Archive for the ‘Holocaust’ Category

Argentina delivers thousands of WWII-era documents to US … – The Times of Israel

BUENOS AIRES The Argentine Foreign Ministry delivered to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington a series of documents about World War II, some of them related to Nazi war criminals.

The digital copies of the documents delivered are mainly letters, telegrams, newspaper articles, notes and reports, totaling almost 40,000 documents. An agreement for this transfer was signed on Friday in Buenos Aires between Argentinas Secretary of International Cooperation Ernesto Gaspari and USHMM representative Samanta Casareto.

The 38,779 documents were produced by Argentinas Ministry of Foreign Affairs between 1939 and 1950.

Among the documents are the communications between Argentina and countries involved in the war, as well as information sent by the Argentinean embassy in Germany. Some documents also record a meeting of chancellors in 1944.

Argentina was a refuge for Nazis after World War II. Adolf Eichmann was captured in the northern area of Buenos Aires in 1960; another Nazi war criminal, Erich Priebke, also lived there.

The primary South American destination for Holocaust survivors was also Argentina, which became home to at least 4,800 Holocaust survivors. Others settled in Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Panama, and Costa Rica.

Nazi criminals presence in Argentina was recently in the news after a trove of Nazi objects discovered earlier this month by the Argentine Federal Police has been evaluated as unprecedented and the biggest discovery of its type. Now a judiciary investigation is underway to confirm their origins and how they arrived in Argentina.

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Your chance to help tell a Holocaust survivor’s powerful story – WND.com

Anita Dittman speaks about her life in one of Nazi Germanys concentration camps. She grew up in Germany and was almost 6 years old when Hitler came to power.

By George Escobar

Anita Dittman is the only person Ive ever met who survived the Holocaust. She was barely 18 when she escaped her second Nazi prison camp in 1945.

Abandoned as a child by her Aryan father eight years earlier, Anita was determined to reunite with her Jewish mother held at a death camp 200 miles away in Theresienstadt, Czechoslovakia.

Anita Dittman as a child growing up in Germany, the daughter of a Jewish mother and German father. Her father abandoned the family as the Nazis came to power.

By the time I came to know Anita in 2014, she had just turned 87. I was interviewing her for a documentary about her life, based on the book Trapped in Hitlers Hell: A Young Jewish Girl Discovers the Messiahs Faithfulness in the Midst of the Holocaust,which she had co-written with Jan Markell nearly 20 years earlier.

I didnt expect to become a close friend of Anitas following that meeting. Or fall in love with her story.

Trapped in Hitlers Hell tells the story of Anita Dittman, a Jewish woman who survived 12 years under Adolf Hitlers Nazi regime.

Heres your chance to help bring Holocaust survivor Anita Dittmans incredible and inspiringstory from script to screen! Please donate just $5 or $10 to support this motion-picture projectat WNDs GoFundMe page

The awful events leading to the rise of Nazism are at first too overwhelming for young Anita to fathom. But like so many of her generation, childhoods end comes quickly and decisively.

Upon the abandonment of her fearful Aryan father, Anita begins experiencing a subtle awakening of her trust in God. That trust, however, is severely tested when the Nazis finally imprison her Jewish mother first, and then Anita. Orphaned, alone, and under the yoke of forced labor, Anitas struggle to survive becomes almost unbearable. Only the trace of hope found in her faith that someday she will be reunited with her mother sustains her.

By the conclusion of World War II, Anita had nearly exhausted her reserve of courage and compassion. In our journey with Anita, she will have successfully drawn us personally through an age of darkness. Nonetheless, her resilience and liberating faith will shine like a beam of light through which we can find Gods glory, forgiveness and love.

Anita Dittman

Anita and Jan Markell had long sought to make Anitas heroic life journey into a movie. Three years ago, WND CEO Joseph Farah optioned their book. After hiring me as vice president of WND Films, Joseph commissioned me to write the movie screenplay. That same year, Alone Yet Not Alone, which I had co-written and co-directed, had just received an Academy Award (Oscar) nomination for Best Original Song. I was stunned.

I was further stunned and humbled by this new responsibility. This movie is important because the Holocaust shouldnt be just another historical chapter or footnote we learn in school. When it becomes only about dates and places and times and events, we lose an important measure of our humanity. For as long as we can, we must seek to connect with the souls of persons who survived the Holocaust. These are precious people who lost everything and everyone.

Today, in 2017, there are fewer and fewer Holocaust survivors who are still with us. Rarer still are survivors who have become teachers of the Holocaust. Anita is among them. And we are her students.

The subject matter of the Holocaust is a delicate topic. The remnants of Adolf Hitlers madness and the collective hatred of Jews continue to linger. Ethnic-cleaning policies that caused the annihilation of people groups include not just the Jews, but Armenians, Kurds, Croatians, Laotians, Cambodians, Nigerians and more in just the past hundred years. These tragedies remain a deep stain upon our collective soul.

Unless we examine humanitys sins in detail, exposing the cold-hearted judgments leading up to mass murder, we shall be bound to repeat it. Unless we also examine the defiance of a single individual to oppose evil, to overcome great odds, we shall be less inspired to imitate the power of opposition.

To remember and to inspire. That is my vision for this film. That is our charge at WND Films. This is how we must exercise the power of cinema.

Anita Dittman (right) her mother, Hilde, and sister, Hella, faced violence and oppression during the Holocaust in the late 1930s and 40s.

Our challenge will be to excel cinematically beyond anything weve ever done before. And if we dedicate ourselves to this vision, performing to our utmost abilities, then we can impart future students, teachers and audiences with something of value. A core value that may shed light whenever the future appears dark or dim.

What is that core value? Namely this:

That one person, making the choice to forgive, can bring goodness, hope, and healing.

The focus of Anitas story is not to portray the horrors found in extermination camps. Instead, we will be focusing on seemingly more minor events. We will be experiencing the Holocaust from the viewpoint of a select few characters, predominantly seen through Anitas point of view.

Through her eyes, we will be challenged not only by ghastly acts of cruelty and abandonment, but by an equal measure of kindness and compassion. As we portray the staggering difficulties of her life story, we must endeavor to find those virtues within ourselves that are equally bright and grim. If we can be truthful in the telling, then we can more successfully transfer those resonant virtues on the screen for our audience.

Furthermore, Anitas story must not be a movie that audiences can witness impassively. When Anita comes to the realization that everyone has a fear that can break them, we too will be challenged with what to do when that unfathomable fear overtakes us.

At that moment, I hope audiences will be propelled into agitation and concern. Anitas story must be a heartbreaking and remarkable account of a young womans triumph over a dystopian nightmare. This is not the stuff of fiction like Hunger Games or Divergent. This is real life.

It is why we need the support of WND readers. They understand the importance of re-telling Anitas story.

I ask each reader to donate just $5 to $10 (the price of a fancy Starbucks drink) to the to the GoFundMe campaign for this movie. Your support is critical to enable us to move forward. Be the person who makes a difference.

George Escobar is vice president of WND Films.

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Argentina Delivers Documents To U.S. Holocaust Museum The … – Forward

ushmm.org

U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington

BUENOS AIRES (JTA) The Argentine Foreign Ministry delivered to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington a series of documents about World War II, some of them related to Nazi war criminals.

