Archive for the ‘Holocaust’ Category

Sarasota Holocaust survivor Jacob Brodman dies at 97 – Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Barbara Peters Smith Staff Writer @barbarapsmith

SARASOTA As a young man in Poland before his peaceful decades as a business owner and retiree in Sarasota Jacob Brodman had to watch from a nearby window while a Gestapo officer shot his father, and listen to his sister cry for help as she disappeared on an overcrowded train bound for the Belsen concentration camp.

His remarkable Holocaust survival story, told many times over the years, included forced labor and starvation in Auschwitz-Birkenau, Buchenwald and Ohrduf, two death marches, and a daring escape from the Germans just before American soldiers arrived in time to save him and his older brother.

Jacob Brodman, who died Wednesday in Sarasota at 97, was born April 24, 1920, in Grybow, Poland. His father owned three lumber mills, and Brodman had just started studying law when the Germans invaded his country in 1939. His mother, two sisters and a younger brother all died in the Holocaust. In 1989, Brodman gave an oral history interview for the archives now kept by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

“You ever stay near a fire, near a building that burns, close by?” he asked the interviewer, describing a day when he was forced to watch his fellow Jews lined up for execution, and then told to help incinerate the bodies.

“You couldnt stay there,” he remembered. “The fire was so high, 20 feet high. You had to work so fast. We were crying and carrying, crying and throwing. We didnt know what to do. And one guy didnt work fast enough, and they threw him up there alive. We came back broken. It was terrible, just to stay in front of the fire and to throw people on the top of the fire.”

Finally, on a forced march as the Germans were in retreat, he and his brother managed to slip away into the woods with some other men. They found food and clothes in abandoned houses, and eluded capture until they encountered American troops.

On a ship to New York in 1946, Brodman met his first wife, Anya Sygall, and he studied interior design to start his own upholstery business. After traveling to Warm Mineral Springs for treatment of spinal injuries he sustained in the war, the couple decided to relocate to Sarasota, where they operated Jack’s Interiors.

Brodman returned to Germany in 1966 to testify in the trial of his father’s killer. After Anya Brodman’s death in 1996, he married Helen Miller Ackerstein, also a Holocaust survivor, who passed away in January 2016.

He is survived by a daughter, Shawn Bravin, her husband, Ben Bravin, of Los Angeles, two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A memorial is set for 2:30 Sunday at Temple Beth Sholom Cemetery.

The temple honored him on his 95th birthday, and until a year ago, Brodman kept up a lively Twitter feed that displayed strong political opinions. Rabbi Michael Werbow said he was a fixture at Saturday morning services, and remembers him as “a schmoozer.”

“You knew he was there,” Werbow said. “He liked being with people and was always conversing.”

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Holocaust survivor sees similarities in current political climate – King 5 – KING5.com

He says the rhetoric over the past few months has made him nervous and reminds him of the time before he fled Europe. But he still believes that we should still be hopeful.

Matt Mrozinski, KING 4:40 PM. PDT August 18, 2017

Ninety-six-year-old Franz Wasserman has noted similarities in the current political climate with Nazi Germany during World War II. (Photo: KING)

Current world events have alarmed a holocaust survivor in Seattle.

Ninety-six-year-old Franz Wasserman has noted similarities in the current political climate with Nazi Germany during World War II.

He says society’s reaction to the rhetoric and events like Charlottesville, Virginia, have given him some hope.

“Ever since the campaign, before the election, it is the same kind of prejudice and the kind of nationalism. And at that time I was very much afraid it would lead to the same thing as it led to Germany,” said Wasserman.

“I feel a great deal more hopeful these days than I did nine months ago. Our Democratic institutions seem to stand firm. And the people as a whole are standing firm…that the whole phenomenon of Trump will go away.”

2017 KING-TV

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Holocaust survivor on protests: ‘it has to be stopped at the beginning’ – ABC Action News

TAMPA, Fla. – Just before she turned 18, Rene Hammond, was sent by cattle car to Auschwitz where she would be separated from her parents before they were sent to the gas chambers and killed.

“I remember it,” she said.

Hammond recalls the story of being sent to a camp in Germany where she would have to march — there she would meet a German man who helped her, her sister and four other girls hide in Poland until the end of World War II.

At 91-years-old, her sister is still alive too.

This picture is the only image Hammond has of her family after the Holocaust.

Hammond is one of 250 Holocaust survivors in a six-county area of the Tampa Bay area that’s part of theGulf Coast Jewish Family and Community Services.

They have a Holocaust Survivor program that helps provide aide and support to those in need.

Hammond sat with ABC Action News on Thursday talking about the current events, “it starts out small,” she uttered in reference to people marching in the streets with torches while chanting ‘Jews will not replace us.’

The images of intolerance is something she thought she would never see again in her lifetime.

“It has to be stopped at the beginning,” she said, “we can’t let it go on.”

Hammond wants people to know in Germany Nazi symbols are banned, but here in America it’s free speech.

“It’s really important people stand up to it, don’t look the other way and let it go,” said Hammond.

On Thursday, The Florida Holocaust Museum released a statement on the relevancy of teaching about the Holocaust in 2017:

I’ve been asked over the last few days to talk about the new face of American white supremacy. While no expert in contemporary Nazism, I do not see a new face. The neo-Nazis of today marched through the University of Virginia campus, thrusting lit torches into the air while screaming racist invectives. Who could witness that scene and not immediately be transported to scenes of lynchings, pogroms and auto-de-fes of the past?

People throughout the centuries try to justify their own hatred and bigotry by exploiting the fears and prejudices of their contemporary societies, using the tools they had at their disposal to try to make hate palatable to the general public. The “new face” of fascism in America is no different. While they may refer to their narrative as competing or “alternative”, it is not new. It is the same narrative of hate, coated now in 21st century clothing.

