asserts: Had Hitler been captured alive, would anyone have suggested life without parole? Yes. Me. I would have. Knowing the exorbitant costs of capital punishment on our judicial system and on our identity as civilized, compassionate, peaceful, justice-loving people had I been alive at the time, I would have recommended a life without parole sentence and not the death penalty for Hitler. And Im Jewish. Both my parents come from Jewish families; before immigrating to the United States, my paternal grandparents were Jews from Poland and my maternal grandparents were Jews from Germany. My paternal grandfather, Denis Cooper, even fought for the United States Army against Hitler. (He came to the United States around 1938, working and attending George Washington University Law School at night. Once the war broke out, he joined the Army and his duties were wide-ranging; they included interrogating captured Germans, assisting liberated towns in reestablishing local governments, and participating in various de-Nazification efforts. Near the end of the war, my grandfather once captured a small group of German officers by walking into their office and introducing himself as Captain Cooper of the United States Army; then he informed them that they could either surrender to him or wait and surrender to the Russians.) But Jewish or not, one need not linger long on Gordons hyperbolic Hitler-hypothesis undergirding much of his screed to know that its off-base. As horrific as their crimes have been, theres never been a prisoner on death row in the United States that has ever committed atrocities on the scale of Hitler and there never will be. The crimes of inmates on death row may be demonic in description but, despite the unsubtle attempts of Gordon and other death penalty proponents to cast them as such, death row inmates are not otherworldly demons. As I have written elsewhere, for example, when we talk about a backlog of death row inmates, we are not talking about curtailing an exploding population of coyotes. We are talking about a population of human beings, many of whom suffer from serious mental illness, a frequent byproduct of a childhood where poverty, abuse, violence, and neglect were the norm. Gordons tenuous reliance on an imagined what if Hitler had been captured alive scenario to argue for expedited state-killing is also undercut by his erroneous claim that the history of the death penalty is one of ever-decreasing cruelty [and] spectacle. As a backdrop for his repugnant and incorrect supposition that lethal injection is humane and not a sick freak show, Gordon reminds us in macabre and disturbingly longing fashion that: The Romans, like all ancient peoples, put criminals to death, and for even petty offenses; Many of the condemned were dispatched by wild animals in the arena; [o]thers were crucified; beheading, hanging, drawing and quartering, and burning at the stake were all common punishments. Gordon completely ignores the grisly horror of the big jab or stainless steel ride which Ive described in pieces like The death penalty in Alabama: Whats it really like?, Alabamas last execution may have burned a man alive, and When will the United States stop tinkering with the machinery of death? Heck, just last month I wrote a column demanding to know, Is Alabama hiding evidence it tortured its citizens? Guided by an op-ed entitled, The drugs we use for executions can cause immense pain and suffering by David Waisel, an associate professor of anesthesia at Harvard Medical School, I pointed specifically to the lethal injections of Christopher Brooks on January 21, 2016, and that of Ronald Bert Smith on December 8, 2016, as being based on publicly available information botched executions. But Alabama just executed Tommy Arthur on May 25, right around the witching hour and before the expiration of his death warrant and everything went just dandy, swimmingly and according to protocol or so Alabamas Department of Corrections, John Steele Gordon and perhaps, even you, dear reader might say? Perhaps. But, maybe the excruciating, cruel and unusual pain Arthur felt and the resultant torment on his body as the lethal drugs saturated his system was sanitized from public view by way of a chemical straightjacket? Or, maybe, as I wrote after Christopher Brooks troubled execution which at the time was also rosily reported as having gone smoothly perhaps Alabama just got lucky this time? Hard to say, isnt it? As executions around the country demonstrate, killing another human being, even when done by the state, is hardly an exact science. State-sponsored killing was horrific under the Romans, it was horrific under Hitler, and its horrific now, on any level, in modern times. Still, the nation and Alabamas rattlesnake rodeo operation continues. In fact, its in high gear with the countrys and Alabamas next execution (and possibly torturous event) just around the corner the execution of Robert Melson scheduled for June 8. (About the Author: Stephen Cooper is a former D.C. public defender who worked as an assistant federal public defender in Alabama between 2012 and 2015. He has contributed to numerous magazines and newspapers in the United States and overseas. He writes full-time and lives in Woodland Hills, California. Follow him on Twitter @SteveCooperEsq.) Prepped for CityWatch by Linda Abrams. -cw

