Archive for the ‘Hitler’ Category

Adolf Hitler – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adolf Hitler (German: [adlf htl]( listen); 20 April 1889 30 April 1945) was an Austrian-born German politician and the leader of the Nazi Party (German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP); National Socialist German Workers Party). He was chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and dictator of Nazi Germany (as Fhrer und Reichskanzler) from 1934 to 1945. Hitler was at the centre of Nazi Germany, World War II in Europe, and the Holocaust.

Hitler was a decorated veteran of World War I. He joined the German Workers’ Party (precursor of the NSDAP) in 1919, and became leader of the NSDAP in 1921. In 1923, he attempted a coup in Munich to seize power. The failed coup resulted in Hitler’s imprisonment, during which time he wrote his memoir, Mein Kampf (My Struggle). After his release in 1924, Hitler gained popular support by attacking the Treaty of Versailles that had been forced on Germany and promoted nationalism, Pan-Germanism, and antisemitism with charismatic oratory, and Nazi propaganda. Hitler frequently denounced international capitalism and communism as being part of a Jewish conspiracy.

Hitler’s Nazi Party became the largest democratically elected party in the German Reichstag, leading to his appointment as chancellor in 1933. Following fresh elections won by his coalition, the Reichstag passed the Enabling Act, which began the process of transforming the Weimar Republic into the Third Reich, a single-party dictatorship based on the totalitarian and autocratic ideology of National Socialism. Hitler aimed to eliminate Jews from Germany and establish a New Order to counter what he saw as the injustice of the post-World War I international order dominated by Britain and France. His first six years in power resulted in rapid economic recovery from the Great Depression, the denunciation of restrictions imposed on Germany after World War I, and the annexation of territories that were home to millions of ethnic Germans, actions which gave him significant popular support.

Hitler actively sought Lebensraum (“living space”) for the German people. His aggressive foreign policy is considered to be the primary cause of the outbreak of World War II in Europe. He directed large-scale rearmament and on 1 September 1939 invaded Poland, resulting in British and French declarations of war on Germany. In June 1941, Hitler ordered an invasion of the Soviet Union. By the end of 1941 German forces and their European allies occupied most of Europe and North Africa. Failure to defeat the Soviets and the entry of the United States into the war forced Germany onto the defensive and it suffered a series of escalating defeats, partly because of Hitler’s countless military blunders. In the final days of the war, during the Battle of Berlin in 1945, Hitler married his long-time lover, Eva Braun. On 30 April 1945, less than two days later, the two committed suicide to avoid capture by the Red Army, and their corpses were burned. Under Hitler’s leadership and racially motivated ideology, the regime was responsible for the genocide of at least 5.5 million Jews, and millions of other victims whom he and his followers deemed racially inferior.

Hitler’s father, Alois Hitler, Sr. (18371903), was the illegitimate child of Maria Anna Schicklgruber. Because the baptismal register did not show the name of his father, Alois initially bore his mother’s surname, Schicklgruber. In 1842, Johann Georg Hiedler married Alois’s mother, Maria Anna. After she died in 1847 and Johann Georg Hiedler in 1856, Alois was brought up in the family of Hiedler’s brother, Johann Nepomuk Hiedler. In 1876, Alois was legitimated and the baptismal register changed by a priest to register Johann Georg Hiedler as Alois’s father (recorded as Georg Hitler). Alois then assumed the surname Hitler, also spelled as Hiedler, Httler, or Huettler. The Hitler surname is probably based on “one who lives in a hut” (Standard German Htte for hut) or on “shepherd” (Standard German hten for to guard); alternatively, it might be derived from the Slavic words Hidlar or Hidlarcek.

Nazi official Hans Frank suggested that Alois’s mother had been employed as a housekeeper for a Jewish family in Graz and that the family’s 19-year-old son, Leopold Frankenberger, had fathered Alois. Because no Frankenberger was registered in Graz during that period, and no record of Leopold Frankenberger’s existence has been produced, historians dismiss the claim that Alois’s father was Jewish.[9]

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Adolf Hitler was born on 20 April 1889 at the Gasthof zum Pommer, an inn located at Salzburger Vorstadt 15, Braunau am Inn, Austria-Hungary, a town on the border with Bavaria, Germany. He was the fourth of six children to Alois Hitler and Klara Plzl (18601907). Hitler’s older siblingsGustav, Ida, and Ottodied in infancy. When Hitler was three, the family moved to Passau, Germany. There he acquired the distinctive lower Bavarian dialect, rather than Austrian German, which marked his speech throughout his life. In 1894 the family relocated to Leonding (near Linz), and in June 1895, Alois retired to a small landholding at Hafeld, near Lambach, where he farmed and kept bees. Hitler attended Volksschule (a state-supported school) in nearby Fischlham. He became fixated on warfare after finding a picture book about the Franco-Prussian War among his father’s belongings.

