Archive for the ‘Hitler’ Category

Hitler’s awkward audience with MI5 housewife on the eve of war – The Times (subscription)

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In the annals of British espionage the story of how MI5 managed to get a spy into close contact with Adolf Hitler only a month before the start of the Second World War should have been one of its greatest coups.

The agent codenamed M/T, who has been unmasked for the first time in a new book, did not look like much of a spy.

Kathleen Tesch was a small Home Counties housewife with a fondness for dogs whose chief claim to fame until that point was the costumes she wore at her village fte.

As for her audience with Hitler, did it produce an invaluable insight into the Fhrers strategic thinking, provide incisive analysis of his personality or even give warning of his plan

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Hitler’s awkward audience with MI5 housewife on the eve of war – The Times (subscription)

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May 3, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Sean Spicer’s Hitler comments: a warning from the history of speech and atrocity – OUPblog (blog)

Earlier this month, during a media briefing, Donald Trumps Press Secretary, Sean Spicer, engaged in what some have referred to as a form of Holocaust denial. In referencing Bashar al-Assads most recent alleged use of chemical weapons on his own citizens, Spicer made an unprompted reference to Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler: We didnt use chemical weapons in World War II. You know, you had a, you know, someone as despicable as Hitler who didnt even sink to using chemical weapons. Given that Hitler notoriously used chemicals as part of gas chamber mass murder operations against Jews, many in the room seemed aghast. When later asked to clarify this comment, Spicer only added to the sense of disbelief, noting that Hitler was not using the gas on his own people the same way Assad is doing Hitler, he stated, brought [the chemicals] into the Holocaust center while Assad dropped them down to innocent, in the middle of towns

The implications of Spicers words are chilling. He began by suggesting Hitler did not use Zyklon B against the Jews. When confronted with this apparent whitewash of history, he tried to distinguish Hitler from Assad by emphasizing that the former did not use chemicals against his own people, despite the fact that over one hundred thousand murdered German Jews were among Hitlers victims. His characterization of grisly extermination camps, such as Auschwitz, as Holocaust centers could give one the impression that they were innocuous administrative units. In describing Assads victims as innocent when contrasting them with Jewish victims, one could infer that the latter were perhaps being perceived as not innocent.

Steven Goldstein, executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, accused Spicer of having engaged in Holocaust denial, the most offensive form of fake news imaginable, by denying Hitler gassed millions of Jews to death. Apart from the anti-Semitic implications of Spicers statements, some have noted their value as a diversion in reference to Trumps many failings as president. Francine Prose points out that this latest controversy allows us to stop thinking about the damage being done to our environment and our schools, about the mass deportations of hard-working immigrants about the ways in which our democracy is being undermined, every minute, every hour.

But it would be a mistake to focus on these short-term implications of Spicers statements without understanding the broader harms they could engender. The history of speech and atrocity reveals that the most effective persecution campaigns can begin with relatively ordinary words with more subtle negative connotations. On their own, and in the abstract, they seem innocent enough. But in the larger context, they anesthetize the majority individual to the idea that the minority is an alien other, as opposed to a fellow citizen. And combined with other words and actions, they can eventually lead to tragic ends. For example, before ultimately falling victim to genocidal violence in Rwanda, Tutsis were at first chided by extremist Hutus for their alleged Ethiopian origins or their supposed accumulation of great wealth. But as Rwanda inexorably ramped up for genocide, such rhetoric intensified, with Tutsis eventually reduced to the vile caricature of cockroaches bent on liquidating the Hutus.

This is not to say that Spicers comments augur violence of such a scale. But it is important to remember that they are part of a larger, disturbing trend. One of Trumps key advisers is Steve Bannon, whose Breitbart news is a wellspring of bigotry and propaganda. During his campaign, in bashing Hillary Clinton, Trump tweeted the image of a Star of David over a pile of money, which allegedly emerged from a neo-Nazi message board. In January, the White House omitted reference to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust in a statement to commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day. And this is all in the context of a rising tide of anti-Semitism and hate crimes against Jews in the U.S. and around the world. In this sense, Spicers oafish Holocaust denial could be part of a larger, emerging mosaic of anti-Semitism.

As conditions deteriorate, when anchored to more direct calls for violence, Holocaust denial can morph into a technique for incitement to genocide. And in the context of a widespread or systematic attack against a civilian population, it can be part of the conduct element of persecution as a crime against humanity. Genocide denial is not merely an ugly reminder of a bloody past but should also be treated as a potential harbinger of a violent future. We are not anywhere close to that stage now, but we have been given notice and we ignore the larger context at our own peril.

