Archive for the ‘Hitler’ Category

Japanese Central Banker Praises Hitler’s Economic Policies – New York Times

TOKYO A Bank of Japan policymaker praised Adolf Hitler’s economic policies on Thursday, but said they enabled the Nazi dictator to do “horrible” things to the world.

Yutaka Harada, a member of the board of Japan’s central bank, said Western policymakers helped bring Hitler to power by being slow to apply John Maynard Keynes’ proposals to fight the Great Depression.

Hitler had taken “wonderful” fiscal and monetary stimulus steps, which in turn led to “something horrible for the world” as his strengthened grip on power led to the Holocaust and massive human casualties during World War Two, Harada said in a seminar on monetary policy in Tokyo.

Hitler became German chancellor in 1933.

“Because Hitler had taken appropriate fiscal and monetary policy steps, tragedy resulted. What I’m saying is that someone should have taken appropriate fiscal and monetary policy steps before Hitler did,” said Harada, an academic-turned BOJ policymaker.

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German drama ’13 Minutes’ details 1939 assassination attempt on Hitler – Los Angeles Times

A man is placing sticks of dynamite into a wall and setting a timer. Intensely focused and sweating profusely, he’s under a lot of stress, and no wonder. The date is Nov. 8, 1939, the place is Munich, the target is Adolf Hitler.

Inspired by a plot against der Fhrer that most people have never heard of, a lone wolf endeavor that came within the titular 13 Minutes of succeeding, this Oliver Hirschbiegel-directed German drama tells a fascinating but inevitably grim story, both more interesting and more downbeat than one might anticipate.

Given that the director is Hirschbeigel, best known in this country for the Oscar-nominated Downfall, source of endless ranting Hitler memes, it is not surprising that 13 Minutes is a solidly made, straight-ahead depiction of events.

What is unexpected, besides the details of the out-of-nowhere plot and unwelcome scenes of realistic torture and death, is the unusual personality and character of plotter Georg Elser.

As played by Christian Friedel, previously seen in Michael Hanekes The White Ribbon, Elser is a most unlikely plotter. Though left leaning, he was resolutely apolitical. A small-town carpenter and clockmaker from Knigsbronn in the Swabia region of Bavaria, he did not fit anyones profile of a potential assassin.

So how did this man get to the position where only an unforeseeable, last-minute schedule change kept him from assassinating Hitler and preventing the Second World War?

Unlike some films based on history, 13 Minutes does not play games with us. We see almost at once that Elsers scheme did not succeed and, as written by Fred Breinersdorfer and Leonie-Claire Breinersdorfer, the film goes back and forth between his capture and interrogation and flashbacks to his pre-plot life.

Doing the interrogating are a classic good cop/bad cop duo. The good cop is Arthur Nebe (Burghart Klaussner), head of Germany’s Criminal Police, while, inevitably, the bad guy is chief of the Gestapo Heinrich Mller (Johann von Blow).

The Gestapo being first among equals, when Elser refuses to talk, Mller’s fairly graphic methods of torture are tried first, an agonizing situation, which frankly the film would have been better off without. Anyone who needs convincing at this point that the Nazis were not softies is probably not worth reaching.

A more experienced interrogator, Nebe has better luck, largely because he threatens to torture Elsers family as well as Elsa (Katharina Schttler), the key woman in his life, if answers are not forthcoming.

Before the mechanics of the plot get detailed, we see Elser’s carefree life, starting with pleasant time spent across the border in Switzerland. Something of a free spirit, he’s a musician as well as an incorrigible womanizer who has zero interest in commitment, romantic or otherwise.

When family troubles bring him back to Germany, Elser hangs out with old friend and zealous Communist Josef Schurr (David Zimmerschied), but women are still his extracurricular interest of choice.

Elsers life changes radically when he meets Elsa, who is attracted to him but married to a thuggish alcoholic lout. An affair begins anyway, and a key focus of 13 Minutes is the complexities of that risky relationship.

13 Minutes also deals with the specifics of Elsers plot, and the way his confession frustrates interrogators Nebe and Mller.

For though Elser insists he acted on his own, which happens to be the truth, Hitler is convinced that he is only the front man for a more wide-ranging conspiracy. He puts his underlings in the Kafkaesque situation of trying to get the stubborn Elser to confess to something that was not true.

Perhaps the most interesting question 13 Minutes raises but doesnt totally answer is why this ordinary, nonpolitical German got so radicalized by Hitlers policies that he attempted this cataclysmic act.

A man who always went his own way, Elser seemed to see things clearer than his fellow countrymen. Why do they all follow this gangster? he asks at one point, foreseeing bloodshed in the future and adding, Someone has to stop this madman, it has to happen.

To his interrogators, Elser insists I am a free human being. I have to do whats right. In fact his position was so unpopular for so long that as recently as 2014 German Chancellor Angela Merkel made news when she acknowledged Elsers heroism. Why so few Germans saw things the way he did, or acted on their feelings if they did, is a question no film can answer.