The move to Hafeld coincided with the onset of intense father-son conflicts caused by Hitler’s refusal to conform to the strict discipline of his school. Alois Hitler’s farming efforts at Hafeld ended in failure, and in 1897 the family moved to Lambach. The eight-year-old Hitler took singing lessons, sang in the church choir, and even considered becoming a priest. In 1898 the family returned permanently to Leonding. The death of his younger brother, Edmund, from measles on 2 February 1900 deeply affected Hitler. He changed from a confident, outgoing, conscientious student to a morose, detached, sullen boy who constantly fought with his father and teachers.

Alois had made a successful career in the customs bureau and wanted his son to follow in his footsteps. Hitler later dramatised an episode from this period when his father took him to visit a customs office, depicting it as an event that gave rise to an unforgiving antagonism between father and son, who were both strong-willed. Ignoring his son’s desire to attend a classical high school and become an artist, in September 1900 Alois sent Hitler to the Realschule in Linz. Hitler rebelled against this decision, and in Mein Kampf revealed that he intentionally did poorly in school, hoping that once his father saw “what little progress I was making at the technical school he would let me devote myself to my dream”.

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Adolf Hitler – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Hitler Historical Museum

Introduction The Hitler Historical Museum is a non-biased, non-profit museum devoted to the study and preservation of the world history related to Adolf Hitler and the National Socialist Party. True to its role as an educational museum, these exhibits allow for visitors to understand and examine historical documents and information for themselves. The museum, while acknowledging the tragedy that over 50 million people died during World War 2, retains its non-biased status by refraining from making political judgments of any sort. Neither does it make the standard, uninformative, and cliched historical judgement that the victor of the war was “good” and that the loser of the war was “bad.” Instead, all materials and resources are provided as a documentation of the time period and as scholastic resources with notes for clarification. No biased judgments, slanderous labels or childish name calling exist here as they do in most of the writings on this topic.

The Museum’s chief concern is to provide documents and information that shed light on Adolf Hitler and the National Socialist Party. Because of the numerous contradicting, disjoint, biased, confused, and deficient interpretations that exist, few scholars are able to gather the facts and to understand and explain them coherently. Whether this failure is from a lack of information, scholarship ability, or honesty is unimportant. What is important is that historical information be made freely available and gathered into exhibits that allow researchers to derive indepedent conclusions from the relatively well preserved writings of this time period.

Ideological Statement The teaching of history should convey only facts and be free from political motives, personal opinions, biases, propaganda, and other common tactics of distortion. Every claim that is made about history should also be accompanied by documentation proving its basis. Only responsible scholarship and teaching should be permitted. Those who intend to support particular political interests and agendas should have their biased historical interpretations criticized for lacking proof.

Contributors If you are in possession of any artifacts, documents, images, or other material that would be worthwhile to our efforts, we invite you to contact us to arrange for its inclusion in our online exhibit.

News: Hitler draws Disney characters News: Hitler’s Globe Sells for $100,000 News: Hitler Paintings Auctioned in England

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Hitler Historical Museum

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Gettysburg Curator: Blood-stained piece of Hitler's couch preserves history

Erik Dorr, curator of the Gettysburg Museum of History, poses for a photograph with a piece of upholstery from the couch that Adolf Hitler commited suicide on. Dorr acquired the artifact earlier this year in an auction. (Shane Dunlap – The Evening Sun)

Erik Dorr believes some items, no matter how grisly, do more good in public view than forgotten in someone’s closet.

That’s why a piece of the sofa on which Adolf Hitler allegedly committed suicide is now on display at his Museum of History in Gettysburg. It doesn’t look like much just a 3-by-6 inch piece of frayed fabric but Dorr hopes someone can help him find out more about a tiny, dark stain on its corner.

