Archive for the ‘Holocaust’ Category

Natalie Portman Compares Eating Meat To The Holocaust In …

In a new video released by PETA, actress Natalie Portman compares the killing of animals for meat consumption to the Holocaust.

Portman makes the comparison by quoting Nobel Prize in Literature recipient Isaac Bashevis Singer, an influential Polish-born Jewish writer from the 20th century.

“Isaac Singer grew up in the same part of Poland as my family,” Portman says in the video. “And like them, he fled the horrors of the Holocaust.”

“We do to Gods creatures what the Nazis did to us,” Portman says, quoting a character from one of Singers novel.

“As long as people will shed the blood of innocent creatures there can be no peace, no liberty, no harmony,” the video concludes. “Slaughter and justice cannot dwell together.”

According to the Times of Israel, PETA was banned from comparing meat consumption to the Holocaust by a German court in 2009. The court told PETA that they could not use images of the Holocaust alongside abused animals after PETA launched the “Holocaust on your Plate” campaign.

The video caused a stir online. Below are a few examples of responses:

This is not the first time Portman found herself in the middle of controversy in recent months. In April, she announced she would not attend an awards ceremony in Israel, where she was being awarded a prize, because she did not want to “appear as endorsing Benjamin Netanyahu, who was to be giving a speech at the ceremony.”

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The Holocaust Explained: Designed for schools

Welcome to The Holocaust Explained

This website has been created to help learners understand the essential facts of the Holocaust, its causes and its consequences. We aim to answer questions that people most often want to ask in an accessible, reliable and engaging way. Designed with the British school curriculum in mind, our content is organised across nine clearly defined and easy-to-navigate topic areas.

The Holocaust Explained includes hundreds of pages of content based on a wide variety of source material in the form of videos, images and text. It is managed by The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide, London. The Library is the oldest archive of material on the Nazi era and the Holocaust in the world. It is Britains national Holocaust archive, and enjoys an international reputation as a leading centre of research and learning.

All of the main learning materials onThe Holocaust Explained have been designed to be accessible to learners from the age of eleven to thirteen. We know that different people learn at very different speeds and also in quite different ways. That is why we have added advanced content aimed at people who feel they already have achieved a good basic understanding of a topic, but who wish to explore in greater depth.

In order to activate advanced content across the site, simply click the redbuttonon the left-hand side of each page. On the mobile version, just tap on the topic menu.

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Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust

Museum of Jewish Heritage Core Exhibition

MJH Building Exterior David Paler

Andy Goldsworthy’s first permanent commission in New York City, Garden of Stones

Museum of Jewish Heritage – Aerial View

Garden of Stones – Above

Memory Unearthed

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Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education | St. Cloud …

The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education provides academic support for students, faculty, staff and community.

We create education about the Holocaust and other genocides through material resources and consultation.

We also work to increase awareness and knowledge of multidisciplinary approaches to the study of the Holocaust.

We strive to develop sensitivity to and understanding of anti-Semitism, racism, sexism, hatred, oppression, and other ideological constructs and forms of behavior that lead to human suffering.

“Could the activity of thinking . . . be among the conditions that make men (sic) abstain from evil-doing or even actually ‘condition’ them against it?”

Hannah Arendt

“The Life of the Mind”

Dr. Wildeson is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies. He teaches writing, speaking, argumentation, theories of persuasion, ethics in human communication, antisemitism and Holocaust literature courses.

As center director he is responsible for developing programming with speakers, exhibits, films, workshops, study tours and curriculum.

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Holocaust Studies | Middle Tennessee State University

See links to the left to learn about our mission, committee, and related matters.

October 30, 20189:00 – 2:00 pmStudent Union Building, MTSU Campus

Register Now!

April 19-21, 2018

More Info!

November 2017

More Info!

Questions or comments? Contact this page’s web manager.

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Holocaust Studies | Middle Tennessee State University

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Kupferberg Holocaust Center

About The Center

Marisa L. Hollywood Assistant Director

The Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC), established in 1983, is an educational resource for Queensborough Community College, the City University of New York, the broader New York City and Long Island communities, and the global community. The KHC uses the lessons of the Holocaust and other mass atrocities to teach and empower citizens to become agents of positive social change in their lives and in their communities. Through its student and community programs and two galleries for original exhibits, library, and archives, the KHC serves approximately 20,000 visitors each year.

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Kupferberg Holocaust Center

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Holocaust Pathfinder – University of Pittsburgh

Holocaust PathfinderHolocaust PathfinderSCOPESince the mid nineteen-seventies there has been a proliferation of interest regarding the Holocaust. The resulting materials, which are interdisciplinary in nature, include works in the fields of history, political science, religion, philosophy, psychology, and literature.

This pathfinder is intended as a guide to Holocaust materials for the beginning researcher. It is not meant to be exhaustive, but, instead should serve as a springboard for deeper coverage of the topic. Unless otherwise indicated, the materials cited here are written in the English language and are housed in Hillman Library.

INTRODUCTIONThe Academic American Encyclopedia provides an introduction to the topic and defines the term in this manner:

SUBJECT HEADINGSThe following SUBJECT HEADINGS can be used to find relevant materials in the card catalog and in Pittcat:

Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)World War, 1939-1945Genocide–Germany–HistoryHolocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)–CausesHolocaust SurvivorsHolocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), in literatureHolocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)–PolandWorld War, 1939-1945–Concentration Camps

Books in these subject areas are cataloged under the following Library of Congress CALL NUMBERS:

D 804-805D 810DD 247-251DS 11DS 135

MAJOR TEXTSDawidowicz, Lucy S. The War Against the Jews, 1933-1945. 10th Anniversary edition. NY: Bantam Books, 1986. 466 pp. D810 J4D33 1986

Hilberg, Raul. The Destruction of the European Jews. Revised and definitive edition. NY: Holmes and Meier, 1985. 1273 pp. D810 J4H5 1985(Considered by scholars to be the standard work in the field.)

