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Holocaust denier Arthur Jones has no opponents in GOP primary …

Arthur Jones, known for his racist and anti-Semitic views, is running to represent Illinois’s 3rd District. (Elyse Samuels/The Washington Post)

Like most candidates running for Congress, Arthur Jones has a campaign website.

It outlines the Republican candidates educational background, stance on issues and how to donate to his campaign to represent Illinois 3rd Congressional District.

It also lays out Joness unapologetically racist and anti-Semitic views.

In a section called Holocaust? Jones describes the atrocities as a racket and the biggest, blackest, lie in history. Under another tab titled Flags of Conflict, he lists the Confederate flag first and describes it as a symbol of White pride and White resistance and the flag of a White counter revolution.

And in his most recent blog post dated Aug. 24 Jones rails against Radical Leftists and blames them for starting racial violence that had roiledCharlottesville about two weeks earlier. Heather Heyer, 32, a protester at a white supremacist rally,died after a driver rammed a car into a crowd of demonstrators. Aself-professed neo-Nazihas been charged with first-degree murder in the incident. Jones painted the death as an accident.

Despite his views, Jones is all but certain to become the GOP nominee in one of Illinoiss most prominent congressional districts one that includes parts of Chicago andseveral suburbs to the west and southwest. Jones is running unopposed in the Republican primary; the deadline for candidates to file was in early December.

His chances of winning the seat are extremely slim. The district is rated safely Democratic, according to Ballotpedia, and two Democrats are facing off: Marie Newman and incumbent Daniel Lipinski.An independent candidate,Mat Tomkowiak, withdrew from the race.

Still, even getting this far in the race is a new milestone for Jones. Over three decades, he has unsuccessfully thrown his hat into the ring for the 3rd District seat seven times,according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

WhenSun-Times reporter Frank Main drove to Lyons, Ill., to track down Jones, the candidate was no less vocal about his extreme views.

Well first of all, Im running for Congress not the chancellor of Germany, all right? Jones told Main. To me, the Holocaust is what I said it is: Its an international extortion racket.

Jones also told the newspaper that he was once a leader in the American Nazi Party and now leads the America First Committee an organization whose membership is open to any white American citizen of European, non-Jewish descent.

Jones did not immediately respond to interview requests Sunday afternoon. Its unclear how he arrived at the opinion that the Holocaust, a systematic genocide in which an estimated 6 million Jews were killed by the Nazi regime, was a sham.

Jones has been involved with at least half a dozen racist groups stretching back to the 1970s, according to the Anti-Defamation League, which has a page devoted to Jones on its website. From 2008 and 2011, Jones was known to have participated in events celebrating the birthday of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, the ADL page states. He was also among those who protested the 2009 opening of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie, Ill., according to Haaretz.

In 2016, the state election board tossed Jones from the ballot for the 3rd District for flagrant disregard of the election code, the Chicago Tribune reported, although a lawyer for the board did not specify why Joness signatures were not valid.

The newspaper that year also highlighted Joness former membership in the American National Socialist Workers Party, which the Southern Poverty Law Center lists as a relatively recent offshoot of the National Socialist Movement, one of the largest and most prominent neo-Nazi groups in the United States.

Representatives from the Illinois Republican Party did not respond to questions sent by email Sunday. But Tim Schneider, the chairman of the Illinois GOP, told the Sun-Times that the party denounced Jones.

The Illinois Republican Party and our country have no place for Nazis like Arthur Jones, Schneider told the newspaper. We strongly oppose his racist views and his candidacy for any public office, including the 3rd Congressional District.

The National Republican Congressional Committee, which supports conservative candidates, balked at questions about Jones.

This guy is a fringe candidate who has been doing this for over a decade with no real connection to the GOP, NRCC spokesman Jesse Hunt said in a Sunday-night email.

Writing about Jones, Hunt said, gives him exactly what he wants: a platform. And quite frankly I find it shameful.

Joness candidacy comes at a time when far-right groups have had new clout in the national discussion: Some hate groups haveramped up recruitmenton college campuses and, for a time,some far-right leadersimagined they had an ally in the White Housein Stephen K. Bannon, who served as an adviser to President Trump before departing his post in August.

Last week,Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) was criticizedfor bringinganaccused Holocaust denieras his guest to the State of the Union address. Gaetz later defended himself, saying he didnt know who Chuck Johnson was when he invited him to the speech.

Avi Selk contributed to this post, which has been updated.

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Polish Senate backs controversial legislation that will …

By Monika ScislowskaThe Associated Press

Thu., Feb. 1, 2018

WARSAW, POLANDPolands Senate has backed legislation that will regulate Holocaust speech, a move that has already strained relations with both Israel and the United States.

The bill proposed by Polands ruling conservative Law and Justice party and voted for early Thursday could see individuals facing up to three years in prison for intentionally attempting to falsely attribute the crimes of Nazi Germany to the Polish nation as a whole.

It was approved by the lower house last week. The bill has yet to become law as it requires the approval from President Andrzej Duda, who has supported it.

Although the bill exempts artistic and research work, it has raised concerns that the Polish state will decide itself what it considers to be historic facts. The bill has already sparked a diplomatic dispute with Israel and drawn calls from the United States for a reconsideration.

Though Deputy Justice Minister Patryk Jaki suggested Israel had been consulted on the bill and voiced no objections, many in Israel have argued that the move is an attempt to whitewash the role some Poles played in the killing of Jews during World War II.

Israels Foreign Ministry said Israel opposes categorically the vote by Polands senators.

Israel views with utmost gravity any attempt to challenge historical truth, the ministry said in a statement. No law will change the facts.

Halina Birenbaum, a Holocaust survivor and acclaimed Israeli author, called the new law madness, telling Israels Army Radio it was ludicrous and disproportionate to what actually happened to Jews there.

Expressing surprise at the storm the legislation has unleashed, the Polish government said it planned to issue an explanatory statement later Thursday.

Polands Deputy Prime Minister Jaroslaw Gowin said the government had acted in good faith and the countrys foreign ministry said the legislation is intended to protect historic truth and fight all forms of denying and distorting the truth about the Holocaust as well as belittling the responsibility of its actual perpetrators.

Polands government argues that it is fighting against the use of phrases like Polish death camps to refer to camps operated by Nazi Germany in occupied Poland during World War II. Poland was among the hardest-hit victims of Nazi Germany, losing some six million citizens, half of them Jews, and is preserving Holocaust memorials.

The government has expressed hope that adoption of the law will not affect Polands strategic partnership with the U.S.

Working groups in Poland and Israel are to start discussing the issue this week, although it was not clear what effect it could have on the bill.

Before the Senates vote, the U.S. asked Poland to rethink the proposed legislation saying it could undermine free speech and academic discourse and affect ties with the U.S. and Israel.

Israels Holocaust memorial, Yad Vashem, issued a statement saying it was most unfortunate that Poland was proceeding with a law liable to blur historical truths that jeopardized the free and open discussion of the part of the Polish people in the persecution of the Jews at the time.

Israeli Intelligence Minister who also looks after transport matters, Yisrael Katz said the law constituted a denial of Polands part in the Holocaust of the Jews. He called on Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to immediately recall Israels ambassador from Warsaw for consultation.

In the balance between diplomatic considerations and moral considerations, there must be a clear decision: perpetuating the memory of the victims of the Holocaust above any other consideration.

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The Holocaust in popular culture – Wikipedia

There is a wide range of ways in which people have represented the Holocaust in popular culture.