This stain, historians believe, is Hitler’s blood.

Dorr bought the relic in February at Alexander Historical Auctions, a Maryland-based company, at a cost of $16,000, according to auction records. Although some people might disagree with his decision to publicly display the relic, he said, he believes it could help visitors understand the horrors of World War II.

“My policy here is we don’t censor history,” he said.

While similar samples allegedly containing Hitler’s blood exist in Russian archives, authorities there have strictly limited researchers’ access to their collections, Dorr said. He purchased the artifact with the hopes that someone with the appropriate resources would step forward and try to isolate a DNA sample from the piece. This sample could then be compared to other samples known to contain the dictator’s DNA.

Until such a person comes forward, however, the relic is available for public viewing in his free museum, Dorr said.

“Sometimes with stuff like that, you don’t want it to get in the wrong hands, so I wanted to keep it in the museum system,” he said.

The piece of the couch was taken by United States Army Colonel Roswell P. Rosengren, who served during most of World War II as public information officer for General Dwight D. Eisenhower, said Bill Panagopulos, president of Alexander Historical Auctions. A few days after Hitler committed suicide by a pistol shot to the head, Rosengren and a few fellow American officers were let into the dictator’s air raid bunker by the Soviet forces, which controlled that portion of Berlin, Panagopulos said. Rosengren used the opportunity to take a section of the couch, along with a few other items from the bunker.

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Gettysburg Curator: Blood-stained piece of Hitler's couch preserves history

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The Nazis' "Degenerate Art"

“Degenerate Art” is the term Adolf Hitler and his henchmen used to describe works they simply did not like. The Nazis are long gone. Much of the art they denounced has survived, and is now on view. Here’s Erin Moriarty of “48 Hours”:

In the cultural capital that was Berlin in the early 1930s, art and politics often clashed, with modern artists like George Grosz leading the charge.

19 Photos

A NYC gallery exhibit documents how Hitler’s henchmen demonized artists who failed to evoke the Nazi ideal

A weapon to lampoon those in power, through political cartoons and graphic, sometimes grotesque, paintings. Grosz even dared to caricature lampoon Adolf Hitler.

“George Grosz poked fun at almost everyone, but especially the Nazis,” Petropoulos said. “He threatened the Nazis in a way that — well, they were never going to forgive him.”

Grosz’ youngest son, Marty — now 84 — recalls a story his father told about Nazi thugs coming to his studio: “They’re banging on the door: ‘Where is that pig Grosz? We want him. We’ll take care of him.’ And [Grosz] said, ‘Oh gee, I’m sorry, he’s not here. I’m just the guy who cleans up.’ They believed him! And he got out of it that way.”

So it’s no surprise that when Adolph Hitler decided to wage war against modern art, George Grosz became enemy number one.

His art — and the works of other contemporary artists, including Paul Klee, Otto Dix, Max Beckmann, Ernst Kirchner, Wassily Kandinsky and others — were denounced, confiscated from museums, and then put on public display as examples of “Degenerate Art.”

The exhibit, Petropoulos said, was clearly “very ideological. It was a way of articulating the Nazi worldview.”

Link:

The Nazis' "Degenerate Art"

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Germany's interest in Adolf Hitler at record levels

Another film dealt with Hitler’s decision to ban traditional Rhineland Catholic carnivals. Germany’s public ZDF Info channel was found to have screened 109 documentaries on Hitler this year alone.

Robert Bachem, its director said: “As history is one of our main fields of interest, it is not surprising that we run many programmes about National Socialism.”

Sociologists have attributed the rise of interest in Hitler and the Nazis to the fact that the majority of today’s Germans have had no experience of the Second World War, are less ashamed of the period than previous generations and more eager to learn about it.

They point out that most of today’s Germans had family experience of the war only through parents or grandparents.

In many German families, the Second World War remained a taboo subject for decades after 1945.

However, this aspect is now also under scrutiny. A rash of new books by German authors in their fifties and sixties have sought to lift the lid on their families’ dark past.

In several cases the authors have been shocked to discover that their parents were dedicated, and sometimes brutal, Nazis.