Featured image credit: Sean Spicer, by Gage Skidmore. CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

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Sean Spicer’s Hitler comments: a warning from the history of speech and atrocity – OUPblog (blog)

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May 1, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Professor assures Harvard she only compares Trump to Hitler outside of class – The College Fix

Professor assures Harvard she only compares Trump to Hitler outside of class

UPDATED

Targeted for a Soros connection?

Danielle Allen is miffed that she was included on the Professor Watchlist, the Turning Point USA project that identifies professors who discriminate against conservative students and advance leftist propaganda in the classroom.

The Harvard professor wants to make plain to the administration, her colleagues and students that her leftist advocacy including publicly comparing Donald Trump to Adolf Hitler is strictly extracurricular.

In a Harvard Crimson op-ed, Allen claims her free speech is under attack because of criticism she is now receiving for a Washington Post op-ed a year ago.

Allen had written that she finally understood Hitlers rise to power after watching Donald Trumps political rise. That is the lone incident for which she is on the list:

The site provides no documentation of my having made arguments comparing Trump to Hitler in the classroombecause there is none. I have never made such a comparison in class, not even in the attenuated form in my opinion piece.

I treasure academic freedom but also believe that teachers should avoid politicizing the classroom. To my mind, full-throated political engagement belongs on op-ed pages and in the hard work of citizenship. That said, faculty members should not be watchlisted if they make other judgments than mine about how to deploy academic freedom.

MORE: 12,000 professors ask to be added to Watchlist

Allen said her role in the classroom, where I strongly distinguish values-based analysis from partisan deliberation and never advocate partisan positions in class, is different from her roles as opinion columnist and engaged citizen.

Allen notes she was recently mentioned on Tucker Carlsons Fox News show when Turning Point founder Charlie Kirk highlighted her entry.

She said Kirks claim was simply false that Allen teaches that we can learn a lot from this rise of Donald Trump and this populist rise because actually it is very similar to that of Adolf Hitler.

Allen thinks she was put on the list for a year-old op-ed because, wearing her engaged citizen hat, she is connected to the left-wing philanthropist George Soros.

MORE: Philly-area professors peeved at being added to Watchlist

In March she took over as chair of an advisory board for the Open Society Foundations, a Soros project that is distinct from his political donations, she said.

As a result of being on the list and featured on Fox News, Allen said she received vile emails, tweets and two crude voicemails.

Though she agrees free speech is under threat on college campuses like Middlebury, Allen compares the crude messages she has received to violent protests against libertarian scholar Charles Murray:

[F]speech also needs protection from assaults from the right. Both sides have developed dangerous tactics for silencing those who disagree with them.

Turning Points Matt Lamb, who oversees the watchlist, told The College Fix in an email:

The work of an academic comprises not just what they directly say in the classroom but what they say outside of the classroom. By comparing Trump to Hitler, which she did, she sends a message to Trump supporters in her classrom [sic]: they too, are just like Nazis. It is beyond ironic that a professor says she wants to advance political dialogue, while comparing people she opposes to Nazis.

Read the op-ed.

UPDATE: The Professor Watchlist defended its inclusion of Allen on the list after this post was published. Its comments have been included.

MORE: Watchlist creators say criticism is misguided, overblown

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Professor assures Harvard she only compares Trump to Hitler outside of class – The College Fix

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Donald Trump might think Hitler, like slavery, was not so bad either – IrishCentral

Donald Trump’s comments about the Civil War have to be read to be believed. Wikimedia Commons

Donald Trump believes the Civil War could have been avoided if slave owner Andrew Jackson had lived longer.

Jackson, son of Irish immigrants Andrew and Elizabeth Jackson, had 150 slaves when he died, up from 9 when he took over his residence called The Hermitage in Tennessee

He didn’t just enjoy the fruits of having slaves, he had earned the name Indian Killer from Indian tribes.

Andrew Jackson recommended that troops systematically kill Indian women and children after massacres in order to complete the extermination. As historians noted The Creeks tribe lost 23 million acres of land in southern Georgia and central Alabama, paving the way for cotton plantation slavery. His frontier warfare and subsequent negotiations opened up much of the southeast U.S. to settler colonialism.

Read More: Irish Andrew Jackson – his life and times

Andrew Jackson was about as likely to stop slavery as Jefferson Davis was. Subjugation, foot on the neck stuff was his modus operandi. Trump has shown himself indelibly ignorant by such a proposition.

He made the comments in an interview that airs today on Sirius XM’s P.O.T.U.S. station:

TRUMP: [Jackson] was a swashbuckler. But when his wife died, did you know he visited her grave every day? I visited her grave actually, because I was in Tennessee.

ZITO: Oh, that’s right. You were in Tennessee.