The digital copies of the documents delivered are mainly letters, telegrams, newspaper articles, notes and reports, totaling almost 40,000 documents. An agreement for this transfer was signedon Fridayin Buenos Aires between Argentinas Secretary of International Cooperation Ernesto Gaspari and USHMM representative Samanta Casareto.

The38,779documents were produced by Argentinas Ministry of Foreign Affairs between 1939 and 1950.

Among the documents are the communications between Argentina and countries involved in the war, as well as information sent by the Argentinean embassy in Germany. Some documents also record a meeting of chancellors in 1944.

Argentina was a refuge for Nazis after World War II. Adolf Eichmann was captured in the northern area of Buenos Aires in 1960; another Nazi war criminal, Erich Priebke, also lived there.

The primary South American destination for Holocaust survivor was also Argentina, which became home to at least 4,800 Holocaust survivors. Others settled in Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Panama, and Costa Rica.

Nazi criminals presence in Argentina was recently in the news after a trove ofNazi objectsdiscoveredearlier this month by the Argentine Federal Police has been evaluated as unprecedented and the biggest discovery of its type. Now a judiciary investigation is underway to confirm their origins and how theyarrived in Argentina.

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Argentina Delivers Documents To U.S. Holocaust Museum The … – Forward

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Irish Journalist Behind Antisemitic Sunday Times Article Unmasked as Holocaust Denier – Algemeiner

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Journalist Kevin Myers tells Sunday Times readers that Jews always drive a hard bargain. Photo: Screenshot via Tom Gross Media

An Irish journalist fired from his post on Sunday morning after penning an antisemitic attack on two British Jewish TV presenters is a known Holocaust denier, whose article denying the Nazi genocide of six million Jews was removed only today from the website of the Irish newspaper that had hosted it since 2009.

Social media users took to Twitter to point out that the Holocaust denial article by journalist Kevin Myers in which he opined,There was no holocaust (or Holocaust, as my computer software insists) and six million Jews were not murdered by the Third Reich. These two statements of mine are irrefutable truths had finally disappeared from the online pages of the Irish Independent.

Myers final fall from grace occurred after he published an article in the Irish edition of the UKs Sunday Times newspaper in which he asserted that the BBC presenters Claudia Winkleman andVanessa Feltz were well paid because they are Jewish.

Under the headline Sorry ladies, equal pay has to be earned, Myers wrote: I note that two of the best-paid women presenters in the BBC Claudia Winkleman and Vanessa Feltz, with whose, no doubt, sterling work I am tragically unacquainted are Jewish. Good for them.

Myers continued: Jews are not generally noted for their insistence on selling their talent for the lowest possible price, which is the most useful measure there is of inveterate, lost-with-all-hands stupidity. I wonder, who are their agents? If theyre the same ones that negotiated the pay for the women on the lower scales, then maybe the latter have found their true value in the marketplace.

After the column was removed, the editor of the Sunday Times, Martin Ivens, issued a statement saying Myers comments were unacceptable and should not have been published.

It has been taken down and we sincerely apologize both for the remarks and the error of judgment that led to publication, he said.

The editor of the papers Irish edition, Frank Fitzgibbon, added: I apologize unreservedly for the offence caused by comments in a column written by Kevin Myers and published today in the Ireland edition of the Sunday Times.

This newspaper abhors antisemitism and did not intend to cause offense to Jewish people, Fitzgibbon concluded.

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Could we please stop making Holocaust analogies? – DailyO

Another day and there is another article about how we are walking down the path of Nazi Germany. I used to be annoyed at Indian illiteracy about the Holocaust, and what happened during Adolf Hitlers rule. It used to distress me that hip, fashionable young men could walk around wearing a swastika the Nazi one, not the original one that they stole from us on their T-shirt or on a sticker on their car. We had a Mithun Chakraborty film called Hitler, a TV series named Hitler Didi, and Mein Kampfhas beena bestseller in India since 2003.

All of these things are so different from how Europe or the US, or even Russia looks at the Nazis. And it isnt as if we were uninvolved. Two million Indian soldiers served in World War II. The great split between Subhas Chandra Bose and Jawaharlal Nehru/Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi happened at least partially over support for the Allied or Axis cause. And yet, we forgot.

Maybe it is because we had our own horrors. As the hero of England, Winston Churchill, chomped down on his cigar, millions of Bengalis starved to death in the great Bengal famine of 1943. As has been shown by a number of people, the famine was the result of the British governments failures, and in response, Churchill gave orders for air power to be used to suppress Indians.

While millions of our people died, while millions of others saved Europe from the Nazis, and Asia from imperial Germany, and received no real recognition except the monstrosity of Partition, botched and bloody, whose date was chosen by Louis Mountbatten to celebrate the date of victory against Japan.

It is not surprising then that our memories of blood and murder are closer to home, and the monsters of Europe for us blur, sometimes, and Churchill stands not that far from Hitler.

Certainly in my education I learned more about, and thought more of, the nuclear bombs dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima than the concentration camps of Auschwitz and Sobibor. What did it have to do with us

Today it seems everybody thinks it does. We look at the creeping authoritarianism in our public life the onset of 24/7 surveillance, a public space of hyper-nationalism and militarisation, the industrialists fawning over and being fawned over by politicians, the hate and fear addressed at minority groups, and call them all manifestations of Nazi-ism. If we knew more, we would not make that comparison.

We are overlooking the mundane mass murders that are closer to home by focussing on an exotic, horrible crime.

The industrialised slaughter of millions by the Nazi regime, primarily Jews, but also including other undesirables such as Communists, gays and others, is a crime of monstrous proportions, hard to encompass within our heads. It is also a crime that almost nobody tries to justify (neo-Nazis largely suggest that it was made up to malign Hitler). Unlike the 30 or so million that perished in Chinas Great Leap Forward, the crimes of the Nazis are seen as crimes of a government so evil that it can have only one end murder and dissolution. To suggest a political party is the same as the Nazis as too many do implies that we should eliminate it immediately for the good of all concerned. It is without redemption.

This should not indicate a blanket ban. Sometimes people use terms such as Swapan Dasguptas recent usage of rootless cosmopolitans which has specific anti-Semitic roots (though it has to be said, deeper in the Soviet Union than Nazi Germany) that need to be called out. In other contexts, people like MS Golwalkar, who specifically praised the vicious treatment of Jews by the Nazis, and considered it a model to follow in India vis–vis Muslims, also need to be highlighted. These are people specifically using Nazi terms, or promoting Nazi methods. There can be nothing, but condemnation for this.

At the same time when we compare the virulent hate passed around by WhatsApp groups as similar to the indoctrination of hatred before the Holocaust, this does not help.

Are all those people proto-Nazis, or sympathisers with a regime that will set up camps to herd people into, work them until they are skin and bones, and then execute them using poison gas?

Is the government stripping people of citizenship based on race and ethnicity, stealing their property, herding to transport to where they can be imprisoned and murdered?

Are marriages between people based on race forbidden?

Is the government controlled by one megalomaniac who has eliminated all forms of opposition, banned all political parties, destroyed all institutions of authority except his own?

Are we burning books and artwork in the street?

Are we a country that has lost a war, and a substantial population of its young men, is drowning in hyper-inflation, and paying reparations that are driving the country deeper into poverty?

Do we have foreign soldiers placed on our soil?

The differences between any instance that has a resemblance to what the Nazis did and the current Indian situation is so large as to be meaningless. More problematically, what we ignore are comparisons with horrors that we have witnessed in India, and thus could recur more easily. An uncle of mine, a close family friend who is Hindu and who was a journalist during the 1984 anti-Sikh pogroms, was telling me the other day that conversations he had recently relating to Muslims sounded very much like what he had heard before 1984, often among his colleagues.