At The Florida Holocaust Museum, we use the lessons of the Holocaust to help identify the ominous echoes of history. We believe that the best way to combat prejudice and bigotry is to educate about the terrible consequences of unchecked hatred.

The Museum says they have partnered with EckerdCollege to present Frank Meeink, author of Autobiography of a Recovering Skinhead.

The forum will be September 7 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

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O’Connor stands in solidarity at Boston Holocaust Memorial – Wicked Local Hingham

Bradford Randall brandall@wickedlocal.com

One day after the Boston Holocaust Memorial was vandalized, state Sen. Patrick O’Connor, R-Weymouth, stood in solidarity with local leaders at the damaged memorial.

“I had to go, for myself and the people I represent,” O’Connor told The News. “To stand up and say, ‘you will not win, this will not stand.’ As the senator from the South Shore I’m presenting that message.”

A 17-year-old from Malden has been charged in connection with the vandalism, which occurred around 6:40 p.m. Monday after witnesses said they saw the teen throw a rock at the memorial, shattering a glass panel.

At the memorial on August 15, O’Connor said he was able to hear a Holocaust survivor speak of his mother, father, and then his younger brother being taken by Nazis in Europe.

O’Connor said the survivor was denied funerals, wakes or grave-sites for his loved ones but the Boston Holocaust Memorial is where survivors can find peace.

“That site was where so many go on those birthdays, anniversaries or dates of death to remember,” he said.

Approximately six million Jews were killed during the Holocaust before Germany was defeated in World War II, according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

O’Connor said he was the only Republican legislator in attendance and only two state senators showed up besides him. State Rep. Jim Cantwell, D-Marshfield, was also in attendance.

“The way forward is to come together, to stop the partisan divide that is, right now, nothing but an illogical barrier to human progress,” O’Connor said.

The teen who police believe committed the vandalism will be charged with willful and malicious destruction of property. Police said their civil rights unit is also investigating the incident to determine if additional charges are pending.

It is the second time this summer that the memorial was damaged. Boston police said James Isaac, 21, of Roxbury, threw a rock at the memorial back in June. Repairs were made to fix the damaged panel and it was rededicated in July.

O’Connor said he believes the discourse in America is not appropriate, and said Americans should stand up to hatred, xenophobia, bigotry, homophobia, sexism and racism.

“We have an opioid crisis that is killing as many people as died in 9/11 every three weeks,” O’Connor said, adding that struggling schools and oppertunities not realized my minorities are also issues that demand focus.

“Let’s get to work on the future,” O’Connor said.

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Holocaust discovery: Ritual baths uncovered in synagogue complex … – Fox News

Archaeologists have uncovered two ritual baths in the remains of the Great Synagogue of Vilna (Vilnius), in Lithuania, more than 70 years after its destruction during the Holocaust.

A team of experts from Israel, the U.S. and Lithuania uncovered the baths in the Lithuanian capital last month, the latest discovery at the historic site.

The 17th-century Great Synagogue was at the heart of the Jewish community Vilnius for hundreds of years until its destruction by the Nazis. Prior to the Holocaust, the Great Synagogue was also surrounded by a host of buildings, including other synagogues, a community council, kosher meat stalls, miqvaot (ritual baths) and the famous Strashun rabbinical library.

RADAR TECHNOLOGY HELPS REDISCOVER THE GREAT SYNAGOGUE OF VILNIUS, 70 YEARS AFTER ITS DESTRUCTION

The site was also home to Rabbi Eliyahu, the celebrated 18th-century Vilna Gaon, or genius.

The excavation site (Jon Seligman).

The Great Synagogue compound was looted and burned by German forces in 1941, and the standing remains were later completely destroyed by Soviet authorities in the 1950s. The Soviets later built a school on top of the area in 1964.

In 2015, archaeologists used ground-penetrating radar to locate the remains of the Great Synagogue and the buildings around its Shulhoyf or shulof community courtyard.

HOLOCAUST ESCAPE TUNNEL FOUND: PRISONERS DUG WITH SPOONS TO ESCAPE NAZIS

Most of the historical descriptions of the Great Synagogue in Vilna and the community courtyard (the Shulhoyf) relate to the Great Synagogue and the surrounding prayer halls, explained Dr. Jon Seligman of the Israel Antiquities Authority, who led the research team, in a statement. Until now, we have found little information about the bathhouse and Miqve (ritual bath) building of the Jewish community, a community that comprised almost half of the city’s population.

Archaeologists followed a late 19th century architectural plan for the restoration of the ancient bathhouse. According to the plan, the bathhouse consisted of two main floors, a number of rooms, and a large service wing. Experts were also able to identify two ritual baths.

In July, the team exposed the ritual baths, which date to the early 20th century. The baths have tiled walls and floors, steps leading to the pool, and an otzar, an auxiliary pool in which water is collected for the miqve, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority.

HOLOCAUST HEROINE’S WILL, LOST PHOTOS, UNEARTHED IN SCOTLAND

Mantas Daubaras of the Lithuanian Cultural Heritage Organization and Professor Richard Freund of Hartford University also participated in the excavation.

“These discoveries add a new dimension to the understanding of the daily lives of the Jews of Vilna, and will certainly provide a new focus for understanding the lost cultural heritage of the Jewish community of Vilna, the ‘Jerusalem of Lithuania’, the researchers said in a statement.

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For Dallas’ Holocaust survivors, the past has suddenly become painfully present – Daily Egyptian

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Max Glauben, a Holocaust survivor, with a “March of the Living” scarf at his home in Dallas on August 14, 2017. (Jae S. Lee/Dallas Morning News/TNS)

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Max Glauben, a Holocaust survivor, with a “March of the Living” scarf at his home in Dallas on August 14, 2017. (Jae S. Lee/Dallas Morning News/TNS)

August 17, 2017 Filed under National

Monday afternoon I called a man Ive known for years, Max Glauben, the 89-year-old son of Warsaw, Poland, made an orphan by the Nazis. How did you know I was going to call you? he said when his wife handed Max the phone. I asked about what. But I knew.