TRUMP: And it was amazing. The people of Tennessee are amazing people. They love Andrew Jackson. They love Andrew Jackson in Tennessee.

ZITO: Yeah, he’s a fascinating…

TRUMP: I mean, had Andrew Jackson been a little later, you wouldn’t have had the Civil War. He was a very tough person, but he had a big heart. And he was really angry that — he saw what was happening with regard to the Civil War. He said, There’s no reason for this. People don’t realize, you know, the Civil War if you think about it, why? People don’t ask that question, but why was there the Civil War? Why could that one not have been worked out?

2

Andrew Jackson

He has been making a bigger ass of himself than normal lately.

The only way a civil war could have been prevented was to allow slavery not just in the south but across America as the south was seeking in the new territory. Lincoln would not stand for it. Trump no doubt would have cut a deal

He recently asked why Palestinians and Israelis could not get along, the little matter of the creation of Israel, the dislocation of millions of Palestinians, the 1967 war and a vicious on and off conflict notwithstanding.

Soon he may ask how come the Second World War happened. After all, Hitler built great highways, put folks back to work. Ok, there was that pesky Jewish Holocaust issue but can’t we all get along?

He sounds like a hippie from ’60s Haight-Ashbury trying to condense world history into yet another soundbite.

His own foreign policy is laughable. Now that he had appointed Jared his Jewish son in law to mediate in Palestine and he is apparently ready to announce the US Embassy will move to Jerusalem – what could go wrong with getting a deal from the humiliated once again Palestinians?

Imagine If Hillary were president and she had appointed Chelseas husband as her de facto Secretary of State?

Wed rightly be outraged. The sad part is that Trump understands history so poorly that the son in law might indeed be a better bet.

God Save America with this guy in the White House.

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Donald Trump might think Hitler, like slavery, was not so bad either – IrishCentral

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When Adolf Hitler confidante Unity Mitford came to stay – BBC News – BBC News


BBC News
When Adolf Hitler confidante Unity Mitford came to stay – BBC News
BBC News
One of the high-society Mitford sisters, Unity, caused a scandal thanks to her relationship with Adolf Hitler. So how did she end up in a Warwickshire vicarage?

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When Adolf Hitler confidante Unity Mitford came to stay – BBC News – BBC News

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

That Time Hitler’s Nephew Viciously Denounced Uncle Adolf In An American Magazine – Task & Purpose

Family dinners can be tense affairs. Doubly so if youre related to one of the most despised human beings in history: Adolf fucking Hitler.

Born in Liverpool, England, in 1911, William Patrick Hitlers father, Alois Hitler, was brother to Adolf, and as William grew up, he was apparently an irritating and embarrassing thorn in his uncles side. Their tense relationship worsened substantially after he published numerous articles in the United Kingdom and United States detailing his uncles personal life. Thanks to Mark Frauenfelder over at BoingBoing, we can share some of those anecdotes.

In the July 4, 1939 edition of Look Magazine, a bi-weekly general interest magazine based in Des Moines, Iowa, the younger Hitler published a six-page feature entitled Why I Hate My Uncle.

Theres that bit about Adolf Hitlers autographed photo, his preferred after-dinner snack, and his mannerisms:

Being very close to my father at the time, he (Adolf Hitler) autographed this picture for me. We had cakes and whipped cream, Hitlers favorite dessert. I was struck by his intensity, his feminine gestures. There was dandruff on his coat.

Then theres some disturbing implications about the suicide of Hitlers half-niece:

When I visited Berlin in 1931, the family was in trouble. Geli Raubal, the daughter of Hitlers and my fathers sister, had committed suicide. Everyone knew that Hitler and she had long been intimate and that she had been expecting a child a fact that enraged Hitler. His revolver was found by her body.

Oh, and the descriptions of William Hitlers visits to Germany, where he met with his uncle. Tense doesnt really cut it:

I published some articles on my uncle when I returned to England and was forthwith summoned back to Berlin and taken with my father and aunt to Hitlers hotel. He was furious. Pacing up and down, wild-eyed and tearful, he made me promise to retract my articles and threatened to kill himself if anything else were written on his private life.

I shall never forget the last time he sent for me. He was in a brutal temper when I arrived. Walking back and forth, brandishing his horsehide whip, he shouted insults at my head as if he were delivering a political oration.

William Hitler moved to the United States in 1939, and later changed his last name to Stuart-Houston. He also enlisted in the Navy during the war yeah, in addition to slamming his piece of shit uncle in print, he signed up to fight in World War II. His initial attempts to join the Army were shot down, due to his family connections, but after writing an impassioned plea to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, he was permitted to serve in the Navy, according to the Daily Mail:

I am the nephew and only descendant of the ill-famed Chancellor and Leader of Germany who today so despotically seeks to enslave the free and Christian peoples of the globe. More than anything else I would like to see active combat as soon as possible and thereby be accepted by my friends and comrades as one of them in this great struggle for liberty.