————-

13 Minutes

Rating: R, for disturbing violence and some sexuality

Running time: 1 hour, 50 minutes

Playing: Laemmle’s Royal, West Los Angeles

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kenneth.turan@latimes.com

@KennethTuran

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German drama ’13 Minutes’ details 1939 assassination attempt on Hitler – Los Angeles Times

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Alone in Berlin review couple wage a quiet war against Hitler … – The Guardian

Strong performances Brendan Gleeson and Emma Thompson. Photograph: Marcel Hartman/X Filme

Here is a handsomely produced and solidly acted period drama set in Nazi Germany, based on the postwar novel by Hans Fallada and based on a true-life case.

Brendan Gleeson and Emma Thompson play Otto and Anna Quangel, a middle-aged couple in Berlin in 1940. Hating the Nazis and galvanised by grief and rage at the loss of their son in battle, they embark on tiny but very dangerous acts of resistance: leaving anonymous anti-Hitler postcards in stairwells and public places a capital crime. Daniel Brhl plays the police inspector on their trail, using flags on a city map showing the whereabouts of cards handed in to the authorities to calculate where the culprit might live.

Part of the storys potency lies in the fact that this is a kind of resistance that anyone can imagine carrying out, however timid, however lonely, however secretly convinced that its effects are likely to be minimal but also that it requires the weird tenacity and organisation of a serial killer. More than once, Alone in Berlin reminded me of Fritz Langs M.

Gleeson, Thompson and Brhl give strong performances and this is a well-carpentered film.

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Aidan Turner Joins Sam Elliott In ‘The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot’ – Deadline

EXCLUSIVE: Poldark star Aidan Turner has been set to co-star in The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot, the film already toplined by Sam Elliott from writer-director Robert D. Krzykowski and executive producer John Sayles. Shooting is now set to begin August 1 on the East Coast.

The film tells the story of American soldier Calvin Barr (Turner), who leaves his true love behind to infiltrate enemy lines and kill Adolph Hitler in the heart of World War II. Decades later, Barr (now Elliott) is needed again, this time to hunt the legendary Bigfoot carrier of a deadly plague hidden deep in the Canadian wilderness.

Krzykowski is producing with Lucky McKee, Patrick Ewald and Shaked Berenson; Ewald and Berensons Epic Pictures is financing and handling worldwide sales.

The film features a loaded VFX team including Blade RunnersDouglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich and Rocco Gioffre and Spectral Motion effects house which was behind Hellboy and Stranger Things among others.

Turner played Kili in Peter Jacksons Hobbit movies and currently stars on BBCs Poldark which is airing Season 3 in the UK and airs on PBS Masterpiece on October 1. His film credits include Jim Sheridans The Secret Scripture and the upcoming Loving Vincent with Saoirse Ronan and Chris ODowd.

Hes reppedby the Lisa Richards Agency and Principal Entertainment LA.

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Hitler’s glamorous high flyers – Spectator.co.uk

It is conventional wisdom in the publishing industry that, despite the old adage, readers do indeed judge books by their covers. So, it seems, do passengers on the No. 29 bus. For a middle-aged man reading Clare Mulleys The Women Who Flew for Hitler, some of the looks I got made me so uncomfortable that I took to hiding the cover behind a newspaper.

So lets get one thing straight from the beginning: this is not a niche book for Third Reich enthusiasts, nor a seedy excuse to fantasise about women in Nazi uniforms. Do not be put off by the awful title: it is in fact a serious double biography of two of the most remarkable women in the history of aviation.

The first of Mulleys subjects, and the more famous of the two, is Hanna Reitsch. Reitsch was the darling of the prewar German press and one of the most giftedfliers of her generation. At the age of 21, this extraordinary woman flew a glider through storm clouds to set a new world altitude record for unpowered flight. In 1937 she became the first woman ever to fly a helicopter, and during the second world war she flew every plane going, including manned versions of the V-1 flying bomb.

Her physical courage seemed to know no bounds. In 1942, she crashed in a jet plane prototype she was testing; but despite breaking her back in several places, and having her nose torn from her face, she was back flying again within a year. She was the first German woman to be made a Flight Captain, the first to receive the Military Flying Medal, and the first to receive the Iron Cross, First Class. She was the one and only Hanna Reitsch, as one of her male colleagues put it, a symbol of German womanhood and the idol of German aviation.

The second woman in Mulleys book, though less well known, is perhaps even more impressive. Melitta Schiller was a military test pilot whose determination to stress her planes to their very limits seemed almost suicidal. According to one contemporary, taking a plane into even a moderate nosedive was something many male pilots already regarded as an act of heroism. Melitta insisted on flying her planes almost vertically towards the ground, only pulling out at the very last moment. On one such dive the canopy of her plane blew off, leaving her exposed to the elements as she tried to bring her plane back under control. On another occasion her windscreen exploded. She was forced to crash-land several times, and once had to bail out when her plane caught fire. Yet she remained undeterred: during the course of her career she completed more than 2,000 nosedives in the name of research.