They are getting too uppity, they must be taught a lesson and the like.

For those that know of the tragedies that Kashmiri Hindus faced in the early 1990s, one of them was the use of cassette tapes blasting out threats from mosque loudspeakers. Today similar slogans are heard against Muslims, whether on cassette tapes, or from organisations that are considered fringe.

We have had the Jabalpur riots of 1961, the Nellie massacre of 1983, The Bhagalpur riots, the trail and death and devastation that was Advanis Rath Yatra, the 1992 Bombay riots, the Hashimpura massacre there are murders and mass murders, more than often with nobody held responsible. And as nobody has been punished what everybody has learned is the murder of Indian citizens is unlikely to cost an Indian politician any jail time, and might even get them a higher position.

It is this poison, already in our bloodstream, that we need to deal with. If you are infected by cholera, taking steps to save you from leukaemia (if there are any such) will not help you.

By focussing on an exotic, horrible crime we are overlooking the mundane mass murders that are closer to home, and which are much more dangerous, and more likely to kill Indians than the replay of a terrible crime that still scars history.

Also read: Life and times of Elie Wiesel, Holocaust survivor and chronicler

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Lawrence Hill, The Holocaust, Syria, Vietnamese Woman, and Aylan Kurdi – The Good Men Project (blog)

Lawrence Hill is one of Canadas most distinguished and published authors. In this extensive interview, we discuss everything in Hills purview. In his words, I have to say that I dont think Ive ever been interviewed by somebody who had such a profound grasp of such a wide variety of things that Ive shared, written, or spoken about whether they are personal, professional or things to do with my books or my family life. This series will explore his life and philosophy, just for you, part 10.

Scott Douglas Jacobsen:If you look at the early 20thcentury, we have The Holocaust. Similarly, if we look at the early 21stcentury, we have a singular tragedy in the Syrian refugee crisis. 12,000,000 Syrians are refugees, or more. By comparison with the total Canadian population, that is about 1/3 of Canada, at least. That rhetoric of those mentioned and unstated can be damaging to people in a similar manner as with blood or on being a real [fill in the blank] (American, Canadian, and so on). These are individual human beings going through extraordinary circumstances.

You worked for the Ontario Welcome House at Toronto Pearson International Airport welcoming refugees at age 16. My sense is deep empathy for refugees from you. Also, something unstated about them. This experience never leaves them. That is, it is important to get compassion right the first time. Related toThe Book of Negroes, Aminatas life is marked forever by the experience of being stolen and enslaved. Her entire travels, life story, and narrative of being taken against her will out of Bayo is ever after marked by this. This was important forThe Illegalwith Keita Ali as well. How did this and the current Syrian refugee crisis inform the foundation for this novel as the events in Syria progressed?

Lawrence Hill:The refugee crisis in Syria did not inform the writing ofThe Illegal.Like many Canadians and most people around the world, I was not aware of the buildup of refugees in Syria when I wrote the novel. The novel was finished well before we talked openly in the West, about that particular refugee crisis. However, there were many other refugee crises in the world and they did informThe Illegal.

Jacobsen:We have images of the Vietnamese woman fleeing napalm bombs, Aylan Kurdi, and so on. The phenomenon of genocide neglect is real. Individual images and stories move hearts more than statistics and news reports. How might the arts community humanize the downtrodden, the desperate, the fleeing, and the suffering?

There is a role for every type of person in talking about the downtrodden and the suffering, and in this case the plight of refugees. There is a role for great humanitarians in the field attempting to alleviate immediate suffering in refugee camps. There are advocates working for organizations. They speak up. They tell us the results of studies. There are activists and university professors.

There are lawyers. There are politicians learning a great deal about the plight of refugees. There are endless numbers of organizations from the United Nations onward. They produce reports for the public to read about it. There are people and organizations with things to share. There are journalists. They do a great job bringing the information about the world to us.

There is narrative too. Artists can more intensely, efficiently, and with more ardor, passion, and success than a typical historian, journalist or university professor excite and trigger the imagination. The artist is capable of taking somebody by the collar and saying, Look at this person. Behold this humanity!

The role of the artist is to connect with the humanity of the individuals perceiving the art. It is to excite and stir and provoke people.

It is the work that I do in life. It is my contribution. I do not want to overstate it. I do not want to understate the role of the artist. The artist is not unlike the rabbi, the imam, or the priest. A person who evokes the story of humanity to evoke or elicit faith. We all need story to understand ourselves. We need narrative to understand the world and our place in it.

Some of us look to religion. Others look to art for the same thing: guidance. For words that tell us how to be, remind us of the deeper truer values, that set us on the right path. Religion plays a similar role in satisfying a fundamental need to be told a story, how to be, and how to be good in the world.

Original Publication (1, 2, 3, and 4) in www.in-sightjournal.com.

Photo Credit: Getty Images

Scott Douglas Jacobsen founded In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. He works as an Associate Editor and Contributor for Conatus News, Editor and Contributor to The Good Men Project, a Board Member, Executive International Committee (International Research and Project Management) Member, and as the Chair of Social Media for the Almas Jiwani Foundation, Executive Administrator and Writer for Trusted Clothes, and Councillor in the Athabasca University Students Union. He contributes to the Basic Income Earth Network, The Beam, Canadian Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Check Your Head, Conatus News, Humanist Voices, The Voice Magazine, and Trusted Clothes. If you want to contact Scott: [emailprotected]; website: www.in-sightjournal.com; Twitter: https://twitter.com/InSight_Journal.

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After Documenting Holocaust Graves, This French Priest Takes on IS Crimes – Forward

She was 22 when she was sold to a high-ranking soldier in the Islamic State group.

And she knew she was privileged, getting a high-ranking husband. After all, most Yazidi girls are sold 25 times at minimum. Being owned by a high-ranking official meant she would most likely be kept for longer.

Every morning, her husband would take her along on his walks through his military camp. She would follow him, bedecked in a niqab, forced to watch him torture prisoners.

One morning, I saw him behead 75 men, one after another, the young Yazidi woman said in an interview later in a refugee camp.

Father Patrick Desbois, her interviewer, gestured for the young woman to pause. He turned to his co-worker, Costel Nastasie. I am finished for today, he said. I cannot go on.

Lets keep going, Nastasie pressed him. We have more questions.

After another hour of harrowing stories, Nastasie paused the interview and turned to Desbois. Im done for the day, too. He needed to get out, to breathe.

Desbois has made a name for himself as the French Catholic priest who is devoting his life to Holocaust studies and to the improvement of Catholic-Jewish relations. Most famously, he has embarked on a mission across Eastern Europe to find unmarked graves of mass killings of Jews during the Holocaust, under his not-for-profit Yahad-In Unum. His search for graves involved thousands of interviews with local villagers across Ukraine and Belarus, witnesses who had never spoken before about what they had seen during the war years.

But today, Desbois has turned to a new project – one that is less concerned with the past, and more focused on the present. His latest book, La Fabrique des Terroristes: Dans les Secrets de Daech (The Terrorist Factory: Inside ISIS Secrets), co-written with Nastasie, is set to be released in English next year.