Its unclear if the early articles were published for noble reasons, or personal gain rumors of the articles being an attempt at blackmail abound but the fact that Hitlers nephew signed on with the Navy to kick Nazi-butt makes us think hed have been welcomed among the likes of the Inglourious Basterds, had they been real.

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That Time Hitler’s Nephew Viciously Denounced Uncle Adolf In An American Magazine – Task & Purpose

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Rick Sirvint’s list of best books about Adolf Hitler – The Keene Sentinel

Posted: Saturday, April 29, 2017 6:00 am

Rick Sirvints list of best books about Adolf Hitler

Posted on Apr 29, 2017

by CLARK

1. Hitler, 1889-1936: Hubris, by Ian Kershaw

2. Hitler, 1936-1945: Nemesis, by Ian Kershaw

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Adolf Hitler and his wife Eva Braun through the years – New York Daily News


New York Daily News
Adolf Hitler and his wife Eva Braun through the years
New York Daily News
Adolf Hitler has remained one of the most feared and despised names in world history, but the name of his closest companion is one that isn't as known: Eva …

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Adolf Hitler and his wife Eva Braun through the years – New York Daily News

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"Why I Hate My Uncle," by William Hitler (Look magazine, 1939) – Boing Boing

A copy of Look Magazine from July 4, 1939 will cost you $950, because it has a a six-page photo-illustrated feature by William P. Hitler, called “Why I Hate My Uncle.”

William Patrick Hitler was born in Liverpool in the UK in 1911. His father was Adolf Hitlers brother Alois Hitler. William moved to Germany in 1933 in an attempt to benefit from his uncles position of power. It appears William, who was familiar with Adolfs family background, was an embarrassing thorn in Adolfs side during the 1930s. Moving to the United States in 1939, William served in the US Navy in World War II. After the war, William Hitler changed his last name to Stuart-Houston.

Looks article is written by William and reveals what it was like to be Adolf Hitlers nephew. Here are some excerpts:

The July 4, 1939 issue of Look Magazine is scarce with just the single copy listed for sale on AbeBooks. It is offered by Rare Non Fiction, a seller located in British Columbia, Canada.

Look was a rival to Life Magazine, and was published between 1937 and 1971. Prominently featuring eye-catching photography and well known people, Look employed Stanley Kubrick as a staff photographer from 1946 to 1951.

Originally priced at 10 cents, this copy features Hollywood film stars Hedy Lamarr and Robert Taylor on the cover, and also has articles on Americas most wanted criminals, nurses, and horse racing. It is comfortably the most expensive copy of Look listed for sale on AbeBooks.

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"Why I Hate My Uncle," by William Hitler (Look magazine, 1939) – Boing Boing

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Hitler’s awkward audience with MI5 housewife on the eve of war – The Times (subscription)

Read the full article Just register a few details. In the annals of British espionage the story of how MI5 managed to get a spy into close contact with Adolf Hitler only a month before the start of the Second World War should have been one of its greatest coups. The agent codenamed M/T, who has been unmasked for the first time in a new book, did not look like much of a spy. Kathleen Tesch was a small Home Counties housewife with a fondness for dogs whose chief claim to fame until that point was the costumes she wore at her village fte. As for her audience with Hitler, did it produce an invaluable insight into the Fhrers strategic thinking, provide incisive analysis of his personality or even give warning of his plan Want to read more? Register with a few details to continue reading this article. Unlock quality journalism on the topics that you decide matter most Subscribe and catch up with all the stories behind the headlines

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May 3, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Sean Spicer’s Hitler comments: a warning from the history of speech and atrocity – OUPblog (blog)

