Archive for the ‘Holocaust’ Category

ETSU Reece Museum featuring traveling Holocaust exhibit – WCYB – WCYB

A new exhibit featured at the Reece Museum on the ETSU campus dives into some of the atrocities committed by medical professionals during the Holocaust.

The exhibit is called “Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race.” It shows how the Nazi party experimented on people during the 1930’s and 1940’s.

The display also depicts some of the propaganda used to convince the German citizens that attempting to engineer a master race was in their best interest.

Museum officials say the exhibit is timely after recent events.

“I think something like the Holocaust, you can never, you can’t forget. You’ll always need to recognize it. Especially with these past events and the resurgence of certain groups and hate. I think this is a really important thing for everyone to educate themselves on,” Reece Museum Exhibition Coordinator Spenser Brenner said.

The Reece Museum is also hosting a lecture by Holocaust survivor Trudy Dryer on August 24.

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‘Deadly Medicine’: Traveling Exhibit Depicts Horrors of Holocaust, Resilience of Survivors – Greeneville Sun

JOHNSON CITY Images and details of the atrocities of the Holocaust are horrifying, to be sure, but visitors to Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, now on display at the Reece Museum at East Tennessee State University, are encouraged to look beyond the horror and ask themselves what can be learned from those who survived.

Deadly Medicine, a traveling exhibit produced by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, will be at ETSU through Sept. 28, according to a news release. It is presented locally by the Tennessee Holocaust Commission, the Reece Museum and the ETSU Academic Health Sciences Center and Interprofessional Education.

It was Dr. Teresa Stephens ongoing research on resilience that led to the exhibit coming to ETSU, the release says. The former ETSU associate professor of nursing studies individuals and populations that have experienced extreme forms of trauma and survived. The aim of her research is to help health care students and professionals, as well as patients and others, learn ways they can be more resilient and better cope with stressful or traumatic situations.

One of the primary populations she works with is Holocaust survivors, many of whom she has contacted with the assistance of the Tennessee Holocaust Commission, it adds. THC Executive Director Danielle Kahane-Kaminsky reached out to Stephens last year and offered to bring the Deadly Medicine exhibit to East Tennessee if a suitable venue could be found. Stephens found that venue in the Reece Museum.

The Reece Museum is honored to host Deadly Medicine’, said Randy Sanders, museum director, and we are grateful to the Tennessee Holocaust Commission and the ETSU Academic Health Sciences Center for making this presentation possible. As the director of an art and history museum on a university campus, I am reminded of Miriam Osters timely quote, Education and remembrance are the only cures for hatred and bigotry.

This is more than hosting an exhibit, Stephens said. Its really an opportunity to showcase this work and lessons to be learned through the Holocaust. Theres a lot to learn about leadership, about the dangers in secrets of a society, about human injustices, about ethics in research and appropriate behaviors in medicine the things that can go wrong when things are not kept in check. These were horrible things that were done to people, and we dont ever want to repeat those again.

But there are also lessons in survival and resilience from the people who came out of that, she continued. The exhibit includes testimony on video from those who were part of those experiments. What I would like people to take away from this is to listen to their voices and see the incredible strength and capacity of humans to withstand this kind of trauma. What can we take away from that for when we face adversity?

Stephens said in the release that these lessons in resilience can apply to anyone, including health care providers who experience high levels of stress and witness trauma in their work, as well as patients who receive life-changing medical diagnoses.

Stephens also hopes the exhibit will encourage visitors to play a role in preventing atrocities from happening again in the future.

Thats what the survivors want us to do, she said. Any time Im working with survivors, theyre sharing their stories with the hope that it will prevent future atrocities or that it may help someone. Theyre hoping, of course, that it isnt repeated, that we dont see this type of horror again, but they also want people to learn from the strength that they found in themselves, for whatever challenges they faced.

From now through Sept. 28, a full schedule of programming has been planned in conjunction with the Deadly Medicine exhibit.

Remaining events in August include:

The secret WWII concentration camp diary of Odd Nansen, a lecture by Tim Boyce, editor of From Day to Day: One Mans Diary of Survival in Nazi Concentration Camps, on Tuesday at 2 p.m. in the D.P. Culp University Centers Martha Street Culp Auditorium (followed by a book-signing at 3 p.m.);

Odd Nansen and the Nazis deadly medicine, a lecture by Boyce, at 9 a.m. at The Museum at Mountain Home on the campus of the Quillen Veterans Affairs Medical Center; and

I Gave You Life Twice: A Story of Survival, Dreams, Betrayals and Accomplishments, a lecture by Holocaust survivor Henry Fribourg, on Wednesday, Aug. 30, at 1 p.m. at the Reece Museum, according to the release.

The Deadly Medicine exhibit and associated events are free and open to the public. Regular museum hours are Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Three reserved parking spaces are available directly in front of the museum, located at 363 Stout Drive on the ETSU campus. A parking permit for these spaces can be obtained at the front desk of the museum upon arrival. Visitor parking passes must be used for parking elsewhere on campus on Monday-Friday until 4:30 p.m.; these may be obtained online at http://www.etsu.edu/facilities/parking/.

For more information or to schedule group tours, call the Reece Museum at 423-439-4392. For disability accommodations, call the ETSU Office of Disability Services at 423-439-8346.

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‘Deadly Medicine’: Traveling Exhibit Depicts Horrors of Holocaust, Resilience of Survivors – Greeneville Sun

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Why teach about the Holocaust? – Cleveland Jewish News

“The world is too dangerous to live in not because of the people who do evil, but because of the people who sit and let it happen.”

Albert Einstein

What happened in Charlottesville, Va., is simply one of the most recent examples of hatred and bigotry. Racist, anti-Semitic and intolerant views have no place in a society that cherishes freedom and liberty for all. Studying the Holocaust provides one of the most effective subjects for examining basic moral issues and human behavior.

The Holocaust was not an accident in history. It occurred because individuals, organizations and governments made choices that not only legalized discrimination, but also allowed prejudice, hatred and genocide.