Levin, Nora. The Holocaust: The Destruction of European Jewry. NY: Schocken, 1968. 768 pp. D810 J4 L455

ADDITIONAL TITLES include:Bauer, Yehuda. A History of the Holocaust. NY: Franklin Watts, 1982. 398 pp. D810 J4 B315823 1982

Edelheit, Abraham J. and Hershel Edelheit. History of the Holocaust: A Handbook and Dictionary. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1994. 524 pp. Ref D804.3 E33 1994

Gilbert, Martin. Atlas of the Holocaust. NY: Macmillan, 1982. 256 pp. Ref G1797.21.E29 G48 1982

Gilbert, Martin. The Holocaust: A History of the Jews of Europe During the Second World War. NY: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1986. 959 pp. D810.J4 G525 1986

The Holocaust: An 18-Volume Collection of Primary Documents. John Mendelsohn, ed. NY: Garland Publishing, 1982. D810 J4 H655

Levi, Primo. Survival in Auschwitz: The Nazi Assault on Humanity. NY: Collier, 1967. 157 pp. D804 G4L383 1961

Morse, Arthur. While Six Million Died: A Chronicle of American Apathy. NY: Random House, 1986. 420 pp. D810 J4 M59

Reitlinger, Gerald Roberts. The Final Solution: The Attempt to Exterminate the Jews of Europe, 1939-1945. 2nd revised and augmented edition. South Brunswick, NJ: T. Yoseloff, 1968. 667 pp. DS135 E89 R37 1968

Wiesel, Elie. Night. 1st American edition. NY: Hill and Wang, 1960. 116 pp. DS11 W651 1960a

BIBLIOGRAPHIESBloomberg, Marty. The Jewish Holocaust: An Annotated Guide to Books in English. San Bernadino, CA: Borgo Press, 1991. 248 pp. Z6374.H6B58The first volume in a series entitled “Studies in Judaica and the Holocaust,” this title contains the most current materials relating to the study of the Holocaust. It also has the advantage of including references to subjects otherwise overlooked in some of the older bibliographies, such as mail in the concentration camps, historical revisionists, starvation, and the search for missing nazis. Written by a librarian, the book contains a list of core title recommendations for college and university libraries.

Cargas, Harry J. The Holocaust: An Annotated Bibliography. 2nd ed. Chicago: American Library Association, 1985. 293 pp. Z6374 H6C37 1985An updated version of Cargas’ 1977 volume, the second edition is an excellent sourcebook, with helpful annotations. Contains a chapter entitled “Researching the Holocaust: Guidance for Students” which is very well organized. Other sections include: Anti-Semitism and the rise of Nazism, memoirs of the victims, reflections on the Holocaust, and Jewish resistance.

Edelheit, Abraham J. and Hershel Edelheit. Bibliography on Holocaust Literature. Boulder: Westview Press, 1986. 842 pp. Z6374 H6E33 1986Contains a wealth of material, a great deal of which is not covered in other sources. For each major section there is an introductory essay, followed by references to periodicals, books, documents, and eyewitness accounts. The scope of this bibliography is wide, and includes such topics as: Jewish life in pre-war Europe, the free world reaction, the Holocaust and the literary imagination, and distorting the Holocaust. One of the most valuable sections is the list of periodicals used (pp. xxvii-xxxii). It serves as an excellent source for research into the larger field of Jewish Studies. Updated by a 2-volume supplement published in 1990 (Z6374 H6E33 1986 Suppl.)

Muffs, Judith H. The Holocaust in Books and Films: A Selected, Annotated List. 3rd ed. NY: Hippocrene Books, 1986. 158 pp. Z6374 H6M83 1986″Designed primarily as a guide for teachers and librarians in the junior and senior high schools,” this bibliography serves a variety of functions. Though not comprehensive, it contains current references to films, books, filmstrips, booklets, posters, photographs, and other sources which deal with the Holocaust. It contains a list of audio-visual distributors and a section on Holocaust education and resource centers.

Robinson, Jacob, ed. The Holocaust and After: Sources and Literature in English. Jerusalem: Israel Universities Press, 1973. 353 pp. Z6374 H6R6Summaries in English of books, articles, film scripts, and plays about the Holocaust. Because it was published in the early 1970’s, some of the more current scholarship has been omitted, but this is more than made up for by the inclusion of original material from the 1930’s and 1940’s.

Sable, Martin H. Holocaust Studies: A Directory and Bibliography of Bibliographies. Greenwood, FL: Penkevill Publishing Co., 1987. 115 pp. Z6374 H6S22 1987Contains listings (without annotations) of Holocaust bibliographies in a variety of languages. The second half of the work is a directory of associations, councils, foundations, and various types of agencies which are concerned with some aspect of the Destruction. Included in this category is a list of memorials, monuments, sculptures, statues, and museums.

Szonyi, David M. The Holocaust: An Annotated Bibliography and Resource Guide. NY: Ktav, 1985. 396 pp. Z6374 H6H65 1985Covers the standard facets of the topic (resistance, life in the ghettos, war crime trials, children of survivors, etc.), along with literature of the Holocaust, audio-visual materials, research institutes and archival centers, religious services, oral history projects, traveling exhibits, Holocaust curricula, and materials and landmarks in North America. The strength of this guide is in its emphasis on education. In this sense, it is a unique source.

RESEARCH COLLECTIONSAmerican Jewish Archives. Cincinnati. Manuscript Catalog of the American Jewish Archives. 4 volumes. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1964. 1st supplement, 1978. Z6375 H38

Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. Cincinnati. Dictionary Catalog of the Klau Library. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1964. This catalog is not in the Hillman Library.