The half-Jewish Melitta Schiller, who supported the plot to kill Hitler.

However, what made Melitta Schiller so exceptional was that the equipment she was testing during these dives was often also designed by her. The research of this talented aeronautical engineer gave rise to scores of innovations, especially in night-fighter technology. Thus, not only did she become the second woman to be awarded the Iron Cross, First Class, but towards the end of the war she was also appointed head of her own research station. She would spend her mornings performing death-defying manoeuvres in the air and her afternoons at the drawing board, perfecting her designs.

As a story of two women bursting through the very low glass ceilings of their time and rising to the pinnacle of their profession, Mulleys book is a satisfying, rollicking read. But there is a great deal more nuance here than first meets the eye. Neither woman regarded herself as a feminist indeed, Melitta openly repudiated the very idea. Both worked in the service of a vile regime, and were well aware of the crimes it was committing. One wants to celebrate their achievements, but Mulley deliberately makes us uncomfortable about doing so.

Furthermore, she reveals that despite some superficial similarities, these were two very different women. Hanna was brash, impatient for change, and became a fanatical Nazi. She had private dinners with Gring, Himmler and Hitler, and even spent time with Hitler in his bunker during the final days of the Nazi Reich. She survived the war but kept the taint of her Nazi past until her death in 1979.

Melitta, by contrast, lived by the traditional values of the old German Junker class. She was also half-Jewish, and was only spared deportation to the camps because her pioneering work was worth too much to the regime. Before the war she married into the family of Claus von Stauffenberg, and wholeheartedly supported his plot to kill Hitler in 1944. She died in a doomed attempt to find her husband at the very end of the war when her plane was shot down by the Allies. Each woman in her way was therefore emblematic of a different facet of German society during the most turbulent years of the 20th century.

Mulleys biography is well researched, beautifully written, and gives a perspective on the war that even seasoned students will find refreshing. So do not be put off by the title: this is one book that should not be judged by its cover.

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Duterte compares Islamic State to Hitler – NEWS.com.au

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte says he cannot guarantee that other parts of the country are safe from attacks by the Islamic State organisation, a group he likened to German dictator Adolf Hitler.

Hitler, said Duterte, killed millions of Jews “for nothing.”

Duterte said he could not even tell when a siege by hundreds of militants allied with the terrorist group in Marawi City, 800km south of Manila, would end, nor what to expect in the coming days.

“It if ends tomorrow, I’ll be the most happiest man in the country,” Duterte told reporters after receiving millions of dollars worth of rifles and ammunition donated by China.

When asked if he could guarantee that a similar attack in other parts of the country would not happen, the 72-year-old leader said, “I cannot give that assurance.”

“It’s bereft of ideology,” he said, referring to the Islamic State. “What they know is just to kill and destroy … It’s a mass insanity.”

“Every generation has that kind of [phenomenon]. During our parents’ time, Hitler was a madman, and yet he was able to contaminate a lot of people with his ideas about killing Jews.

“Killing by the millions for nothing. That’s just like ISIS.”

Troops have been battling the militants for more than a month in Marawi City, where rescuers on Wednesday recovered 17 decomposing bodies of civilians believed to have been killed by the terrorists.

The retrieval brought to 44 the number of civilians allegedly killed by the militants during the five-week conflict, said Brigadier General Restituto Padilla, a military spokesman.

Padilla said the number of civilians killed by the militants allied with Islamic State could still increase as reports of other executions are validated.

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North Korea Says Trump Is Following Hitler’s Path and His ‘America First’ Policies Are More Brutal Than Nazism – Newsweek

North Koreas state-run news agency has slammed President Donald Trumps America First policies as being even more ferocious and brutal than Nazism under Adolf Hitler. The editorial, titled Nazism in the 21st CenturyDefeating America First, published by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) Tuesday, comes at a time of increasing tensions between the two countries and ahead of South Korean President Moon Jae-Ins first visit to the White House this week.

Related: North Korea threat is top priority, says Trumps new ambassador to China

The American-first principle…advocates the world domination by recourse to military means just as was the case with Hitlers concept of world occupation, read the editorial, in comments translated by The Japan Times.

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It added: The American version of Nazism [is] far surpassing the fascism in the last century in its ferocious, brutal and chauvinistic nature.

The wild charges follow Trumps touting of hisAmerica First theme since his campaign last year. Trumphas threatened to pull out of international trade agreements and military alliances, and has withdrawn the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement.

KCNA had some strong words for the United States president, too, claiming that he was following Hitlers dictatorial politics, dividing people into either friends or foes and manufacturing an atmosphere of horror among political, public, media, information and all other circles in the U.S.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un watches a test of a new anti-aircraft guided-weapon system organized by the Academy of National Defense Science in this undated photo released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), May 28. KCNA/Reuters

Writing on the North Korea analysis site 38North, Robert Carlin, a visiting scholar at Stanford Universitys Center for International Security and Cooperation, said Monday that over the past month Pyongyang had relaxed restrictions on rhetorical attacks on the new U.S. administration.