For those of us touched by the Holocaust, when we say Never Again we mean it. Kol Israel is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing educators with accurate, relevant and useful materials for teaching about the Holocaust. We are committed to preserving and sharing the eyewitness stories of survivors to ensure that the true stories of the horror of the Holocaust are not only never forgotten, but also are never repeated.

While many of Clevelands courageous survivors have been sharing their stories for decades, the day will come when there will be no eyewitnesses left to teach our children about what happened in the Holocaust. This sad reality makes it all the more imperative to have a way to continue to tell their stories.

As the new school year approaches, it is imperative that we join together to reject all bias and hate in our country and communities. Teachers, though they may be required to do so by state standards, rarely have enough time to teach these complicated topics. To meet their needs, Kol Israel Foundation has created a unique mobile Holocaust education program designed to honor and preserve the stories and experiences of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. We believe that first-person accounts and memoir literature add individual voices to a collective experience, helping students put a face on history and make meaning out of statistics.

Survivors stories come to life through video oral histories enhanced with historic and personal photographs and help teach tolerance, provide a focus of personal responsibility against prejudice of any sort and develop an awareness of personal choice. The videos run 20 minutes or less in length, optimizing the single-period classroom experience.

Kol Israel Foundation is eager to work with teachers and the community to fulfill the Jewish value of tikkun olam, repairing the world. Presentations are free and available to schools, civic and religious groups throughout Northeast Ohio.

If you know of a school or organization interested in a presentation or for more information, contact info@kifcle.orginfo@kifcle.org.

Ellen Jacob is vice president of Kol Israel Foundation in Beachwood.

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Anti-Semitic Vandals to Meet With Holocaust Survivor as Part of Punishment – Haaretz

A before and after shot of the Ellis family menorah that was vandalized in Arizona, December, 2016. Facebook / Naomi Ellis

Three teens pleaded guilty to criminal damaging charges fortwisting a large decorative menorah in the front yard of an Arizona familys home into a swastika.

The teens, who were arrested in March and charged as juveniles in the December incident in a residential neighborhood in Chandler, pleaded guilty on Thursday in Maricopa County Court.

They were sentenced to serve 30 hours of community service, along with writing an apology letter to the victims and paying restitution. They also must meet with a Holocaust survivor and write an essay on what they learned about the Holocaust and how their desecration of the menorah affected the community, the CBS affiliate in Phoenix reported.

The Maricopa County Attorneys Office has not yet decided how to charge a fourth teen in the incident, Clive Jamar Wilson, 19,who posted anapologyto the family on Facebook after he was arrested.

The Hanukkah candelabradamagedon Dec. 30, 2016, was made of gold spray-painted PVC pipes and solar-powered lights.

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Naomi and Seth Ellis said they built the 7-foot menorah in front of their house after their three sons, aged 5, 6 and 9, asked for lights in their yard like their neighbors Christmas decorations.

Police helped the Ellises dismantle the swastika early in the morning before their children saw it. The menorah was rebuilt and replaced. About 100 members of the familys synagogue and their rabbi and neighbors gathered in the Ellis front yard to light the rebuilt menorah.

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Holocaust survivors who live in Richmond speak to educators at museum – Fredericksburg.com

Alan and Halina Zimm of Richmond have accomplished two amazing feats almost none of us will ever achieve, and the second one we wouldnt want to. They have been married almost 70 years, and they both survived the Holocaust.

The Zimms spoke recently to a group of about 45 educators in a summer program at the Virginia Holocaust Museum in Richmond, a hidden gem on Cary Street. As a middle school history teacher from Spotsylvania, I was honored and excited to hear them speak.

However, Id seen Alan many times before. About 15 years ago, I started using the video testimonies on the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museums website with my students. Of the hundreds of videos available, I randomly selected about 12 that gave a representation of major aspects of the Holocaust, and Alans story of liberation happened to be one of them. Imagine my surprise and delight to see his name as a speaker on our syllabus.

At the time, I had no idea he lived in Richmond, or that his wife was also a survivor. As I learned in the two-week Teacher Education Institute, the second one that the museum offered this summer, Richmond has had a strong Jewish community going back to Colonial times. After World War II, when Holocaust survivors were leaving Europe for either the United States or Israel, many were placed in Richmond by Jewish relief organizations such as the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, and the Thalhimer family.

As a result, Richmond became one of several hubs in the United States for survivors, though it is estimated that only about 25 remain in that area today. While some have died, others have moved away to be near family.

The Virginia Holocaust Museum is one of 10 Holocaust museums in this country. Its housed in a former tobacco warehouse, and the brick and wood construction along with trains roaring past one block away create a feeling of stepping back into the past. The exhibits narrate the story of the Holocaust and include some things you wont find anywhere else: a re-creation of the courtroom at the postwar Nuremberg trials, complete with wax statues, for one.

Other items relate to the survivors who settled in Richmond. One of the museums founders, Jay Ipsen, was a survivor from Kovno, Lithuania, and an exhibit tells his story of hiding for months with his family in a potato hole his father dug under a field in the countryside. Theres also a reproduction of the interior of a beautiful 19th-century synagogue in Kovno.

Like Jay Ipsen, Alan and Halina were targeted because they were Jewish, although the Nazis targeted many other groups as well. Stories of victims who survived usually contain a few common threads: personal endurance, kindness from others, and sheer luck.

Alan, who is now 97, told the teachers that night that he had been held prisoner at four different concentration camps. Dora was this camp that was dug underground in the mountains. Most people didnt know it was there. We worked on the V-2 rockets. We had to make 20 rockets a day. And if they found any mistakes, they would say it was sabotage. And they would hang you. So I always made 25 rockets a day. And one SS guard, he would see this and he would slip me extra food when no one was looking.