Earlier this month, during a media briefing, Donald Trumps Press Secretary, Sean Spicer, engaged in what some have referred to as a form of Holocaust denial. In referencing Bashar al-Assads most recent alleged use of chemical weapons on his own citizens, Spicer made an unprompted reference to Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler: We didnt use chemical weapons in World War II. You know, you had a, you know, someone as despicable as Hitler who didnt even sink to using chemical weapons. Given that Hitler notoriously used chemicals as part of gas chamber mass murder operations against Jews, many in the room seemed aghast. When later asked to clarify this comment, Spicer only added to the sense of disbelief, noting that Hitler was not using the gas on his own people the same way Assad is doing Hitler, he stated, brought [the chemicals] into the Holocaust center while Assad dropped them down to innocent, in the middle of towns The implications of Spicers words are chilling. He began by suggesting Hitler did not use Zyklon B against the Jews. When confronted with this apparent whitewash of history, he tried to distinguish Hitler from Assad by emphasizing that the former did not use chemicals against his own people, despite the fact that over one hundred thousand murdered German Jews were among Hitlers victims. His characterization of grisly extermination camps, such as Auschwitz, as Holocaust centers could give one the impression that they were innocuous administrative units. In describing Assads victims as innocent when contrasting them with Jewish victims, one could infer that the latter were perhaps being perceived as not innocent. Steven Goldstein, executive director of the Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect, accused Spicer of having engaged in Holocaust denial, the most offensive form of fake news imaginable, by denying Hitler gassed millions of Jews to death. Apart from the anti-Semitic implications of Spicers statements, some have noted their value as a diversion in reference to Trumps many failings as president. Francine Prose points out that this latest controversy allows us to stop thinking about the damage being done to our environment and our schools, about the mass deportations of hard-working immigrants about the ways in which our democracy is being undermined, every minute, every hour. But it would be a mistake to focus on these short-term implications of Spicers statements without understanding the broader harms they could engender. The history of speech and atrocity reveals that the most effective persecution campaigns can begin with relatively ordinary words with more subtle negative connotations. On their own, and in the abstract, they seem innocent enough. But in the larger context, they anesthetize the majority individual to the idea that the minority is an alien other, as opposed to a fellow citizen. And combined with other words and actions, they can eventually lead to tragic ends. For example, before ultimately falling victim to genocidal violence in Rwanda, Tutsis were at first chided by extremist Hutus for their alleged Ethiopian origins or their supposed accumulation of great wealth. But as Rwanda inexorably ramped up for genocide, such rhetoric intensified, with Tutsis eventually reduced to the vile caricature of cockroaches bent on liquidating the Hutus. This is not to say that Spicers comments augur violence of such a scale. But it is important to remember that they are part of a larger, disturbing trend. One of Trumps key advisers is Steve Bannon, whose Breitbart news is a wellspring of bigotry and propaganda. During his campaign, in bashing Hillary Clinton, Trump tweeted the image of a Star of David over a pile of money, which allegedly emerged from a neo-Nazi message board. In January, the White House omitted reference to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust in a statement to commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day. And this is all in the context of a rising tide of anti-Semitism and hate crimes against Jews in the U.S. and around the world. In this sense, Spicers oafish Holocaust denial could be part of a larger, emerging mosaic of anti-Semitism. As conditions deteriorate, when anchored to more direct calls for violence, Holocaust denial can morph into a technique for incitement to genocide. And in the context of a widespread or systematic attack against a civilian population, it can be part of the conduct element of persecution as a crime against humanity. Genocide denial is not merely an ugly reminder of a bloody past but should also be treated as a potential harbinger of a violent future. We are not anywhere close to that stage now, but we have been given notice and we ignore the larger context at our own peril. Featured image credit: Sean Spicer, by Gage Skidmore. CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

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May 1, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Professor assures Harvard she only compares Trump to Hitler outside of class – The College Fix

Professor assures Harvard she only compares Trump to Hitler outside of class UPDATED Targeted for a Soros connection? Danielle Allen is miffed that she was included on the Professor Watchlist, the Turning Point USA project that identifies professors who discriminate against conservative students and advance leftist propaganda in the classroom. The Harvard professor wants to make plain to the administration, her colleagues and students that her leftist advocacy including publicly comparing Donald Trump to Adolf Hitler is strictly extracurricular. In a Harvard Crimson op-ed, Allen claims her free speech is under attack because of criticism she is now receiving for a Washington Post op-ed a year ago. Allen had written that she finally understood Hitlers rise to power after watching Donald Trumps political rise. That is the lone incident for which she is on the list: The site provides no documentation of my having made arguments comparing Trump to Hitler in the classroombecause there is none. I have never made such a comparison in class, not even in the attenuated form in my opinion piece. I treasure academic freedom but also believe that teachers should avoid politicizing the classroom. To my mind, full-throated political engagement belongs on op-ed pages and in the hard work of citizenship. That said, faculty members should not be watchlisted if they make other judgments than mine about how to deploy academic freedom. MORE: 12,000 professors ask to be added to Watchlist Allen said her role in the classroom, where I strongly distinguish values-based analysis from partisan deliberation and never advocate partisan positions in class, is different from her roles as opinion columnist and engaged citizen. Allen notes she was recently mentioned on Tucker Carlsons Fox News show when Turning Point founder Charlie Kirk highlighted her entry. She said Kirks claim was simply false that Allen teaches that we can learn a lot from this rise of Donald Trump and this populist rise because actually it is very similar to that of Adolf Hitler. Allen thinks she was put on the list for a year-old op-ed because, wearing her engaged citizen hat, she is connected to the left-wing philanthropist George Soros. MORE: Philly-area professors peeved at being added to Watchlist In March she took over as chair of an advisory board for the Open Society Foundations, a Soros project that is distinct from his political donations, she said. As a result of being on the list and featured on Fox News, Allen said she received vile emails, tweets and two crude voicemails. Though she agrees free speech is under threat on college campuses like Middlebury, Allen compares the crude messages she has received to violent protests against libertarian scholar Charles Murray: [F]speech also needs protection from assaults from the right. Both sides have developed dangerous tactics for silencing those who disagree with them. Turning Points Matt Lamb, who oversees the watchlist, told The College Fix in an email: The work of an academic comprises not just what they directly say in the classroom but what they say outside of the classroom. By comparing Trump to Hitler, which she did, she sends a message to Trump supporters in her classrom [sic]: they too, are just like Nazis. It is beyond ironic that a professor says she wants to advance political dialogue, while comparing people she opposes to Nazis. Read the op-ed. UPDATE: The Professor Watchlist defended its inclusion of Allen on the list after this post was published. Its comments have been included. MORE: Watchlist creators say criticism is misguided, overblown Like The College Fix on Facebook / Follow us on Twitter IMAGE:BlueSkyImage/Shutterstock