I decided to go to Iraq with a new project called Action Yazidis, he said in an interview with the Forward. We began the same methodology as our work with Holocaust witnesses and survivors. Only now, we are interviewing survivors as soon as they escape. What IS is doing is dividing the family taking the newborns and placing them in IS families: Bboys are sent to military training camps, girls are checked for virginity by doctors and sold in groups by 100-300 at a time, while older women are used as human shields. Everybody has a purpose. If there is no purpose if theyre too old, too sick or they make problems, they kill them. We can identify this strategy. Its nothing new, he said.

Action Yazidis, an initiative of Yahad – In Unum, collects and catalogs testimony from survivors of IS atrocities. This is a criminal investigation, Desbois said. We want to put names in front of an international court, so these criminals can be judged not only as terrorists, but as perpetrators of crimes against humanity.

A young woman named Nasrine, in an interview posted on YouTube, tells of a Iraqi-born IS soldier who bought her as a sex slave and brought her to a hotel room, where she was repeatedly raped by him and four other guards. They called me Khadama, servant, she says. The interviewer asks repeated, detailed questions asking for names and origins of the rapists, for descriptions of the families of the perpetrators, of the buildings she saw.

Another interview features a mother, sold many times, who bore a child to a Libyan soldier. The man didnt like this child, Desbois said. So he broke his leg, his nose, and then threw him at high-speed from a car. The child, who was smuggled out by his mother, is now years old and completely disabled.

There is no limit to the violence, he said.

Now, Action Yazidis runs a safehouse in Cham Mushko in Iraqi Kurdistan, for Yazidi women, featuring a sewing workshop, where trained therapists teach refugees with severe traumas how to sew. The place allows survivors to meet, to speak about their past and think about their future, because sadly, no men will come back, Desbois said. We see a huge change in them. Though I dont know whats next for these women.

He sees it as a natural progression from his work in Eastern Europe, studying the Holocaust and collecting testimony. We are fighting the same evils, the same human disease, he said. It is the same people who did it in 42, we are fighting the same people who do it today.

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Museum’s program teaches police pitfalls that led to Holocaust – Arlington Voice

The Arlington Police Department has been taking part in a training program that focuses on the role law enforcement played in the Holocaust.

The program is called Law Enforcement and Society: Lessons of the Holocaust, and it’s offered by the Dallas Holocaust Museum. Started in September 2016, the intent of the program is to help officers develop a better understanding of their personal responsibility as public servants.

The idea for the training program came during a conversation between Dallas Holocaust Museum President and CEO Mary Pat Higgins and Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez. They discussed methods for broadening the reach of the museum while simultaneously developing an ethics and leadership program for the Sheriffs recruits.

The class is broken into two parts. The first part includes a tour of the museum, a photo analysis of the Holocaust, and a discussion of the slippery slope German police were on once they fell in line with the Nazis.

The second part is led by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL). Participants discuss the current public perception of law enforcement and the role it plays in communities and democracy.

We focus on the now, said Cheryl Drazin, Regional Director of the ADL. We look at the stereotypes of law enforcement and what people think when law enforcement pops into their mind.

After doing some research, Higgins discovered that the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. already had a similar program called Law Enforcement and Society Training.

After deciding not to start an entirely new program, Higgins reached out to the ADL for support because they helped author the original program in Washington. With their assistance, the Dallas Holocaust Museum became certified to offer the training.

The goal is for our visitors to come to this museum, understand its history, and think about the dangers of unchecked prejudice and hatred, Higgins said. “The Holocaust is a paradigm of what happens when state-sponsored hatred is unchecked.

When Arlington Police Chief Will Johnson learned of the class, he reached out to the museum. After attending the same course at the National museum in Washington, Johnson took several senior officers to the class at the Dallas facility last November.

Deputy Chief Os Flores was one of those officers.

I think the training is critical, because the lessons of the Holocaust help officers understand their role as protectors of the American people and the Constitution,” Flores said.

From his own experience, Flores said the training highlights the role law enforcement has in protecting the civil rights of all people, and cultivating and inspiring tolerance and understanding of others.

More than 100,000 local, regional, and federal officers have participated in the program at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum since it first started in 1999.

To get more information about this and other programs and events offered at the Dallas Holocaust Museum, call the museum at (214) 741-7500 or visit dallasholocaustmuseum.org.

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Summer Symposium on Remembering the Holocaust held August 5-10 at The Marriott in Boone – High Country Press

BOONEThe 16th Annual Martin and Doris Rosen Summer Symposium on Remembering the Holocaustwill be heldfromAugust 5-10at the Marriott Hotel

at 1050 Highway 105near theAppalachian State Universitycampus. This years symposiumexplores the significanceof gender in this genocide.The event is organized by ASUs Center for Judaic, Holocaust, andPeace Studies.

The week-long symposiumbrings internationally and nationally acclaimed scholars, authors, and educators to Boone. The events faculty and speakersinclude Auschwitz survivorRalph J.Preiss,Rwandan genocide survivor EugenieMukeshimana,Dr. RebeccaErbelding(United States Holocaust MemorialMuseum),and Professor Michael Berenbaum (American Jewish University)Dr.Racelle Weiman, a world-renowened Holocaust educator, will serve as thisyears co-director. In a special evening event, Suzanne Lasky-Gerard willscreen and discuss her Emmy award winning documentary on theMarch of theLivingthat aired on PBS.

ASUs Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and PeaceStudies isalso continuing its collaborationwithYad Vashem, theWorld Centerfor Holocaust Research, Documentation, Education and Commemoration,inJerusalemand will feature a presentation bySheryl Ochayon, JD, from YadVashemsInternational School for Holocaust Studies.

The freeand open-to-the-publicsymposium provides public and privateschool teachers, university faculty, students and community membersinformation and insights about the victims, perpetrators, and consequences ofthe Nazigenocide of European Jewry. In addition, the program widens thefocus to explore Jewish religious and cultural life before the Shoah (Holocaust).Reflecting this years emphasis, the symposum participants will not only learnand ponder howthe Holocaust needs to be understood and taught as an eventin globalhistory and notexclusively inJewish history.The audience will alsogain knowledge on how theJewishrefugee crisis of the 1930s and 1940srelates to and teaches us lessons in our grappling with current refugee crisesaround the world.

Contributing to the international reach and composition of the event,secondary-school teachers fromHungaryandthe Czech Republicwill beamong the participants and will discuss the teaching of the Holocaust in theircountries.

As in years past, North Carolina teachers can receive continuing educationunits for attending the lectures, workshops, discussions, filmscreeninganddemonstrations.As one of the participants in the 2016 meeting summarized,The Symposium was an excellent academic experience that offerededucators the opportunity to grow!

The symposium is sponsored byThe Conference on Jewish Material ClaimsAgainst Germany,the Martin and Doris Rosen Endowment,the CommunityAdvisory Board and Friends of the Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and PeaceStudies,Appalachians College ofArts and Sciences and University Bookstore,the Boone Jewish Community/Temple of the High Country,Havurahof theHigh Country, the Margolis Family,the Ruth and StanEtkinSymposium ScholarsFund, the Leon Levine Foundation,the North Carolina Council on theHolocaust,the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, D.C.,andEchoes and Reflections ofYadVashem(in collaboration with the USCShoahFoundationand the Anti-Defamation League).

For a schedule of eventsand complete list of speakers,pleasevisithttps://holocaust.appstate.edu/symposium/2017-schedule.To register forCEUs, visithttps://holocaust.appstate.edu/symposium/registration.