Halina, who met Alan after the war, never went to a camp. Her father managed to obtain real birth certificates from a Catholic acquaintance who had daughters the same age as Halina and her sister. This allowed Halina to travel to Warsaw and work outside the ghetto, pretending to not be Jewish. She had a few harrowing escapes, including being betrayed by someone from her past who recognized her in Warsaw. She came back to the house where she worked as a cook to find SS guards. The Polish woman Halina worked for bravely stood up for her and saved her that day, but only because she really believed Halina wasnt Jewish. Yet despite all this, Halina assured the teachers, I still believe most people are good.

The museums distinguished senior historian, Charlie Sydnor, also spoke to the teachers. Sydnor worked with the Department of Justice for years as a key witness on many trials of Nazis involved in the Holocaust who lied about their backgrounds in order to get into the United States. His papers are now part of the museums collection, and interested members of the public can make an appointment to view them.

Like many others from the Fredericksburg area, I was only dimly aware of this museum, though Id visited its more famous cousin in D.C. With its top notch exhibits, well-educated staff, free admission and free parking, the Virginia Holocaust Museum is a must-see.

Wendy Migdal, a teacher at Spotsylvania Countys Ni River Middle School, is a freelance writer in Fredericksburg.

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Holocaust survivor: This is not the America I came to – wtvr.com

Holocaust survivor Sonia K. survived four concentration camps. She recently spoke with CNN about her view of the events in Charlottesville.

When I came to the United States in 1949 after the Second World War, the world had just witnessed the horrific culmination of centuries of anti-Semitism: the indefensible murder of 6 million Jews.

In the 1930s, we all believed that nothing like the Holocaust could ever happen, and for the past seven decades, weve said that nothing like it can ever happen again.

But the last few months have felt like 1938 all over again, the year when Kristallnacht a night when riotous violence against Jews swept through Nazi Germany announced the brutal persecution to come. Im scared not for myself, but for my children, my grandchildren, and all children.

Some might dismiss the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, as the actions of unhinged or fringe individuals. Others might believe President Trumps comments equating neo-Nazi and anti-fascist protesters are merely reflective of his often exaggerated speech. However, Holocaust survivors know all too well that what starts as a protest or an offhand comment can turn into something far worse. In the 1930s, the warning signs of what was to come were similar to the events unfolding today and society didnt listen. We cant afford to make that mistake again.

I was born in Poland and forced to live in theWarsaw Ghettountil mid-1943, when I was taken to Majdanek concentration camp and then Auschwitz. By the time I was liberated in April 1945, I had survived four concentration camps. I met my husband in the Mittenwald camp, and we lived in Germany for four years after the war before settling in Buffalo, New York.

Thinking back, it seems almost impossible that I survived when so many of my neighbors and family members perished. But the human spirit and the strength to persevere are powerful forces.

Despite all that I had endured, I was surprised to find that when I temporarily settled in Germany after my liberation, some of my neighbors did not know what I had been through. In the four years that I lived there before coming to the United States, everyone claimed that they hadnt known that their Jewish neighbors were disappearing. How could that be?

Today, I know.

The biggest mistake that was made during the Holocaust was that people didnt speak up. The Holocaust took place because individuals, groups and nations made decisions to act or not to act. The world was quiet then, but we must not be quiet again. Now we know better. We must all commit to making the world a better, kinder and more understanding place. Perhaps its as simple as speaking out when you see something wrong and saying, I know better. But please, never be a bystander or a perpetrator.

This is not the America I came to. Its easy to say, Never forget, to assume that the world has learned its lesson. But unless we move beyond simply remembering, and take an active part in standing against anti-Semitism and racism, we could find ourselves repeating a regrettable history. We all need to be on guard, resist and fight.

Five years ago, I participated in Witness Theater, a program run by Selfhelp Community Services. Through the program, I had the privilege of meeting high school students who learned our stories and bore witness to our experiences. Its critical that we relate to the younger generation and share our stories so they can carry them on when we are no longer here. They will honor our legacy and live the lessons we shared so that never again can truly mean never again.

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Bill O’Reilly Says Trump Defended Nazis Because He Doesn’t Get How Bad the Holocaust Was – Slate Magazine (blog)

Trump visits Yad Vashem, the Holocaust memorial museum in Jerusalem, on May 23.

AFP/Getty Images

As hard as these past several days have been for people whod prefer to have a consistently anti-Nazi president, they have been even more trying for those tasked with defending our commander in chief. One of those defenders is Bill OReilly, the former Fox News host ousted from the network for the same behavior that somehow did not prevent Donald Trumps election. OReilly now hosts his own podcast, but apparently felt the need to address the controversy over Trumps response to Charlottesville via the written word.

Isaac Chotiner is a Slate staff writer.

Trumps defenders have generally taken three approaches: They have argued that of course Trump hates Nazis but the media is making a big deal over nothing; or that the real issue is Confederate heritage, which deserves real respect; or that in the 19th century many evil racists were Democrats, so there. (The last two arguments dont really mesh, but never mind.) OReilly, however, takes an entirely original and dare I say bold tack. The problem isnt Democrats or the media. And it certainly isnt a racist and bigoted president. No, its a lack of historical knowledge. As he writes in the Hill:

Perhaps youve heard: OReilly is the best-selling author of the Killing series, which includes such historically dubious books as Killing Kennedy, Killing Lincoln, and Killing Jesus. This makes him extraordinarily well-positioned, in his own mind, to bring the past to bear on this latest Trump controversy. IfDonald Trumpand millions of others had really studied the evil of the Third Reich, OReilly writes, the Charlottesville political debacle might have been avoided in the sense that zero tolerance for the supremacists could have actually united the country.

OReilly goes on to worry that in todays America, only Jews know about Hitlers evil. For everyone else, including the president of the United States, the Holocaust is just a bad thing that happened a long time ago. What most people dont get is that the crimes of Hitler’s regime and the population that allowed it were so terrible that words cannot come close to description, OReilly explains. President Trump did not understand that and it has hurt him. He was trying to make other points in the midst of the revulsion of white supremacists marching in Charlottesville.