About the stuff thats happening right now, he said through the accent that has been tempered only slightly after decades as a U.S. citizen. And then Glauben, who survived six concentration camps and a death march before being liberated by U.S. armed forces, told me what it was like to turn on the television over the weekend and see Sieg-Heiling, Jew will not replace us-spitting, blood and soil-shouting white supremacists carrying swastika flags down American streets.

It was just unbelievable, just unbelievable, said Glauben, who came to this country 70 years ago next month and, shortly after, was drafted into the U.S. Army.

He said he had to close his eyes, because he hurt all over. But, he said, the past began to overwhelm the present unfolding in Charlottesville, Virginia, where authorities said 32-year-old Heather Heyer, a woman who dared to protest Tiki-torch-bearing neo-Nazis swamping her streets, was killed by a 20-year-old man from Ohio who idolized Hitler.

And everything that happened in 1939, 40 and 41 to me in Warsaw, Poland, gets right in front of my brain, Glauben said. My eyes dont want to see it again. I have to close my eyes so I wouldnt see this. But all my feelings are coming back.

So, too, the memories. Of the Warsaw Ghetto and not being able to go out in the street by myself without somebody wanting to hurt me because I was a member of a certain religion. Of Nazi soldiers on sidewalks and street corners who threatened to shoot him if he looked them in the eye. Of being transported to a camp in a crowded, fetid boxcar where prisoners fought for tiny drops of water falling from the ceiling just to wet parched lips. Of his mother, father and brother being executed in the death camps.

Glauben was among the founders of the Dallas Holocaust Museum when it was just a room in the Jewish Community Centers basement. When we spoke almost a year ago, he warned that we would again see neo-Nazis, the Klan and white supremacists marching in the streets.

Hed heard obscene whispers escalate into violent bawls coming from supporters of the would-be president; he saw a St. Marks graduate ascend to the top of the hatemongers trash heap. He even went to Texas A&M last year, on the same day that graduate, Dallas native Richard Spencer, was there spouting his alt-right bushwa, in the hopes of turning bystanders into upstanders who would combat the hate now eager to show its face in broad daylight.

This is how it started, with them doing this, Glauben said Monday, his TV tuned to the footage. Then killing my family. Right now I am looking at it. On MSNBC, theyre repeating it and repeating it. And what does a child do if hes 10, 12, 14 and sees people raising their hands and saying, Heil Hitler?’

I tried to reach several Dallas survivors Monday, but found few willing or able to talk about the images looping, almost nonstop, on cable news. Some couldnt speak, their memories having faded into the fog. Others, traumatized all over again, wouldnt speak.

But then there are women like 89-year-old Marianne Rubin, who, on Sunday, became a viral star. During a rally in Union Square in New York City, she was photographed holding a sign that read, I escaped the Nazis once. You will not defeat me now. I went to Glaubens house Monday evening and showed him the photo of the woman who had escaped Nazi Germany with her family in the 1930s. He grinned and said only, Wow.

Ninety-three-year-old Jack Repp, too, was eager to talk. Wed never met until Monday, but he told me of our connection: For decades, he owned a department store on Second Avenue, across from my grandfather Harrys auto parts store. Most of my grandfathers family had been killed by Nazis, and Repp said they would often get together to speak Yiddish a dying language, especially in South Dallas in the 1940s and 50s.

Repp was 21 years old and 69 pounds when he was liberated from a concentration camp. I was 99.9 percent dead, he told me, but I still had my mind. Like Glauben, he travels the world recounting his story one, he said Monday, that began with images like those seen on television over the weekend.

They used to go in small towns beating up Jews and burning up homes, and this is is exactly how it looked, Repp said. It reminded me of the pogroms. It reminded me so much of that, I was sick. I couldnt leave the house for two days. When you see something like this as a Holocaust survivor He paused, sighed.

I never thought I would see something like this in America.

___

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Teen arrested after Holocaust memorial in Boston vandalized – CBS News

Last Updated Aug 15, 2017 9:28 PM EDT

BOSTON — For the second time this summer, the Holocaust memorial in Boston has been vandalized.

Boston Police say a 17-year-old boy from Malden allegedly threw a rock at the memorial around 6:30 p.m. Monday and smashed a glass panel.

“I saw this guy running around the corner dressed in all black,” one witness told CBS Boston. “It was a dozen people chasing him. The world’s gone crazy.”

The suspect was detained by two bystanders until police arrived at the scene. Witnesses said they heard the suspect ranting incoherently.

“I’m grateful for the quick response and the community help, which led to the swift arrest of the suspect responsible for the damage done to the Holocaust memorial,” Boston Police Commissioner William Evans said.

“Clearly, this type of behavior will not be tolerated in our city,” he said. “And, in light of the recent events and unrest in Charlottesville, it’s sad to see a young person choose to engage in such senseless and shameful behavior.”

Over the weekend, an attack after a violentwhite nationalist rally in Charlottesville claimed the life of a woman and injured 19 others.

The teen’s name has not been released. He will be charged with the willful and malicious destruction of property. The Boston Police Civil Rights Unit is also investigating to determine if additional charges are pending.

The panels on the memorial’s six towers are etched with millions of numbers that represent tattoos on the arms of the Jews murdered by the Nazis.

Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said he was saddened to see “such a despicable action in this great city.”

The memorial was rededicated in July after a21-year-old man who authorities say suffers from mental illness threw a rock through one of the panels.

“And now that this has happened twice in one summer it cannot be a coincidence,” said Jeremy Burton of the Jewish Community Relations Council.

Burton’s group oversees the memorial and points to the weekend’s neo-Nazi violence in Virginia and fears a disturbing trend.