New York Public Library. Reference Department. Dictionary Catalog of the Jewish Collection. 14 vols. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1960. 1st supplement, 1975. Z6375 N6

INDEXESAmerican Humanities Index (1975-)Arts and Humanities Citation Index (1976-)Arts and Humanities Citation Index on CD-ROM (1980-)British Humanities Index (1962-)Historical Abstracts on CD-ROM (1982-)Humanities Index (1974-)Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (1966-) Z6367.J62Index to Jewish Periodicals(1963-)Religion Index One (1977-)Religious and Theological Abstracts (1958-)Social Sciences Citation Index (1969-)Social Sciences Citation Index on CD-ROM (1986-)Social Sciences Index (1974-)

JOURNALS that contain articles about the Holocaust include:

Bulletin des Leo Baeck Instituts (1957-) DS135.G3A2618 Holocaust and Genocide Studies. (1986-)Holocaust Studies Annual. (1983-) DS135 E83H66Shoah: A Journal of Resources on the Holocaust (1978-)Simon Wiesenthal Center Annual (1984-) DS810 J4S537Yad Vashem Studies (1963-) DS135 E83Y3YIVO Bleter (1931-) PJ5120.A1Y5

RESOURCE CENTERS AND ARCHIVESLeo Baeck Institute129 E. 73rd StreetNew York, NY 10021(212) 744-6400

Center for Holocaust Studies, Documentation and Research1605 Avenue JBrooklyn, NY 11230(212) 338-6494

International Center for Holocaust StudiesAnti-Defamation League of B’nai Brith823 United Nations PlazaNew York, NY 10017(215) 787-1753

National Institute of the HolocaustP.O. Box 2147Philadelphia, PA 19103(202) 653-9152

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum100 Raoul Wallenberg Pl. S.W.Washington, DC 20024(202) 488-0400

William Weiner Oral History LibraryAmerican Jewish Committee165 E. 56th StreetNew York, NY 10022(212) 751-4000

Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust StudiesYeshiva University9769 W. Pico Blvd.Los Angeles, CA 90035(213) 553-9036

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research1048 Fifth AvenueNew York, NY 10028(212) 535-6700

Compiled & Updated by Laurie Cohen, 9/95

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Annual Holocaust Remembrance Program | Holocaust …

2018 HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE PROGRAM DUE TO THE TORNADOES WHICH AFFECTED CAMPUS ON 19 MARCH, THE 2018 HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE SCHEDULED FOR APRIL HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

Remembrance Program Archives (1982-2017)Contains information on past remembrance programs, including newspaper articles, photos, program flyers, and more.

Imagining the Holocaust Writing Contest This writing competition is open to Alabama junior high and high school students, and encompasses many kinds of writing, from essays to more creative approaches in poetry and fiction. Entries are due 1 March, and prizes, including U.S. Savings Bonds worth $100, $75, and $50 will be awarded to the top three winners in each category. The top winners will also be invited to participate in JSU’s annual Holocaust Remembrance program in April.

Contact Program PlannersE-mail program planners for information or questions about the annual Holocaust Remembrance program.

National Days of RemembranceThe national Days of Remembrance program observed by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

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The Holocaust in Russia | Military Wiki | FANDOM powered …

Holocaust in Reichskommissariat Ostland (which included Russia): a map

Russia. Jewish women and children being forced out of their homes. A soldier in Romanian uniform is marching along as a guard, 17 July 1941.

The Holocaust in Russia refers to the Nazi crimes during the occupation of Russia by Nazi Germany.

Beyond longstanding controversies, ranging from the MolotovRibbentrop Pact to anti-Zionism, the Soviet Union did grant official “equality of all citizens regardless of status, sex, race, religion, and nationality.” The years before the Holocaust were an era of rapid change for Soviet Jews, leaving behind the dreadful poverty of the Pale of Settlement. 40% of the population in the former Pale left for large cities within the USSR. Emphasis on education and movement from countryside shtetls to newly industrialized cities allowed many Soviet Jews to enjoy overall advances under Joseph Stalin and to become one of the most educated population groups in the world. Due to Stalinist emphasis on its urban population, interwar migration inadvertently rescued countless Soviet Jews; Nazi Germany penetrated the entire former Jewish Pale but were kilometers short of Leningrad and Moscow. The great wave of deportations from the areas annexed by Soviet Union according to the Nazi-Soviet pact, often seen by victims as genocide, paradoxically also saved lives of a few hundred thousand Jewish deportees. However horrible their conditions, the fate of Jews in Nazi Germany was much worse. The migration of many Jews deeper East from the part of the Jewish Pale that would become occupied by Germany saved at least forty percent of this area’s Jewish population.

Map titled “Jewish Executions Carried Out by Einsatzgruppe A” from Stahlecker’s report. Marked “Secret Reich Matter,” the map shows the number of Jews shot, and reads at the bottom: “the estimated number of Jews still on hand is 128,000”.