The subject of the Holocaust has been dealt with in modern dance.[1]

The Holocaust has been the subject of many films, such as Night and Fog (1955), The Pawnbroker (1964), The Sorrow and the Pity (1969), Voyage of the Damned (1976), Sophie’s Choice (1982), Shoah (1985), Korczak (1990), Schindler’s List (1993), Life Is Beautiful (1997), and The Pianist (2002). A list of hundreds of Holocaust movies is available at the University of South Florida,[7] and the most comprehensive Holocaust-related film database, comprising thousands of films, is available at the Yad Vashem visual center.[8]

Arguably, the Holocaust film most highly acclaimed by critics and historians alike is Alain Resnais Night and Fog (1955), which is harrowingly brutal in its graphic depiction of the events at the camps. (One of the more notable scenes shows Jewish fat being carved into soap.) Many historians and critics have noted its realistic portrayal of the camps and its lack of histrionics present in so many other Holocaust films.[citation needed] Renowned film historian Peter Cowie states: “It’s a tribute to the clarity and cogency of Night and Fog that Resnais masterpiece has not been diminished by time, or displaced by longer and more ambitious films on the Holocaust, such as Shoah and Schindler’s List.”[9]

With the aging population of Holocaust survivors, there has also been increasing attention in recent years to preserving the memory of the Holocaust through documentaries. Among the most influential of these[citation needed] is Claude Lanzmann’s Shoah, which attempts to tell the story in as literal a manner as possible, without dramatization of any kind. Reaching the young population (especially in countries where the Holocaust is not part of education programs) is a challenge, as shown in Mumin Shakirov’s documentary The Holocaust – Glue for Wallpaper?.

The Holocaust has been a particularly important theme in cinema in the Central and Eastern European countries, particularly the cinemas of Poland, both the Czech and Slovak halves of Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. These nations hosted concentration camps and/or lost substantial portions of their Jewish populations to the gas chambers and, consequently, the Holocaust and the fate of Central Europe’s Jews has haunted the work of many film directors, although certain periods have lent themselves more easily to exploring the subject.[which?][citation needed] Although some directors were inspired by their Jewish roots, other directors, such as Hungary’s Mikls Jancs, have no personal connection to Judaism or the Holocaust and yet have repeatedly returned to explore the topic in their works.[which?][citation needed]

Early films about the Holocaust include Auschwitz survivor Wanda Jakubowska’s semi-documentary The Last Stage (Ostatni etap, Poland, 1947) and Alfrd Radok’s hallucinogenic The Long Journey (Dalek cesta, Czechoslovakia, 1948). As Central Europe fell under the grip of Stalinism and state control over the film industry increased, works about the Holocaust ceased to be made until the end of the 1950s (although films about the World War II generally continued to be produced). Among the first films to reintroduce the topic were Ji Weiss’ Sweet Light in a Dark Room (Romeo, Juliet a tma, Czechoslovakia, 1959) and Andrzej Wajda’s Samson (Poland, 1961).[citation needed]

In the 1960s, a number of Central European films that dealt with the Holocaust, either directly or indirectly, had critical successes internationally. In 1966, the Slovak-language Holocaust drama The Shop on Main Street (Obchod na korze, Czechoslovakia, 1965) by Jn Kadr and Elmer Klos won a special mention at the Cannes Film Festival in 1965 and the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film the following year.[citation needed] Another sophisticated Holocaust film from Czechoslovakia is Dita Saxova (Antonn Moskalyk, 1967). [10]

While some of these films, such as Shop on the Main Street, used a conventional filmmaking style,[citation needed] a significant body of films were bold stylistically and used innovative techniques to dramatise the terror of the period. This included nonlinear narratives and narrative ambiguity, as for example in Andrzej Munk’s Passenger (Pasaerka, Poland, 1963) and Jan Nmec’s Diamonds of the Night (Dmanty noci, Czechoslovakia, 1964); expressionist lighting and staging, as in Zbynk Brynych’s The Fifth Horseman is Fear (…a paty jezdec je Strach, Czechoslovakia, 1964); and grotesquely black humour, as in Juraj Herz’s The Cremator (Spalova mrtvol, Czechoslovakia, 1968).

Literature was an important influence on these films, and almost all of the film examples cited in this section were based on novels or short stories. In Czechoslovakia, five stories by Arnot Lustig were adapted for the screen in the 1960s, including Nmec’s Diamonds of the Night.[citation needed]

Although some works, such as Munk’s The Passenger,[when?] had disturbing and graphic sequences of the camps,[citation needed] generally these films depicted the moral dilemmas the Holocaust placed ordinary people in and the dehumanising effects it had on society as a whole, rather than the physical tribulations of individuals actually in the camps. As a result, a body of these Holocaust films were interested in those who collaborated in the Holocaust, either by direct action, as for example in The Passenger and Andrs Kovcs’s Cold Days (Hideg Napok, Hungary, 1966), or through passive inaction, as in The Fifth Horseman is Fear.[citation needed]

The 1970s and 1980s were less fruitful times for Central European film generally,[citation needed] and Czechoslovak cinema particularly suffered after the 1968 Soviet-led invasion.[citation needed] Nevertheless, interesting works on the Holocaust, and more generally the Jewish experience in Central Europe, were sporadically produced in this period, particularly in Hungary. Holocaust films from this time include Imre Gyngyssy and Barna Kabay’s The Revolt of Job (Jb lzadsa, Hungary, 1983), Leszek Wosiewicz’s Kornblumenblau (Poland, 1988), and Ravensbrck survivor Juraj Herz’s Night Caught Up With Me (Zastihla m noc, Czechoslovakia, 1986), whose shower scene is thought to be the basis of Spielberg’s similar sequence in Schindler’s List.[citation needed]

Directors such as Istvn Szab (Hungary) and Agnieszka Holland (Poland) were able to make films that touched on the Holocaust by working internationally, Szab with his Oscar-winning Mephisto (Germany/Hungary/Austria, 1981) and Holland with her more directly Holocaust-themed Angry Harvest (Bittere Ernte, Germany, 1984). Also worth noting is the East German-Czechoslovak coproduction Jacob the Liar (Jakob, der Lgner, 1975) in German and directed by German director Frank Beyer, but starring the acclaimed Czech actor Vlastimil Brodsk. The film was remade in an English-language version in 1999 but did not achieve the scholarly acceptance of the East German version by Beyer.[citation needed]

A resurgence of interest in Central Europe’s Jewish heritage in the post-Communist era has led to a number of more recent features about the Holocaust, such as Wajda’s Korczak (Poland, 1990), Szab’s Sunshine (Germany/Austria/Canada/Hungary, 1999), and Jan Hebejk’s Divided We Fall (Musme si pomhat, Czech Republic, 2001). Both Sunshine and Divided We Fall are typical of a trend of recent films from Central Europe that asks questions about integration and how national identity can incorporate minorities.[citation needed]

Generally speaking, these recent films have been far less stylised and subjectivised than their 1960s counterparts. For example, Polish director Roman Polanski’s The Pianist (France/Germany/UK/Poland, 2002) was noted for its emotional economy and restraint, which somewhat surprised some critics given the overwrought style of some of Polanski’s previous films[citation needed] and Polanski’s personal history as a Holocaust survivor.[citation needed]

There is a substantial body of literature and art in many languages. Perhaps one of the most difficult part of studying Holocaust literature is the language often used in stories or essays; survivor Primo Levi notes in an interview for the International School for Holocaust Studies, housed at the Yad Vashem:

This type of language is present in many, if not most, of the words by authors presented here.

These authors published fictional works as their memoirs and claimed to be holocaust survivors:

The Holocaust has been a common subject in American literature, with authors ranging from Saul Bellow to Sylvia Plath addressing it in their works.

German philosopher Theodor Adorno famously commented that “writing poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric”, but he later retracted this statement. There are some substantial works dealing with the Holocaust and its aftermath, including the work of survivor Paul Celan, which uses inverted syntax and vocabulary in an attempt to express the inexpressible. Celan considered the German language tainted by the Nazis, although it is interesting to note his friendship with Nazi sympathizer and philosopher Martin Heidegger.