When the memorial was built more than 20 years ago, the organizers knew vandalism was possible and they created extra panels.

“It’s horrific, it’s terrible,” one man visiting from Miami told CBS Boston. “You come here to pay your respects. You don’t want to be reminded about the hate and evil.”

When the glass was shattered in June, it was replaced in just two weeks. The pane smashed Monday is bigger and might take longer.

2017 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Holocaust Survivors Foundation USA Condemns Vandalization of Boston Holocaust Memorial and Rise of Hatred … – PR Newswire (press release)

We are heartbroken and angry that the Holocaust Memorial in Boston was vandalized, this week. As Holocaust survivors, we are profoundly saddened by the outrageous expressions of hatred, bigotry, racism, and anti-Semitism that seek to poison our society, and the failure of the President to categorically condemn the dangerous people threatening the fabric of our democracy. It is difficult for us to comprehend how such venom has become acceptable to a so much of the American public.

The symbolism of having a Holocaust Memorial attacked at a time of growing extremism, whether it calls itself white supremacy, neo-Nazism, racism, anti-semitism, or Fascism, is not only painful to witness, it is dangerous to the public.

We, the remaining voices for six million Jews who were murdered because of the “normalization” of such bigotry in Nazi Germany and Europe, are speaking out to sound the alarm loud and clear. Our losses were real — our grandparents, parents, brothers, sisters, cousins, aunts, and uncles, were all murdered because people in the 1930s did not take action to stop the spread of hate and bigotry. Three deaths in Charlottesville this week are too many already, but we know from experience there will be more unless people of good will from our national leaders to each one of us in our communities take action to condemn these forces.

The recent attack in Boston, in the shadow of the Charlottesville terror, is especially painful because the Boston Holocaust Memorial was built on a foundation of love and commitment to humanity of our beloved colleague Izzy Arbeiter. Izzy served for over 30 years as the President of the Holocaust Survivors of Greater Boston, and personally devoted thousands of hours teachingpeople of all backgrounds about the horrors of the Holocaust. Though all of us experienced the ultimate trauma, and have worked hard to preserve the memory of our loved ones and not let the world forget the evil and indifference that led to the Holocaust, Izzy’s imprint in Boston and the world has been unique and extraordinary. Our love and support go out to Izzy and all of Holocaust survivors in Greater Boston and New England at this difficult time, and we redouble our determination to stand strong against hatred, racism, white supremacy, bigotry, neo-Nazism, Fascism and anti-semitism wherever we see them.

For more information, go to: http://www.hsf-usa.org

SIGNED BY THE HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS FOUNDATION USAEXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Dena Axelrod, Ft. Lauderdale, FL Renee Firestone, Los Angeles, CA Sello Fisch, Bronx NY Ella Frumkin, Los Angeles, CA Nesse Godin, Washington D.C. Jay Ipson, Richmond, VA Louise Lawrence-Israels, Washington D.C. Herbert Karliner, Miami Beach, FL Annette Lantos, Washington, D.C. David Mermelstein, Miami FL Alex Moskovic, Hobe Sound, FL Leo Rechter, Queens, NY Shirley Rubin, Boynton Beach, FL David Schaecter, Miami, FL Anita Schuster, Las Vegas NV Agnes Vertes, Weston, CT Esther Widman, Brooklyn NY

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Seeing Nazis on TV is painful reminder to Holocaust families – KSDK

The hate speech and violence in Charlottesville has been painful for the son of a Holocaust survivor to watch.

Jennifer Meckles, KSDK 11:23 AM. CDT August 17, 2017

ST. LOUIS – The hate speech and violence in Charlottesville has been painful for the son of a Holocaust survivor to watch.

Burt Newman is what the local Jewish community calls a “second generation” Holocaust survivor.

His father, Max Newman, grew up in Russelsheim, Germany. He was the son of Jewish shoemakers who lived above their shop.

They had a good life, Newman explained. Had it not been for the rise of Hitler, they would have lived out their lives in peace and productivity. But of course that was not to be.

Burt said his father, who died in 1994, told stories about Nazi soldiers walking past the family store.

They would march past their home, singing of the dream of the extermination of all Jews, getting rid of all the Jews. It was their dream.

With the help of a sponsor who lived in St. Louis, Max escaped Germany in the late 1930s, when he was 23 years old. He also moved to St. Louis, where he later opened a grocery store and started a family.

Most of his extended family did not survive the Holocaust.

Burt said his father didnt talk about those years very often, and the son only learned more about his family history from an autobiography written by his grandmother. Burt and one of his cousins later took that information, in addition to their own research, and wrote a book about their family history.

As the son of a Holocaust survivor, Newman said it is painful to watch anti-Semitism and white supremacists on the news now.

I was driving today to the doctor and just thinking what would dad think about what happened in Charlottesville? And I know for a fact, he would have been absolutely terrified, Newman said.

People talking about down with the Jews, how far is that from what the [Nazi] soldiers were saying when they marched past their home in Russelsheim?

President Trump made several remarks following the violence in Charlottesville. Some of his responses have been widely criticized by both political parties.

Newman is also critical of the presidents response.

Theres a divide in our country. If youre Mexican, if youre Islamic, if youre black, if youre Jewish, the wheels have come off as far as the President is concerned, Newman said. I think the wheels came off [Tuesday] when he made the speech in Trump Tower.

I think this has to be fought tooth and nail, he continued. I think people have to come out of the wood works and say, Were not going to stand for this. This is not what this country was about or created for.

Newman, who is married to Missouri Democratic State Representative Stacey Newman, often speaks about the Holocaust. Several times a week, he shares his story at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center in St. Louis.

One of the reasons I speak at the museum is so that this story, my story and others like, it are known to other people who dont have exposure to what happened in the Holocaust, he said.