On 22 June 1941, Adolf Hitler abruptly broke the nonaggression pact and invaded the Soviet Union. The Soviet territories occupied by early 1942, including all of Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Ukraine, and Moldova and most Russian territory west of the line Leningrad-Moscow-Rostov, contained about four million Jews, including hundreds of thousands who had fled Poland in 1939. Despite the chaos of the Soviet retreat, some effort was made to evacuate Jews, who were either employed in the military industries or were family members of servicemen. Of 4 million about a million succeeded in escaping further east. The remaining three million were left at the mercy of the Nazis. Despite the subservience of the Oberkommando des Heeres to Adolf Hitler, Heinrich Himmler did not trust the Army to approve of, let alone carry out, the large-scale killings of Jews in the occupied Soviet territories. This task was assigned to SS formations called Einsatzgruppen (“task groups”), under the overall command of Reinhard Heydrich. These had been used on a limited scale in Poland in 1939, but were now organized on a much larger scale. According to Otto Ohlendorf at his trial, “the Einsatzgruppen had the mission to protect the rear of the troops by killing the Jews, gypsies, Communist functionaries, active Communists, and all persons who would endanger the security.” In practice, their victims were nearly all defenseless Jewish civilians (not a single Einsatzgruppe member was killed in action during these operations). Raul Hilberg writes that the Einsatzgruppe member were ordinary citizens; the great majority were university-educated professionals.[1] They used their skills to become efficient killers, according to Michael Berenbaum.[2] By the end of 1941, however, the Einsatzgruppen had killed only 15 percent of the Jews in the occupied Soviet territories, and it was apparent that these methods could not be used to kill all the Jews of Europe. Even before the invasion of the Soviet Union, experiments with killing Jews in the back of vans using gas from the van’s exhaust had been carried out, and when this proved too slow, more lethal gasses were tried. For large-scale killing by gas, however, fixed sites would be needed, and it was decidedprobably by Heydrich and Eichmannthat the Jews should be brought to camps specifically built for the purpose.

Although the Soviet Union was victorious in World War II, the war resulted in around 2627 million Soviet deaths (estimates vary)[3] and had devastated the Soviet economy in the struggle. Some 1,710 towns and 70 thousand settlements were destroyed.[4] The occupied territories suffered from the ravages of German occupation and deportations of slave labor in Germany.[5] Thirteen million Soviet citizens became victims of a repressive policy of Germans and their allies in occupied territory, where they died because of mass murders, famine, absence of elementary medical aid and slave labor.[6][7][8][9] The Nazi Genocide of the Jews carried by German Einsatzgruppen, along the local collaborators resulted in almost complete annihilation of the Jewish population over the entire territory temporary occupied by Germany and its allies.[10][11][12][13] During occupation, Russia’s Leningrad, now Saint Petersburg, region lost around a quarter of its population.[9] 3.6 million Soviet prisoners of war (of 5.5 million) died in German camps.[14][15][16] British historian Martin Gilbert used a similar approach in his Atlas of the Holocaust, but arrived at a number of 5.75 million Jewish victims, since he estimated higher numbers of Jews killed in Russia and other locations.[17] Lucy S. Dawidowicz used pre-war census figures to estimate that 5.934 million Jews died.[18] In October 1943, 600 Jewish and Russian prisoners attempted an escape at the Sobibr extermination camp. About 60 survived and joined the Belarusian partisans. In Eastern Europe, many Jews joined the ranks of the Soviet partisans: throughout the war, they faced antisemitism and discrimination from the Soviets and some Jewish partisans were killed, but over time, many of the Jewish partisan groups were absorbed into the command structure of the much larger Soviet partisan movement.[19] Soviet partisans were not in a position to ensure protection to the Jews in the Holocaust. The fit Jews were usually welcomed by the partisans (sometimes only if they brought their own weapons); however women, children, and the elderly were mostly unwelcome. Eventually, however, separate Jewish groups, both guerrilla units and mixed family groups of refugees (like the Bielski partisans), were subordinated to the communist partisan leadership and considered as Soviet assets. Even as some assisted the Germans, a significant number of individuals in the territories under German control also helped Jews escape death (see Righteous Among the Nations). During World War II, Lon Poliakov established the Centre de documentation juive contemporaine (1943) and after the war, he assisted Edgar Faure at the Nuremberg Trial. By 1944, the Germans had been pushed out of the Soviet Union onto the banks of the Vistula River, just east of Prussia. With Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov attacking from Prussia, and Marshal Konev slicing Germany in half from the south the fate of Nazi Germany was sealed. It is estimated that up to 1.4 million Jews fought in Allied armies; 40% of them in the Red Army.[20] In total, at least 142 500 Soviet soldiers of Jewish nationality lost their lives fighting against the German invadors and their allies[21] Salomon Smolianoff was selected for Operation Bernhard, transferred to the Sachsenhausen concentration camp in 1944, and eventually to the Ebensee site of the Mauthausen camp network,[22] where he was liberated by the US Army on 6 May 1945.[23] Without changing its official anti-Zionist stance, from late 1944 until 1948 Joseph Stalin had adopted a de facto pro-Zionist foreign policy, apparently believing that the new country would be socialist and would speed the decline of British influence in the Middle East.[24]

1946. The official response to an inquiry by the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee about the military decorations of Jews during the war (1.8% of the total number). Some antisemites attempted to accuse Jews of lack of patriotism and of hiding from military service.

In January 1948 Solomon Mikhoels, a popular actor-director of the Moscow State Jewish Theater and the chairman of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee, was killed in a staged car accident.[25] Mass arrests of prominent Jewish intellectuals and suppression of Jewish culture followed under the banners of campaign against “rootless cosmopolitans” and anti-Zionism. On 12 August 1952, in the event known as the Night of the Murdered Poets, thirteen most prominent Yiddish writers, poets, actors and other intellectuals were executed on the orders of Joseph Stalin, among them Peretz Markish, Leib Kvitko, David Hofstein, Itzik Feffer and David Bergelson.[26] In the 1955 UN Assembly’s session a high Soviet official still denied the “rumors” about their disappearance.

In 2012, Yad Vashem began releasing more than a million new testimonial pages about Jews in the Soviet Union that are expected to help researchers measure the scope of persecution and extermination of Jews in the former Soviet Union.[27]

SS-Gruppenfhrer Otto Ohlendorf, November 1943.

14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS Galicia (1st Ukrainian) somewhere in Russia, with noncombatant women and a child.