Poet Charles Reznikoff, in his 1975 book Holocaust,[23] created a work intrinsically respectful of the pitfalls implied by Adorno’s statement; in itself both a “defense of poetry” and an acknowledgment of the obscenity of poetical rhetoric relative to atrocity, this book utilizes none of the author’s own words, coinages, flourishes, interpretations and judgments: it is a creation solely based on U.S. government records of the Nuremberg Trials and English-translated transcripts of the Adolf Eichmann trial in Jerusalem. Through selection and arrangement of these source materials (the personal testimonies of both survivor victims and perpetrators), and severe editing down to essentials, Reznikoff fulfills a truth-telling function of poetry by laying bare human realities, and horrors, without embellishment, achieving the “poetic” through ordering the immediacy of documented testimony.

In 1998, Northwestern University Press published an anthology, edited by Marguerite M. Striar, entitled Beyond Lament: Poets of the World Bearing Witness to the Holocaust,[24] which, in poetry, defends the sentiments of the statement of Adorno, in a section entitled “In Defense of Poetry,” and reinforces the need to document for future generations what occurred in those times so as to never forget. The book collects, in poetry by survivors, witnesses, and many other poetswell known and notremembrances of, and reflections on, the Holocaust, dealing with the subject in other sections chronologically, the poems organized in further sections by topics: “The Beginning: Premonitions and Prophecies,” “The Liberation,” and “The Aftermath.”

Aside from Adorno’s opinion, a great deal of poetry has been written about the Holocaust by poets from various backgroundssurvivors (for example, Sonia Schrieber Weitz[25]) and countless others, including well-known poet, William Heyen (author of Erika: Poems of the Holocaust, The Swastika Poems,and The Shoah Train), himself a nephew of two men who fought for the Nazis in World War II.

I Never Saw Another Butterfly, by Hana Volavkova, is a collection of works of art and poetry by Jewish children who lived in the concentration camp Theresienstadt.

Pinaki Roy offered a comparative study of the different Holocaust novels written in or translated into English.[26] Roy also reread different Holocaust victims’ poems translated into English for the elements of suffering and protestations ingrained in them.[27] Elsewhere, Roy explored different aspects of Anne Frank’s memoir of the Nazi atrocities, one of the more poignant remembrances of the excesses of World War II.[28] Moreover, in his “Damit wir nicht vergessen!: a very brief Survey of Select Holocaust Plays”, published in English Forum(4, 2015: 121-41, ISSN2279-0446), Roy offers a survey and critical estimate of different plays (in Yiddish, German, and English translation), which deal with the theme of the Holocaust.

Ernestine Schlant has analyzed the Holocaust literature by West German authors.[29] She discussed literary works by Heinrich Bll, Wolfgang Koeppen, Alexander Kluge, Gert Hofmann, W.G. Sebald and others. The so-called Vterliteratur (novels about fathers) from around 1975 reflected the new generation’s exploration of their fathers’ (and occasionally mothers’) involvement in the Nazi atrocities, and the older generation’s generally successful endeavour to pass it under silence.[30] This was often accompanied by a critical portrayal of the new generation’s upbringing by authoritarian parents. Jews are usually absent from these narratives, and the new generation tends to appropriate from unmentioned Jews the status of victimhood.[31] One exception, where the absence of the Jew was addressed through the gradual ostracism and disappearance of an elderly Jew in a small town, is Gert Hofmann’s Veilchenfeld (1986).[32]

White Wolf, Inc. put out Charnal Houses of Europe: The Shoah in 1997 under its adult Black Dog Game Factory label. It is a carefully researched, respectful, and horrifically detailed supplement on the ghosts of the victims of the Holocaust for the Wraith: The Oblivion.

The songs that were created during the Holocaust in ghettos, camps, and partisan groups tell the stories of individuals, groups and communities in the Holocaust period and were a source of unity and comfort, and later, of documentation and remembrance.[33]

Terezn: The Music 194144 is a set of CDs of music composed by inmates at Terezn concentration camp.[34][35][36] It contains chamber music by Gideon Klein, Viktor Ullmann, and Hans Krsa, the children’s opera Brundibr by Krsa, and songs by Ullmann and Pavel Haas. The music was composed in 1943 and 1944, and all the composers died in concentration camps in 1944 and 1945.[37] The CDs were released in 1991.

The massacre of Jews at Babi Yar inspired a poem written by a Russian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko which was set to music by Dmitri Shostakovich in his Symphony No. 13 in B-Flat Minor, first performed in 1962.

In 1966, the Greek composer Mikis Theodorakis released the Ballad of Mauthausen, a cycle of four arias with lyrics based on poems written by Greek poet Iakovos Kambanellis, a Mauthausen concentration camp survivor.

In Pink Floyd’s album The Wall (1979), one of the record’s tracks is titled “Waiting for the Worms”. This song is set in the middle of the time the main character, Pink, has become a neo-nazi, and the head of a fascist group. The song seems to be set in a march down a main street in Brixton, England, with Pink singing/saying the lyrics through a megaphone. One of the lyrics from the song is, “Waiting! For the final solution to strengthen the strain!”

In 1984, Canadian rock band Rush recorded the song “Red Sector A” on the album Grace Under Pressure. The song is particularly notable for its allusions to The Holocaust, inspired by Geddy Lee’s memories of his mother’s stories[38] about the liberation of Bergen-Belsen, where she was held prisoner. One of Lee’s solo songs, “Grace to Grace” on the album My Favourite Headache, was also inspired by his mother’s Holocaust experiences.[38]

In 1988, Steve Reich composed Different Trains, a three-movement piece for string quartet and tape. In the second movement, Europe During the War, three Holocaust survivors (identified by Reich as Paul, Rachel, and Rachella) speak about their experiences in Europe during the war, including their train trips to concentration camps. The third movement, “After the War”, features Holocaust survivors talking about the years immediately following World War II.

Kaddish (1993), by Towering Inferno, and Kaddish, by Israeli band Salem (1994), are concept albums based on the Holocaust.

In 2007, composer Lior Navok composed “And The Trains Kept Coming…” (Slavery Documents no.3) for narrators, soloists, choir and orchestra, based on real documents, correspondence between the allies, train schedules and last letters. It was premiered in Boston, by the Cantata Singers, David Hoose, music director. [1]

The fifth track on Sabaton’s Coat of Arms (2010) album is titled “Final Solution” and contains explicit lyrics describing the trains and the furnaces.

On Disturbed’s album Asylum (2010), the song “Never Again” is about the Holocaust.

There are many plays related to the Holocaust, for example “The Substance of Fire” by Jon Robin Baitz, “The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui” by Bertolt Brecht, Jeff Cohen’s “The Soap Myth”, Dea Loher’s “Olga’s Room”, “Cabaret”, the stage adaptation of “The Diary of Anne Frank”, “Broken Glass” by Arthur Miller, and “Bent” by Martin Sherman.[39][40] In 2010 the Advisory Board of the National Jewish Theater Foundation launched the Holocaust Theater International Initiative, which has three parts: the Holocaust Theater Catalog, a digital catalog in the form of a website containing plays from 1933 to the present about the Holocaust that has user specific informative entries, the Holocaust Theater Education (HTE), which is the development of curricula, materials, techniques, and workshops for the primary, secondary, and higher education levels, and the Holocaust Theater Production (HTP), which is the promotion and facilitation of an increased number of live domestic and international productions about the Holocaust, that includes theater works to be recorded for digital access.[41] The Holocaust Theater Catalog, which launched in October 2014, is the first comprehensive archive of theater materials related to the Holocaust; it was created by the Sue and Leonard Miller Center for Contemporary Judaic Studies and the George Feldenkreis Program in Judaic Studies both at the University of Miami and the National Jewish Theater Foundation.[40]

Creating artwork inside the Nazi concentration camps and ghettos was punishable; if found, the person who created it could be killed. The Nazis branded art that portrayed their regime poorly as “horror propaganda”.[42] Nonetheless, many people painted and sketched as inhabitants needed a way to bring life into their lives and express their human need to create and be creative. The Nazis found many of the artists’ works before the prisoners could complete them.