Lets grant part of OReilly unstated premise: The president is probably not poring over history books when the grinding work of the presidency ends every evening. But that hardly explains why Trumps gaffes and errors always happen to oh-so-perfectly reinforce the cause of white nationalism.

Lest anyone think this op-ed is actually mildly tough on Trump, OReilly adds that, The result of the president’s remarks has been to give his legions of enemies license to brand him, his staff, and his supporters Nazi sympathizers. That is not true, but truth is always the first casualty of hysteria we have our leadership under sustained, vicious attack and even more ideological strife on our hands.

Does OReilly have a solution to this madness? If Americans finally begin to learn about and truly understand the past, then something positive might emerge from this awful situation. We can only hope. Deliverance may be at hand, however: His bio line informs us that the next book in the Killing series is out next month.

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Trump Official Reportedly Praised Defender of Holocaust Deniers – Haaretz

Teresa Manning, a deputy assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, praised Joseph Sobran, who had a long history of negative statements about Jews and their alleged influence in the U.S.

WASHINGTON — An official appointed by the Trump administration to a senior position at the Department of Health and Human Services at one time praised a defender and politicalally of Holocaust deniers, according to a report published on Monday by Mother Jones magazine. Teresa Manning, a deputy assistant secretary at HHS, who was a vocal anti-abortion activist and is now responsible for family planning policy, once called Joseph Sobran, a writer who strongly defended Holocaust deniers, the finest columnist of his generation and a national treasure,Mother Jones reported.

The quotes attributed to Manning are from 2003, when she hosted a panel at aconference of anti-abortion activists. Sobran, who was one of the speakers at the conference, was a leading voice on abortion issues and also had a long history of negative statements about Jews and their alleged influence in the United States.

In introducing Sobran, Manning reportedly said: He has been called the finest columnist of his generation as well as a national treasure. I wholeheartedly agree with both statements.

The report publishedon Mondaynotes that just a few months before thatevent, Sobran was a speaker at a conference organized by the Institute for Historical Review, an organization devoted to denyingthe historical facts of the Holocaust and promoting research that calls the number of Jews murdered by the Nazis, the methods used to exterminate the Jews and other core elements of the Holocaust into question.

Sobran praised the anti-Semitic organization on multiple occasions and wrote in an article in 2001 that the group was being threatened by Jewish thugs who are narrow-minded and refuse to hold a debate on the true nature of the Holocaust.

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Obviously, something disastrous happened to the Jews during World War II; even the revisionists dont deny that, he wrote. But does the word Holocaust accurately sum up the Jewish misfortune? Maybe so; maybe the secular Jewish-Zionist thugs and pressure groups are essentially right. But thats a conclusion Id want to reach as a free man, not because a different conclusion might result in my kneecaps being broken. And in this controversy, I know which side is appealing to my mind, and which is going for my kneecaps.

Sobran also defended David Irving, the Holocaust denier whose libel suit against historian Deborah Lipstadt was the subject of a book that she wrote as well as the film Denial. In his2001 article, Sobran called Irving brilliant and added that Irving has been fined $18,000 in Germany for arguing that an Auschwitz cyanide chamber was a mere replica. He was correct, but he had to pay anyway.

Sobran also remarked: The Holocaust controversy is so bitter that it cant even be called a debate. One side refuses to debate, denying that there is anything to debate.

At the 2002 conference that took place just months before Manning praised him at the anti-abortion event, Sobran came to the defense of the Institute for Historical Review, saying in my thirty years in journalism,nothing has amazed me more than the prevalent fear in the profession of offending Jews, especially Zionist Jews. The Holocaust, he said, has become a device for exempting Jews from normal human obligations.

In 1993, he wasfired as a columnist for the conservative National Reviewby editor William F. Buckley, who had once mentored Sobran and now disparaged his contextually anti-Semitic writing, Mother Jones noted.

Sobran died in 2010. His anti-Semitic rhetoric was mentioned in his Washington Post obituary, and according to the Mother Jones report, he had been well-known in right-wing political circles as early as the 1990s, long before Manning praised him as a national treasure in 2003. The magazine said Manning failed to respond to a request for comment for its article.

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Bozeman May Soon Be Home to A Holocaust Museum – kmmsam

So, as far as World War IIgoes, and the killing of six million Jews, I thought I knew all about it. I also know of millions of other people who were also killed by the Germans handicapped people, homosexuals, gypsies, communists and others were rounded up and sent to concentration caps.

I had heard the stories in school about the skin of Jews being used for soap and lamp shades. So I thought I understood the Holocaust. I didnt see any reason to go to a Holocaust museum.

A few years ago, I was doing my morning show in Houston, Texas. After the show, I had the rest of the day to kill. Driving, looking around the city, I turned the corner and there it was Houston had a Holocaust museum. Well, maybe a fast in and out. I mean, I know the terrible story. Museums like this were not for people like me,

I grew up in New York City, which has a good size Jewish community, spent most of my life in Hollywood, again another large Jewish community. I went to my friends bar mitzvah. I had Jewish roommates. I considered myself almost a Jew. But I was here. I had some time. I went into the Holocaust museum.

I was there over three hours to see pictures, notes, glasses of people who were killed, hear the stories of people who were tortured, had experimental surgeries, some while awake Stop.

I was crying. It hit me so hard. How could therebe such hate? How could one human do this to another human?

That afternoon changed my life.

When I heard Bozeman was raising money for a Holocaust museum, I was very happy. If people could experience what I experienced it could be life changing. I saw an interview on the local news. I talked to a local rabbi about the project, a few prominent Jews. Most saw this as a good thing for our town. Some worried it might be a second-rate Holocaust museum. The majority said yes, it would be a good thing for Bozeman. A very small number thought it was a mistake and the Holocaust museum group would not be able to raise the funds.

For my two cents, I hope they do get the money, it would be an honor to have a Holocaust museum in Bozeman.