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June 9, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

EDITORIAL: Trump is not Hitler – The Northwest Florida Daily News

Donald Trump is a lot of things, but hes not Adolf Hitler. While perusing social media for news tips on a daily basis, we see a lot of nonsensical things. Many of them are political in nature. Most recently, photos of Adolf Hitler beside President Trump have caught our attention. Fascism has come to America! one meme proclaims. Heil Trump! blasts another one, referencing the Nazi salute Heil Hitler! Lets get one thing straight. Trump is our legitimately elected president. He is a family man and a successful global business leader. He isnt a homicidal maniac. To make such ludicrous comparisons is not only an insult to our nations highest office, but to the millions who died under Hitlers tyrannical reign. We have seen people on social media many of whom we highly respect be caught up in this sensationalism to try and categorize Donald Trump as someone who wants to take over our nation and lead us into fascism. They spend hours and hours each day sharing rumors about how Trump is going to lock everyone up and throw away the key if we dont step in line and follow his orders. Whats happening to these good folks? What is making them believe such crazy notions? We honestly dont know, but it scares us. And dont get us wrong, we dont support all of President Trumps policies. We think he is brash and often says things before thinking about them. And his Twitter account must go. But he is the president, and that office deserves respect from the American people, whether you agree with Trump or not. During the presidents joint address to Congress earlier this year, many Democrats refused to stand or clap for anything he said. Even when he talked about making America great and strong again, they sat on their hands, refusing to acknowledge that he was even talking. Cry babies. How can anyone be against wanting to make our country great again, we ask? And those who say we are already great are correct. We ARE a great nation, but we have many areas on which to improve. We believe our military needs bolstering. We believe our infrastructure needs updates. We believe that America must come first. When we have millions who are homeless, elderly who cannot afford medications and children starving in the streets, how can we justify spending billions overseas? These are some of Trumps ideas that we can get behind without even batting an eye. We remain baffled at how so many Americans have such a hatred for Donald Trump and his ideas to make America great again. Give the man a chance to succeed before tearing him down. And stop comparing him to Hitler. This guest editorial is from The Commercial in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, a Daily News sister paper with GateHouse Media.

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June 9, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