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May 1, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Donald Trump might think Hitler, like slavery, was not so bad either – IrishCentral

Donald Trump’s comments about the Civil War have to be read to be believed. Wikimedia Commons Donald Trump believes the Civil War could have been avoided if slave owner Andrew Jackson had lived longer. Jackson, son of Irish immigrants Andrew and Elizabeth Jackson, had 150 slaves when he died, up from 9 when he took over his residence called The Hermitage in Tennessee He didn’t just enjoy the fruits of having slaves, he had earned the name Indian Killer from Indian tribes. Andrew Jackson recommended that troops systematically kill Indian women and children after massacres in order to complete the extermination. As historians noted The Creeks tribe lost 23 million acres of land in southern Georgia and central Alabama, paving the way for cotton plantation slavery. His frontier warfare and subsequent negotiations opened up much of the southeast U.S. to settler colonialism. Read More: Irish Andrew Jackson – his life and times Andrew Jackson was about as likely to stop slavery as Jefferson Davis was. Subjugation, foot on the neck stuff was his modus operandi. Trump has shown himself indelibly ignorant by such a proposition. He made the comments in an interview that airs today on Sirius XM’s P.O.T.U.S. station: TRUMP: [Jackson] was a swashbuckler. But when his wife died, did you know he visited her grave every day? I visited her grave actually, because I was in Tennessee. ZITO: Oh, that’s right. You were in Tennessee. TRUMP: And it was amazing. The people of Tennessee are amazing people. They love Andrew Jackson. They love Andrew Jackson in Tennessee. ZITO: Yeah, he’s a fascinating… TRUMP: I mean, had Andrew Jackson been a little later, you wouldn’t have had the Civil War. He was a very tough person, but he had a big heart. And he was really angry that — he saw what was happening with regard to the Civil War. He said, There’s no reason for this. People don’t realize, you know, the Civil War if you think about it, why? People don’t ask that question, but why was there the Civil War? Why could that one not have been worked out? 2 Andrew Jackson He has been making a bigger ass of himself than normal lately. The only way a civil war could have been prevented was to allow slavery not just in the south but across America as the south was seeking in the new territory. Lincoln would not stand for it. Trump no doubt would have cut a deal He recently asked why Palestinians and Israelis could not get along, the little matter of the creation of Israel, the dislocation of millions of Palestinians, the 1967 war and a vicious on and off conflict notwithstanding. Soon he may ask how come the Second World War happened. After all, Hitler built great highways, put folks back to work. Ok, there was that pesky Jewish Holocaust issue but can’t we all get along? He sounds like a hippie from ’60s Haight-Ashbury trying to condense world history into yet another soundbite. His own foreign policy is laughable. Now that he had appointed Jared his Jewish son in law to mediate in Palestine and he is apparently ready to announce the US Embassy will move to Jerusalem – what could go wrong with getting a deal from the humiliated once again Palestinians? Imagine If Hillary were president and she had appointed Chelseas husband as her de facto Secretary of State? Wed rightly be outraged. The sad part is that Trump understands history so poorly that the son in law might indeed be a better bet. God Save America with this guy in the White House.