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Summer Symposium on Remembering the Holocaust held August 5-10 at The Marriott in Boone – High Country Press

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Argentina delivers thousands of WWII-era documents to US … – The Times of Israel

BUENOS AIRES The Argentine Foreign Ministry delivered to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington a series of documents about World War II, some of them related to Nazi war criminals. The digital copies of the documents delivered are mainly letters, telegrams, newspaper articles, notes and reports, totaling almost 40,000 documents. An agreement for this transfer was signed on Friday in Buenos Aires between Argentinas Secretary of International Cooperation Ernesto Gaspari and USHMM representative Samanta Casareto. The 38,779 documents were produced by Argentinas Ministry of Foreign Affairs between 1939 and 1950. Among the documents are the communications between Argentina and countries involved in the war, as well as information sent by the Argentinean embassy in Germany. Some documents also record a meeting of chancellors in 1944. Argentina was a refuge for Nazis after World War II. Adolf Eichmann was captured in the northern area of Buenos Aires in 1960; another Nazi war criminal, Erich Priebke, also lived there. The primary South American destination for Holocaust survivors was also Argentina, which became home to at least 4,800 Holocaust survivors. Others settled in Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Panama, and Costa Rica. Nazi criminals presence in Argentina was recently in the news after a trove of Nazi objects discovered earlier this month by the Argentine Federal Police has been evaluated as unprecedented and the biggest discovery of its type. Now a judiciary investigation is underway to confirm their origins and how they arrived in Argentina.

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Your chance to help tell a Holocaust survivor’s powerful story – WND.com

Anita Dittman speaks about her life in one of Nazi Germanys concentration camps. She grew up in Germany and was almost 6 years old when Hitler came to power. By George Escobar Anita Dittman is the only person Ive ever met who survived the Holocaust. She was barely 18 when she escaped her second Nazi prison camp in 1945. Abandoned as a child by her Aryan father eight years earlier, Anita was determined to reunite with her Jewish mother held at a death camp 200 miles away in Theresienstadt, Czechoslovakia. Anita Dittman as a child growing up in Germany, the daughter of a Jewish mother and German father. Her father abandoned the family as the Nazis came to power. By the time I came to know Anita in 2014, she had just turned 87. I was interviewing her for a documentary about her life, based on the book Trapped in Hitlers Hell: A Young Jewish Girl Discovers the Messiahs Faithfulness in the Midst of the Holocaust,which she had co-written with Jan Markell nearly 20 years earlier. I didnt expect to become a close friend of Anitas following that meeting. Or fall in love with her story. Trapped in Hitlers Hell tells the story of Anita Dittman, a Jewish woman who survived 12 years under Adolf Hitlers Nazi regime. Heres your chance to help bring Holocaust survivor Anita Dittmans incredible and inspiringstory from script to screen! Please donate just $5 or $10 to support this motion-picture projectat WNDs GoFundMe page The awful events leading to the rise of Nazism are at first too overwhelming for young Anita to fathom. But like so many of her generation, childhoods end comes quickly and decisively. Upon the abandonment of her fearful Aryan father, Anita begins experiencing a subtle awakening of her trust in God. That trust, however, is severely tested when the Nazis finally imprison her Jewish mother first, and then Anita. Orphaned, alone, and under the yoke of forced labor, Anitas struggle to survive becomes almost unbearable. Only the trace of hope found in her faith that someday she will be reunited with her mother sustains her. By the conclusion of World War II, Anita had nearly exhausted her reserve of courage and compassion. In our journey with Anita, she will have successfully drawn us personally through an age of darkness. Nonetheless, her resilience and liberating faith will shine like a beam of light through which we can find Gods glory, forgiveness and love. Anita Dittman Anita and Jan Markell had long sought to make Anitas heroic life journey into a movie. Three years ago, WND CEO Joseph Farah optioned their book. After hiring me as vice president of WND Films, Joseph commissioned me to write the movie screenplay. That same year, Alone Yet Not Alone, which I had co-written and co-directed, had just received an Academy Award (Oscar) nomination for Best Original Song. I was stunned. I was further stunned and humbled by this new responsibility. This movie is important because the Holocaust shouldnt be just another historical chapter or footnote we learn in school. When it becomes only about dates and places and times and events, we lose an important measure of our humanity. For as long as we can, we must seek to connect with the souls of persons who survived the Holocaust. These are precious people who lost everything and everyone. Today, in 2017, there are fewer and fewer Holocaust survivors who are still with us. Rarer still are survivors who have become teachers of the Holocaust. Anita is among them. And we are her students. The subject matter of the Holocaust is a delicate topic. The remnants of Adolf Hitlers madness and the collective hatred of Jews continue to linger. Ethnic-cleaning policies that caused the annihilation of people groups include not just the Jews, but Armenians, Kurds, Croatians, Laotians, Cambodians, Nigerians and more in just the past hundred years. These tragedies remain a deep stain upon our collective soul. Unless we examine humanitys sins in detail, exposing the cold-hearted judgments leading up to mass murder, we shall be bound to repeat it. Unless we also examine the defiance of a single individual to oppose evil, to overcome great odds, we shall be less inspired to imitate the power of opposition. To remember and to inspire. That is my vision for this film. That is our charge at WND Films. This is how we must exercise the power of cinema. Anita Dittman (right) her mother, Hilde, and sister, Hella, faced violence and oppression during the Holocaust in the late 1930s and 40s. Our challenge will be to excel cinematically beyond anything weve ever done before. And if we dedicate ourselves to this vision, performing to our utmost abilities, then we can impart future students, teachers and audiences with something of value. A core value that may shed light whenever the future appears dark or dim. What is that core value? Namely this: That one person, making the choice to forgive, can bring goodness, hope, and healing. The focus of Anitas story is not to portray the horrors found in extermination camps. Instead, we will be focusing on seemingly more minor events. We will be experiencing the Holocaust from the viewpoint of a select few characters, predominantly seen through Anitas point of view. Through her eyes, we will be challenged not only by ghastly acts of cruelty and abandonment, but by an equal measure of kindness and compassion. As we portray the staggering difficulties of her life story, we must endeavor to find those virtues within ourselves that are equally bright and grim. If we can be truthful in the telling, then we can more successfully transfer those resonant virtues on the screen for our audience. Furthermore, Anitas story must not be a movie that audiences can witness impassively. When Anita comes to the realization that everyone has a fear that can break them, we too will be challenged with what to do when that unfathomable fear overtakes us. At that moment, I hope audiences will be propelled into agitation and concern. Anitas story must be a heartbreaking and remarkable account of a young womans triumph over a dystopian nightmare. This is not the stuff of fiction like Hunger Games or Divergent. This is real life. It is why we need the support of WND readers. They understand the importance of re-telling Anitas story. I ask each reader to donate just $5 to $10 (the price of a fancy Starbucks drink) to the to the GoFundMe campaign for this movie. Your support is critical to enable us to move forward. Be the person who makes a difference. George Escobar is vice president of WND Films.