From Holocaust Survivors And Remembrance ProjectiSurvived.org:

DEFA Film Library Massachusetts

World ORT Resources:

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Polish Senate passes Holocaust bill slammed by Israel – Al …

Polands senate on Thursday passed a controversial Holocaust bill, which was designed to defend the countrys image abroad but has instead sparked a diplomatic row with Israel.

The bill, which sets fines or a maximum three-year jail term for anyone who refers to Nazi German death camps as Polish or accuses Poland of complicity in the Third Reichs crimes, was approved by 57 votes to 23 in the upper house of parliament, with two abstentions.

Israel had earlier called for the bill to be dropped, seeing one of its provisions as an attempt to deny Polish involvement in Nazi Germanys extermination of Jews. We have no tolerance for the distortion of the truth and rewriting history or denying the Holocaust, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Sunday.

ALSO READ:Skeptical at first, US author writes on progressive Saudi remarks on Holocaust

The lower house of parliament, which like the senate is controlled by the governing right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) party, had passed the bill on Friday — triggering the protest from abroad.

Knesset lawmakers penned a proposed bill of their own Wednesday amending Israels law regarding Holocaust denial, so that diminishing or denying the role of those who aided the Nazis in crimes against Jews would be punishable with jail.

Before the vote on the Polish bill, US State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert expressed concern that if enacted this draft legislation could undermine free speech and academic discourse.

We are also concerned about the repercussions this draft legislation… could have on Polands strategic interests and relationships — including with the United States and Israel, she added.

To take effect, the legislation still needs to be signed by Polish President Andrzej Duda, who has 21 days to do so. In theory he could veto the bill but on Monday he said: We absolutely cant back down, we have the right to defend the historical truth.

He added that he was flabbergasted by Israels violent and very unfavorable reaction. Poland was attacked and occupied by Nazi Germany in World War II, losing six million of its citizens including three million Jews.

Muslim World League: Holocaust is a crime that no one can deny or undermine

Helping Jews, even offering them a glass of water, was punishable by death in occupied Poland. More than 6,700 Poles — outnumbering any other nationality — have been honored as Righteous Among the Nations, a title given to non-Jews who stood up to the Nazis, by Jerusalems Holocaust memorial Yad Vashem.

Yad Vashem said it opposes the Polish bill, as it is liable to blur the historical truths regarding the assistance the Germans received from the Polish population during the Holocaust.

But it added that to refer to the extermination camps the Nazis built in Poland as Polish is a historical misrepresentation. American Jewish Committee CEO David Harris urged Polish leaders to withdraw the legislation and focus on education, not criminalization, about inaccurate and harmful speech.

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Poland approves draft Holocaust law | Euronews

Polish lawmakers have approved draft legislation penalising suggestions of complicity by Poland in the Nazi Holocaust on its soil during World War Two.

Violators could face three years in prison for a mention of ‘Polish death camps’.

Some experts believe the new law could have the opposite effect and highlight Poland’s collaboration with the Nazi regime.

“It is unacceptable for me, an historian and a liberal person, to threaten someone with prison because he or she gives his or her opinion based on research,” says Hungarian historian, Laszlo Karsai. “Polish lawmakers are using the ‘Turkish’ way. They are faking their own history. You can get three years in prison if you say there was an Armenian genocide in Turkey.”

The ruling Law and Justice party has a nationalist agenda and has reignited debate on the issue as part of a campaign to fuel patriotism.

Andras Domany, a Hungarian journalist and expert in Polish politics, believes the government is using history for its own political means.

“History is not considered a science by the Polish government, it is a tool for national awareness,” he says. “They want to cut all discussion on how some Polish people collaborated with the Nazi regime or participated in killing Jews.”

Germany occupied Poland in 1939 and later built death camps, including Auschwitz and Treblinka, on Polish soil.

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Holocaust hologram history-making | Local News …

Stanley Bernath estimates that he tells the story of how he survived the Holocaust 10 to 15 times a year. Hes recounted his experience in front of students and professionals at schools, colleges and businesses for more than 40 years, along the way providing insight thats helped shape and inform countless perspectives.

But the 91-year-old Lyndhurst resident understands that, like all survivors, the day will come when he can no longer share his story. At least not in person, that is.

This past August in Los Angeles, Bernath participated in a program that will forever preserve his story of survival, which includes his experience in the ghetto and how a Nazi soldier dropped bits of food to Bernath from a guard tower at Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria.

Stanley Bernath, 91, of Lyndhurst shares his Holocaust experience with a group of students at the auditorium in the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Beachwood.

In a Hollywood studio, Bernath sat under a dome similar in structure to a playground geometric dome climber fitted with more than 6,000 lights and 100 cameras. There, he answered 430 questions during a 10-hour, two-day span for the USC Shoah Foundations New Dimensions in Testimony oral history project a project he said he was honored to take part in.

The project has recorded 15 Holocaust survivors biographies that will be turned into interactive holograms that allow people to have lifelike conversations with survivors.

Eight years from now, 10 years from now, there will be no survivors left, Bernath said. Now if you want to see me … you can go (to a museum) and ask me questions.

About two years ago, the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Beachwood heard of the foundations project and reached out to collaborate. Through this relationship, the Maltz Museum selected four survivors in March 2017 to be sent to Los Angeles and the Shoah Foundation chose Bernath the following April for the level of cognizance he displayed and his personality.

When one bears witness to (Bernaths) survival of the Holocaust, his voice and storytelling draw you in like he is talking directly to you, and his personal story is inspiring, said Kia Hays, who is program manager of the Shoah Foundations New Dimensions in Testimony. We knew that this sense of presence would make his New Dimensions in Testimony interview extraordinarily compelling. He also has a great sense of humor which we thought might make its way into his testimony, and it did.

The images of the survivors are produced by the University of Southern Californias Institute for Creative Technologies in cooperation with the USC Shoah Foundation, which is a nonprofit founded in 1994 by Jewish film director Steven Spielberg to preserve Holocaust and other genocide survivor testimonies.

While the images may be perceived as holograms, the technology hasnt quite reached that point. Instead, the image is produced using a special illusionary technique and two-dimensional technology to give the appearance of a hologram. However, the testimonies are recorded at various angles so that if holographic technology advances, the recordings can be reproduced and keep up with the technology.

In tandem with its Shoah Foundation partnership, the Maltz Museum is embarking on its own Survivor Memory Project to preserve survivors stories with this new technology.

These survivors are dying out, and if we dont tell their story, the naysayers will find a way to say (the Holocaust) never really happened, said Ken Liffman, who chairs the Survivor Memory Project. This is the wave, right now, of the future for learning techniques.

“These survivors are dying out, and if we don’t tell their story, the naysayers will find a way to say (the Holocaust) never really happened.”

Ken Liffman, Chair

Survivor Memory Project

When future students visit the museum, they will be able to ask Bernath questions like, Where wereyou born? Do you believe in God? and How did you survive? Those questions are processed by technology similar to Apples Siri, an intelligent personal assistant that uses voice queries and a language-user interface, and are turned into video segments that can play back Bernaths recorded responses verbatim, as if he were actually there.

You have to be able to communicate (their experiences) to the kids in a way that they will comprehend, Liffman said. That story may need to be told more than once, and it may need additional individuals. But I cant think of a better way to raise awareness of what happened than through this particular program.

Students from Facing History New Tech in Cleveland hug and thank 91-year-old Holocaust survivor Stanley Bernath after he shared his experience as a teenager during the Holocaust at the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Beachwood.

The plan is to have a beta test of the hologram image come to the Maltz Museum during the summer in a temporary location, where visitors can pose questions to Bernath.

The museum is in phase one of its campaign to create a permanent exhibit, which includes acquiring and setting up the technology and included sending Bernath to Los Angeles because that is the only location that can currently film the testimonies. The goal of phase one is to raise $400,000, and Liffman said the museum is more than halfway there and plans to roll out the permanent exhibit within the year.