The coarsening language toward the administration, and toward the president himself, seems to reflect a slowly sharpening discussion within the regime over how to react once Washington announced its new policy of maximum pressure and dialogue, Carlin added.

In the face of continued North Korea missile launches and its repeated vows to carry out a sixth nuclear test, the White House has talked up the possibility of a major conflict with that country.

Another point of contention was the case of American Otto Warmbier, whodiedlast week just days after returning home to the U.S. in a coma after17 months in North Korean detention. Following Warmbiers death, Trump condemned the brutality of the North Korean regime.

South Korean President Moon also blamed North Korea for Warmbiersdeath. However, Moon, who was elected last month, has embraced a more diplomatic, cooperative stance with North Korea in comparison to his conservative predecessors of the past decade.

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One tried to kill him, one tried to save him: the women who flew for Hitler – Telegraph.co.uk

In September 1938, Melitta von Stauffenberg touched down on British soil. The German pilot was a special guest at Chigwell airfield, in Essex, which had been put at the disposal of the British Womens Air Reserve.

Keen to show off Germanys female aviators, Nazi Minister for Aviation Hermann Gring, selected Melitta to take part in the displays at the grand opening.

Her official mission was to extend the hand of friendship. Unofficially, she was there to show British pilots how it was done. Melitta, 35, hated publicity and was loathe to take part.

Nevertheless, she wowed the crowds by performing perilous loops. Yet even as she did, Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain was, at that very moment, in talks with Hitler in Cologne.

Less than a week later, Britain agreed to the German annexation of the Czech Sudetenland. Within a year, the two countries would be at war.

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Donald Trump Is Not Like Hitler, Says the Director of ‘Downfall’ – IndieWire

Oliver Hirschbiegels 2004 drama Downfall was the definitive portrait of Adolf Hitler at the end of WWII, examining the dictator during his final days as he ran out of options. It also provided fodder for one of the greatest viral memes of all time the Downfall parody videos, which position fake subtitles over a pivotal scene in which Hitler (Bruno Ganz) lashes out at his staff upon realizing that hes lost the war. Over the years, Hitler has lashed out over topics ranging from Oasis splitting up to Ben Affleck getting cast as the Batman.

While this wasnt part of Hirschbiegels plan, the video does speak to his skills as a filmmaker, given that the scene is filled with pregnant pauses and sudden bursts of anger that make it the perfect template for so many circumstances.

READ MORE: 13 Minutes Trailer: Downfall Director Oliver Hirschbiegel Dramatizes the Failed Plot to Assassinate Hitler

Needless to say, a lot of the world has felt like it has been watching a slowed-down, real-life version of the Downfall parody ever since Donald Trump became a candidate for president. The cartoonish ex-reality stars heated temperament and outsized ego drag the histrionics of the Downfall scene into modern times. But Hirschbiegel, who has revised the Third Reich era with 13 Minutes, opening this week, is wary of comparing the two figures.

You cant compare Trump to Hitler, Hirschbiegel said. Hes certainly not a dictator or a tyrant who slaughtered his own people, as Hitler did. Instead, the director said that the parallel exists only in the impulses that catapulted Trump to the White House. Overall, there seems to be this tendency where people do not believe in the political system and they feel betrayed by the elite, he said. Thats why theyre looking for figures like Trump or Teresa May. They put hope in people like that, which is terrible, because these people only work by a system of right or wrong, or winning and losing. Thats childish. Thats not what civilized people should do in a diverse, globalized society.

In 13 Minutes, Hirschbiegel chronicles the little-known efforts of the working class carpenter Georg Elser (Christian Frieden), who attempted to assassinate Hitler in November 1939. Elser set off a bomb at a rally that killed several people, but Hitler had left the event early; Elser was later arrested and executed at the Dachau concentration camp. Hirschbiegel noted that the film was welcomed positively in Germany, unlike Downfall, which was seen as controversial for foregrounding Hitlers experiences.

Elsers not a known figure, Hirschbiegel said, but he is the first to see that somebody needed to do something. He was really clairvoyant. People appreciated this character. We need people like that today looking at the state of the world. He wasnt a political person. He just saw something terribly wrong happening and nobody was doing anything about it. The reality was way more drastic. In order to stop this, he knew he had to become the tyrant slayer.

READ MORE: Robert Smigel on Triumphs Hulu Specials and Why He Regrets Comparing Donald Trump to Hitler

While Hirschbiegel stopped short of saying that America needs its own Elser, the filmmaker did acknowledge that Trump has had a dramatic effect on the way American citizens are evaluating their individual responsibilities. Trump is all about power, Hirschbiegel said. But the good effect of Trump is that people are waking up. Theyre realizing, Oops, I should vote and I should have a position. Because if I dont, watch out: someone will get elected who doesnt represent my interests and could abuse the whole country.