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Germany's interest in Adolf Hitler at record levels

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Worcestershire Gentleman's cricket team who said Heil to Hitler in 1937 tour

Adolf Hitler became fascinated by cricket in August 1937, demanded match Shipped the Gentlemen of Worcestershire to Berlin for three-day test Appeared to be propaganda plug after success of Olympics year before British players shocked by violence of captain and aggressive shouting

By Dan Waddell

Published: 17:02 EST, 3 May 2014 | Updated: 10:31 EST, 4 May 2014

It is one of the lesser known but more remarkable facts in the annals of cricketing history that Adolf Hitler once took an interest in the game then fell out with it decisively.

This was witnessed at first-hand by British Army officers held prisoner in Germany during the First World War, who met the then corporal and were surprised to find him asking for an explanation of the rules.

A few days later, Hitler returned to announce that he had been training a team of Germans and wanted to play the English at the earliest opportunity. The scores are unknown.

Welcome: A Berlin newspaper reports the arrival of the team for the three-day test match in August 1937

Alas, Hitler found the sport insufficiently violent for the prime of German volk. In particular, it was unmanly for batsmen to wear pads to protect their legs.

And so it came to be that, for disciples of National Socialism, cricket was not just English, but effeminate.

It is not as if the Nazis were fans of modern sport in any form. Once in power, they legalised sabre-duelling, where the object was to inflict a scar on your opponents face.

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Worcestershire Gentleman's cricket team who said Heil to Hitler in 1937 tour

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Inside Hitler's bunker hideaway where he and Eva Braun died after fall of Berlin

Haunting images reveal inside Hitler’s Fhrerbunker in Berlin, Germany Photographer William Vandivert given access to hideaway in 1945 Extraordinary series of images were then published in Life Magazine Pictures show piles of debris, old documents and blood-stained furniture Hilter and wife Eva Braun killed themselves in the bunker on April 30 1945

By Allan Hall In Berlin

Published: 08:24 EST, 1 May 2014 | Updated: 04:23 EST, 2 May 2014

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These haunting images show the inside of the Fhrerbunker – the underground hideaway where Hitler and Eva Braun took their own lives after the fall of Berlin.

The death of Adolf Hitler, then 56, and Eva Braun, 33, in the heart of Berlin on April 30, 1945, is widely regarded as the fall of the Third Reich.

The couple lived the last few months of their lives together in the Fhrerbunker – with Hitler controlling his failing military operation from the base.

They are even thought to have wed in the hideaway the day before their suicide.

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Inside Hitler's bunker hideaway where he and Eva Braun died after fall of Berlin