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May 1, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

When Adolf Hitler confidante Unity Mitford came to stay – BBC News – BBC News

BBC News When Adolf Hitler confidante Unity Mitford came to stay – BBC News BBC News One of the high-society Mitford sisters, Unity, caused a scandal thanks to her relationship with Adolf Hitler. So how did she end up in a Warwickshire vicarage? and more »

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

That Time Hitler’s Nephew Viciously Denounced Uncle Adolf In An American Magazine – Task & Purpose

Family dinners can be tense affairs. Doubly so if youre related to one of the most despised human beings in history: Adolf fucking Hitler. Born in Liverpool, England, in 1911, William Patrick Hitlers father, Alois Hitler, was brother to Adolf, and as William grew up, he was apparently an irritating and embarrassing thorn in his uncles side. Their tense relationship worsened substantially after he published numerous articles in the United Kingdom and United States detailing his uncles personal life. Thanks to Mark Frauenfelder over at BoingBoing, we can share some of those anecdotes. In the July 4, 1939 edition of Look Magazine, a bi-weekly general interest magazine based in Des Moines, Iowa, the younger Hitler published a six-page feature entitled Why I Hate My Uncle. Theres that bit about Adolf Hitlers autographed photo, his preferred after-dinner snack, and his mannerisms: Being very close to my father at the time, he (Adolf Hitler) autographed this picture for me. We had cakes and whipped cream, Hitlers favorite dessert. I was struck by his intensity, his feminine gestures. There was dandruff on his coat. Then theres some disturbing implications about the suicide of Hitlers half-niece: When I visited Berlin in 1931, the family was in trouble. Geli Raubal, the daughter of Hitlers and my fathers sister, had committed suicide. Everyone knew that Hitler and she had long been intimate and that she had been expecting a child a fact that enraged Hitler. His revolver was found by her body. Oh, and the descriptions of William Hitlers visits to Germany, where he met with his uncle. Tense doesnt really cut it: I published some articles on my uncle when I returned to England and was forthwith summoned back to Berlin and taken with my father and aunt to Hitlers hotel. He was furious. Pacing up and down, wild-eyed and tearful, he made me promise to retract my articles and threatened to kill himself if anything else were written on his private life. I shall never forget the last time he sent for me. He was in a brutal temper when I arrived. Walking back and forth, brandishing his horsehide whip, he shouted insults at my head as if he were delivering a political oration. William Hitler moved to the United States in 1939, and later changed his last name to Stuart-Houston. He also enlisted in the Navy during the war yeah, in addition to slamming his piece of shit uncle in print, he signed up to fight in World War II. His initial attempts to join the Army were shot down, due to his family connections, but after writing an impassioned plea to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, he was permitted to serve in the Navy, according to the Daily Mail: I am the nephew and only descendant of the ill-famed Chancellor and Leader of Germany who today so despotically seeks to enslave the free and Christian peoples of the globe. More than anything else I would like to see active combat as soon as possible and thereby be accepted by my friends and comrades as one of them in this great struggle for liberty. Its unclear if the early articles were published for noble reasons, or personal gain rumors of the articles being an attempt at blackmail abound but the fact that Hitlers nephew signed on with the Navy to kick Nazi-butt makes us think hed have been welcomed among the likes of the Inglourious Basterds, had they been real.

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Rick Sirvint’s list of best books about Adolf Hitler – The Keene Sentinel