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Argentina Delivers Documents To U.S. Holocaust Museum The … – Forward

ushmm.org U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington BUENOS AIRES (JTA) The Argentine Foreign Ministry delivered to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington a series of documents about World War II, some of them related to Nazi war criminals. The digital copies of the documents delivered are mainly letters, telegrams, newspaper articles, notes and reports, totaling almost 40,000 documents. An agreement for this transfer was signedon Fridayin Buenos Aires between Argentinas Secretary of International Cooperation Ernesto Gaspari and USHMM representative Samanta Casareto. The38,779documents were produced by Argentinas Ministry of Foreign Affairs between 1939 and 1950. Among the documents are the communications between Argentina and countries involved in the war, as well as information sent by the Argentinean embassy in Germany. Some documents also record a meeting of chancellors in 1944. Argentina was a refuge for Nazis after World War II. Adolf Eichmann was captured in the northern area of Buenos Aires in 1960; another Nazi war criminal, Erich Priebke, also lived there. The primary South American destination for Holocaust survivor was also Argentina, which became home to at least 4,800 Holocaust survivors. Others settled in Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Panama, and Costa Rica. Nazi criminals presence in Argentina was recently in the news after a trove ofNazi objectsdiscoveredearlier this month by the Argentine Federal Police has been evaluated as unprecedented and the biggest discovery of its type. Now a judiciary investigation is underway to confirm their origins and how theyarrived in Argentina.

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Irish Journalist Behind Antisemitic Sunday Times Article Unmasked as Holocaust Denier – Algemeiner

Email a copy of “Irish Journalist Behind Antisemitic Sunday Times Article Unmasked as Holocaust Denier” to a friend Journalist Kevin Myers tells Sunday Times readers that Jews always drive a hard bargain. Photo: Screenshot via Tom Gross Media An Irish journalist fired from his post on Sunday morning after penning an antisemitic attack on two British Jewish TV presenters is a known Holocaust denier, whose article denying the Nazi genocide of six million Jews was removed only today from the website of the Irish newspaper that had hosted it since 2009. Social media users took to Twitter to point out that the Holocaust denial article by journalist Kevin Myers in which he opined,There was no holocaust (or Holocaust, as my computer software insists) and six million Jews were not murdered by the Third Reich. These two statements of mine are irrefutable truths had finally disappeared from the online pages of the Irish Independent. Myers final fall from grace occurred after he published an article in the Irish edition of the UKs Sunday Times newspaper in which he asserted that the BBC presenters Claudia Winkleman andVanessa Feltz were well paid because they are Jewish. Under the headline Sorry ladies, equal pay has to be earned, Myers wrote: I note that two of the best-paid women presenters in the BBC Claudia Winkleman and Vanessa Feltz, with whose, no doubt, sterling work I am tragically unacquainted are Jewish. Good for them. Myers continued: Jews are not generally noted for their insistence on selling their talent for the lowest possible price, which is the most useful measure there is of inveterate, lost-with-all-hands stupidity. I wonder, who are their agents? If theyre the same ones that negotiated the pay for the women on the lower scales, then maybe the latter have found their true value in the marketplace. After the column was removed, the editor of the Sunday Times, Martin Ivens, issued a statement saying Myers comments were unacceptable and should not have been published. It has been taken down and we sincerely apologize both for the remarks and the error of judgment that led to publication, he said. The editor of the papers Irish edition, Frank Fitzgibbon, added: I apologize unreservedly for the offence caused by comments in a column written by Kevin Myers and published today in the Ireland edition of the Sunday Times. This newspaper abhors antisemitism and did not intend to cause offense to Jewish people, Fitzgibbon concluded.

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Could we please stop making Holocaust analogies? – DailyO

Another day and there is another article about how we are walking down the path of Nazi Germany. I used to be annoyed at Indian illiteracy about the Holocaust, and what happened during Adolf Hitlers rule. It used to distress me that hip, fashionable young men could walk around wearing a swastika the Nazi one, not the original one that they stole from us on their T-shirt or on a sticker on their car. We had a Mithun Chakraborty film called Hitler, a TV series named Hitler Didi, and Mein Kampfhas beena bestseller in India since 2003. All of these things are so different from how Europe or the US, or even Russia looks at the Nazis. And it isnt as if we were uninvolved. Two million Indian soldiers served in World War II. The great split between Subhas Chandra Bose and Jawaharlal Nehru/Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi happened at least partially over support for the Allied or Axis cause. And yet, we forgot. Maybe it is because we had our own horrors. As the hero of England, Winston Churchill, chomped down on his cigar, millions of Bengalis starved to death in the great Bengal famine of 1943. As has been shown by a number of people, the famine was the result of the British governments failures, and in response, Churchill gave orders for air power to be used to suppress Indians. While millions of our people died, while millions of others saved Europe from the Nazis, and Asia from imperial Germany, and received no real recognition except the monstrosity of Partition, botched and bloody, whose date was chosen by Louis Mountbatten to celebrate the date of victory against Japan. It is not surprising then that our memories of blood and murder are closer to home, and the monsters of Europe for us blur, sometimes, and Churchill stands not that far from Hitler. Certainly in my education I learned more about, and thought more of, the nuclear bombs dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima than the concentration camps of Auschwitz and Sobibor. What did it have to do with us Today it seems everybody thinks it does. We look at the creeping authoritarianism in our public life the onset of 24/7 surveillance, a public space of hyper-nationalism and militarisation, the industrialists fawning over and being fawned over by politicians, the hate and fear addressed at minority groups, and call them all manifestations of Nazi-ism. If we knew more, we would not make that comparison. We are overlooking the mundane mass murders that are closer to home by focussing on an exotic, horrible crime. The industrialised slaughter of millions by the Nazi regime, primarily Jews, but also including other undesirables such as Communists, gays and others, is a crime of monstrous proportions, hard to encompass within our heads. It is also a crime that almost nobody tries to justify (neo-Nazis largely suggest that it was made up to malign Hitler). Unlike the 30 or so million that perished in Chinas Great Leap Forward, the crimes of the Nazis are seen as crimes of a government so evil that it can have only one end murder and dissolution. To suggest a political party is the same as the Nazis as too many do implies that we should eliminate it immediately for the good of all concerned. It is without redemption. This should not indicate a blanket ban. Sometimes people use terms such as Swapan Dasguptas recent usage of rootless cosmopolitans which has specific anti-Semitic roots (though it has to be said, deeper in the Soviet Union than Nazi Germany) that need to be called out. In other contexts, people like MS Golwalkar, who specifically praised the vicious treatment of Jews by the Nazis, and considered it a model to follow in India vis–vis Muslims, also need to be highlighted. These are people specifically using Nazi terms, or promoting Nazi methods. There can be nothing, but condemnation for this. At the same time when we compare the virulent hate passed around by WhatsApp groups as similar to the indoctrination of hatred before the Holocaust, this does not help. Are all those people proto-Nazis, or sympathisers with a regime that will set up camps to herd people into, work them until they are skin and bones, and then execute them using poison gas? Is the government stripping people of citizenship based on race and ethnicity, stealing their property, herding to transport to where they can be imprisoned and murdered? Are marriages between people based on race forbidden? Is the government controlled by one megalomaniac who has eliminated all forms of opposition, banned all political parties, destroyed all institutions of authority except his own? Are we burning books and artwork in the street? Are we a country that has lost a war, and a substantial population of its young men, is drowning in hyper-inflation, and paying reparations that are driving the country deeper into poverty? Do we have foreign soldiers placed on our soil? The differences between any instance that has a resemblance to what the Nazis did and the current Indian situation is so large as to be meaningless. More problematically, what we ignore are comparisons with horrors that we have witnessed in India, and thus could recur more easily. An uncle of mine, a close family friend who is Hindu and who was a journalist during the 1984 anti-Sikh pogroms, was telling me the other day that conversations he had recently relating to Muslims sounded very much like what he had heard before 1984, often among his colleagues. They are getting too uppity, they must be taught a lesson and the like. For those that know of the tragedies that Kashmiri Hindus faced in the early 1990s, one of them was the use of cassette tapes blasting out threats from mosque loudspeakers. Today similar slogans are heard against Muslims, whether on cassette tapes, or from organisations that are considered fringe. We have had the Jabalpur riots of 1961, the Nellie massacre of 1983, The Bhagalpur riots, the trail and death and devastation that was Advanis Rath Yatra, the 1992 Bombay riots, the Hashimpura massacre there are murders and mass murders, more than often with nobody held responsible. And as nobody has been punished what everybody has learned is the murder of Indian citizens is unlikely to cost an Indian politician any jail time, and might even get them a higher position. It is this poison, already in our bloodstream, that we need to deal with. If you are infected by cholera, taking steps to save you from leukaemia (if there are any such) will not help you. By focussing on an exotic, horrible crime we are overlooking the mundane mass murders that are closer to home, and which are much more dangerous, and more likely to kill Indians than the replay of a terrible crime that still scars history. Also read: Life and times of Elie Wiesel, Holocaust survivor and chronicler