13 Minutes opens theatrically on Friday, June 30. Watch the trailer below:

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Japanese Central Banker Praises Hitler’s Economic Policies – New York Times

TOKYO A Bank of Japan policymaker praised Adolf Hitler’s economic policies on Thursday, but said they enabled the Nazi dictator to do “horrible” things to the world. Yutaka Harada, a member of the board of Japan’s central bank, said Western policymakers helped bring Hitler to power by being slow to apply John Maynard Keynes’ proposals to fight the Great Depression. Hitler had taken “wonderful” fiscal and monetary stimulus steps, which in turn led to “something horrible for the world” as his strengthened grip on power led to the Holocaust and massive human casualties during World War Two, Harada said in a seminar on monetary policy in Tokyo. Hitler became German chancellor in 1933. “Because Hitler had taken appropriate fiscal and monetary policy steps, tragedy resulted. What I’m saying is that someone should have taken appropriate fiscal and monetary policy steps before Hitler did,” said Harada, an academic-turned BOJ policymaker.

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German drama ’13 Minutes’ details 1939 assassination attempt on Hitler – Los Angeles Times

A man is placing sticks of dynamite into a wall and setting a timer. Intensely focused and sweating profusely, he’s under a lot of stress, and no wonder. The date is Nov. 8, 1939, the place is Munich, the target is Adolf Hitler. Inspired by a plot against der Fhrer that most people have never heard of, a lone wolf endeavor that came within the titular 13 Minutes of succeeding, this Oliver Hirschbiegel-directed German drama tells a fascinating but inevitably grim story, both more interesting and more downbeat than one might anticipate. Given that the director is Hirschbeigel, best known in this country for the Oscar-nominated Downfall, source of endless ranting Hitler memes, it is not surprising that 13 Minutes is a solidly made, straight-ahead depiction of events. What is unexpected, besides the details of the out-of-nowhere plot and unwelcome scenes of realistic torture and death, is the unusual personality and character of plotter Georg Elser. As played by Christian Friedel, previously seen in Michael Hanekes The White Ribbon, Elser is a most unlikely plotter. Though left leaning, he was resolutely apolitical. A small-town carpenter and clockmaker from Knigsbronn in the Swabia region of Bavaria, he did not fit anyones profile of a potential assassin. So how did this man get to the position where only an unforeseeable, last-minute schedule change kept him from assassinating Hitler and preventing the Second World War? Unlike some films based on history, 13 Minutes does not play games with us. We see almost at once that Elsers scheme did not succeed and, as written by Fred Breinersdorfer and Leonie-Claire Breinersdorfer, the film goes back and forth between his capture and interrogation and flashbacks to his pre-plot life. Doing the interrogating are a classic good cop/bad cop duo. The good cop is Arthur Nebe (Burghart Klaussner), head of Germany’s Criminal Police, while, inevitably, the bad guy is chief of the Gestapo Heinrich Mller (Johann von Blow). The Gestapo being first among equals, when Elser refuses to talk, Mller’s fairly graphic methods of torture are tried first, an agonizing situation, which frankly the film would have been better off without. Anyone who needs convincing at this point that the Nazis were not softies is probably not worth reaching. A more experienced interrogator, Nebe has better luck, largely because he threatens to torture Elsers family as well as Elsa (Katharina Schttler), the key woman in his life, if answers are not forthcoming. Before the mechanics of the plot get detailed, we see Elser’s carefree life, starting with pleasant time spent across the border in Switzerland. Something of a free spirit, he’s a musician as well as an incorrigible womanizer who has zero interest in commitment, romantic or otherwise. When family troubles bring him back to Germany, Elser hangs out with old friend and zealous Communist Josef Schurr (David Zimmerschied), but women are still his extracurricular interest of choice. Elsers life changes radically when he meets Elsa, who is attracted to him but married to a thuggish alcoholic lout. An affair begins anyway, and a key focus of 13 Minutes is the complexities of that risky relationship. 13 Minutes also deals with the specifics of Elsers plot, and the way his confession frustrates interrogators Nebe and Mller. For though Elser insists he acted on his own, which happens to be the truth, Hitler is convinced that he is only the front man for a more wide-ranging conspiracy. He puts his underlings in the Kafkaesque situation of trying to get the stubborn Elser to confess to something that was not true. Perhaps the most interesting question 13 Minutes raises but doesnt totally answer is why this ordinary, nonpolitical German got so radicalized by Hitlers policies that he attempted this cataclysmic act. A man who always went his own way, Elser seemed to see things clearer than his fellow countrymen. Why do they all follow this gangster? he asks at one point, foreseeing bloodshed in the future and adding, Someone has to stop this madman, it has to happen. To his interrogators, Elser insists I am a free human being. I have to do whats right. In fact his position was so unpopular for so long that as recently as 2014 German Chancellor Angela Merkel made news when she acknowledged Elsers heroism. Why so few Germans saw things the way he did, or acted on their feelings if they did, is a question no film can answer. ————- 13 Minutes Rating: R, for disturbing violence and some sexuality Running time: 1 hour, 50 minutes Playing: Laemmle’s Royal, West Los Angeles See the most-read stories in Entertainment this hour kenneth.turan@latimes.com @KennethTuran