Dominick

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ETSU Reece Museum featuring traveling Holocaust exhibit – WCYB – WCYB

A new exhibit featured at the Reece Museum on the ETSU campus dives into some of the atrocities committed by medical professionals during the Holocaust. The exhibit is called “Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race.” It shows how the Nazi party experimented on people during the 1930’s and 1940’s. The display also depicts some of the propaganda used to convince the German citizens that attempting to engineer a master race was in their best interest. Museum officials say the exhibit is timely after recent events. “I think something like the Holocaust, you can never, you can’t forget. You’ll always need to recognize it. Especially with these past events and the resurgence of certain groups and hate. I think this is a really important thing for everyone to educate themselves on,” Reece Museum Exhibition Coordinator Spenser Brenner said. The Reece Museum is also hosting a lecture by Holocaust survivor Trudy Dryer on August 24.

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‘Deadly Medicine’: Traveling Exhibit Depicts Horrors of Holocaust, Resilience of Survivors – Greeneville Sun

JOHNSON CITY Images and details of the atrocities of the Holocaust are horrifying, to be sure, but visitors to Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, now on display at the Reece Museum at East Tennessee State University, are encouraged to look beyond the horror and ask themselves what can be learned from those who survived. Deadly Medicine, a traveling exhibit produced by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, will be at ETSU through Sept. 28, according to a news release. It is presented locally by the Tennessee Holocaust Commission, the Reece Museum and the ETSU Academic Health Sciences Center and Interprofessional Education. It was Dr. Teresa Stephens ongoing research on resilience that led to the exhibit coming to ETSU, the release says. The former ETSU associate professor of nursing studies individuals and populations that have experienced extreme forms of trauma and survived. The aim of her research is to help health care students and professionals, as well as patients and others, learn ways they can be more resilient and better cope with stressful or traumatic situations. One of the primary populations she works with is Holocaust survivors, many of whom she has contacted with the assistance of the Tennessee Holocaust Commission, it adds. THC Executive Director Danielle Kahane-Kaminsky reached out to Stephens last year and offered to bring the Deadly Medicine exhibit to East Tennessee if a suitable venue could be found. Stephens found that venue in the Reece Museum. The Reece Museum is honored to host Deadly Medicine’, said Randy Sanders, museum director, and we are grateful to the Tennessee Holocaust Commission and the ETSU Academic Health Sciences Center for making this presentation possible. As the director of an art and history museum on a university campus, I am reminded of Miriam Osters timely quote, Education and remembrance are the only cures for hatred and bigotry. This is more than hosting an exhibit, Stephens said. Its really an opportunity to showcase this work and lessons to be learned through the Holocaust. Theres a lot to learn about leadership, about the dangers in secrets of a society, about human injustices, about ethics in research and appropriate behaviors in medicine the things that can go wrong when things are not kept in check. These were horrible things that were done to people, and we dont ever want to repeat those again. But there are also lessons in survival and resilience from the people who came out of that, she continued. The exhibit includes testimony on video from those who were part of those experiments. What I would like people to take away from this is to listen to their voices and see the incredible strength and capacity of humans to withstand this kind of trauma. What can we take away from that for when we face adversity? Stephens said in the release that these lessons in resilience can apply to anyone, including health care providers who experience high levels of stress and witness trauma in their work, as well as patients who receive life-changing medical diagnoses. Stephens also hopes the exhibit will encourage visitors to play a role in preventing atrocities from happening again in the future. Thats what the survivors want us to do, she said. Any time Im working with survivors, theyre sharing their stories with the hope that it will prevent future atrocities or that it may help someone. Theyre hoping, of course, that it isnt repeated, that we dont see this type of horror again, but they also want people to learn from the strength that they found in themselves, for whatever challenges they faced. From now through Sept. 28, a full schedule of programming has been planned in conjunction with the Deadly Medicine exhibit. Remaining events in August include: The secret WWII concentration camp diary of Odd Nansen, a lecture by Tim Boyce, editor of From Day to Day: One Mans Diary of Survival in Nazi Concentration Camps, on Tuesday at 2 p.m. in the D.P. Culp University Centers Martha Street Culp Auditorium (followed by a book-signing at 3 p.m.); Odd Nansen and the Nazis deadly medicine, a lecture by Boyce, at 9 a.m. at The Museum at Mountain Home on the campus of the Quillen Veterans Affairs Medical Center; and I Gave You Life Twice: A Story of Survival, Dreams, Betrayals and Accomplishments, a lecture by Holocaust survivor Henry Fribourg, on Wednesday, Aug. 30, at 1 p.m. at the Reece Museum, according to the release. The Deadly Medicine exhibit and associated events are free and open to the public. Regular museum hours are Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Three reserved parking spaces are available directly in front of the museum, located at 363 Stout Drive on the ETSU campus. A parking permit for these spaces can be obtained at the front desk of the museum upon arrival. Visitor parking passes must be used for parking elsewhere on campus on Monday-Friday until 4:30 p.m.; these may be obtained online at http://www.etsu.edu/facilities/parking/. For more information or to schedule group tours, call the Reece Museum at 423-439-4392. For disability accommodations, call the ETSU Office of Disability Services at 423-439-8346.