‘Hitler bell’ in German village sparks controversy – Deutsche Welle

For decades, the bells at Herxheim am Berg’s oldest church have been ringing in Christmas, Easter and confirmation services. The recent revelation that one of those chimes comes from a Nazi-era relic is making some in the area, situated in the western state of Rhineland-Palatinate, very uncomfortable. The bronze bell in question, which is over 80 years old, is inscribed with a swastika and the phrase: “Everything for the Fatherland – Adolf Hitler.” The town website details the history of St. Jacob’s Church, from it’s founding in 1014 to the celebration of its 1,000th anniversary in 2014. One timeline entry notes that in August 1934, the village school teacher set fire to the church and that by December of the same year, three new bells were placed in the tower. The “Hitler bell” was one of them, but the website doesn’t mention the swastika or the Nazi inscription. Considering that the bell is ensconced behind thick stone in the belfry, it’s likely that visitors to the town are completely unaware of its presence. Backlash over continued use A former organist at the church, Sigrid Peters, only recently learned of the bell’s inscription and is calling for it to be switched off immediately. The ‘Hitler bell’ is ensconced behind thick stone in the tower at St. Jacob’s Church “It can’t happen that a baby is baptized and a bell with the words ‘everything for the Fatherland’ is chiming,” she told news agency DPA. She was also disturbed by the fact that numerous couples around the state of Rhineland-Palatinate come to the picturesque church to get married every year. “They don’t know at all” about the bell, Peters said. Bell ‘wasn’t a problem before’ The Mayor of Herxheim am Berg, Ronald Becker, told DW that the existence of the bell is common knowledge around the village. According to Becker, “it was already widely known” among local residents that a bell bearing the name “Adolf Hitler” existed within the stone steeple of the town’s ancient church. Becker says he doesn’t see a problem with the bell and has the ‘backing of the town’ Becker, who has been mayor for three years, was concise when asked whether or not the bell was problematic. “There wasn’t a problem before and there won’t be a problem with it in the future, either,” he said. Becker noted that bell was a “historic relic,” but that it was important to understand and respect the history surrounding it. The mayoralso dismissed some proposed solutions to classify the bell as a WWII memorial or to install a plaque, informing visitors of the Nazi-inscribed bell’s presence. He said he doesn’t want Herxheim am Berg to become “a cult site” where people – most likely of the far-wing persuasion – visit the church for the “wrong reasons.” Since this particular bell doesn’t belong to the church, but rather to the municipality of Herxheim am Berg, politics will ultimately decide the bell’s future. And Becker sees no need to remove it. “I have the backing of the town,” he explained, adding that Herxheim am Berg’s nearly 800 residents “support me.” “It is closed in the church tower and it will remain so,” Becker said. The villa on Berlin’s Wannsee lake was pivotal in planning the Holocaust. 15 members of the Nazi government and the SS Schutzstaffel met here on January 20, 1942 to plan what became known as the “Final Solution,” the deportation and extermination of all Jews in German-occupied territory. In 1992, the villa where the Wannsee Conference was held was turned into a memorial and museum. The Nazi regime opened the first concentration camp in Dauchau not far from Munich. Just a few weeks after Adolf Hitler came to power it was used by the paramilitary SS “Schutzstaffel” to imprison, torture and kill political opponents to the regime. Dachau also served as a prototype and model for the other Nazi camps that followed. Nuremberg hosted the biggest Nazi party propaganda rallies from 1933 until the start of the Second World War. The annual Nazi party congress as well as rallies with as many as 200,000 participants took place on the 11-km (4.25 square miles) area. Today, the unfinished Congress Hall building serves as a documentation center and a museum. The Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Lower Saxony was initially established as a prisoner of war camp before becoming a concentration camp. Prisoners too sick to work were brought here from other concentration camps, so many also died of disease. One of the 50,000 killed here was Anne Frank, a Jewish girl who gained international fame posthumously after her diary was published. The Bendlerblock building in Berlin was the headquarters of a military resistance group. On July 20, 1944, a group of Wehrmacht officers around Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg carried out an assassination attempt on Adolf Hitler that failed. The leaders of the conspiracy were summarily shot the same night in the courtyard of the Bendlerblock, which is today the German Resistance Memorial Center. From 1941 people with physical and mental disabilities were killed at a psychiatric hospital in Hadamar in Hesse. Declared “undesirables” by the Nazis, some 15,000 people were murdered here by asphyxiation with carbon monoxide or by being injected with lethal drug overdoses. Across Germany some 70,000 were killed as part of the Nazi-euthanasia program. Today Hadamar is a memorial to those victims. Located next to the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin’s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe was inaugurated sixty years after the end of World War II on May 10, 2005, and opened to the public two days later. Architect Peter Eisenman created a field with 2,711 concrete slabs. An attached underground “Place of Information” holds the names of all known Jewish Holocaust victims. Not too far from the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, another concrete memorial honors the thousands of homosexuals persecuted by the Nazis between 1933 and 1945. The four-meter high monument, which has a window showing alternately a film of two men or two women kissing, was inaugurated in Berlin’s Tiergarten on May 27, 2008. Opposite the Reichstag parliament building in Berlin, a park inaugurated in 2012 serves as a memorial to the 500,000 Sinti and Roma people killed by the Nazi regime. Around a memorial pool the poem “Auschwitz” by Roma poet Santino Spinelli is written in English, Germany and Romani: “gaunt face, dead eyes, cold lips, quiet, a broken heart, out of breath, without words, no tears.” In the 1990s, the artist Gunther Demnig began a project to confront Germany’s Nazi past. Brass-covered concrete cubes were placed in front of the former houses of Nazi victims, providing details on the person as well as the dates of deportation and death, if known. More than 45,000 “Stolpersteine” have been laid in 18 countries in Europe – it’s the world’s largest decentralized Holocaust memorial. Right next to the “Fhrerbau” where Adolf Hitler had his office, the headquarters of the Nazi Party in Germany were based in the “Brown House” in Munich. A white cube now occupies its former location. A new “Documentation Center for the History of National Socialism” opened on April 30, 2015, 70 years after the liberation of the Nazi regime, uncovering further dark chapters of history. Author: Max Zander, Ille Simon