2017 KSDK-TV

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Sarasota Holocaust survivor Jacob Brodman dies at 97 – Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Barbara Peters Smith Staff Writer @barbarapsmith SARASOTA As a young man in Poland before his peaceful decades as a business owner and retiree in Sarasota Jacob Brodman had to watch from a nearby window while a Gestapo officer shot his father, and listen to his sister cry for help as she disappeared on an overcrowded train bound for the Belsen concentration camp. His remarkable Holocaust survival story, told many times over the years, included forced labor and starvation in Auschwitz-Birkenau, Buchenwald and Ohrduf, two death marches, and a daring escape from the Germans just before American soldiers arrived in time to save him and his older brother. Jacob Brodman, who died Wednesday in Sarasota at 97, was born April 24, 1920, in Grybow, Poland. His father owned three lumber mills, and Brodman had just started studying law when the Germans invaded his country in 1939. His mother, two sisters and a younger brother all died in the Holocaust. In 1989, Brodman gave an oral history interview for the archives now kept by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. “You ever stay near a fire, near a building that burns, close by?” he asked the interviewer, describing a day when he was forced to watch his fellow Jews lined up for execution, and then told to help incinerate the bodies. “You couldnt stay there,” he remembered. “The fire was so high, 20 feet high. You had to work so fast. We were crying and carrying, crying and throwing. We didnt know what to do. And one guy didnt work fast enough, and they threw him up there alive. We came back broken. It was terrible, just to stay in front of the fire and to throw people on the top of the fire.” Finally, on a forced march as the Germans were in retreat, he and his brother managed to slip away into the woods with some other men. They found food and clothes in abandoned houses, and eluded capture until they encountered American troops. On a ship to New York in 1946, Brodman met his first wife, Anya Sygall, and he studied interior design to start his own upholstery business. After traveling to Warm Mineral Springs for treatment of spinal injuries he sustained in the war, the couple decided to relocate to Sarasota, where they operated Jack’s Interiors. Brodman returned to Germany in 1966 to testify in the trial of his father’s killer. After Anya Brodman’s death in 1996, he married Helen Miller Ackerstein, also a Holocaust survivor, who passed away in January 2016. He is survived by a daughter, Shawn Bravin, her husband, Ben Bravin, of Los Angeles, two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A memorial is set for 2:30 Sunday at Temple Beth Sholom Cemetery. The temple honored him on his 95th birthday, and until a year ago, Brodman kept up a lively Twitter feed that displayed strong political opinions. Rabbi Michael Werbow said he was a fixture at Saturday morning services, and remembers him as “a schmoozer.” “You knew he was there,” Werbow said. “He liked being with people and was always conversing.”

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Holocaust survivor sees similarities in current political climate – King 5 – KING5.com

He says the rhetoric over the past few months has made him nervous and reminds him of the time before he fled Europe. But he still believes that we should still be hopeful. Matt Mrozinski, KING 4:40 PM. PDT August 18, 2017 Ninety-six-year-old Franz Wasserman has noted similarities in the current political climate with Nazi Germany during World War II. (Photo: KING) Current world events have alarmed a holocaust survivor in Seattle. Ninety-six-year-old Franz Wasserman has noted similarities in the current political climate with Nazi Germany during World War II. He says society’s reaction to the rhetoric and events like Charlottesville, Virginia, have given him some hope. “Ever since the campaign, before the election, it is the same kind of prejudice and the kind of nationalism. And at that time I was very much afraid it would lead to the same thing as it led to Germany,” said Wasserman. “I feel a great deal more hopeful these days than I did nine months ago. Our Democratic institutions seem to stand firm. And the people as a whole are standing firm…that the whole phenomenon of Trump will go away.” 2017 KING-TV

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Holocaust survivor on protests: ‘it has to be stopped at the beginning’ – ABC Action News

TAMPA, Fla. – Just before she turned 18, Rene Hammond, was sent by cattle car to Auschwitz where she would be separated from her parents before they were sent to the gas chambers and killed. “I remember it,” she said. Hammond recalls the story of being sent to a camp in Germany where she would have to march — there she would meet a German man who helped her, her sister and four other girls hide in Poland until the end of World War II. At 91-years-old, her sister is still alive too. This picture is the only image Hammond has of her family after the Holocaust. Hammond is one of 250 Holocaust survivors in a six-county area of the Tampa Bay area that’s part of theGulf Coast Jewish Family and Community Services. They have a Holocaust Survivor program that helps provide aide and support to those in need. Hammond sat with ABC Action News on Thursday talking about the current events, “it starts out small,” she uttered in reference to people marching in the streets with torches while chanting ‘Jews will not replace us.’ The images of intolerance is something she thought she would never see again in her lifetime. “It has to be stopped at the beginning,” she said, “we can’t let it go on.” Hammond wants people to know in Germany Nazi symbols are banned, but here in America it’s free speech. “It’s really important people stand up to it, don’t look the other way and let it go,” said Hammond. On Thursday, The Florida Holocaust Museum released a statement on the relevancy of teaching about the Holocaust in 2017: I’ve been asked over the last few days to talk about the new face of American white supremacy. While no expert in contemporary Nazism, I do not see a new face. The neo-Nazis of today marched through the University of Virginia campus, thrusting lit torches into the air while screaming racist invectives. Who could witness that scene and not immediately be transported to scenes of lynchings, pogroms and auto-de-fes of the past? People throughout the centuries try to justify their own hatred and bigotry by exploiting the fears and prejudices of their contemporary societies, using the tools they had at their disposal to try to make hate palatable to the general public. The “new face” of fascism in America is no different. While they may refer to their narrative as competing or “alternative”, it is not new. It is the same narrative of hate, coated now in 21st century clothing. At The Florida Holocaust Museum, we use the lessons of the Holocaust to help identify the ominous echoes of history. We believe that the best way to combat prejudice and bigotry is to educate about the terrible consequences of unchecked hatred. The Museum says they have partnered with EckerdCollege to present Frank Meeink, author of Autobiography of a Recovering Skinhead. The forum will be September 7 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