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Lawrence Hill, The Holocaust, Syria, Vietnamese Woman, and Aylan Kurdi – The Good Men Project (blog)

Lawrence Hill is one of Canadas most distinguished and published authors. In this extensive interview, we discuss everything in Hills purview. In his words, I have to say that I dont think Ive ever been interviewed by somebody who had such a profound grasp of such a wide variety of things that Ive shared, written, or spoken about whether they are personal, professional or things to do with my books or my family life. This series will explore his life and philosophy, just for you, part 10. Scott Douglas Jacobsen:If you look at the early 20thcentury, we have The Holocaust. Similarly, if we look at the early 21stcentury, we have a singular tragedy in the Syrian refugee crisis. 12,000,000 Syrians are refugees, or more. By comparison with the total Canadian population, that is about 1/3 of Canada, at least. That rhetoric of those mentioned and unstated can be damaging to people in a similar manner as with blood or on being a real [fill in the blank] (American, Canadian, and so on). These are individual human beings going through extraordinary circumstances. You worked for the Ontario Welcome House at Toronto Pearson International Airport welcoming refugees at age 16. My sense is deep empathy for refugees from you. Also, something unstated about them. This experience never leaves them. That is, it is important to get compassion right the first time. Related toThe Book of Negroes, Aminatas life is marked forever by the experience of being stolen and enslaved. Her entire travels, life story, and narrative of being taken against her will out of Bayo is ever after marked by this. This was important forThe Illegalwith Keita Ali as well. How did this and the current Syrian refugee crisis inform the foundation for this novel as the events in Syria progressed? Lawrence Hill:The refugee crisis in Syria did not inform the writing ofThe Illegal.Like many Canadians and most people around the world, I was not aware of the buildup of refugees in Syria when I wrote the novel. The novel was finished well before we talked openly in the West, about that particular refugee crisis. However, there were many other refugee crises in the world and they did informThe Illegal. Jacobsen:We have images of the Vietnamese woman fleeing napalm bombs, Aylan Kurdi, and so on. The phenomenon of genocide neglect is real. Individual images and stories move hearts more than statistics and news reports. How might the arts community humanize the downtrodden, the desperate, the fleeing, and the suffering? There is a role for every type of person in talking about the downtrodden and the suffering, and in this case the plight of refugees. There is a role for great humanitarians in the field attempting to alleviate immediate suffering in refugee camps. There are advocates working for organizations. They speak up. They tell us the results of studies. There are activists and university professors. There are lawyers. There are politicians learning a great deal about the plight of refugees. There are endless numbers of organizations from the United Nations onward. They produce reports for the public to read about it. There are people and organizations with things to share. There are journalists. They do a great job bringing the information about the world to us. There is narrative too. Artists can more intensely, efficiently, and with more ardor, passion, and success than a typical historian, journalist or university professor excite and trigger the imagination. The artist is capable of taking somebody by the collar and saying, Look at this person. Behold this humanity! The role of the artist is to connect with the humanity of the individuals perceiving the art. It is to excite and stir and provoke people. It is the work that I do in life. It is my contribution. I do not want to overstate it. I do not want to understate the role of the artist. The artist is not unlike the rabbi, the imam, or the priest. A person who evokes the story of humanity to evoke or elicit faith. We all need story to understand ourselves. We need narrative to understand the world and our place in it. Some of us look to religion. Others look to art for the same thing: guidance. For words that tell us how to be, remind us of the deeper truer values, that set us on the right path. Religion plays a similar role in satisfying a fundamental need to be told a story, how to be, and how to be good in the world. Original Publication (1, 2, 3, and 4) in www.in-sightjournal.com. Photo Credit: Getty Images Scott Douglas Jacobsen founded In-Sight Publishing and In-Sight: Independent Interview-Based Journal. He works as an Associate Editor and Contributor for Conatus News, Editor and Contributor to The Good Men Project, a Board Member, Executive International Committee (International Research and Project Management) Member, and as the Chair of Social Media for the Almas Jiwani Foundation, Executive Administrator and Writer for Trusted Clothes, and Councillor in the Athabasca University Students Union. He contributes to the Basic Income Earth Network, The Beam, Canadian Students for Sensible Drug Policy, Check Your Head, Conatus News, Humanist Voices, The Voice Magazine, and Trusted Clothes. If you want to contact Scott: [emailprotected]; website: www.in-sightjournal.com; Twitter: https://twitter.com/InSight_Journal.

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After Documenting Holocaust Graves, This French Priest Takes on IS Crimes – Forward