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed

Why teach about the Holocaust? – Cleveland Jewish News

“The world is too dangerous to live in not because of the people who do evil, but because of the people who sit and let it happen.” Albert Einstein What happened in Charlottesville, Va., is simply one of the most recent examples of hatred and bigotry. Racist, anti-Semitic and intolerant views have no place in a society that cherishes freedom and liberty for all. Studying the Holocaust provides one of the most effective subjects for examining basic moral issues and human behavior. The Holocaust was not an accident in history. It occurred because individuals, organizations and governments made choices that not only legalized discrimination, but also allowed prejudice, hatred and genocide. For those of us touched by the Holocaust, when we say Never Again we mean it. Kol Israel is a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing educators with accurate, relevant and useful materials for teaching about the Holocaust. We are committed to preserving and sharing the eyewitness stories of survivors to ensure that the true stories of the horror of the Holocaust are not only never forgotten, but also are never repeated. While many of Clevelands courageous survivors have been sharing their stories for decades, the day will come when there will be no eyewitnesses left to teach our children about what happened in the Holocaust. This sad reality makes it all the more imperative to have a way to continue to tell their stories. As the new school year approaches, it is imperative that we join together to reject all bias and hate in our country and communities. Teachers, though they may be required to do so by state standards, rarely have enough time to teach these complicated topics. To meet their needs, Kol Israel Foundation has created a unique mobile Holocaust education program designed to honor and preserve the stories and experiences of victims and survivors of the Holocaust. We believe that first-person accounts and memoir literature add individual voices to a collective experience, helping students put a face on history and make meaning out of statistics. Survivors stories come to life through video oral histories enhanced with historic and personal photographs and help teach tolerance, provide a focus of personal responsibility against prejudice of any sort and develop an awareness of personal choice. The videos run 20 minutes or less in length, optimizing the single-period classroom experience. Kol Israel Foundation is eager to work with teachers and the community to fulfill the Jewish value of tikkun olam, repairing the world. Presentations are free and available to schools, civic and religious groups throughout Northeast Ohio. If you know of a school or organization interested in a presentation or for more information, contact info@kifcle.orginfo@kifcle.org. Ellen Jacob is vice president of Kol Israel Foundation in Beachwood.

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed

Anti-Semitic Vandals to Meet With Holocaust Survivor as Part of Punishment – Haaretz

A before and after shot of the Ellis family menorah that was vandalized in Arizona, December, 2016. Facebook / Naomi Ellis Three teens pleaded guilty to criminal damaging charges fortwisting a large decorative menorah in the front yard of an Arizona familys home into a swastika. The teens, who were arrested in March and charged as juveniles in the December incident in a residential neighborhood in Chandler, pleaded guilty on Thursday in Maricopa County Court. They were sentenced to serve 30 hours of community service, along with writing an apology letter to the victims and paying restitution. They also must meet with a Holocaust survivor and write an essay on what they learned about the Holocaust and how their desecration of the menorah affected the community, the CBS affiliate in Phoenix reported. The Maricopa County Attorneys Office has not yet decided how to charge a fourth teen in the incident, Clive Jamar Wilson, 19,who posted anapologyto the family on Facebook after he was arrested. The Hanukkah candelabradamagedon Dec. 30, 2016, was made of gold spray-painted PVC pipes and solar-powered lights. We’ve got more newsletters we think you’ll find interesting. Please try again later. This email address has already registered for this newsletter. Naomi and Seth Ellis said they built the 7-foot menorah in front of their house after their three sons, aged 5, 6 and 9, asked for lights in their yard like their neighbors Christmas decorations. Police helped the Ellises dismantle the swastika early in the morning before their children saw it. The menorah was rebuilt and replaced. About 100 members of the familys synagogue and their rabbi and neighbors gathered in the Ellis front yard to light the rebuilt menorah. Want to enjoy ‘Zen’ reading – with no ads and just the article? Subscribe today

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed

Holocaust survivors who live in Richmond speak to educators at museum – Fredericksburg.com

Alan and Halina Zimm of Richmond have accomplished two amazing feats almost none of us will ever achieve, and the second one we wouldnt want to. They have been married almost 70 years, and they both survived the Holocaust. The Zimms spoke recently to a group of about 45 educators in a summer program at the Virginia Holocaust Museum in Richmond, a hidden gem on Cary Street. As a middle school history teacher from Spotsylvania, I was honored and excited to hear them speak. However, Id seen Alan many times before. About 15 years ago, I started using the video testimonies on the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museums website with my students. Of the hundreds of videos available, I randomly selected about 12 that gave a representation of major aspects of the Holocaust, and Alans story of liberation happened to be one of them. Imagine my surprise and delight to see his name as a speaker on our syllabus. At the time, I had no idea he lived in Richmond, or that his wife was also a survivor. As I learned in the two-week Teacher Education Institute, the second one that the museum offered this summer, Richmond has had a strong Jewish community going back to Colonial times. After World War II, when Holocaust survivors were leaving Europe for either the United States or Israel, many were placed in Richmond by Jewish relief organizations such as the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, and the Thalhimer family. As a result, Richmond became one of several hubs in the United States for survivors, though it is estimated that only about 25 remain in that area today. While some have died, others have moved away to be near family. The Virginia Holocaust Museum is one of 10 Holocaust museums in this country. Its housed in a former tobacco warehouse, and the brick and wood construction along with trains roaring past one block away create a feeling of stepping back into the past. The exhibits narrate the story of the Holocaust and include some things you wont find anywhere else: a re-creation of the courtroom at the postwar Nuremberg trials, complete with wax statues, for one. Other items relate to the survivors who settled in Richmond. One of the museums founders, Jay Ipsen, was a survivor from Kovno, Lithuania, and an exhibit tells his story of hiding for months with his family in a potato hole his father dug under a field in the countryside. Theres also a reproduction of the interior of a beautiful 19th-century synagogue in Kovno. Like Jay Ipsen, Alan and Halina were targeted because they were Jewish, although the Nazis targeted many other groups as well. Stories of victims who survived usually contain a few common threads: personal endurance, kindness from others, and sheer luck. Alan, who is now 97, told the teachers that night that he had been held prisoner at four different concentration camps. Dora was this camp that was dug underground in the mountains. Most people didnt know it was there. We worked on the V-2 rockets. We had to make 20 rockets a day. And if they found any mistakes, they would say it was sabotage. And they would hang you. So I always made 25 rockets a day. And one SS guard, he would see this and he would slip me extra food when no one was looking. Halina, who met Alan after the war, never went to a camp. Her father managed to obtain real birth certificates from a Catholic acquaintance who had daughters the same age as Halina and her sister. This allowed Halina to travel to Warsaw and work outside the ghetto, pretending to not be Jewish. She had a few harrowing escapes, including being betrayed by someone from her past who recognized her in Warsaw. She came back to the house where she worked as a cook to find SS guards. The Polish woman Halina worked for bravely stood up for her and saved her that day, but only because she really believed Halina wasnt Jewish. Yet despite all this, Halina assured the teachers, I still believe most people are good. The museums distinguished senior historian, Charlie Sydnor, also spoke to the teachers. Sydnor worked with the Department of Justice for years as a key witness on many trials of Nazis involved in the Holocaust who lied about their backgrounds in order to get into the United States. His papers are now part of the museums collection, and interested members of the public can make an appointment to view them. Like many others from the Fredericksburg area, I was only dimly aware of this museum, though Id visited its more famous cousin in D.C. With its top notch exhibits, well-educated staff, free admission and free parking, the Virginia Holocaust Museum is a must-see. Wendy Migdal, a teacher at Spotsylvania Countys Ni River Middle School, is a freelance writer in Fredericksburg.