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O’Connor stands in solidarity at Boston Holocaust Memorial – Wicked Local Hingham

Bradford Randall brandall@wickedlocal.com One day after the Boston Holocaust Memorial was vandalized, state Sen. Patrick O’Connor, R-Weymouth, stood in solidarity with local leaders at the damaged memorial. “I had to go, for myself and the people I represent,” O’Connor told The News. “To stand up and say, ‘you will not win, this will not stand.’ As the senator from the South Shore I’m presenting that message.” A 17-year-old from Malden has been charged in connection with the vandalism, which occurred around 6:40 p.m. Monday after witnesses said they saw the teen throw a rock at the memorial, shattering a glass panel. At the memorial on August 15, O’Connor said he was able to hear a Holocaust survivor speak of his mother, father, and then his younger brother being taken by Nazis in Europe. O’Connor said the survivor was denied funerals, wakes or grave-sites for his loved ones but the Boston Holocaust Memorial is where survivors can find peace. “That site was where so many go on those birthdays, anniversaries or dates of death to remember,” he said. Approximately six million Jews were killed during the Holocaust before Germany was defeated in World War II, according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. O’Connor said he was the only Republican legislator in attendance and only two state senators showed up besides him. State Rep. Jim Cantwell, D-Marshfield, was also in attendance. “The way forward is to come together, to stop the partisan divide that is, right now, nothing but an illogical barrier to human progress,” O’Connor said. The teen who police believe committed the vandalism will be charged with willful and malicious destruction of property. Police said their civil rights unit is also investigating the incident to determine if additional charges are pending. It is the second time this summer that the memorial was damaged. Boston police said James Isaac, 21, of Roxbury, threw a rock at the memorial back in June. Repairs were made to fix the damaged panel and it was rededicated in July. O’Connor said he believes the discourse in America is not appropriate, and said Americans should stand up to hatred, xenophobia, bigotry, homophobia, sexism and racism. “We have an opioid crisis that is killing as many people as died in 9/11 every three weeks,” O’Connor said, adding that struggling schools and oppertunities not realized my minorities are also issues that demand focus. “Let’s get to work on the future,” O’Connor said. Follow The News on Twitter!

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Holocaust discovery: Ritual baths uncovered in synagogue complex … – Fox News

Archaeologists have uncovered two ritual baths in the remains of the Great Synagogue of Vilna (Vilnius), in Lithuania, more than 70 years after its destruction during the Holocaust. A team of experts from Israel, the U.S. and Lithuania uncovered the baths in the Lithuanian capital last month, the latest discovery at the historic site. The 17th-century Great Synagogue was at the heart of the Jewish community Vilnius for hundreds of years until its destruction by the Nazis. Prior to the Holocaust, the Great Synagogue was also surrounded by a host of buildings, including other synagogues, a community council, kosher meat stalls, miqvaot (ritual baths) and the famous Strashun rabbinical library. RADAR TECHNOLOGY HELPS REDISCOVER THE GREAT SYNAGOGUE OF VILNIUS, 70 YEARS AFTER ITS DESTRUCTION The site was also home to Rabbi Eliyahu, the celebrated 18th-century Vilna Gaon, or genius. The excavation site (Jon Seligman). The Great Synagogue compound was looted and burned by German forces in 1941, and the standing remains were later completely destroyed by Soviet authorities in the 1950s. The Soviets later built a school on top of the area in 1964. In 2015, archaeologists used ground-penetrating radar to locate the remains of the Great Synagogue and the buildings around its Shulhoyf or shulof community courtyard. HOLOCAUST ESCAPE TUNNEL FOUND: PRISONERS DUG WITH SPOONS TO ESCAPE NAZIS Most of the historical descriptions of the Great Synagogue in Vilna and the community courtyard (the Shulhoyf) relate to the Great Synagogue and the surrounding prayer halls, explained Dr. Jon Seligman of the Israel Antiquities Authority, who led the research team, in a statement. Until now, we have found little information about the bathhouse and Miqve (ritual bath) building of the Jewish community, a community that comprised almost half of the city’s population. Archaeologists followed a late 19th century architectural plan for the restoration of the ancient bathhouse. According to the plan, the bathhouse consisted of two main floors, a number of rooms, and a large service wing. Experts were also able to identify two ritual baths. In July, the team exposed the ritual baths, which date to the early 20th century. The baths have tiled walls and floors, steps leading to the pool, and an otzar, an auxiliary pool in which water is collected for the miqve, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority. HOLOCAUST HEROINE’S WILL, LOST PHOTOS, UNEARTHED IN SCOTLAND Mantas Daubaras of the Lithuanian Cultural Heritage Organization and Professor Richard Freund of Hartford University also participated in the excavation. “These discoveries add a new dimension to the understanding of the daily lives of the Jews of Vilna, and will certainly provide a new focus for understanding the lost cultural heritage of the Jewish community of Vilna, the ‘Jerusalem of Lithuania’, the researchers said in a statement. Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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For Dallas’ Holocaust survivors, the past has suddenly become painfully present – Daily Egyptian