Posted: Saturday, April 29, 2017 6:00 am Rick Sirvints list of best books about Adolf Hitler Posted on Apr 29, 2017 by CLARK 1. Hitler, 1889-1936: Hubris, by Ian Kershaw 2. Hitler, 1936-1945: Nemesis, by Ian Kershaw An online service is needed to view this article in its entirety. You need an online service to view this article in its entirety. Click here if you already have a login to the site. Need a print or online subscription? If you or your household receives a 7 day home delivery subscription to The Keene Sentinel, you are entitled to FREE access to the premium subscription services on SentinelSource.com PLUS access to FREE archived content. To activate your online subscription, please follow the instructions presented. This is a one-time only process. If you are unsure about the type of account you have, please contact the Circulation Department at 603-283-0797 option 3 or by email at circulation@keenesentinel.com or webmaster@keenesentinel.com Need an account? Create one now. kAmb] %96 #:D6 2?5 u2== @7 E96 %9:C5 #6:49 p w:DE@CJ @7 }2K: v6C> 2?J[ 3J (:==:2> $9:C6Ck^Am kAmc] |6:? z2> A7[ 3J p5@=7 w:E=6Ck^Am kAmd] w:E=6C s:28?@D:D @7 2 s6DECF4E:G6 !C@A96E[ 3J uC:EK #65=:49k^Am kAme] %96 w:E=6C q@@ E96 x?E6CC@82E:@?D @7 w:E=6CD !6CD@?2= p:56D] t5:E65 3J w6?C: {6q@C 2?5 #@86C q@J6Dk^Am kAmg] w:E=6C 2?5 E96 !@H6C @7 p6DE96E:4D[ 3J uC656C:4 $A@EEDk^Am kAmh] w:E=6CD u:CDE (2C[ 3J %9@> 2D (636Ck^Am kAm`_] %96 {@DE {:76 @7 tG2 qC2F?[ 3J p?86=2 {2> 36CEk^Am Thank you for reading 5 free articles on our site. You can come back at the end of your 30-day period for another 5 free articles, or you can purchase a subscription and continue to enjoy valuable local news and information. If you need help, please contact our office at 603-352-1234. You need an online service to view this article in its entirety. Click here if you already have a login to the site. Need a print or online subscription? If you or your household receives a 7 day home delivery subscription to The Keene Sentinel, you are entitled to FREE access to the premium subscription services on SentinelSource.com PLUS access to FREE archived content. To activate your online subscription, please follow the instructions presented. This is a one-time only process. If you are unsure about the type of account you have, please contact the Circulation Department at 603-283-0797 option 3 or by email at circulation@keenesentinel.com or webmaster@keenesentinel.com Need an account? Create one now. Posted in The Keene Sentinel Local News on Saturday, April 29, 2017 6:00 am.

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

Adolf Hitler and his wife Eva Braun through the years – New York Daily News

New York Daily News Adolf Hitler and his wife Eva Braun through the years New York Daily News Adolf Hitler has remained one of the most feared and despised names in world history, but the name of his closest companion is one that isn't as known: Eva … and more »

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed

"Why I Hate My Uncle," by William Hitler (Look magazine, 1939) – Boing Boing

A copy of Look Magazine from July 4, 1939 will cost you $950, because it has a a six-page photo-illustrated feature by William P. Hitler, called “Why I Hate My Uncle.” William Patrick Hitler was born in Liverpool in the UK in 1911. His father was Adolf Hitlers brother Alois Hitler. William moved to Germany in 1933 in an attempt to benefit from his uncles position of power. It appears William, who was familiar with Adolfs family background, was an embarrassing thorn in Adolfs side during the 1930s. Moving to the United States in 1939, William served in the US Navy in World War II. After the war, William Hitler changed his last name to Stuart-Houston. Looks article is written by William and reveals what it was like to be Adolf Hitlers nephew. Here are some excerpts: The July 4, 1939 issue of Look Magazine is scarce with just the single copy listed for sale on AbeBooks. It is offered by Rare Non Fiction, a seller located in British Columbia, Canada. Look was a rival to Life Magazine, and was published between 1937 and 1971. Prominently featuring eye-catching photography and well known people, Look employed Stanley Kubrick as a staff photographer from 1946 to 1951. Originally priced at 10 cents, this copy features Hollywood film stars Hedy Lamarr and Robert Taylor on the cover, and also has articles on Americas most wanted criminals, nurses, and horse racing. It is comfortably the most expensive copy of Look listed for sale on AbeBooks. report this ad Robots (or spiders, or crawlers) are little computer programs that search engines use to scan and index websites. Robots.txt is a little file placed on webservers to tell search engines what they should and shouldnt index. The Internet Archive isnt a search engine, but has historically obeyed exclusion requests from robots.txt files. But its changing [] Before the internet, even before desktop publishing, gang members who wanted calling cards headed to a printer with their idea. The results are collected in Brandon Johnsons Thee Almighty & Insane: Chicago Gang Business Cards from the 1970s & 1980s. The long-awaited documentary Graphic Means just premiered at the ByDesign film festival, describing a half-century of world-changing analog-to-digital shifts in how graphic designers worked. Heres the trailer. Bamboo has lots of uses beyond just being panda food. Things like bikes, roads, scaffolding, and musical instruments are made from the fast-growing grass. But unless you are participating in a tropical-themed LARP, you probably wouldnt want a shirt made from bamboo stalks. So why dobamboo bed sheets make any sense? Because yarn extracted from [] If you want to work in tech, but dont have any desire to code web apps to help businesses sell things to other business, you might want to consider a career in cybersecurity. Judging from the apparent complete infiltration of Russian hackers in American cyberspace,it seems fair to speculate that theres a major shortage of [] All moms are different. But all moms like getting flowers on Mothers Day, and thats a fact (not, however a fact we can document in any fashion.) Instead of getting chewed out for forgetting to call her on the second Sunday of May, you can take care of it ahead of time with Telefloras flower [] report this ad

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed


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