She was 22 when she was sold to a high-ranking soldier in the Islamic State group. And she knew she was privileged, getting a high-ranking husband. After all, most Yazidi girls are sold 25 times at minimum. Being owned by a high-ranking official meant she would most likely be kept for longer. Every morning, her husband would take her along on his walks through his military camp. She would follow him, bedecked in a niqab, forced to watch him torture prisoners. One morning, I saw him behead 75 men, one after another, the young Yazidi woman said in an interview later in a refugee camp. Father Patrick Desbois, her interviewer, gestured for the young woman to pause. He turned to his co-worker, Costel Nastasie. I am finished for today, he said. I cannot go on. Lets keep going, Nastasie pressed him. We have more questions. After another hour of harrowing stories, Nastasie paused the interview and turned to Desbois. Im done for the day, too. He needed to get out, to breathe. Desbois has made a name for himself as the French Catholic priest who is devoting his life to Holocaust studies and to the improvement of Catholic-Jewish relations. Most famously, he has embarked on a mission across Eastern Europe to find unmarked graves of mass killings of Jews during the Holocaust, under his not-for-profit Yahad-In Unum. His search for graves involved thousands of interviews with local villagers across Ukraine and Belarus, witnesses who had never spoken before about what they had seen during the war years. But today, Desbois has turned to a new project – one that is less concerned with the past, and more focused on the present. His latest book, La Fabrique des Terroristes: Dans les Secrets de Daech (The Terrorist Factory: Inside ISIS Secrets), co-written with Nastasie, is set to be released in English next year. I decided to go to Iraq with a new project called Action Yazidis, he said in an interview with the Forward. We began the same methodology as our work with Holocaust witnesses and survivors. Only now, we are interviewing survivors as soon as they escape. What IS is doing is dividing the family taking the newborns and placing them in IS families: Bboys are sent to military training camps, girls are checked for virginity by doctors and sold in groups by 100-300 at a time, while older women are used as human shields. Everybody has a purpose. If there is no purpose if theyre too old, too sick or they make problems, they kill them. We can identify this strategy. Its nothing new, he said. Action Yazidis, an initiative of Yahad – In Unum, collects and catalogs testimony from survivors of IS atrocities. This is a criminal investigation, Desbois said. We want to put names in front of an international court, so these criminals can be judged not only as terrorists, but as perpetrators of crimes against humanity. A young woman named Nasrine, in an interview posted on YouTube, tells of a Iraqi-born IS soldier who bought her as a sex slave and brought her to a hotel room, where she was repeatedly raped by him and four other guards. They called me Khadama, servant, she says. The interviewer asks repeated, detailed questions asking for names and origins of the rapists, for descriptions of the families of the perpetrators, of the buildings she saw. Another interview features a mother, sold many times, who bore a child to a Libyan soldier. The man didnt like this child, Desbois said. So he broke his leg, his nose, and then threw him at high-speed from a car. The child, who was smuggled out by his mother, is now years old and completely disabled. There is no limit to the violence, he said. Now, Action Yazidis runs a safehouse in Cham Mushko in Iraqi Kurdistan, for Yazidi women, featuring a sewing workshop, where trained therapists teach refugees with severe traumas how to sew. The place allows survivors to meet, to speak about their past and think about their future, because sadly, no men will come back, Desbois said. We see a huge change in them. Though I dont know whats next for these women. He sees it as a natural progression from his work in Eastern Europe, studying the Holocaust and collecting testimony. We are fighting the same evils, the same human disease, he said. It is the same people who did it in 42, we are fighting the same people who do it today.

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Museum’s program teaches police pitfalls that led to Holocaust – Arlington Voice

The Arlington Police Department has been taking part in a training program that focuses on the role law enforcement played in the Holocaust. The program is called Law Enforcement and Society: Lessons of the Holocaust, and it’s offered by the Dallas Holocaust Museum. Started in September 2016, the intent of the program is to help officers develop a better understanding of their personal responsibility as public servants. The idea for the training program came during a conversation between Dallas Holocaust Museum President and CEO Mary Pat Higgins and Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez. They discussed methods for broadening the reach of the museum while simultaneously developing an ethics and leadership program for the Sheriffs recruits. The class is broken into two parts. The first part includes a tour of the museum, a photo analysis of the Holocaust, and a discussion of the slippery slope German police were on once they fell in line with the Nazis. The second part is led by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL). Participants discuss the current public perception of law enforcement and the role it plays in communities and democracy. We focus on the now, said Cheryl Drazin, Regional Director of the ADL. We look at the stereotypes of law enforcement and what people think when law enforcement pops into their mind. After doing some research, Higgins discovered that the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. already had a similar program called Law Enforcement and Society Training. After deciding not to start an entirely new program, Higgins reached out to the ADL for support because they helped author the original program in Washington. With their assistance, the Dallas Holocaust Museum became certified to offer the training. The goal is for our visitors to come to this museum, understand its history, and think about the dangers of unchecked prejudice and hatred, Higgins said. “The Holocaust is a paradigm of what happens when state-sponsored hatred is unchecked. When Arlington Police Chief Will Johnson learned of the class, he reached out to the museum. After attending the same course at the National museum in Washington, Johnson took several senior officers to the class at the Dallas facility last November. Deputy Chief Os Flores was one of those officers. I think the training is critical, because the lessons of the Holocaust help officers understand their role as protectors of the American people and the Constitution,” Flores said. From his own experience, Flores said the training highlights the role law enforcement has in protecting the civil rights of all people, and cultivating and inspiring tolerance and understanding of others. More than 100,000 local, regional, and federal officers have participated in the program at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum since it first started in 1999. To get more information about this and other programs and events offered at the Dallas Holocaust Museum, call the museum at (214) 741-7500 or visit dallasholocaustmuseum.org.

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Summer Symposium on Remembering the Holocaust held August 5-10 at The Marriott in Boone – High Country Press

BOONEThe 16th Annual Martin and Doris Rosen Summer Symposium on Remembering the Holocaustwill be heldfromAugust 5-10at the Marriott Hotel at 1050 Highway 105near theAppalachian State Universitycampus. This years symposiumexplores the significanceof gender in this genocide.The event is organized by ASUs Center for Judaic, Holocaust, andPeace Studies. The week-long symposiumbrings internationally and nationally acclaimed scholars, authors, and educators to Boone. The events faculty and speakersinclude Auschwitz survivorRalph J.Preiss,Rwandan genocide survivor EugenieMukeshimana,Dr. RebeccaErbelding(United States Holocaust MemorialMuseum),and Professor Michael Berenbaum (American Jewish University)Dr.Racelle Weiman, a world-renowened Holocaust educator, will serve as thisyears co-director. In a special evening event, Suzanne Lasky-Gerard willscreen and discuss her Emmy award winning documentary on theMarch of theLivingthat aired on PBS. ASUs Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and PeaceStudies isalso continuing its collaborationwithYad Vashem, theWorld Centerfor Holocaust Research, Documentation, Education and Commemoration,inJerusalemand will feature a presentation bySheryl Ochayon, JD, from YadVashemsInternational School for Holocaust Studies. The freeand open-to-the-publicsymposium provides public and privateschool teachers, university faculty, students and community membersinformation and insights about the victims, perpetrators, and consequences ofthe Nazigenocide of European Jewry. In addition, the program widens thefocus to explore Jewish religious and cultural life before the Shoah (Holocaust).Reflecting this years emphasis, the symposum participants will not only learnand ponder howthe Holocaust needs to be understood and taught as an eventin globalhistory and notexclusively inJewish history.The audience will alsogain knowledge on how theJewishrefugee crisis of the 1930s and 1940srelates to and teaches us lessons in our grappling with current refugee crisesaround the world. Contributing to the international reach and composition of the event,secondary-school teachers fromHungaryandthe Czech Republicwill beamong the participants and will discuss the teaching of the Holocaust in theircountries. As in years past, North Carolina teachers can receive continuing educationunits for attending the lectures, workshops, discussions, filmscreeninganddemonstrations.As one of the participants in the 2016 meeting summarized,The Symposium was an excellent academic experience that offerededucators the opportunity to grow! The symposium is sponsored byThe Conference on Jewish Material ClaimsAgainst Germany,the Martin and Doris Rosen Endowment,the CommunityAdvisory Board and Friends of the Center for Judaic, Holocaust, and PeaceStudies,Appalachians College ofArts and Sciences and University Bookstore,the Boone Jewish Community/Temple of the High Country,Havurahof theHigh Country, the Margolis Family,the Ruth and StanEtkinSymposium ScholarsFund, the Leon Levine Foundation,the North Carolina Council on theHolocaust,the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington, D.C.,andEchoes and Reflections ofYadVashem(in collaboration with the USCShoahFoundationand the Anti-Defamation League). For a schedule of eventsand complete list of speakers,pleasevisithttps://holocaust.appstate.edu/symposium/2017-schedule.To register forCEUs, visithttps://holocaust.appstate.edu/symposium/registration. comments

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July 27, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed


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