Close Max Glauben, a Holocaust survivor, with a “March of the Living” scarf at his home in Dallas on August 14, 2017. (Jae S. Lee/Dallas Morning News/TNS) TNS TNS Max Glauben, a Holocaust survivor, with a “March of the Living” scarf at his home in Dallas on August 14, 2017. (Jae S. Lee/Dallas Morning News/TNS) August 17, 2017 Filed under National Monday afternoon I called a man Ive known for years, Max Glauben, the 89-year-old son of Warsaw, Poland, made an orphan by the Nazis. How did you know I was going to call you? he said when his wife handed Max the phone. I asked about what. But I knew. About the stuff thats happening right now, he said through the accent that has been tempered only slightly after decades as a U.S. citizen. And then Glauben, who survived six concentration camps and a death march before being liberated by U.S. armed forces, told me what it was like to turn on the television over the weekend and see Sieg-Heiling, Jew will not replace us-spitting, blood and soil-shouting white supremacists carrying swastika flags down American streets. It was just unbelievable, just unbelievable, said Glauben, who came to this country 70 years ago next month and, shortly after, was drafted into the U.S. Army. He said he had to close his eyes, because he hurt all over. But, he said, the past began to overwhelm the present unfolding in Charlottesville, Virginia, where authorities said 32-year-old Heather Heyer, a woman who dared to protest Tiki-torch-bearing neo-Nazis swamping her streets, was killed by a 20-year-old man from Ohio who idolized Hitler. And everything that happened in 1939, 40 and 41 to me in Warsaw, Poland, gets right in front of my brain, Glauben said. My eyes dont want to see it again. I have to close my eyes so I wouldnt see this. But all my feelings are coming back. So, too, the memories. Of the Warsaw Ghetto and not being able to go out in the street by myself without somebody wanting to hurt me because I was a member of a certain religion. Of Nazi soldiers on sidewalks and street corners who threatened to shoot him if he looked them in the eye. Of being transported to a camp in a crowded, fetid boxcar where prisoners fought for tiny drops of water falling from the ceiling just to wet parched lips. Of his mother, father and brother being executed in the death camps. Glauben was among the founders of the Dallas Holocaust Museum when it was just a room in the Jewish Community Centers basement. When we spoke almost a year ago, he warned that we would again see neo-Nazis, the Klan and white supremacists marching in the streets. Hed heard obscene whispers escalate into violent bawls coming from supporters of the would-be president; he saw a St. Marks graduate ascend to the top of the hatemongers trash heap. He even went to Texas A&M last year, on the same day that graduate, Dallas native Richard Spencer, was there spouting his alt-right bushwa, in the hopes of turning bystanders into upstanders who would combat the hate now eager to show its face in broad daylight. This is how it started, with them doing this, Glauben said Monday, his TV tuned to the footage. Then killing my family. Right now I am looking at it. On MSNBC, theyre repeating it and repeating it. And what does a child do if hes 10, 12, 14 and sees people raising their hands and saying, Heil Hitler?’ I tried to reach several Dallas survivors Monday, but found few willing or able to talk about the images looping, almost nonstop, on cable news. Some couldnt speak, their memories having faded into the fog. Others, traumatized all over again, wouldnt speak. But then there are women like 89-year-old Marianne Rubin, who, on Sunday, became a viral star. During a rally in Union Square in New York City, she was photographed holding a sign that read, I escaped the Nazis once. You will not defeat me now. I went to Glaubens house Monday evening and showed him the photo of the woman who had escaped Nazi Germany with her family in the 1930s. He grinned and said only, Wow. Ninety-three-year-old Jack Repp, too, was eager to talk. Wed never met until Monday, but he told me of our connection: For decades, he owned a department store on Second Avenue, across from my grandfather Harrys auto parts store. Most of my grandfathers family had been killed by Nazis, and Repp said they would often get together to speak Yiddish a dying language, especially in South Dallas in the 1940s and 50s. Repp was 21 years old and 69 pounds when he was liberated from a concentration camp. I was 99.9 percent dead, he told me, but I still had my mind. Like Glauben, he travels the world recounting his story one, he said Monday, that began with images like those seen on television over the weekend. They used to go in small towns beating up Jews and burning up homes, and this is is exactly how it looked, Repp said. It reminded me of the pogroms. It reminded me so much of that, I was sick. I couldnt leave the house for two days. When you see something like this as a Holocaust survivor He paused, sighed. I never thought I would see something like this in America. ___ (c)2017 The Dallas Morning News Visit The Dallas Morning News at www.dallasnews.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Teen arrested after Holocaust memorial in Boston vandalized – CBS News

Last Updated Aug 15, 2017 9:28 PM EDT BOSTON — For the second time this summer, the Holocaust memorial in Boston has been vandalized. Boston Police say a 17-year-old boy from Malden allegedly threw a rock at the memorial around 6:30 p.m. Monday and smashed a glass panel. “I saw this guy running around the corner dressed in all black,” one witness told CBS Boston. “It was a dozen people chasing him. The world’s gone crazy.” The suspect was detained by two bystanders until police arrived at the scene. Witnesses said they heard the suspect ranting incoherently. “I’m grateful for the quick response and the community help, which led to the swift arrest of the suspect responsible for the damage done to the Holocaust memorial,” Boston Police Commissioner William Evans said. “Clearly, this type of behavior will not be tolerated in our city,” he said. “And, in light of the recent events and unrest in Charlottesville, it’s sad to see a young person choose to engage in such senseless and shameful behavior.” Over the weekend, an attack after a violentwhite nationalist rally in Charlottesville claimed the life of a woman and injured 19 others. The teen’s name has not been released. He will be charged with the willful and malicious destruction of property. The Boston Police Civil Rights Unit is also investigating to determine if additional charges are pending. The panels on the memorial’s six towers are etched with millions of numbers that represent tattoos on the arms of the Jews murdered by the Nazis. Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said he was saddened to see “such a despicable action in this great city.” The memorial was rededicated in July after a21-year-old man who authorities say suffers from mental illness threw a rock through one of the panels. “And now that this has happened twice in one summer it cannot be a coincidence,” said Jeremy Burton of the Jewish Community Relations Council. Burton’s group oversees the memorial and points to the weekend’s neo-Nazi violence in Virginia and fears a disturbing trend. When the memorial was built more than 20 years ago, the organizers knew vandalism was possible and they created extra panels. “It’s horrific, it’s terrible,” one man visiting from Miami told CBS Boston. “You come here to pay your respects. You don’t want to be reminded about the hate and evil.” When the glass was shattered in June, it was replaced in just two weeks. The pane smashed Monday is bigger and might take longer. 2017 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Holocaust Survivors Foundation USA Condemns Vandalization of Boston Holocaust Memorial and Rise of Hatred … – PR Newswire (press release)