While the museum hasnt decided where this technology would be housed in its building, Liffman said they wanted to start gathering testimony from survivors while they are still able to tell their stories.

Through his speaker appearances, Bernath said he passes on three lessons hes learned and hopes it will continue when hes gone.

Never give up, no matter how bad it seems, always believe in yourself and no one is any better than I am and Im not better than anyone else, he said. Hatred is off my shoulder. You cant live with hatred because that is like a parasite infecting your brain.

Recording Holocaust survivors and turning their testimonies into holograms is one part of the Shoah Foundations New Dimensions in Testimony project. According to its website, the foundation has interviewed other witnesses to genocide, like the 1937 Nanjing Massacre, and intends to continue gathering survivors to educate future generations.

Completed holograms of other Holocaust survivors can be seen at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.; Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie, Ill.; CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Terre Haute, Ind.; Holocaust Museum Houston in Houston; and the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in Toronto, Canada.

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Polands Senate Approves Holocaust Law – voanews.com

WASHINGTON

Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki says Poland will “never limit the debate” on the Holocaust, saying the country owes it to the victims.

Morawiecki gave a televised address Thursday just after the Senate passed a controversial law making it a crime to call the Nazi genocide of Jews a Polish crime and Nazi death camps Polish death camps, even though some of the most brutal Nazi atrocities took place in Poland.

The law awaits President Andrzej Duda’s signature.

WATCH: Poland’s Holocaust Bill Causes Diplomatic Spat With Israel

“Our government condemns all the crimes of the Second World War committed on Polish soil regardless of the nationalities of their perpetrators and to which nation the victims belonged,” the prime minister said. “Fighting against false claims about the participation of the Polish state in the German war machine, Poland stands on the side of the truth.”

Poland regards itself as having been a victim of Nazi terror. Morawiecki pointed out that six million Poles were killed during World War II, three million of them Jews.

Morawiecki’s televised speech was also aimed at easing concerns of the United States and cooling down the outrage in Israel.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has said Israel will not tolerate “distortion of the truth, rewriting history, and denial of the Holocaust.”

Some experts fear the new Polish law could also mean jail for Holocaust survivors when talking about their ordeals.

Duda, the Polish president, said this week there was no institutional participation by Poland in the Holocaust, but it did recognize criminal actions toward Jews by some individual Poles.

“There were wicked people who sold their neighbors for money. But it was not the Polish nation, it was not an organized action,” Duda said.

He pointed out that some Poles sacrificed their own lives to save Jews from the Nazis, and that the Polish underground and government in exile resisted efforts to wipe out European Jewry.

Poland was home to one of the worlds most thriving Jewish populations before Nazi Germany invaded in 1939. However, some historians say many Poles collaborated with the Nazis in persecuting Jews.

Holocaust survivors who returned to Poland after the war found themselves victims of further anti-Semitism.

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Holocaust Remembrance and the Rise of Hate | Israel …

Every year on January 27 is Holocaust Remembrance Day, when people from across the globe commemorate the tragedy which took place during World War II. The notable day is intended to honor the victims who suffered through and because of the Holocaust, remembering the widespread genocide which occurred with the unfortunate combination of hatred, ignorance and silence.

In todays world, it seems we need to do much more than simply remember. With thousands of Holocaust survivors remaining and aging, it is crucial to continue educating and discussing in the future, especially amidst the exponential rise of antisemitism currently in spring across the globe.

The World Jewish Congress launched a campaign which spans across six continents, with the aim of inspiring six million people to use the hashtag #WeRemember and spread the global word to remember the Holocaust. Robert Lauder, President of the World Jewish Congress says, In todays digital age, social media is the only tool that can allow us to connect the world together with this message.

While the #WeRemember social media campaign has created a large trend of honoring Holocaust Remembrance Day, it should still be noted that 2017 showed record high hatred against Jews on a global scale.

The Anti-Defamation League reported a 67% rise in anti-Semitic acts in America, Britain saw a 78% increase in physical violence alone, and there was a stark increase of anti-Semitic incidents since November 2016 after Trump stepped into the presidency, and began normalizing hatred and inciting violence in the mainstream media. Today social media enables Neo-Nazi and anti-Semitic groups to form, train, recruit and amplify their malicious messages.

From physical violence to vandalism to cold blooded murder, hate crimes are rising across America and Europe, particularly in Germany, Ukraine, France and Britain. The worldwide Jewish bullying continues even with global institutions like the UN and UNESCO, which are allegedly dedicated to unification, however, have expanded to both anti-Jewish and anti-Israel sentiment.

While we may never experience a Holocaust similar to that which took place across Germany in the 1930s, hatred, violence, brainwashing and murder is on the rise and before history is allowed to repeat itself, one of the greatest lessons we can all learn is that silence is certainly not the answer.

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Controversial Holocaust bill is passed in Poland | Euronews

The Polish senate has approved a law that makes it illegal to suggest that Poland played any part in the Nazi Holocaust, which took place on its soil during World War Two.

The law would make the term “Polish death camps” punishable by up to three years in jail. The Auschwitz and Treblinka concentration camps were built on Polish soil.

The bill has already caused a rift with Israel. On Sunday Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu accused Poland of attempting to change history.

In a statement he said: “I strongly oppose it. One cannot change history and the Holocaust cannot be denied.”

Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center, called the legislation “problematic”.

“This law is liable to blur historical truths due to limitations it places on expressions regarding the complicity of segments of the Polish population in crimes against Jews committed by its own people, either directly or indirectly, on Polish soil during the Holocaust,” the center said in a statement.

While the Yad Vashem said the term “Polish death camps” is “erroneous”, it emphasised that historical misrepresentations and statements like that should not be criminalised, adding the law “jeopardizes the free and open discussion of the part of the Polish people in the persecution of the Jews at the time.”

Poland’s deputy justice minister said: “Talking about the past and analysing this past, even the darkest, shameful part of the Polish past is not threatened in any way”

The role of Poland in the atrocities has always been a tough topic for the country, which after being invaded by Nazi Germany saw 90% of its Jewish population killed.

The move to absolve Poles and the Polish state of that responsibility now has momentum, with the bill passing in parliament with 57 votes to 23.

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Holocaust denier Arthur Jones has no opponents in GOP primary …