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Alone in Berlin review couple wage a quiet war against Hitler … – The Guardian

Strong performances Brendan Gleeson and Emma Thompson. Photograph: Marcel Hartman/X Filme Here is a handsomely produced and solidly acted period drama set in Nazi Germany, based on the postwar novel by Hans Fallada and based on a true-life case. Brendan Gleeson and Emma Thompson play Otto and Anna Quangel, a middle-aged couple in Berlin in 1940. Hating the Nazis and galvanised by grief and rage at the loss of their son in battle, they embark on tiny but very dangerous acts of resistance: leaving anonymous anti-Hitler postcards in stairwells and public places a capital crime. Daniel Brhl plays the police inspector on their trail, using flags on a city map showing the whereabouts of cards handed in to the authorities to calculate where the culprit might live. Part of the storys potency lies in the fact that this is a kind of resistance that anyone can imagine carrying out, however timid, however lonely, however secretly convinced that its effects are likely to be minimal but also that it requires the weird tenacity and organisation of a serial killer. More than once, Alone in Berlin reminded me of Fritz Langs M. Gleeson, Thompson and Brhl give strong performances and this is a well-carpentered film.

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Aidan Turner Joins Sam Elliott In ‘The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot’ – Deadline

EXCLUSIVE: Poldark star Aidan Turner has been set to co-star in The Man Who Killed Hitler And Then The Bigfoot, the film already toplined by Sam Elliott from writer-director Robert D. Krzykowski and executive producer John Sayles. Shooting is now set to begin August 1 on the East Coast. The film tells the story of American soldier Calvin Barr (Turner), who leaves his true love behind to infiltrate enemy lines and kill Adolph Hitler in the heart of World War II. Decades later, Barr (now Elliott) is needed again, this time to hunt the legendary Bigfoot carrier of a deadly plague hidden deep in the Canadian wilderness. Krzykowski is producing with Lucky McKee, Patrick Ewald and Shaked Berenson; Ewald and Berensons Epic Pictures is financing and handling worldwide sales. The film features a loaded VFX team including Blade RunnersDouglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich and Rocco Gioffre and Spectral Motion effects house which was behind Hellboy and Stranger Things among others. Turner played Kili in Peter Jacksons Hobbit movies and currently stars on BBCs Poldark which is airing Season 3 in the UK and airs on PBS Masterpiece on October 1. His film credits include Jim Sheridans The Secret Scripture and the upcoming Loving Vincent with Saoirse Ronan and Chris ODowd. Hes reppedby the Lisa Richards Agency and Principal Entertainment LA.

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Hitler’s glamorous high flyers – Spectator.co.uk

It is conventional wisdom in the publishing industry that, despite the old adage, readers do indeed judge books by their covers. So, it seems, do passengers on the No. 29 bus. For a middle-aged man reading Clare Mulleys The Women Who Flew for Hitler, some of the looks I got made me so uncomfortable that I took to hiding the cover behind a newspaper. So lets get one thing straight from the beginning: this is not a niche book for Third Reich enthusiasts, nor a seedy excuse to fantasise about women in Nazi uniforms. Do not be put off by the awful title: it is in fact a serious double biography of two of the most remarkable women in the history of aviation. The first of Mulleys subjects, and the more famous of the two, is Hanna Reitsch. Reitsch was the darling of the prewar German press and one of the most giftedfliers of her generation. At the age of 21, this extraordinary woman flew a glider through storm clouds to set a new world altitude record for unpowered flight. In 1937 she became the first woman ever to fly a helicopter, and during the second world war she flew every plane going, including manned versions of the V-1 flying bomb. Her physical courage seemed to know no bounds. In 1942, she crashed in a jet plane prototype she was testing; but despite breaking her back in several places, and having her nose torn from her face, she was back flying again within a year. She was the first German woman to be made a Flight Captain, the first to receive the Military Flying Medal, and the first to receive the Iron Cross, First Class. She was the one and only Hanna Reitsch, as one of her male colleagues put it, a symbol of German womanhood and the idol of German aviation. The second woman in Mulleys book, though less well known, is perhaps even more impressive. Melitta Schiller was a military test pilot whose determination to stress her planes to their very limits seemed almost suicidal. According to one contemporary, taking a plane into even a moderate nosedive was something many male pilots already regarded as an act of heroism. Melitta insisted on flying her planes almost vertically towards the ground, only pulling out at the very last moment. On one such dive the canopy of her plane blew off, leaving her exposed to the elements as she tried to bring her plane back under control. On another occasion her windscreen exploded. She was forced to crash-land several times, and once had to bail out when her plane caught fire. Yet she remained undeterred: during the course of her career she completed more than 2,000 nosedives in the name of research. The half-Jewish Melitta Schiller, who supported the plot to kill Hitler. However, what made Melitta Schiller so exceptional was that the equipment she was testing during these dives was often also designed by her. The research of this talented aeronautical engineer gave rise to scores of innovations, especially in night-fighter technology. Thus, not only did she become the second woman to be awarded the Iron Cross, First Class, but towards the end of the war she was also appointed head of her own research station. She would spend her mornings performing death-defying manoeuvres in the air and her afternoons at the drawing board, perfecting her designs. As a story of two women bursting through the very low glass ceilings of their time and rising to the pinnacle of their profession, Mulleys book is a satisfying, rollicking read. But there is a great deal more nuance here than first meets the eye. Neither woman regarded herself as a feminist indeed, Melitta openly repudiated the very idea. Both worked in the service of a vile regime, and were well aware of the crimes it was committing. One wants to celebrate their achievements, but Mulley deliberately makes us uncomfortable about doing so. Furthermore, she reveals that despite some superficial similarities, these were two very different women. Hanna was brash, impatient for change, and became a fanatical Nazi. She had private dinners with Gring, Himmler and Hitler, and even spent time with Hitler in his bunker during the final days of the Nazi Reich. She survived the war but kept the taint of her Nazi past until her death in 1979. Melitta, by contrast, lived by the traditional values of the old German Junker class. She was also half-Jewish, and was only spared deportation to the camps because her pioneering work was worth too much to the regime. Before the war she married into the family of Claus von Stauffenberg, and wholeheartedly supported his plot to kill Hitler in 1944. She died in a doomed attempt to find her husband at the very end of the war when her plane was shot down by the Allies. Each woman in her way was therefore emblematic of a different facet of German society during the most turbulent years of the 20th century. Mulleys biography is well researched, beautifully written, and gives a perspective on the war that even seasoned students will find refreshing. So do not be put off by the title: this is one book that should not be judged by its cover.