Amin el Husseini the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, talking to Azerbaijani Legion volunteers.

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Natalie Portman Compares Eating Meat To The Holocaust In …

In a new video released by PETA, actress Natalie Portman compares the killing of animals for meat consumption to the Holocaust. Portman makes the comparison by quoting Nobel Prize in Literature recipient Isaac Bashevis Singer, an influential Polish-born Jewish writer from the 20th century. “Isaac Singer grew up in the same part of Poland as my family,” Portman says in the video. “And like them, he fled the horrors of the Holocaust.” “We do to Gods creatures what the Nazis did to us,” Portman says, quoting a character from one of Singers novel. “As long as people will shed the blood of innocent creatures there can be no peace, no liberty, no harmony,” the video concludes. “Slaughter and justice cannot dwell together.” According to the Times of Israel, PETA was banned from comparing meat consumption to the Holocaust by a German court in 2009. The court told PETA that they could not use images of the Holocaust alongside abused animals after PETA launched the “Holocaust on your Plate” campaign. The video caused a stir online. Below are a few examples of responses: This is not the first time Portman found herself in the middle of controversy in recent months. In April, she announced she would not attend an awards ceremony in Israel, where she was being awarded a prize, because she did not want to “appear as endorsing Benjamin Netanyahu, who was to be giving a speech at the ceremony.”

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The Holocaust Explained: Designed for schools

Welcome to The Holocaust Explained This website has been created to help learners understand the essential facts of the Holocaust, its causes and its consequences. We aim to answer questions that people most often want to ask in an accessible, reliable and engaging way. Designed with the British school curriculum in mind, our content is organised across nine clearly defined and easy-to-navigate topic areas. The Holocaust Explained includes hundreds of pages of content based on a wide variety of source material in the form of videos, images and text. It is managed by The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide, London. The Library is the oldest archive of material on the Nazi era and the Holocaust in the world. It is Britains national Holocaust archive, and enjoys an international reputation as a leading centre of research and learning. All of the main learning materials onThe Holocaust Explained have been designed to be accessible to learners from the age of eleven to thirteen. We know that different people learn at very different speeds and also in quite different ways. That is why we have added advanced content aimed at people who feel they already have achieved a good basic understanding of a topic, but who wish to explore in greater depth. In order to activate advanced content across the site, simply click the redbuttonon the left-hand side of each page. On the mobile version, just tap on the topic menu.

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Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust

Museum of Jewish Heritage Core Exhibition MJH Building Exterior David Paler Andy Goldsworthy’s first permanent commission in New York City, Garden of Stones Museum of Jewish Heritage – Aerial View Garden of Stones – Above Memory Unearthed

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Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education | St. Cloud …

The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Education provides academic support for students, faculty, staff and community. We create education about the Holocaust and other genocides through material resources and consultation. We also work to increase awareness and knowledge of multidisciplinary approaches to the study of the Holocaust. We strive to develop sensitivity to and understanding of anti-Semitism, racism, sexism, hatred, oppression, and other ideological constructs and forms of behavior that lead to human suffering. “Could the activity of thinking . . . be among the conditions that make men (sic) abstain from evil-doing or even actually ‘condition’ them against it?” Hannah Arendt “The Life of the Mind” Dr. Wildeson is a professor in the Department of Communication Studies. He teaches writing, speaking, argumentation, theories of persuasion, ethics in human communication, antisemitism and Holocaust literature courses. As center director he is responsible for developing programming with speakers, exhibits, films, workshops, study tours and curriculum.

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Holocaust Studies | Middle Tennessee State University

See links to the left to learn about our mission, committee, and related matters. October 30, 20189:00 – 2:00 pmStudent Union Building, MTSU Campus Register Now! April 19-21, 2018 More Info! November 2017 More Info! Questions or comments? Contact this page’s web manager.

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Kupferberg Holocaust Center

About The Center Marisa L. Hollywood Assistant Director The Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC), established in 1983, is an educational resource for Queensborough Community College, the City University of New York, the broader New York City and Long Island communities, and the global community. The KHC uses the lessons of the Holocaust and other mass atrocities to teach and empower citizens to become agents of positive social change in their lives and in their communities. Through its student and community programs and two galleries for original exhibits, library, and archives, the KHC serves approximately 20,000 visitors each year.

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Holocaust Pathfinder – University of Pittsburgh