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June 7, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Don’t Worry, Norm Macdonald Fans: ‘Hitler’s Dog’ Was Submitted For Emmy Consideration – Decider

Decider Don't Worry, Norm Macdonald Fans: ' Hitler's Dog' Was Submitted For Emmy Consideration Decider Whether or not that happened again over the weekend remains unclear; what we do know, however, is that Macdonald did delete a tweet that was lightly critical of Netflix, which is the home of his most recent standup special Norm Macdonald: Hitler's Dog, …

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June 7, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

"Secret Hitler" board game adds Trump administration booster pack – Boing Boing

Secret Hitler is a social deduction game that seems to be a variation on games like Werewolf and Mafia. The design, by artist Mackenzie Schubert, is beautiful. The majority of players are liberals. If they can learn to trust each other, they have enough votes to control the table and win the game. But some players are fascists. They will say whatever it takes to get elected, enact their agenda, and blame others for the fallout. The liberals must work together to discover the truth before the fascists install their cold-blooded leader and win the game. They just introduced new cards “featuring Donald Trump and prominent members of his administration,” also drawn by Schubert. report this ad Brett Gaylor writes, As part of the Mozilla Privacy Arcade project in this years Global Sprint, Mozilla is inviting activists, artists, designers, educators, gamers, storytellers, and technologists of all backgrounds to invent new privacy-themed adventures for the role playing game Cryptomancer. Role-players, boardgamers, writers, coders, artists, graphic designers, teachers, house-cleaners, lucid dreamers, gym-rats, distance runners, commuters can enjoy over 100 ambient atmospheric loops with names like Orbital Promenade, Lunar Outpost, Testing Chamber and so on. Games for the Many sends us Put on Your Corbyn Face, A web game where you are challenged to match the emotions of a photo Jeremy Corbyn. Possibly the first web game you play with empathy and emotion. Apple makes it hard to not use iCloud, at least for a few things. Since their cloud storage is baked so deeply into iOS, using iTunes on the desktop to manually move files and backup your device can sometimes feel like an awkward step backwards. To give your iPhone more flexibility to manage large files [] Few things are as relaxing than an afternoon laying around in the sun. But no matter how careful you are, wet towels always seem to track some sand back home with you. The Quicksand Mat eliminates this beach-going annoyance by letting sand easily pass through.Whether you use it as a blanket or a buffer to [] Drones are the perfect way to cheaply shoot aerial video, but it can be difficult to accurately point its camera when your view is limited to a tiny smartphone screen. This quadcopter offers a first-person view of the action in immersive 3D, so you can frame your shots as if you were flying.The Micro Drone [] report this ad

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June 7, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Adolf Hitler – Military Leader, Dictator – Biography.com