Arthur Jones, known for his racist and anti-Semitic views, is running to represent Illinois’s 3rd District. (Elyse Samuels/The Washington Post) Like most candidates running for Congress, Arthur Jones has a campaign website. It outlines the Republican candidates educational background, stance on issues and how to donate to his campaign to represent Illinois 3rd Congressional District. It also lays out Joness unapologetically racist and anti-Semitic views. In a section called Holocaust? Jones describes the atrocities as a racket and the biggest, blackest, lie in history. Under another tab titled Flags of Conflict, he lists the Confederate flag first and describes it as a symbol of White pride and White resistance and the flag of a White counter revolution. And in his most recent blog post dated Aug. 24 Jones rails against Radical Leftists and blames them for starting racial violence that had roiledCharlottesville about two weeks earlier. Heather Heyer, 32, a protester at a white supremacist rally,died after a driver rammed a car into a crowd of demonstrators. Aself-professed neo-Nazihas been charged with first-degree murder in the incident. Jones painted the death as an accident. Despite his views, Jones is all but certain to become the GOP nominee in one of Illinoiss most prominent congressional districts one that includes parts of Chicago andseveral suburbs to the west and southwest. Jones is running unopposed in the Republican primary; the deadline for candidates to file was in early December. His chances of winning the seat are extremely slim. The district is rated safely Democratic, according to Ballotpedia, and two Democrats are facing off: Marie Newman and incumbent Daniel Lipinski.An independent candidate,Mat Tomkowiak, withdrew from the race. Still, even getting this far in the race is a new milestone for Jones. Over three decades, he has unsuccessfully thrown his hat into the ring for the 3rd District seat seven times,according to the Chicago Sun-Times. WhenSun-Times reporter Frank Main drove to Lyons, Ill., to track down Jones, the candidate was no less vocal about his extreme views. Well first of all, Im running for Congress not the chancellor of Germany, all right? Jones told Main. To me, the Holocaust is what I said it is: Its an international extortion racket. Jones also told the newspaper that he was once a leader in the American Nazi Party and now leads the America First Committee an organization whose membership is open to any white American citizen of European, non-Jewish descent. Jones did not immediately respond to interview requests Sunday afternoon. Its unclear how he arrived at the opinion that the Holocaust, a systematic genocide in which an estimated 6 million Jews were killed by the Nazi regime, was a sham. Jones has been involved with at least half a dozen racist groups stretching back to the 1970s, according to the Anti-Defamation League, which has a page devoted to Jones on its website. From 2008 and 2011, Jones was known to have participated in events celebrating the birthday of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, the ADL page states. He was also among those who protested the 2009 opening of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie, Ill., according to Haaretz. In 2016, the state election board tossed Jones from the ballot for the 3rd District for flagrant disregard of the election code, the Chicago Tribune reported, although a lawyer for the board did not specify why Joness signatures were not valid. The newspaper that year also highlighted Joness former membership in the American National Socialist Workers Party, which the Southern Poverty Law Center lists as a relatively recent offshoot of the National Socialist Movement, one of the largest and most prominent neo-Nazi groups in the United States. Representatives from the Illinois Republican Party did not respond to questions sent by email Sunday. But Tim Schneider, the chairman of the Illinois GOP, told the Sun-Times that the party denounced Jones. The Illinois Republican Party and our country have no place for Nazis like Arthur Jones, Schneider told the newspaper. We strongly oppose his racist views and his candidacy for any public office, including the 3rd Congressional District. The National Republican Congressional Committee, which supports conservative candidates, balked at questions about Jones. This guy is a fringe candidate who has been doing this for over a decade with no real connection to the GOP, NRCC spokesman Jesse Hunt said in a Sunday-night email. Writing about Jones, Hunt said, gives him exactly what he wants: a platform. And quite frankly I find it shameful. Joness candidacy comes at a time when far-right groups have had new clout in the national discussion: Some hate groups haveramped up recruitmenton college campuses and, for a time,some far-right leadersimagined they had an ally in the White Housein Stephen K. Bannon, who served as an adviser to President Trump before departing his post in August. Last week,Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) was criticizedfor bringinganaccused Holocaust denieras his guest to the State of the Union address. Gaetz later defended himself, saying he didnt know who Chuck Johnson was when he invited him to the speech. Avi Selk contributed to this post, which has been updated. Read more: A neo-Nazi converted to Islam and killed 2 roommates for disrespecting his faith, police say Behind a bookcase, a secret passageway leads to a trove of Nazi artifacts in Argentina An American tourist gave the Nazi salute in Germany so a stranger beat him up, police say

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Polish Senate backs controversial legislation that will …

By Monika ScislowskaThe Associated Press Thu., Feb. 1, 2018 WARSAW, POLANDPolands Senate has backed legislation that will regulate Holocaust speech, a move that has already strained relations with both Israel and the United States. The bill proposed by Polands ruling conservative Law and Justice party and voted for early Thursday could see individuals facing up to three years in prison for intentionally attempting to falsely attribute the crimes of Nazi Germany to the Polish nation as a whole. It was approved by the lower house last week. The bill has yet to become law as it requires the approval from President Andrzej Duda, who has supported it. Although the bill exempts artistic and research work, it has raised concerns that the Polish state will decide itself what it considers to be historic facts. The bill has already sparked a diplomatic dispute with Israel and drawn calls from the United States for a reconsideration. Though Deputy Justice Minister Patryk Jaki suggested Israel had been consulted on the bill and voiced no objections, many in Israel have argued that the move is an attempt to whitewash the role some Poles played in the killing of Jews during World War II. Israels Foreign Ministry said Israel opposes categorically the vote by Polands senators. Israel views with utmost gravity any attempt to challenge historical truth, the ministry said in a statement. No law will change the facts. Halina Birenbaum, a Holocaust survivor and acclaimed Israeli author, called the new law madness, telling Israels Army Radio it was ludicrous and disproportionate to what actually happened to Jews there. Expressing surprise at the storm the legislation has unleashed, the Polish government said it planned to issue an explanatory statement later Thursday. Polands Deputy Prime Minister Jaroslaw Gowin said the government had acted in good faith and the countrys foreign ministry said the legislation is intended to protect historic truth and fight all forms of denying and distorting the truth about the Holocaust as well as belittling the responsibility of its actual perpetrators. Polands government argues that it is fighting against the use of phrases like Polish death camps to refer to camps operated by Nazi Germany in occupied Poland during World War II. Poland was among the hardest-hit victims of Nazi Germany, losing some six million citizens, half of them Jews, and is preserving Holocaust memorials. The government has expressed hope that adoption of the law will not affect Polands strategic partnership with the U.S. Working groups in Poland and Israel are to start discussing the issue this week, although it was not clear what effect it could have on the bill. Before the Senates vote, the U.S. asked Poland to rethink the proposed legislation saying it could undermine free speech and academic discourse and affect ties with the U.S. and Israel. Israels Holocaust memorial, Yad Vashem, issued a statement saying it was most unfortunate that Poland was proceeding with a law liable to blur historical truths that jeopardized the free and open discussion of the part of the Polish people in the persecution of the Jews at the time. Israeli Intelligence Minister who also looks after transport matters, Yisrael Katz said the law constituted a denial of Polands part in the Holocaust of the Jews. He called on Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to immediately recall Israels ambassador from Warsaw for consultation. In the balance between diplomatic considerations and moral considerations, there must be a clear decision: perpetuating the memory of the victims of the Holocaust above any other consideration.

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The Holocaust in popular culture – Wikipedia