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August 22, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed

Holocaust survivor: This is not the America I came to – wtvr.com

Holocaust survivor Sonia K. survived four concentration camps. She recently spoke with CNN about her view of the events in Charlottesville. When I came to the United States in 1949 after the Second World War, the world had just witnessed the horrific culmination of centuries of anti-Semitism: the indefensible murder of 6 million Jews. In the 1930s, we all believed that nothing like the Holocaust could ever happen, and for the past seven decades, weve said that nothing like it can ever happen again. But the last few months have felt like 1938 all over again, the year when Kristallnacht a night when riotous violence against Jews swept through Nazi Germany announced the brutal persecution to come. Im scared not for myself, but for my children, my grandchildren, and all children. Some might dismiss the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, as the actions of unhinged or fringe individuals. Others might believe President Trumps comments equating neo-Nazi and anti-fascist protesters are merely reflective of his often exaggerated speech. However, Holocaust survivors know all too well that what starts as a protest or an offhand comment can turn into something far worse. In the 1930s, the warning signs of what was to come were similar to the events unfolding today and society didnt listen. We cant afford to make that mistake again. I was born in Poland and forced to live in theWarsaw Ghettountil mid-1943, when I was taken to Majdanek concentration camp and then Auschwitz. By the time I was liberated in April 1945, I had survived four concentration camps. I met my husband in the Mittenwald camp, and we lived in Germany for four years after the war before settling in Buffalo, New York. Thinking back, it seems almost impossible that I survived when so many of my neighbors and family members perished. But the human spirit and the strength to persevere are powerful forces. Despite all that I had endured, I was surprised to find that when I temporarily settled in Germany after my liberation, some of my neighbors did not know what I had been through. In the four years that I lived there before coming to the United States, everyone claimed that they hadnt known that their Jewish neighbors were disappearing. How could that be? Today, I know. The biggest mistake that was made during the Holocaust was that people didnt speak up. The Holocaust took place because individuals, groups and nations made decisions to act or not to act. The world was quiet then, but we must not be quiet again. Now we know better. We must all commit to making the world a better, kinder and more understanding place. Perhaps its as simple as speaking out when you see something wrong and saying, I know better. But please, never be a bystander or a perpetrator. This is not the America I came to. Its easy to say, Never forget, to assume that the world has learned its lesson. But unless we move beyond simply remembering, and take an active part in standing against anti-Semitism and racism, we could find ourselves repeating a regrettable history. We all need to be on guard, resist and fight. Five years ago, I participated in Witness Theater, a program run by Selfhelp Community Services. Through the program, I had the privilege of meeting high school students who learned our stories and bore witness to our experiences. Its critical that we relate to the younger generation and share our stories so they can carry them on when we are no longer here. They will honor our legacy and live the lessons we shared so that never again can truly mean never again.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed

Bill O’Reilly Says Trump Defended Nazis Because He Doesn’t Get How Bad the Holocaust Was – Slate Magazine (blog)

Trump visits Yad Vashem, the Holocaust memorial museum in Jerusalem, on May 23. AFP/Getty Images As hard as these past several days have been for people whod prefer to have a consistently anti-Nazi president, they have been even more trying for those tasked with defending our commander in chief. One of those defenders is Bill OReilly, the former Fox News host ousted from the network for the same behavior that somehow did not prevent Donald Trumps election. OReilly now hosts his own podcast, but apparently felt the need to address the controversy over Trumps response to Charlottesville via the written word. Isaac Chotiner is a Slate staff writer. Trumps defenders have generally taken three approaches: They have argued that of course Trump hates Nazis but the media is making a big deal over nothing; or that the real issue is Confederate heritage, which deserves real respect; or that in the 19th century many evil racists were Democrats, so there. (The last two arguments dont really mesh, but never mind.) OReilly, however, takes an entirely original and dare I say bold tack. The problem isnt Democrats or the media. And it certainly isnt a racist and bigoted president. No, its a lack of historical knowledge. As he writes in the Hill: Perhaps youve heard: OReilly is the best-selling author of the Killing series, which includes such historically dubious books as Killing Kennedy, Killing Lincoln, and Killing Jesus. This makes him extraordinarily well-positioned, in his own mind, to bring the past to bear on this latest Trump controversy. IfDonald Trumpand millions of others had really studied the evil of the Third Reich, OReilly writes, the Charlottesville political debacle might have been avoided in the sense that zero tolerance for the supremacists could have actually united the country. OReilly goes on to worry that in todays America, only Jews know about Hitlers evil. For everyone else, including the president of the United States, the Holocaust is just a bad thing that happened a long time ago. What most people dont get is that the crimes of Hitler’s regime and the population that allowed it were so terrible that words cannot come close to description, OReilly explains. President Trump did not understand that and it has hurt him. He was trying to make other points in the midst of the revulsion of white supremacists marching in Charlottesville. Lets grant part of OReilly unstated premise: The president is probably not poring over history books when the grinding work of the presidency ends every evening. But that hardly explains why Trumps gaffes and errors always happen to oh-so-perfectly reinforce the cause of white nationalism. Lest anyone think this op-ed is actually mildly tough on Trump, OReilly adds that, The result of the president’s remarks has been to give his legions of enemies license to brand him, his staff, and his supporters Nazi sympathizers. That is not true, but truth is always the first casualty of hysteria we have our leadership under sustained, vicious attack and even more ideological strife on our hands. Does OReilly have a solution to this madness? If Americans finally begin to learn about and truly understand the past, then something positive might emerge from this awful situation. We can only hope. Deliverance may be at hand, however: His bio line informs us that the next book in the Killing series is out next month.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed

Trump Official Reportedly Praised Defender of Holocaust Deniers – Haaretz

Teresa Manning, a deputy assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, praised Joseph Sobran, who had a long history of negative statements about Jews and their alleged influence in the U.S. WASHINGTON — An official appointed by the Trump administration to a senior position at the Department of Health and Human Services at one time praised a defender and politicalally of Holocaust deniers, according to a report published on Monday by Mother Jones magazine. Teresa Manning, a deputy assistant secretary at HHS, who was a vocal anti-abortion activist and is now responsible for family planning policy, once called Joseph Sobran, a writer who strongly defended Holocaust deniers, the finest columnist of his generation and a national treasure,Mother Jones reported. The quotes attributed to Manning are from 2003, when she hosted a panel at aconference of anti-abortion activists. Sobran, who was one of the speakers at the conference, was a leading voice on abortion issues and also had a long history of negative statements about Jews and their alleged influence in the United States. In introducing Sobran, Manning reportedly said: He has been called the finest columnist of his generation as well as a national treasure. I wholeheartedly agree with both statements. The report publishedon Mondaynotes that just a few months before thatevent, Sobran was a speaker at a conference organized by the Institute for Historical Review, an organization devoted to denyingthe historical facts of the Holocaust and promoting research that calls the number of Jews murdered by the Nazis, the methods used to exterminate the Jews and other core elements of the Holocaust into question. Sobran praised the anti-Semitic organization on multiple occasions and wrote in an article in 2001 that the group was being threatened by Jewish thugs who are narrow-minded and refuse to hold a debate on the true nature of the Holocaust. We’ve got more newsletters we think you’ll find interesting. Please try again later. This email address has already registered for this newsletter. Obviously, something disastrous happened to the Jews during World War II; even the revisionists dont deny that, he wrote. But does the word Holocaust accurately sum up the Jewish misfortune? Maybe so; maybe the secular Jewish-Zionist thugs and pressure groups are essentially right. But thats a conclusion Id want to reach as a free man, not because a different conclusion might result in my kneecaps being broken. And in this controversy, I know which side is appealing to my mind, and which is going for my kneecaps. Sobran also defended David Irving, the Holocaust denier whose libel suit against historian Deborah Lipstadt was the subject of a book that she wrote as well as the film Denial. In his2001 article, Sobran called Irving brilliant and added that Irving has been fined $18,000 in Germany for arguing that an Auschwitz cyanide chamber was a mere replica. He was correct, but he had to pay anyway. Sobran also remarked: The Holocaust controversy is so bitter that it cant even be called a debate. One side refuses to debate, denying that there is anything to debate. At the 2002 conference that took place just months before Manning praised him at the anti-abortion event, Sobran came to the defense of the Institute for Historical Review, saying in my thirty years in journalism,nothing has amazed me more than the prevalent fear in the profession of offending Jews, especially Zionist Jews. The Holocaust, he said, has become a device for exempting Jews from normal human obligations. In 1993, he wasfired as a columnist for the conservative National Reviewby editor William F. Buckley, who had once mentored Sobran and now disparaged his contextually anti-Semitic writing, Mother Jones noted. Sobran died in 2010. His anti-Semitic rhetoric was mentioned in his Washington Post obituary, and according to the Mother Jones report, he had been well-known in right-wing political circles as early as the 1990s, long before Manning praised him as a national treasure in 2003. The magazine said Manning failed to respond to a request for comment for its article. Want to enjoy ‘Zen’ reading – with no ads and just the article? Subscribe today

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed

Bozeman May Soon Be Home to A Holocaust Museum – kmmsam

So, as far as World War IIgoes, and the killing of six million Jews, I thought I knew all about it. I also know of millions of other people who were also killed by the Germans handicapped people, homosexuals, gypsies, communists and others were rounded up and sent to concentration caps. I had heard the stories in school about the skin of Jews being used for soap and lamp shades. So I thought I understood the Holocaust. I didnt see any reason to go to a Holocaust museum. A few years ago, I was doing my morning show in Houston, Texas. After the show, I had the rest of the day to kill. Driving, looking around the city, I turned the corner and there it was Houston had a Holocaust museum. Well, maybe a fast in and out. I mean, I know the terrible story. Museums like this were not for people like me, I grew up in New York City, which has a good size Jewish community, spent most of my life in Hollywood, again another large Jewish community. I went to my friends bar mitzvah. I had Jewish roommates. I considered myself almost a Jew. But I was here. I had some time. I went into the Holocaust museum. I was there over three hours to see pictures, notes, glasses of people who were killed, hear the stories of people who were tortured, had experimental surgeries, some while awake Stop. I was crying. It hit me so hard. How could therebe such hate? How could one human do this to another human? That afternoon changed my life. When I heard Bozeman was raising money for a Holocaust museum, I was very happy. If people could experience what I experienced it could be life changing. I saw an interview on the local news. I talked to a local rabbi about the project, a few prominent Jews. Most saw this as a good thing for our town. Some worried it might be a second-rate Holocaust museum. The majority said yes, it would be a good thing for Bozeman. A very small number thought it was a mistake and the Holocaust museum group would not be able to raise the funds. For my two cents, I hope they do get the money, it would be an honor to have a Holocaust museum in Bozeman. Dominick

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed


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