Military Leader, Dictator(18891945) Adolf Hitler was the leader of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. He initiated fascist policies that led to World War II and the deaths of at least 11 million people, including the mass murder of an estimated 6 million Jews. 1 of 15 quotes Those who want to live, let them fight, and those who do not want to fight in this world of eternal struggle do not deserve to live. We can never forget that everything Hitler did in Germany was ‘legal.’ (Martin Luther King Jr.) It is not truth that matters, but victory. History shows that all conquerors who have allowed their subject races to carry arms have prepared their own downfall by so doing. Any alliance whose purpose is not the intention to wage war is senseless and useless. All propaganda has to be popular and has to accommodate itself to the comprehension of the least intelligent of those whom it seeks to reach. We will meet propaganda with propaganda, terror with terror, and violence with violence. By shrewd and constant application of propaganda, heaven can be presented to the people as hell and, vice versa, the wretchedest existence as a paradise. And what nonsense it is to aspire to a Heaven to which, according to the Church’s own teaching, only those have entry who have made a complete failure of life on earth! But there’s one thing I can predict to eaters of meat, that the world of the future will be vegetarian! Strength lies not in defense but in attack. I don’t see much future for the Americans. In my view, it’s a decayed country. Germany will either be a world power or will not be at all. I go the way that Providence dictates with the assurance of a sleepwalker. If you want to shine like sun first you have to burn like it. Adolf Hitler Born in Austria in 1889, Adolf Hitler rose to power in German politics as leader of the National Socialist German Workers Party, also known as the Nazi Party. Hitler was chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945, serving as dictator for the bulk of his time in power. His policies precipitated World War II and led to the genocide known as the Holocaust, which resulted in the deathsof some 6 million Jews and another 5 million noncombatants.With defeat on the horizon, Hitler committed suicide with wife Eva Braun on April 30, 1945, in his Berlin bunker. Dictator Adolf Hitler was born in Braunau am Inn, Austria, on April 20, 1889, and was the fourth of six children born to Alois Hitler and Klara Polzl. As a child, Hitler clashed frequently with his emotionally harsh father, who also didn’t approve of his son’s later interest in fine art as a career. Following the death of his younger brother, Edmund, in 1900, Hitler became detached and introverted. He also showed an early interest in German nationalism, rejecting the authority of Austria-Hungary. This nationalism would become the motivating force of Hitler’s life. Alois died suddenly in 1903. Two years later, Adolf’s mother allowed her son to drop out of school. After her death in December 1907, he moved to Vienna and worked as a casual laborer and watercolor painter. Hitler applied to the Academy of Fine Arts twice and was rejected both times. Lacking money outside of an orphan’s pension and funds from selling postcards, he stayed in homeless shelters. Hitler later pointed to these years as the time when he first cultivated his anti-Semitism, though there is some debate about this account. In 1913, Hitler relocated to Munich. At the outbreak of World War I, he applied to serve in the German army. He was accepted in August 1914, though he was still an Austrian citizen. Although Hitler spent much of his time away from the front lines (with some reports that his recollections of his time on the field were generally exaggerated), he was present at a number of significant battles and was wounded at the Somme. He was decorated for bravery, receiving the Iron Cross First Class and the Black Wound Badge. Hitler became embittered over the collapse of the war effort. The experience reinforced his passionate German patriotism, and he was shocked by Germany’s surrender in 1918. Like other German nationalists, he purportedly believed that the German army had been betrayed by civilian leaders and Marxists. He found the Treaty of Versailles degrading, particularly the demilitarization of the Rhineland and the stipulation that Germany accept responsibility for starting the war. After World War I, Hitler returned to Munich and continued to work for the military as an intelligence officer. While monitoring the activities of the German Workers Party (DAP), Hitler adopted many of the anti-Semitic, nationalist and anti-Marxist ideas of partyfounder Anton Drexler. Hitler joined the DAP in September 1919. To increase its appeal, the DAP changed its name to the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), often abbreviated to Nazi. Hitler personally designed the party banner, appropriating theswastika symbol and placing it in a white circle on a red background. He soon gained notoriety for his vitriolic speeches against the Treaty of Versailles, rival politicians, Marxists and Jews. In 1921, Hitler replaced Drexler as NSDAP chairman. Hitler’s fervid beer-hall speeches began attracting regular audiences. Early followers included army captain Ernst Rohm, the head of the Nazi paramilitary organization the Sturmabteilung (SA), which protected meetings and frequently attacked political opponents. On November 8, 1923, Hitler and the SA stormed a public meetingfeaturing Bavarian prime minister Gustav Kahr at a large beer hall in Munich. Hitler announced that the national revolution had begun and declared the formation of a new government. After a short struggle that led to several deaths, the coup known as the “Beer Hall Putsch” failed. Hitler was arrested and tried for high treason. He served