We are heartbroken and angry that the Holocaust Memorial in Boston was vandalized, this week. As Holocaust survivors, we are profoundly saddened by the outrageous expressions of hatred, bigotry, racism, and anti-Semitism that seek to poison our society, and the failure of the President to categorically condemn the dangerous people threatening the fabric of our democracy. It is difficult for us to comprehend how such venom has become acceptable to a so much of the American public. The symbolism of having a Holocaust Memorial attacked at a time of growing extremism, whether it calls itself white supremacy, neo-Nazism, racism, anti-semitism, or Fascism, is not only painful to witness, it is dangerous to the public. We, the remaining voices for six million Jews who were murdered because of the “normalization” of such bigotry in Nazi Germany and Europe, are speaking out to sound the alarm loud and clear. Our losses were real — our grandparents, parents, brothers, sisters, cousins, aunts, and uncles, were all murdered because people in the 1930s did not take action to stop the spread of hate and bigotry. Three deaths in Charlottesville this week are too many already, but we know from experience there will be more unless people of good will from our national leaders to each one of us in our communities take action to condemn these forces. The recent attack in Boston, in the shadow of the Charlottesville terror, is especially painful because the Boston Holocaust Memorial was built on a foundation of love and commitment to humanity of our beloved colleague Izzy Arbeiter. Izzy served for over 30 years as the President of the Holocaust Survivors of Greater Boston, and personally devoted thousands of hours teachingpeople of all backgrounds about the horrors of the Holocaust. Though all of us experienced the ultimate trauma, and have worked hard to preserve the memory of our loved ones and not let the world forget the evil and indifference that led to the Holocaust, Izzy’s imprint in Boston and the world has been unique and extraordinary. Our love and support go out to Izzy and all of Holocaust survivors in Greater Boston and New England at this difficult time, and we redouble our determination to stand strong against hatred, racism, white supremacy, bigotry, neo-Nazism, Fascism and anti-semitism wherever we see them. For more information, go to: http://www.hsf-usa.org SIGNED BY THE HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS FOUNDATION USAEXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Dena Axelrod, Ft. Lauderdale, FL Renee Firestone, Los Angeles, CA Sello Fisch, Bronx NY Ella Frumkin, Los Angeles, CA Nesse Godin, Washington D.C. Jay Ipson, Richmond, VA Louise Lawrence-Israels, Washington D.C. Herbert Karliner, Miami Beach, FL Annette Lantos, Washington, D.C. David Mermelstein, Miami FL Alex Moskovic, Hobe Sound, FL Leo Rechter, Queens, NY Shirley Rubin, Boynton Beach, FL David Schaecter, Miami, FL Anita Schuster, Las Vegas NV Agnes Vertes, Weston, CT Esther Widman, Brooklyn NY View original content with multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/holocaust-survivors-foundation-usa-condemns-vandalization-of-boston-holocaust-memorial-and-rise-of-hatred-racism-and-anti-semitism-300505868.html SOURCE Holocaust Survivors Foundation USA http://www.hsf-usa.org

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Seeing Nazis on TV is painful reminder to Holocaust families – KSDK

The hate speech and violence in Charlottesville has been painful for the son of a Holocaust survivor to watch. Jennifer Meckles, KSDK 11:23 AM. CDT August 17, 2017 ST. LOUIS – The hate speech and violence in Charlottesville has been painful for the son of a Holocaust survivor to watch. Burt Newman is what the local Jewish community calls a “second generation” Holocaust survivor. His father, Max Newman, grew up in Russelsheim, Germany. He was the son of Jewish shoemakers who lived above their shop. They had a good life, Newman explained. Had it not been for the rise of Hitler, they would have lived out their lives in peace and productivity. But of course that was not to be. Burt said his father, who died in 1994, told stories about Nazi soldiers walking past the family store. They would march past their home, singing of the dream of the extermination of all Jews, getting rid of all the Jews. It was their dream. With the help of a sponsor who lived in St. Louis, Max escaped Germany in the late 1930s, when he was 23 years old. He also moved to St. Louis, where he later opened a grocery store and started a family. Most of his extended family did not survive the Holocaust. Burt said his father didnt talk about those years very often, and the son only learned more about his family history from an autobiography written by his grandmother. Burt and one of his cousins later took that information, in addition to their own research, and wrote a book about their family history. As the son of a Holocaust survivor, Newman said it is painful to watch anti-Semitism and white supremacists on the news now. I was driving today to the doctor and just thinking what would dad think about what happened in Charlottesville? And I know for a fact, he would have been absolutely terrified, Newman said. People talking about down with the Jews, how far is that from what the [Nazi] soldiers were saying when they marched past their home in Russelsheim? President Trump made several remarks following the violence in Charlottesville. Some of his responses have been widely criticized by both political parties. Newman is also critical of the presidents response. Theres a divide in our country. If youre Mexican, if youre Islamic, if youre black, if youre Jewish, the wheels have come off as far as the President is concerned, Newman said. I think the wheels came off [Tuesday] when he made the speech in Trump Tower. I think this has to be fought tooth and nail, he continued. I think people have to come out of the wood works and say, Were not going to stand for this. This is not what this country was about or created for. Newman, who is married to Missouri Democratic State Representative Stacey Newman, often speaks about the Holocaust. Several times a week, he shares his story at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center in St. Louis. One of the reasons I speak at the museum is so that this story, my story and others like, it are known to other people who dont have exposure to what happened in the Holocaust, he said. 2017 KSDK-TV

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