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Adolf Hitler – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Adolf Hitler (German: [adlf htl]( listen); 20 April 1889 30 April 1945) was an Austrian-born German politician and the leader of the Nazi Party (German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP); National Socialist German Workers Party). He was chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and dictator of Nazi Germany (as Fhrer und Reichskanzler) from 1934 to 1945. Hitler was at the centre of Nazi Germany, World War II in Europe, and the Holocaust. Hitler was a decorated veteran of World War I. He joined the German Workers’ Party (precursor of the NSDAP) in 1919, and became leader of the NSDAP in 1921. In 1923, he attempted a coup in Munich to seize power. The failed coup resulted in Hitler’s imprisonment, during which time he wrote his memoir, Mein Kampf (My Struggle). After his release in 1924, Hitler gained popular support by attacking the Treaty of Versailles that had been forced on Germany and promoted nationalism, Pan-Germanism, and antisemitism with charismatic oratory, and Nazi propaganda. Hitler frequently denounced international capitalism and communism as being part of a Jewish conspiracy. Hitler’s Nazi Party became the largest democratically elected party in the German Reichstag, leading to his appointment as chancellor in 1933. Following fresh elections won by his coalition, the Reichstag passed the Enabling Act, which began the process of transforming the Weimar Republic into the Third Reich, a single-party dictatorship based on the totalitarian and autocratic ideology of National Socialism. Hitler aimed to eliminate Jews from Germany and establish a New Order to counter what he saw as the injustice of the post-World War I international order dominated by Britain and France. His first six years in power resulted in rapid economic recovery from the Great Depression, the denunciation of restrictions imposed on Germany after World War I, and the annexation of territories that were home to millions of ethnic Germans, actions which gave him significant popular support. Hitler actively sought Lebensraum (“living space”) for the German people. His aggressive foreign policy is considered to be the primary cause of the outbreak of World War II in Europe. He directed large-scale rearmament and on 1 September 1939 invaded Poland, resulting in British and French declarations of war on Germany. In June 1941, Hitler ordered an invasion of the Soviet Union. By the end of 1941 German forces and their European allies occupied most of Europe and North Africa. Failure to defeat the Soviets and the entry of the United States into the war forced Germany onto the defensive and it suffered a series of escalating defeats, partly because of Hitler’s countless military blunders. In the final days of the war, during the Battle of Berlin in 1945, Hitler married his long-time lover, Eva Braun. On 30 April 1945, less than two days later, the two committed suicide to avoid capture by the Red Army, and their corpses were burned. Under Hitler’s leadership and racially motivated ideology, the regime was responsible for the genocide of at least 5.5 million Jews, and millions of other victims whom he and his followers deemed racially inferior. Hitler’s father, Alois Hitler, Sr. (18371903), was the illegitimate child of Maria Anna Schicklgruber. Because the baptismal register did not show the name of his father, Alois initially bore his mother’s surname, Schicklgruber. In 1842, Johann Georg Hiedler married Alois’s mother, Maria Anna. After she died in 1847 and Johann Georg Hiedler in 1856, Alois was brought up in the family of Hiedler’s brother, Johann Nepomuk Hiedler. In 1876, Alois was legitimated and the baptismal register changed by a priest to register Johann Georg Hiedler as Alois’s father (recorded as Georg Hitler). Alois then assumed the surname Hitler, also spelled as Hiedler, Httler, or Huettler. The Hitler surname is probably based on “one who lives in a hut” (Standard German Htte for hut) or on “shepherd” (Standard German hten for to guard); alternatively, it might be derived from the Slavic words Hidlar or Hidlarcek. Nazi official Hans Frank suggested that Alois’s mother had been employed as a housekeeper for a Jewish family in Graz and that the family’s 19-year-old son, Leopold Frankenberger, had fathered Alois. Because no Frankenberger was registered in Graz during that period, and no record of Leopold Frankenberger’s existence has been produced, historians dismiss the claim that Alois’s father was Jewish.[9] . Adolf Hitler was born on 20 April 1889 at the Gasthof zum Pommer, an inn located at Salzburger Vorstadt 15, Braunau am Inn, Austria-Hungary, a town on the border with Bavaria, Germany. He was the fourth of six children to Alois Hitler and Klara Plzl (18601907). Hitler’s older siblingsGustav, Ida, and Ottodied in infancy. When Hitler was three, the family moved to Passau, Germany. There he acquired the distinctive lower Bavarian dialect, rather than Austrian German, which marked his speech throughout his life. In 1894 the family relocated to Leonding (near Linz), and in June 1895, Alois retired to a small landholding at Hafeld, near Lambach, where he farmed and kept bees. Hitler attended Volksschule (a state-supported school) in nearby Fischlham. He became fixated on warfare after finding a picture book about the Franco-Prussian War among his father’s belongings. The move to Hafeld coincided with the onset of intense father-son conflicts caused by Hitler’s refusal to conform to the strict discipline of his school. Alois Hitler’s farming efforts at Hafeld ended in failure, and in 1897 the family moved to Lambach. The eight-year-old Hitler took singing lessons, sang in the church choir, and even considered becoming a priest. In 1898 the family returned permanently to Leonding. The death of his younger brother, Edmund, from measles on 2 February 1900 deeply affected Hitler. He changed from a confident, outgoing, conscientious student to a morose, detached, sullen boy who constantly fought with his father and teachers. Alois had made a successful career in the customs bureau and wanted his son to follow in his footsteps. Hitler later dramatised an episode from this period when his father took him to visit a customs office, depicting it as an event that gave rise to an unforgiving antagonism between father and son, who were both strong-willed. Ignoring his son’s desire to attend a classical high school and become an artist, in September 1900 Alois sent Hitler to the Realschule in Linz. Hitler rebelled against this decision, and in Mein Kampf revealed that he intentionally did poorly in school, hoping that once his father saw “what little progress I was making at the technical school he would let me devote myself to my dream”.