nine monthsin prison, during which time he dictated most of the first volume of Mein Kampf (“My Struggle”) to his deputy, Rudolf Hess. A work of propaganda and falsehoods, the book laid out Hitler’s plans for transforming German society into one based on race. With millions unemployed, the Great Depression in Germany provided a political opportunity for Hitler. Germans were ambivalent to the parliamentary republic and increasingly open to extremist options. In 1932, Hitler ran against 84-year-old Paul von Hindenburg for the presidency. Hitler came in second in both rounds of the election, garnering more than 36 percent of the vote in the final count. The resultsestablished Hitler as a strong force in German politics. Hindenburg reluctantly agreed to appoint Hitler as chancellor in order to promote political balance. Hitler used his position as chancellor to form a de facto legal dictatorship. The Reichstag Fire Decree, announced after a suspicious fire at parliament, suspended basic rights and allowed detention without trial. Hitler also engineered the passage of the Enabling Act, which gave his cabinet full legislative powers for a period of four years and allowed for deviations from the constitution. Having achieved full control over the legislative and executive branches of government, Hitler and his political allies embarked on a systematic suppression of the remaining political opposition. By the end of June, the other parties had been intimidated into disbanding. On July 14, 1933, Hitler’s Nazi Party was declared the only legal political party in Germany. In October of that year, Hitler ordered Germany’s withdrawal from the League of Nations. Military opposition was also punished. The demands of the SA for more political and military power led to the Night of the Long Knives, which took place from June 30 to July 2, 1934. Rohm, a perceived rival, and other SA leaders, along with a number of Hitler’s political enemies, were rounded up and shot. The day before Hindenburg’s death in August 1934, the cabinet had enacted a law abolishing the office of president, combining its powers with those of the chancellor. Hitler thus became head of state as well as head of government and was formally named leader and chancellor. As head of state, Hitler became supreme commander of the armed forces. From 1933 until the start of the war in 1939, Hitler and his Nazi regime instituted hundreds of laws and regulations to restrict and exclude Jews in society. The Anti-Semitic laws were issued throughout all levels of government, making good on the Nazis pledge to persecute Jews if the party came to power. On April 1, 1933, Hitler implemented a national boycott of Jewish businesses, followed by the introduction of the Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service” of April 7, 1933, which was one of the first laws to persecute Jews by excluding them from state service. This was a Nazi implementation of the Aryan Paragraph, a clause calling for the exclusion of Jews and non-Aryans from organizations, employment and eventually all aspects of public life. In April 1933, additional legislation furthered the persecution of Jews including laws restricting the number of Jewish students at schools and universities,limiting Jews working in medical and legal professions, and revoking the licenses of Jewish tax consultants. In April 1933, the Main Office for Press and Propaganda of the German Student Union called for “Action Against the Un-German Spirit, prompting students to burn more than 25,000 Un-German books, ushering in an era of censorship and Nazi propaganda.In 1934, Jewish actors were forbidden from performing in film or in the theater. On September 15, 1935, the Reichstag introduced the Nuremberg Laws which defined a “Jew” as anyone with three or four grandparents who were Jewish, regardless of whether the person considered themselves Jewish or observed the religion. The Nuremberg Laws also set forth the “Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honour,” which banned marriage between non-Jewish and Jewish Germans; and the Reich Citizenship Law, which deprived “non-Aryans” of the benefits of German citizenship. Hitler’s eugenic policies also targeted children with physical and developmental disabilities, and later authorized a euthanasia program for disabled adults. His regime also persecuted homosexuals, arresting an estimated 100,000 men from 1933 to 1945, some of whom were imprisoned or sent to concentration camps. At the camps, gay prisonerswere forced to wear pink triangles to identify their homosexuality, which Nazis considered a crime and a disease. Hitler also promoted anti-smoking campaigns across the country. These campaigns stemmed from Hitler’s self-imposed dietary restrictions, which included abstinence from alcohol and meat. Fueled by fanaticism over what he believed was a superior Aryan race, he encouraged Germans to keep their bodies pure of any intoxicating or unclean substance. In 1936, Hitler and his regime muted their Anti-Semitic rhetoric and actions when Germanyhosted the Winter and Summer Olympic Games, in an effort toavoid criticism on the world stage and a negative impact on tourism. However, after the Olympics, the Nazi persecution of Jews intensified with the continued “Aryanization” of Jewish businesses, which involved the firing of Jewish workers and takeover by non-Jewish owners. In 1938, Hitler, along with several other European leaders, signed the Munich Agreement. The treaty ceded the Sudetenland districts to Germany, reversing part of the Versailles Treaty. As a result of the summit, Hitler was named Time magazine’s Man of the Year for 1938. This diplomatic win only whetted his appetite for a renewed German dominance. The Nazis continued to segregate Jews from German society, banning them from public school, universities, theaters, sports