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Duterte compares Islamic State to Hitler – NEWS.com.au

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte says he cannot guarantee that other parts of the country are safe from attacks by the Islamic State organisation, a group he likened to German dictator Adolf Hitler. Hitler, said Duterte, killed millions of Jews “for nothing.” Duterte said he could not even tell when a siege by hundreds of militants allied with the terrorist group in Marawi City, 800km south of Manila, would end, nor what to expect in the coming days. “It if ends tomorrow, I’ll be the most happiest man in the country,” Duterte told reporters after receiving millions of dollars worth of rifles and ammunition donated by China. When asked if he could guarantee that a similar attack in other parts of the country would not happen, the 72-year-old leader said, “I cannot give that assurance.” “It’s bereft of ideology,” he said, referring to the Islamic State. “What they know is just to kill and destroy … It’s a mass insanity.” “Every generation has that kind of [phenomenon]. During our parents’ time, Hitler was a madman, and yet he was able to contaminate a lot of people with his ideas about killing Jews. “Killing by the millions for nothing. That’s just like ISIS.” Troops have been battling the militants for more than a month in Marawi City, where rescuers on Wednesday recovered 17 decomposing bodies of civilians believed to have been killed by the terrorists. The retrieval brought to 44 the number of civilians allegedly killed by the militants during the five-week conflict, said Brigadier General Restituto Padilla, a military spokesman. Padilla said the number of civilians killed by the militants allied with Islamic State could still increase as reports of other executions are validated.

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North Korea Says Trump Is Following Hitler’s Path and His ‘America First’ Policies Are More Brutal Than Nazism – Newsweek

North Koreas state-run news agency has slammed President Donald Trumps America First policies as being even more ferocious and brutal than Nazism under Adolf Hitler. The editorial, titled Nazism in the 21st CenturyDefeating America First, published by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) Tuesday, comes at a time of increasing tensions between the two countries and ahead of South Korean President Moon Jae-Ins first visit to the White House this week. Related: North Korea threat is top priority, says Trumps new ambassador to China The American-first principle…advocates the world domination by recourse to military means just as was the case with Hitlers concept of world occupation, read the editorial, in comments translated by The Japan Times. Daily Emails and Alerts- Get the best of Newsweek delivered to your inbox It added: The American version of Nazism [is] far surpassing the fascism in the last century in its ferocious, brutal and chauvinistic nature. The wild charges follow Trumps touting of hisAmerica First theme since his campaign last year. Trumphas threatened to pull out of international trade agreements and military alliances, and has withdrawn the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement. KCNA had some strong words for the United States president, too, claiming that he was following Hitlers dictatorial politics, dividing people into either friends or foes and manufacturing an atmosphere of horror among political, public, media, information and all other circles in the U.S. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un watches a test of a new anti-aircraft guided-weapon system organized by the Academy of National Defense Science in this undated photo released by the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), May 28. KCNA/Reuters Writing on the North Korea analysis site 38North, Robert Carlin, a visiting scholar at Stanford Universitys Center for International Security and Cooperation, said Monday that over the past month Pyongyang had relaxed restrictions on rhetorical attacks on the new U.S. administration. The coarsening language toward the administration, and toward the president himself, seems to reflect a slowly sharpening discussion within the regime over how to react once Washington announced its new policy of maximum pressure and dialogue, Carlin added. In the face of continued North Korea missile launches and its repeated vows to carry out a sixth nuclear test, the White House has talked up the possibility of a major conflict with that country. Another point of contention was the case of American Otto Warmbier, whodiedlast week just days after returning home to the U.S. in a coma after17 months in North Korean detention. Following Warmbiers death, Trump condemned the brutality of the North Korean regime. South Korean President Moon also blamed North Korea for Warmbiersdeath. However, Moon, who was elected last month, has embraced a more diplomatic, cooperative stance with North Korea in comparison to his conservative predecessors of the past decade.