Holocaust PathfinderHolocaust PathfinderSCOPESince the mid nineteen-seventies there has been a proliferation of interest regarding the Holocaust. The resulting materials, which are interdisciplinary in nature, include works in the fields of history, political science, religion, philosophy, psychology, and literature. This pathfinder is intended as a guide to Holocaust materials for the beginning researcher. It is not meant to be exhaustive, but, instead should serve as a springboard for deeper coverage of the topic. Unless otherwise indicated, the materials cited here are written in the English language and are housed in Hillman Library. INTRODUCTIONThe Academic American Encyclopedia provides an introduction to the topic and defines the term in this manner: SUBJECT HEADINGSThe following SUBJECT HEADINGS can be used to find relevant materials in the card catalog and in Pittcat: Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)World War, 1939-1945Genocide–Germany–HistoryHolocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)–CausesHolocaust SurvivorsHolocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), in literatureHolocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)–PolandWorld War, 1939-1945–Concentration Camps Books in these subject areas are cataloged under the following Library of Congress CALL NUMBERS: D 804-805D 810DD 247-251DS 11DS 135 MAJOR TEXTSDawidowicz, Lucy S. The War Against the Jews, 1933-1945. 10th Anniversary edition. NY: Bantam Books, 1986. 466 pp. D810 J4D33 1986 Hilberg, Raul. The Destruction of the European Jews. Revised and definitive edition. NY: Holmes and Meier, 1985. 1273 pp. D810 J4H5 1985(Considered by scholars to be the standard work in the field.) Levin, Nora. The Holocaust: The Destruction of European Jewry. NY: Schocken, 1968. 768 pp. D810 J4 L455 ADDITIONAL TITLES include:Bauer, Yehuda. A History of the Holocaust. NY: Franklin Watts, 1982. 398 pp. D810 J4 B315823 1982 Edelheit, Abraham J. and Hershel Edelheit. History of the Holocaust: A Handbook and Dictionary. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1994. 524 pp. Ref D804.3 E33 1994 Gilbert, Martin. Atlas of the Holocaust. NY: Macmillan, 1982. 256 pp. Ref G1797.21.E29 G48 1982 Gilbert, Martin. The Holocaust: A History of the Jews of Europe During the Second World War. NY: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1986. 959 pp. D810.J4 G525 1986 The Holocaust: An 18-Volume Collection of Primary Documents. John Mendelsohn, ed. NY: Garland Publishing, 1982. D810 J4 H655 Levi, Primo. Survival in Auschwitz: The Nazi Assault on Humanity. NY: Collier, 1967. 157 pp. D804 G4L383 1961 Morse, Arthur. While Six Million Died: A Chronicle of American Apathy. NY: Random House, 1986. 420 pp. D810 J4 M59 Reitlinger, Gerald Roberts. The Final Solution: The Attempt to Exterminate the Jews of Europe, 1939-1945. 2nd revised and augmented edition. South Brunswick, NJ: T. Yoseloff, 1968. 667 pp. DS135 E89 R37 1968 Wiesel, Elie. Night. 1st American edition. NY: Hill and Wang, 1960. 116 pp. DS11 W651 1960a BIBLIOGRAPHIESBloomberg, Marty. The Jewish Holocaust: An Annotated Guide to Books in English. San Bernadino, CA: Borgo Press, 1991. 248 pp. Z6374.H6B58The first volume in a series entitled “Studies in Judaica and the Holocaust,” this title contains the most current materials relating to the study of the Holocaust. It also has the advantage of including references to subjects otherwise overlooked in some of the older bibliographies, such as mail in the concentration camps, historical revisionists, starvation, and the search for missing nazis. Written by a librarian, the book contains a list of core title recommendations for college and university libraries. Cargas, Harry J. The Holocaust: An Annotated Bibliography. 2nd ed. Chicago: American Library Association, 1985. 293 pp. Z6374 H6C37 1985An updated version of Cargas’ 1977 volume, the second edition is an excellent sourcebook, with helpful annotations. Contains a chapter entitled “Researching the Holocaust: Guidance for Students” which is very well organized. Other sections include: Anti-Semitism and the rise of Nazism, memoirs of the victims, reflections on the Holocaust, and Jewish resistance. Edelheit, Abraham J. and Hershel Edelheit. Bibliography on Holocaust Literature. Boulder: Westview Press, 1986. 