events and “Aryan” zones. Jewish doctors were also barred from treating “Aryan” patients. Jews were required to carry identity cards and, in the fall of 1938, Jewish people had to have their passports stamped with a “J.” On November 9 and 10, 1938, a wave of violent anti-Jewish pogroms swept Germany, Austria and parts of the Sudetenland. Nazis destroyed synagogues, vandalized Jewish homes, schools and businesses, and close to 100 Jews were murdered. Called Kristallnacht, the “Night of Crystal” or the “Night of Broken Glass,” referring to the broken glass left in the wake of the destruction, the pogroms escalated the Nazi persecution of Jews to another level of brutality and violence. Almost 30,000 Jewish men were arrested and sent to concentration camps, signaling more horrors to come. On September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland. In response, Britain and France declared war on Germany two days later. Between 1939 and 1945, Nazis and their collaborators were responsible for the deaths of at least 1 million noncombatants, including about six million Jews, representing two-thirds of the Jewish population in Europe. As part of Hitler’s “Final Solution,” the genocide enacted by the regime would come to be known as the Holocaust. Deaths and mass executions took place in concentration and extermination camps such as Auschwitz-Birkenau, Bergen-Belsen, Dachau and Treblinka, among many others. Other persecuted groups included Poles, communists, homosexuals, Jehovah’s Witnesses and trade unionists.Prisoners were used as forced laborers for SS construction projects, and in some instances they were forced to build and expand concentration camps. They were subject to starvation, torture and horrific brutalities, including having to endure gruesome and painful medical experiments. Hitler probably never visited the concentration camps and did not speak publicly about the mass killings, but Germans documented the atrocities committed at the campson paper and infilms. Hitler escalated his military activities in 1940, invading Norway, Denmark, France, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Belgium. By July, Hitler ordered bombing raids on the United Kingdom, with the goal of invasion. Germanys formal alliance with Japan and Italy, known collectively as the Axis powers, was agreed upon toward the end of September to deter the United States from supporting and protecting the British. On June 22, 1941, Hitler violated the 1939 non-aggression pact with Joseph Stalin, sending a massive army of German troops into the Soviet Union. The invading force seized a huge area of Russia before Hitler temporarily halted the invasion and diverted forces to encircle Leningrad and Kiev. The pause allowed the Red Army to regroup and conduct a counteroffensive attack, and the German advance was stopped outside Moscow in December 1941. On December 7, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Honoring the alliance with Japan, Hitler was now at war against the Allied powers, a coalition that included Britain, the world’s largest empire, led by Prime Minister Winston Churchill; the United States, the world’s greatest financial power, led by President Franklin D. Roosevelt; and the Soviet Union,which had the world’s largest army, commanded by Stalin. Though initially hoping that he could play the Allies off of one another, Hitler’s military judgment became increasingly erratic, and the Axis powers could not sustain his aggressive and expansive war. In late 1942, German forces failed to seize the Suez Canal, leading to the loss of German control over North Africa. The German army also suffered defeats at the Battle of Stalingrad (1942-43), seen as a turning point in the war, and the Battle of Kursk (1943). On June 6, 1944, on what would come to be known as D-Day, the Western Allied armies landed in northern France. As a result of these significant setbacks, many German officers concluded that defeat was inevitable and that Hitler’s continued rule would result in the destruction of the country. Organized efforts to assassinate the dictator gained traction, and opponents came close in 1944 withthe notorious July Plot,though it ultimately proved unsuccessful. By early 1945, Hitler realized that Germany was going to lose the war. The Soviets had driven the German army back into Western Europe and the Allies were advancing into Germany from the west. At midnight, going into April 29, 1945, Hitler married his girlfriend, Eva Braun, in a small civil ceremony in his Berlin bunker. Around this time, Hitler was informed of the executionof Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. Afraid of falling into the hands of enemy troops, Hitler and Braun committed suicide the day after their wedding, on April 30, 1945. Their bodies were carried to abombed-out areaoutside ofthe Reich Chancellery, where they were burned. Berlin fell on May 2, 1945. Five days later, on May 7, 1945, Germany surrendered unconditionally to the Allies. Hitler’s political programs had brought about a world war, leaving behind a devastated and impoverished Eastern and Central Europe, including Germany. His policies inflicted human suffering on an unprecedented scale and resulted in the death of tens of millions of people, including more than 20 million in the Soviet Union and six million Jews in Europe. Hitler’s defeat marked the end of Germany’s dominance in European history and the defeat of fascism. A new ideological global conflict, the Cold War, emerged in the aftermath of the devastating violence of World War II. We strive for accuracy and fairness. If you see something that doesn’t look right, contact us! Adolf Hitler Biography.com Biography.com Editors The Biography.com website June 6, 2017 A&E Television Networks April 27, 2017 n/a

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