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One tried to kill him, one tried to save him: the women who flew for Hitler – Telegraph.co.uk

In September 1938, Melitta von Stauffenberg touched down on British soil. The German pilot was a special guest at Chigwell airfield, in Essex, which had been put at the disposal of the British Womens Air Reserve. Keen to show off Germanys female aviators, Nazi Minister for Aviation Hermann Gring, selected Melitta to take part in the displays at the grand opening. Her official mission was to extend the hand of friendship. Unofficially, she was there to show British pilots how it was done. Melitta, 35, hated publicity and was loathe to take part. Nevertheless, she wowed the crowds by performing perilous loops. Yet even as she did, Prime Minister, Neville Chamberlain was, at that very moment, in talks with Hitler in Cologne. Less than a week later, Britain agreed to the German annexation of the Czech Sudetenland. Within a year, the two countries would be at war.

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Donald Trump Is Not Like Hitler, Says the Director of ‘Downfall’ – IndieWire

Oliver Hirschbiegels 2004 drama Downfall was the definitive portrait of Adolf Hitler at the end of WWII, examining the dictator during his final days as he ran out of options. It also provided fodder for one of the greatest viral memes of all time the Downfall parody videos, which position fake subtitles over a pivotal scene in which Hitler (Bruno Ganz) lashes out at his staff upon realizing that hes lost the war. Over the years, Hitler has lashed out over topics ranging from Oasis splitting up to Ben Affleck getting cast as the Batman. While this wasnt part of Hirschbiegels plan, the video does speak to his skills as a filmmaker, given that the scene is filled with pregnant pauses and sudden bursts of anger that make it the perfect template for so many circumstances. READ MORE: 13 Minutes Trailer: Downfall Director Oliver Hirschbiegel Dramatizes the Failed Plot to Assassinate Hitler Needless to say, a lot of the world has felt like it has been watching a slowed-down, real-life version of the Downfall parody ever since Donald Trump became a candidate for president. The cartoonish ex-reality stars heated temperament and outsized ego drag the histrionics of the Downfall scene into modern times. But Hirschbiegel, who has revised the Third Reich era with 13 Minutes, opening this week, is wary of comparing the two figures. You cant compare Trump to Hitler, Hirschbiegel said. Hes certainly not a dictator or a tyrant who slaughtered his own people, as Hitler did. Instead, the director said that the parallel exists only in the impulses that catapulted Trump to the White House. Overall, there seems to be this tendency where people do not believe in the political system and they feel betrayed by the elite, he said. Thats why theyre looking for figures like Trump or Teresa May. They put hope in people like that, which is terrible, because these people only work by a system of right or wrong, or winning and losing. Thats childish. Thats not what civilized people should do in a diverse, globalized society. In 13 Minutes, Hirschbiegel chronicles the little-known efforts of the working class carpenter Georg Elser (Christian Frieden), who attempted to assassinate Hitler in November 1939. Elser set off a bomb at a rally that killed several people, but Hitler had left the event early; Elser was later arrested and executed at the Dachau concentration camp. Hirschbiegel noted that the film was welcomed positively in Germany, unlike Downfall, which was seen as controversial for foregrounding Hitlers experiences. Elsers not a known figure, Hirschbiegel said, but he is the first to see that somebody needed to do something. He was really clairvoyant. People appreciated this character. We need people like that today looking at the state of the world. He wasnt a political person. He just saw something terribly wrong happening and nobody was doing anything about it. The reality was way more drastic. In order to stop this, he knew he had to become the tyrant slayer. READ MORE: Robert Smigel on Triumphs Hulu Specials and Why He Regrets Comparing Donald Trump to Hitler While Hirschbiegel stopped short of saying that America needs its own Elser, the filmmaker did acknowledge that Trump has had a dramatic effect on the way American citizens are evaluating their individual responsibilities. Trump is all about power, Hirschbiegel said. But the good effect of Trump is that people are waking up. Theyre realizing, Oops, I should vote and I should have a position. Because if I dont, watch out: someone will get elected who doesnt represent my interests and could abuse the whole country. 13 Minutes opens theatrically on Friday, June 30. Watch the trailer below: Stay on top of the latest TV news! Sign up for our TV email newsletter here.

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