842 pp. Z6374 H6E33 1986Contains a wealth of material, a great deal of which is not covered in other sources. For each major section there is an introductory essay, followed by references to periodicals, books, documents, and eyewitness accounts. The scope of this bibliography is wide, and includes such topics as: Jewish life in pre-war Europe, the free world reaction, the Holocaust and the literary imagination, and distorting the Holocaust. One of the most valuable sections is the list of periodicals used (pp. xxvii-xxxii). It serves as an excellent source for research into the larger field of Jewish Studies. Updated by a 2-volume supplement published in 1990 (Z6374 H6E33 1986 Suppl.) Muffs, Judith H. The Holocaust in Books and Films: A Selected, Annotated List. 3rd ed. NY: Hippocrene Books, 1986. 158 pp. Z6374 H6M83 1986″Designed primarily as a guide for teachers and librarians in the junior and senior high schools,” this bibliography serves a variety of functions. Though not comprehensive, it contains current references to films, books, filmstrips, booklets, posters, photographs, and other sources which deal with the Holocaust. It contains a list of audio-visual distributors and a section on Holocaust education and resource centers. Robinson, Jacob, ed. The Holocaust and After: Sources and Literature in English. Jerusalem: Israel Universities Press, 1973. 353 pp. Z6374 H6R6Summaries in English of books, articles, film scripts, and plays about the Holocaust. Because it was published in the early 1970’s, some of the more current scholarship has been omitted, but this is more than made up for by the inclusion of original material from the 1930’s and 1940’s. Sable, Martin H. Holocaust Studies: A Directory and Bibliography of Bibliographies. Greenwood, FL: Penkevill Publishing Co., 1987. 115 pp. Z6374 H6S22 1987Contains listings (without annotations) of Holocaust bibliographies in a variety of languages. The second half of the work is a directory of associations, councils, foundations, and various types of agencies which are concerned with some aspect of the Destruction. Included in this category is a list of memorials, monuments, sculptures, statues, and museums. Szonyi, David M. The Holocaust: An Annotated Bibliography and Resource Guide. NY: Ktav, 1985. 396 pp. Z6374 H6H65 1985Covers the standard facets of the topic (resistance, life in the ghettos, war crime trials, children of survivors, etc.), along with literature of the Holocaust, audio-visual materials, research institutes and archival centers, religious services, oral history projects, traveling exhibits, Holocaust curricula, and materials and landmarks in North America. The strength of this guide is in its emphasis on education. In this sense, it is a unique source. RESEARCH COLLECTIONSAmerican Jewish Archives. Cincinnati. Manuscript Catalog of the American Jewish Archives. 4 volumes. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1964. 1st supplement, 1978. Z6375 H38 Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. Cincinnati. Dictionary Catalog of the Klau Library. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1964. This catalog is not in the Hillman Library. New York Public Library. Reference Department. Dictionary Catalog of the Jewish Collection. 14 vols. Boston: G.K. Hall, 1960. 1st supplement, 1975. Z6375 N6 INDEXESAmerican Humanities Index (1975-)Arts and Humanities Citation Index (1976-)Arts and Humanities Citation Index on CD-ROM (1980-)British Humanities Index (1962-)Historical Abstracts on CD-ROM (1982-)Humanities Index (1974-)Index of Articles on Jewish Studies (1966-) Z6367.J62Index to Jewish Periodicals(1963-)Religion Index One (1977-)Religious and Theological Abstracts (1958-)Social Sciences Citation Index (1969-)Social Sciences Citation Index on CD-ROM (1986-)Social Sciences Index (1974-) JOURNALS that contain articles about the Holocaust include: Bulletin des Leo Baeck Instituts (1957-) DS135.G3A2618 Holocaust and Genocide Studies. (1986-)Holocaust Studies Annual. (1983-) DS135 E83H66Shoah: A Journal of Resources on the Holocaust (1978-)Simon Wiesenthal Center Annual (1984-) DS810 J4S537Yad Vashem Studies (1963-) DS135 E83Y3YIVO Bleter (1931-) PJ5120.A1Y5 RESOURCE CENTERS AND ARCHIVESLeo Baeck Institute129 E. 73rd StreetNew York, NY 10021(212) 744-6400 Center for Holocaust Studies, Documentation and Research1605 Avenue JBrooklyn, NY 11230(212) 338-6494 International Center for Holocaust StudiesAnti-Defamation League of B’nai Brith823 United Nations PlazaNew York, NY 10017(215) 787-1753 National Institute of the HolocaustP.O. Box 2147Philadelphia, PA 19103(202) 653-9152 United States Holocaust Memorial Museum100 Raoul Wallenberg Pl. S.W.Washington, DC 20024(202) 488-0400 William Weiner Oral History LibraryAmerican Jewish Committee165 E. 56th StreetNew York, NY 10022(212) 751-4000 Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust StudiesYeshiva University9769 W. Pico Blvd.Los Angeles, CA 90035(213) 553-9036 YIVO Institute for Jewish Research1048 Fifth AvenueNew York, NY 10028(212) 535-6700 Compiled & Updated by Laurie Cohen, 9/95