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Hitler Historical Museum

Introduction The Hitler Historical Museum is a non-biased, non-profit museum devoted to the study and preservation of the world history related to Adolf Hitler and the National Socialist Party. True to its role as an educational museum, these exhibits allow for visitors to understand and examine historical documents and information for themselves. The museum, while acknowledging the tragedy that over 50 million people died during World War 2, retains its non-biased status by refraining from making political judgments of any sort. Neither does it make the standard, uninformative, and cliched historical judgement that the victor of the war was “good” and that the loser of the war was “bad.” Instead, all materials and resources are provided as a documentation of the time period and as scholastic resources with notes for clarification. No biased judgments, slanderous labels or childish name calling exist here as they do in most of the writings on this topic. The Museum’s chief concern is to provide documents and information that shed light on Adolf Hitler and the National Socialist Party. Because of the numerous contradicting, disjoint, biased, confused, and deficient interpretations that exist, few scholars are able to gather the facts and to understand and explain them coherently. Whether this failure is from a lack of information, scholarship ability, or honesty is unimportant. What is important is that historical information be made freely available and gathered into exhibits that allow researchers to derive indepedent conclusions from the relatively well preserved writings of this time period. Ideological Statement The teaching of history should convey only facts and be free from political motives, personal opinions, biases, propaganda, and other common tactics of distortion. Every claim that is made about history should also be accompanied by documentation proving its basis. Only responsible scholarship and teaching should be permitted. Those who intend to support particular political interests and agendas should have their biased historical interpretations criticized for lacking proof. Contributors If you are in possession of any artifacts, documents, images, or other material that would be worthwhile to our efforts, we invite you to contact us to arrange for its inclusion in our online exhibit. News: Hitler draws Disney characters News: Hitler’s Globe Sells for $100,000 News: Hitler Paintings Auctioned in England

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Gettysburg Curator: Blood-stained piece of Hitler's couch preserves history

Erik Dorr, curator of the Gettysburg Museum of History, poses for a photograph with a piece of upholstery from the couch that Adolf Hitler commited suicide on. Dorr acquired the artifact earlier this year in an auction. (Shane Dunlap – The Evening Sun) Erik Dorr believes some items, no matter how grisly, do more good in public view than forgotten in someone’s closet. That’s why a piece of the sofa on which Adolf Hitler allegedly committed suicide is now on display at his Museum of History in Gettysburg. It doesn’t look like much just a 3-by-6 inch piece of frayed fabric but Dorr hopes someone can help him find out more about a tiny, dark stain on its corner. This stain, historians believe, is Hitler’s blood. Dorr bought the relic in February at Alexander Historical Auctions, a Maryland-based company, at a cost of $16,000, according to auction records. Although some people might disagree with his decision to publicly display the relic, he said, he believes it could help visitors understand the horrors of World War II. “My policy here is we don’t censor history,” he said. While similar samples allegedly containing Hitler’s blood exist in Russian archives, authorities there have strictly limited researchers’ access to their collections, Dorr said. He purchased the artifact with the hopes that someone with the appropriate resources would step forward and try to isolate a DNA sample from the piece. This sample could then be compared to other samples known to contain the dictator’s DNA. Until such a person comes forward, however, the relic is available for public viewing in his free museum, Dorr said. “Sometimes with stuff like that, you don’t want it to get in the wrong hands, so I wanted to keep it in the museum system,” he said. The piece of the couch was taken by United States Army Colonel Roswell P. Rosengren, who served during most of World War II as public information officer for General Dwight D. Eisenhower, said Bill Panagopulos, president of Alexander Historical Auctions. A few days after Hitler committed suicide by a pistol shot to the head, Rosengren and a few fellow American officers were let into the dictator’s air raid bunker by the Soviet forces, which controlled that portion of Berlin, Panagopulos said. Rosengren used the opportunity to take a section of the couch, along with a few other items from the bunker.

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The Nazis' "Degenerate Art"