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Annual Holocaust Remembrance Program | Holocaust …

2018 HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE PROGRAM DUE TO THE TORNADOES WHICH AFFECTED CAMPUS ON 19 MARCH, THE 2018 HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE SCHEDULED FOR APRIL HAS BEEN CANCELLED. Remembrance Program Archives (1982-2017)Contains information on past remembrance programs, including newspaper articles, photos, program flyers, and more. Imagining the Holocaust Writing Contest This writing competition is open to Alabama junior high and high school students, and encompasses many kinds of writing, from essays to more creative approaches in poetry and fiction. Entries are due 1 March, and prizes, including U.S. Savings Bonds worth $100, $75, and $50 will be awarded to the top three winners in each category. The top winners will also be invited to participate in JSU’s annual Holocaust Remembrance program in April. Contact Program PlannersE-mail program planners for information or questions about the annual Holocaust Remembrance program. National Days of RemembranceThe national Days of Remembrance program observed by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

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The Holocaust in Russia | Military Wiki | FANDOM powered …

Holocaust in Reichskommissariat Ostland (which included Russia): a map Russia. Jewish women and children being forced out of their homes. A soldier in Romanian uniform is marching along as a guard, 17 July 1941. The Holocaust in Russia refers to the Nazi crimes during the occupation of Russia by Nazi Germany. Beyond longstanding controversies, ranging from the MolotovRibbentrop Pact to anti-Zionism, the Soviet Union did grant official “equality of all citizens regardless of status, sex, race, religion, and nationality.” The years before the Holocaust were an era of rapid change for Soviet Jews, leaving behind the dreadful poverty of the Pale of Settlement. 40% of the population in the former Pale left for large cities within the USSR. Emphasis on education and movement from countryside shtetls to newly industrialized cities allowed many Soviet Jews to enjoy overall advances under Joseph Stalin and to become one of the most educated population groups in the world. Due to Stalinist emphasis on its urban population, interwar migration inadvertently rescued countless Soviet Jews; Nazi Germany penetrated the entire former Jewish Pale but were kilometers short of Leningrad and Moscow. The great wave of deportations from the areas annexed by Soviet Union according to the Nazi-Soviet pact, often seen by victims as genocide, paradoxically also saved lives of a few hundred thousand Jewish deportees. However horrible their conditions, the fate of Jews in Nazi Germany was much worse. The migration of many Jews deeper East from the part of the Jewish Pale that would become occupied by Germany saved at least forty percent of this area’s Jewish population. Map titled “Jewish Executions Carried Out by Einsatzgruppe A” from Stahlecker’s report. Marked “Secret Reich Matter,” the map shows the number of Jews shot, and reads at the bottom: “the estimated number of Jews still on hand is 128,000”. On 22 June 1941, Adolf Hitler abruptly broke the nonaggression pact and invaded the Soviet Union. The Soviet territories occupied by early 1942, including all of Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Ukraine, and Moldova and most Russian territory west of the line Leningrad-Moscow-Rostov, contained about four million Jews, including hundreds of thousands who had fled Poland in 1939. Despite the chaos of the Soviet retreat, some effort was made to evacuate Jews, who were either employed in the military industries or were family members of servicemen. Of 4 million about a million succeeded in escaping further east. The remaining three million were left at the mercy of the Nazis. Despite the subservience of the Oberkommando des Heeres to Adolf Hitler, Heinrich Himmler did not trust the Army to approve of, let alone carry out, the large-scale killings of Jews in the occupied Soviet territories. This task was assigned to SS formations called Einsatzgruppen (“task groups”), under the overall command of Reinhard Heydrich. These had been used on a limited scale in Poland in 1939, but were now organized on a much larger scale. According to Otto Ohlendorf at his trial, “the Einsatzgruppen had the mission to protect the rear of the troops by killing the Jews, gypsies, Communist functionaries, active Communists, and all persons who would endanger the security.” In practice, their victims were nearly all defenseless Jewish civilians (not a single Einsatzgruppe member was killed in action during these operations). Raul Hilberg writes that the Einsatzgruppe member were ordinary citizens; the great majority were university-educated professionals.[1] They used their skills to become efficient killers, according to Michael Berenbaum.[2] By the end of 1941, however, the Einsatzgruppen had killed only 15 percent of the Jews in the occupied Soviet territories, and it was apparent that these methods could not be used to kill all the Jews of Europe. Even before the invasion of the Soviet Union, experiments with killing Jews in the back of vans using gas from the van’s exhaust had been carried out, and when this proved too slow, more lethal gasses were tried. For large-scale killing by gas, however, fixed sites would be needed, and it was decidedprobably by Heydrich and Eichmannthat the Jews should be brought to camps specifically built for the purpose. Although the Soviet Union was victorious in World War II, the war resulted in around 2627 million Soviet deaths (estimates vary)[3] and had devastated the Soviet economy in the struggle. Some 1,710 towns and 70 thousand settlements were destroyed.[4] The occupied territories suffered from the ravages of German occupation and deportations of slave labor in Germany.[5] Thirteen million Soviet citizens became victims of a repressive policy of Germans and their allies in occupied territory, where they died because of mass murders, famine, absence of elementary medical aid and slave labor.[6][7][8][9] The Nazi Genocide of the Jews carried by German Einsatzgruppen, along the local collaborators resulted in almost complete annihilation of the Jewish population over the entire territory temporary occupied by Germany and its allies.[10][11][12][13] During occupation, Russia’s Leningrad, now Saint Petersburg, region lost around a quarter of its population.[9] 3.6 million Soviet prisoners of war (of 5.5 million) died in German camps.[14][15][16] British historian Martin Gilbert used a similar approach in his Atlas of the Holocaust, but arrived at a number of 5.75 million Jewish victims, since he estimated higher numbers of Jews killed in Russia and other locations.[17] Lucy S. Dawidowicz used pre-war census figures to estimate that 5.934 million Jews died.[18] In October 1943, 600 Jewish and Russian prisoners attempted an escape at the Sobibr extermination camp. About 60 survived and joined the Belarusian partisans. In Eastern Europe, many Jews joined the ranks of the Soviet partisans: throughout the war, they faced antisemitism and discrimination from the Soviets and some Jewish partisans were killed, but over time, many of the Jewish partisan groups were absorbed into the command structure of the much larger Soviet partisan movement.[19] Soviet partisans were not in a position to ensure protection to the Jews in the Holocaust. The fit Jews were usually welcomed by the partisans (sometimes only if they brought their own weapons); however women, children, and the elderly were mostly unwelcome. Eventually, however, separate Jewish groups, both guerrilla units and mixed family groups of refugees (like the Bielski partisans), were subordinated to the communist partisan leadership and considered as Soviet assets. Even as some assisted the Germans, a significant number of individuals in the territories under German control also helped Jews escape death (see Righteous Among the Nations). During World War II, Lon Poliakov established the Centre de documentation juive contemporaine (1943) and after the war, he assisted Edgar Faure at the Nuremberg Trial. By 1944, the Germans had been pushed out of the Soviet Union onto the banks of the Vistula River, just east of Prussia. With Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov attacking from Prussia, and Marshal Konev slicing Germany in half from the south the fate of Nazi Germany was sealed. It is estimated that up to 1.4 million Jews fought in Allied armies; 40% of them in the Red Army.[20] In total, at least 142 500 Soviet soldiers of Jewish nationality lost their lives fighting against the German invadors and their allies[21] Salomon Smolianoff was selected for Operation Bernhard, transferred to the Sachsenhausen concentration camp in 1944, and eventually to the Ebensee site of the Mauthausen camp network,[22] where he was liberated by the US Army on 6 May 1945.[23] Without changing its official anti-Zionist stance, from late 1944 until 1948 Joseph Stalin had adopted a de facto pro-Zionist foreign policy, apparently believing that the new country would be socialist and would speed the decline of British influence in the Middle East.[24] 1946. The official response to an inquiry by the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee about the military decorations of Jews during the war (1.8% of the total number). Some antisemites attempted to accuse Jews of lack of patriotism and of hiding from military service. In January 1948 Solomon Mikhoels, a popular actor-director of the Moscow State Jewish Theater and the chairman of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee, was killed in a staged car accident.[25] Mass arrests of prominent Jewish intellectuals and suppression of Jewish culture followed under the banners of campaign against “rootless cosmopolitans” and anti-Zionism. On 12 August 1952, in the event known as the Night of the Murdered Poets, thirteen most prominent Yiddish writers, poets, actors and other intellectuals were executed on the orders of Joseph Stalin, among them Peretz Markish, Leib Kvitko, David Hofstein, Itzik Feffer and David Bergelson.[26] In the 1955 UN Assembly’s session a high Soviet official still denied the “rumors” about their disappearance. In 2012, Yad Vashem began releasing more than a million new testimonial pages about Jews in the Soviet Union that are expected to help researchers measure the scope of persecution and extermination of Jews in the former Soviet Union.[27] SS-Gruppenfhrer Otto Ohlendorf, November 1943. 14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS Galicia (1st Ukrainian) somewhere in Russia, with noncombatant women and a child. Amin el Husseini the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, talking to Azerbaijani Legion volunteers.

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