“Degenerate Art” is the term Adolf Hitler and his henchmen used to describe works they simply did not like. The Nazis are long gone. Much of the art they denounced has survived, and is now on view. Here’s Erin Moriarty of “48 Hours”: In the cultural capital that was Berlin in the early 1930s, art and politics often clashed, with modern artists like George Grosz leading the charge. 19 Photos A NYC gallery exhibit documents how Hitler’s henchmen demonized artists who failed to evoke the Nazi ideal A weapon to lampoon those in power, through political cartoons and graphic, sometimes grotesque, paintings. Grosz even dared to caricature lampoon Adolf Hitler. “George Grosz poked fun at almost everyone, but especially the Nazis,” Petropoulos said. “He threatened the Nazis in a way that — well, they were never going to forgive him.” Grosz’ youngest son, Marty — now 84 — recalls a story his father told about Nazi thugs coming to his studio: “They’re banging on the door: ‘Where is that pig Grosz? We want him. We’ll take care of him.’ And [Grosz] said, ‘Oh gee, I’m sorry, he’s not here. I’m just the guy who cleans up.’ They believed him! And he got out of it that way.” So it’s no surprise that when Adolph Hitler decided to wage war against modern art, George Grosz became enemy number one. His art — and the works of other contemporary artists, including Paul Klee, Otto Dix, Max Beckmann, Ernst Kirchner, Wassily Kandinsky and others — were denounced, confiscated from museums, and then put on public display as examples of “Degenerate Art.” The exhibit, Petropoulos said, was clearly “very ideological. It was a way of articulating the Nazi worldview.”

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Germany's interest in Adolf Hitler at record levels

Another film dealt with Hitler’s decision to ban traditional Rhineland Catholic carnivals. Germany’s public ZDF Info channel was found to have screened 109 documentaries on Hitler this year alone. Robert Bachem, its director said: “As history is one of our main fields of interest, it is not surprising that we run many programmes about National Socialism.” Sociologists have attributed the rise of interest in Hitler and the Nazis to the fact that the majority of today’s Germans have had no experience of the Second World War, are less ashamed of the period than previous generations and more eager to learn about it. They point out that most of today’s Germans had family experience of the war only through parents or grandparents. In many German families, the Second World War remained a taboo subject for decades after 1945. However, this aspect is now also under scrutiny. A rash of new books by German authors in their fifties and sixties have sought to lift the lid on their families’ dark past. In several cases the authors have been shocked to discover that their parents were dedicated, and sometimes brutal, Nazis.

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Worcestershire Gentleman's cricket team who said Heil to Hitler in 1937 tour

Adolf Hitler became fascinated by cricket in August 1937, demanded match Shipped the Gentlemen of Worcestershire to Berlin for three-day test Appeared to be propaganda plug after success of Olympics year before British players shocked by violence of captain and aggressive shouting By Dan Waddell Published: 17:02 EST, 3 May 2014 | Updated: 10:31 EST, 4 May 2014 It is one of the lesser known but more remarkable facts in the annals of cricketing history that Adolf Hitler once took an interest in the game then fell out with it decisively. This was witnessed at first-hand by British Army officers held prisoner in Germany during the First World War, who met the then corporal and were surprised to find him asking for an explanation of the rules. A few days later, Hitler returned to announce that he had been training a team of Germans and wanted to play the English at the earliest opportunity. The scores are unknown. Welcome: A Berlin newspaper reports the arrival of the team for the three-day test match in August 1937 Alas, Hitler found the sport insufficiently violent for the prime of German volk. In particular, it was unmanly for batsmen to wear pads to protect their legs. And so it came to be that, for disciples of National Socialism, cricket was not just English, but effeminate. It is not as if the Nazis were fans of modern sport in any form. Once in power, they legalised sabre-duelling, where the object was to inflict a scar on your opponents face.

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Inside Hitler's bunker hideaway where he and Eva Braun died after fall of Berlin

Haunting images reveal inside Hitler’s Fhrerbunker in Berlin, Germany Photographer William Vandivert given access to hideaway in 1945 Extraordinary series of images were then published in Life Magazine Pictures show piles of debris, old documents and blood-stained furniture Hilter and wife Eva Braun killed themselves in the bunker on April 30 1945 By Allan Hall In Berlin Published: 08:24 EST, 1 May 2014 | Updated: 04:23 EST, 2 May 2014 5,817 shares 240 View comments These haunting images show the inside of the Fhrerbunker – the underground hideaway where Hitler and Eva Braun took their own lives after the fall of Berlin. The death of Adolf Hitler, then 56, and Eva Braun, 33, in the heart of Berlin on April 30, 1945, is widely regarded as the fall of the Third Reich. The couple lived the last few months of their lives together in the Fhrerbunker – with Hitler controlling his failing military operation from the base. They are even thought to have wed in the hideaway the day before their suicide.

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May 6, 2014   Posted in: Hitler  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."