There is a wide range of ways in which people have represented the Holocaust in popular culture. The subject of the Holocaust has been dealt with in modern dance.[1] The Holocaust has been the subject of many films, such as Night and Fog (1955), The Pawnbroker (1964), The Sorrow and the Pity (1969), Voyage of the Damned (1976), Sophie’s Choice (1982), Shoah (1985), Korczak (1990), Schindler’s List (1993), Life Is Beautiful (1997), and The Pianist (2002). A list of hundreds of Holocaust movies is available at the University of South Florida,[7] and the most comprehensive Holocaust-related film database, comprising thousands of films, is available at the Yad Vashem visual center.[8] Arguably, the Holocaust film most highly acclaimed by critics and historians alike is Alain Resnais Night and Fog (1955), which is harrowingly brutal in its graphic depiction of the events at the camps. (One of the more notable scenes shows Jewish fat being carved into soap.) Many historians and critics have noted its realistic portrayal of the camps and its lack of histrionics present in so many other Holocaust films.[citation needed] Renowned film historian Peter Cowie states: “It’s a tribute to the clarity and cogency of Night and Fog that Resnais masterpiece has not been diminished by time, or displaced by longer and more ambitious films on the Holocaust, such as Shoah and Schindler’s List.”[9] With the aging population of Holocaust survivors, there has also been increasing attention in recent years to preserving the memory of the Holocaust through documentaries. Among the most influential of these[citation needed] is Claude Lanzmann’s Shoah, which attempts to tell the story in as literal a manner as possible, without dramatization of any kind. Reaching the young population (especially in countries where the Holocaust is not part of education programs) is a challenge, as shown in Mumin Shakirov’s documentary The Holocaust – Glue for Wallpaper?. The Holocaust has been a particularly important theme in cinema in the Central and Eastern European countries, particularly the cinemas of Poland, both the Czech and Slovak halves of Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. These nations hosted concentration camps and/or lost substantial portions of their Jewish populations to the gas chambers and, consequently, the Holocaust and the fate of Central Europe’s Jews has haunted the work of many film directors, although certain periods have lent themselves more easily to exploring the subject.[which?][citation needed] Although some directors were inspired by their Jewish roots, other directors, such as Hungary’s Mikls Jancs, have no personal connection to Judaism or the Holocaust and yet have repeatedly returned to explore the topic in their works.[which?][citation needed] Early films about the Holocaust include Auschwitz survivor Wanda Jakubowska’s semi-documentary The Last Stage (Ostatni etap, Poland, 1947) and Alfrd Radok’s hallucinogenic The Long Journey (Dalek cesta, Czechoslovakia, 1948). As Central Europe fell under the grip of Stalinism and state control over the film industry increased, works about the Holocaust ceased to be made until the end of the 1950s (although films about the World War II generally continued to be produced). Among the first films to reintroduce the topic were Ji Weiss’ Sweet Light in a Dark Room (Romeo, Juliet a tma, Czechoslovakia, 1959) and Andrzej Wajda’s Samson (Poland, 1961).[citation needed] In the 1960s, a number of Central European films that dealt with the Holocaust, either directly or indirectly, had critical successes internationally. In 1966, the Slovak-language Holocaust drama The Shop on Main Street (Obchod na korze, Czechoslovakia, 1965) by Jn Kadr and Elmer Klos won a special mention at the Cannes Film Festival in 1965 and the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film the following year.[citation needed] Another sophisticated Holocaust film from Czechoslovakia is Dita Saxova (Antonn Moskalyk, 1967). [10] While some of these films, such as Shop on the Main Street, used a conventional filmmaking style,[citation needed] a significant body of films were bold stylistically and used innovative techniques to dramatise the terror of the period. This included nonlinear narratives and narrative ambiguity, as for example in Andrzej Munk’s Passenger (Pasaerka, Poland, 1963) and Jan Nmec’s Diamonds of the Night (Dmanty noci, Czechoslovakia, 1964); expressionist lighting and staging, as in Zbynk Brynych’s The Fifth Horseman is Fear (…a paty jezdec je Strach, Czechoslovakia, 1964); and grotesquely black humour, as in Juraj Herz’s The Cremator (Spalova mrtvol, Czechoslovakia, 1968). Literature was an important influence on these films, and almost all of the film examples cited in this section were based on novels or short stories. In Czechoslovakia, five stories by Arnot Lustig were adapted for the screen in the 1960s, including Nmec’s Diamonds of the Night.[citation needed] Although some works, such as Munk’s The Passenger,[when?] had disturbing and graphic sequences of the camps,[citation needed] generally these films depicted the moral dilemmas the Holocaust placed ordinary people in and the dehumanising effects it had on society as a whole, rather than the physical tribulations of individuals actually in the camps. As a result, a body of these Holocaust films were interested in those who collaborated in the Holocaust, either by direct action, as for example in The Passenger and Andrs Kovcs’s Cold Days (Hideg Napok, Hungary, 1966), or through passive inaction, as in The Fifth Horseman is Fear.[citation needed] The 1970s and 1980s were less fruitful times for Central European film generally,[citation needed] and Czechoslovak cinema particularly suffered after the 1968 Soviet-led invasion.[citation needed] Nevertheless, interesting works on the Holocaust, and more generally the Jewish experience in Central Europe, were sporadically produced in this period, particularly in Hungary. Holocaust films from this time include Imre Gyngyssy and Barna Kabay’s The Revolt of Job (Jb lzadsa, Hungary, 1983), Leszek Wosiewicz’s Kornblumenblau (Poland, 1988), and Ravensbrck survivor Juraj Herz’s Night Caught Up With Me (Zastihla m noc, Czechoslovakia, 1986), whose shower scene is thought to be the basis of Spielberg’s similar sequence in Schindler’s List.[citation needed] Directors such as Istvn Szab (Hungary) and Agnieszka Holland (Poland) were able to make films that touched on the Holocaust by working internationally, Szab with his Oscar-winning Mephisto (Germany/Hungary/Austria, 1981) and Holland with her more directly Holocaust-themed Angry Harvest (Bittere Ernte, Germany, 1984). Also worth noting is the East German-Czechoslovak coproduction Jacob the Liar (Jakob, der Lgner, 1975) in German and directed by German director Frank Beyer, but starring the acclaimed Czech actor Vlastimil Brodsk. The film was remade in an English-language version in 1999 but did not achieve the scholarly acceptance of the East German version by Beyer.[citation needed] A resurgence of interest in Central Europe’s Jewish heritage in the post-Communist era has led to a number of more recent features about the Holocaust, such as Wajda’s Korczak (Poland, 1990), Szab’s Sunshine (Germany/Austria/Canada/Hungary, 1999), and Jan Hebejk’s Divided We Fall (Musme si pomhat, Czech Republic, 2001). Both Sunshine and Divided We Fall are typical of a trend of recent films from Central Europe that asks questions about integration and how national identity can incorporate minorities.[citation needed] Generally speaking, these recent films have been far less stylised and subjectivised than their 1960s counterparts. For example, Polish director Roman Polanski’s The Pianist (France/Germany/UK/Poland, 2002) was noted for its emotional economy and restraint, which somewhat surprised some critics given the overwrought style of some of Polanski’s previous films[citation needed] and Polanski’s personal history as a Holocaust survivor.[citation needed] There is a substantial body of literature and art in many languages. Perhaps one of the most difficult part of studying Holocaust literature is the language often used in stories or essays; survivor Primo Levi notes in an interview for the International School for Holocaust Studies, housed at the Yad Vashem: This type of language is present in many, if not most, of the words by authors presented here. These authors published fictional works as their memoirs and claimed to be holocaust survivors: The Holocaust has been a common subject in American literature, with authors ranging from Saul Bellow to Sylvia Plath addressing it in their works. German philosopher Theodor Adorno famously commented that “writing poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric”, but he later retracted this statement. There are some substantial works dealing with the Holocaust and its aftermath, including the work of survivor Paul Celan, which uses inverted syntax and vocabulary in an attempt to express the inexpressible. Celan considered the German language tainted by the Nazis, although it is interesting to note his friendship with Nazi sympathizer and philosopher Martin Heidegger. Poet Charles Reznikoff, in his 1975 book Holocaust,[23] created a work intrinsically respectful of the pitfalls implied by Adorno’s statement; in itself both a “defense of poetry” and an acknowledgment of the obscenity of poetical rhetoric relative to atrocity, this book utilizes none of the author’s own words, coinages, flourishes, interpretations and judgments: it is a creation solely based on U.S. government records of the Nuremberg Trials and English-translated transcripts of the Adolf Eichmann trial in Jerusalem. Through selection and arrangement of these source materials (the personal testimonies of both survivor victims and perpetrators), and severe editing down to essentials, Reznikoff fulfills a truth-telling function of poetry by laying bare human realities, and horrors, without embellishment, achieving the “poetic” through ordering the immediacy of documented testimony. In 1998, Northwestern University Press published an anthology, edited by Marguerite M. Striar, entitled Beyond Lament: Poets of the World Bearing Witness to the Holocaust,[24] which, in poetry, defends the sentiments of the statement of Adorno, in a section entitled “In Defense of Poetry,” and reinforces the need to document for future generations what occurred in those times so as to never forget. The book collects, in poetry by survivors, witnesses, and many other poetswell known and notremembrances of, and reflections on, the Holocaust, dealing with the subject in other sections chronologically, the poems organized in further sections by topics: “The Beginning: Premonitions and Prophecies,” “The Liberation,” and “The Aftermath.” Aside from Adorno’s opinion, a great deal of poetry has been written about the Holocaust by poets from various backgroundssurvivors (for example, Sonia Schrieber Weitz[25]) and countless others, including well-known poet, William Heyen (author of Erika: Poems of the Holocaust, The Swastika Poems,and The Shoah Train), himself a nephew of two men who fought for the Nazis in World War II. I Never Saw Another Butterfly, by Hana Volavkova, is a collection of works of art and poetry by Jewish children who lived in the concentration camp Theresienstadt. Pinaki Roy offered a comparative study of the different Holocaust novels written in or translated into English.[26] Roy also reread different Holocaust victims’ poems translated into English for the elements of suffering and protestations ingrained in them.[27] Elsewhere, Roy explored different aspects of Anne Frank’s memoir of the Nazi atrocities, one of the more poignant remembrances of the excesses of World War II.[28] Moreover, in his “Damit wir nicht vergessen!: a very brief Survey of Select Holocaust Plays”, published in English Forum(4, 2015: 121-41, ISSN2279-0446), Roy offers a survey and critical estimate of different plays (in Yiddish, German, and English translation), which deal with the theme of the Holocaust. Ernestine Schlant has analyzed the Holocaust literature by West German authors.[29] She discussed literary works by Heinrich Bll, Wolfgang Koeppen, Alexander Kluge, Gert Hofmann, W.G. Sebald and others. The so-called Vterliteratur (novels about fathers) from around 1975 reflected the new generation’s exploration of their fathers’ (and occasionally mothers’) involvement in the Nazi atrocities, and the older generation’s generally successful endeavour to pass it under silence.[30] This was often accompanied by a critical portrayal of the new generation’s upbringing by authoritarian parents. Jews are usually absent from these narratives, and the new generation tends to appropriate from unmentioned Jews the status of victimhood.[31] One exception, where the absence of the Jew was addressed through the gradual ostracism and disappearance of an elderly Jew in a small town, is Gert Hofmann’s Veilchenfeld (1986).[32] White Wolf, Inc. put out Charnal Houses of Europe: The Shoah in 1997 under its adult Black Dog Game Factory label. It is a carefully researched, respectful, and horrifically detailed supplement on the ghosts of the victims of the Holocaust for the Wraith: The Oblivion. The songs that were created during the Holocaust in ghettos, camps, and partisan groups tell the stories of individuals, groups and communities in the Holocaust period and were a source of unity and comfort, and later, of documentation and remembrance.[33] Terezn: The Music 194144 is a set of CDs of music composed by inmates at Terezn concentration camp.[34][35][36] It contains chamber music by Gideon Klein, Viktor Ullmann, and Hans Krsa, the children’s opera Brundibr by Krsa, and songs by Ullmann and Pavel Haas. The music was composed in 1943 and 1944, and all the composers died in concentration camps in 1944 and 1945.[37] The CDs were released in 1991. The massacre of Jews at Babi Yar inspired a poem written by a Russian poet Yevgeny Yevtushenko which was set to music by Dmitri Shostakovich in his Symphony No. 13 in B-Flat Minor, first performed in 1962. In 1966, the Greek composer Mikis Theodorakis released the Ballad of Mauthausen, a cycle of four arias with lyrics based on poems written by Greek poet Iakovos Kambanellis, a Mauthausen concentration camp survivor. In Pink Floyd’s album The Wall (1979), one of the record’s tracks is titled “Waiting for the Worms”. This song is set in the middle of the time the main character, Pink, has become a neo-nazi, and the head of a fascist group. The song seems to be set in a march down a main street in Brixton, England, with Pink singing/saying the lyrics through a megaphone. One of the lyrics from the song is, “Waiting! For the final solution to strengthen the strain!” In 1984, Canadian rock band Rush recorded the song “Red Sector A” on the album Grace Under Pressure. The song is particularly notable for its allusions to The Holocaust, inspired by Geddy Lee’s memories of his mother’s stories[38] about the liberation of Bergen-Belsen, where she was held prisoner. One of Lee’s solo songs, “Grace to Grace” on the album My Favourite Headache, was also inspired by his mother’s Holocaust experiences.[38] In 1988, Steve Reich composed Different Trains, a three-movement piece for string quartet and tape. In the second movement, Europe During the War, three Holocaust survivors (identified by Reich as Paul, Rachel, and Rachella) speak about their experiences in Europe during the war, including their train trips to concentration camps. The third movement, “After the War”, features Holocaust survivors talking about the years immediately following World War II. Kaddish (1993), by Towering Inferno, and Kaddish, by Israeli band Salem (1994), are concept albums based on the Holocaust. In 2007, composer Lior Navok composed “And The Trains Kept Coming…” (Slavery Documents no.3) for narrators, soloists, choir and orchestra, based on real documents, correspondence between the allies, train schedules and last letters. It was premiered in Boston, by the Cantata Singers, David Hoose, music director. [1] The fifth track on Sabaton’s Coat of Arms (2010) album is titled “Final Solution” and contains explicit lyrics describing the trains and the furnaces. On Disturbed’s album Asylum (2010), the song “Never Again” is about the Holocaust. There are many plays related to the Holocaust, for example “The Substance of Fire” by Jon Robin Baitz, “The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui” by Bertolt Brecht, Jeff Cohen’s “The Soap Myth”, Dea Loher’s “Olga’s Room”, “Cabaret”, the stage adaptation of “The Diary of Anne Frank”, “Broken Glass” by Arthur Miller, and “Bent” by Martin Sherman.[39][40] In 2010 the Advisory Board of the National Jewish Theater Foundation launched the Holocaust Theater International Initiative, which has three parts: the Holocaust Theater Catalog, a digital catalog in the form of a website containing plays from 1933 to the present about the Holocaust that has user specific informative entries, the Holocaust Theater Education (HTE), which is the development of curricula, materials, techniques, and workshops for the primary, secondary, and higher education levels, and the Holocaust Theater Production (HTP), which is the promotion and facilitation of an increased number of live domestic and international productions about the Holocaust, that includes theater works to be recorded for digital access.[41] The Holocaust Theater Catalog, which launched in October 2014, is the first comprehensive archive of theater materials related to the Holocaust; it was created by the Sue and Leonard Miller Center for Contemporary Judaic Studies and the George Feldenkreis Program in Judaic Studies both at the University of Miami and the National Jewish Theater Foundation.[40] Creating artwork inside the Nazi concentration camps and ghettos was punishable; if found, the person who created it could be killed. The Nazis branded art that portrayed their regime poorly as “horror propaganda”.[42] Nonetheless, many people painted and sketched as inhabitants needed a way to bring life into their lives and express their human need to create and be creative. The Nazis found many of the artists’ works before the prisoners could complete them. From Holocaust Survivors And Remembrance ProjectiSurvived.org: DEFA Film Library Massachusetts World ORT Resources:

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Polish Senate passes Holocaust bill slammed by Israel – Al …

Polands senate on Thursday passed a controversial Holocaust bill, which was designed to defend the countrys image abroad but has instead sparked a diplomatic row with Israel. The bill, which sets fines or a maximum three-year jail term for anyone who refers to Nazi German death camps as Polish or accuses Poland of complicity in the Third Reichs crimes, was approved by 57 votes to 23 in the upper house of parliament, with two abstentions. Israel had earlier called for the bill to be dropped, seeing one of its provisions as an attempt to deny Polish involvement in Nazi Germanys extermination of Jews. We have no tolerance for the distortion of the truth and rewriting history or denying the Holocaust, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Sunday. ALSO READ:Skeptical at first, US author writes on progressive Saudi remarks on Holocaust The lower house of parliament, which like the senate is controlled by the governing right-wing Law and Justice (PiS) party, had passed the bill on Friday — triggering the protest from abroad. Knesset lawmakers penned a proposed bill of their own Wednesday amending Israels law regarding Holocaust denial, so that diminishing or denying the role of those who aided the Nazis in crimes against Jews would be punishable with jail. Before the vote on the Polish bill, US State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert expressed concern that if enacted this draft legislation could undermine free speech and academic discourse. We are also concerned about the repercussions this draft legislation… could have on Polands strategic interests and relationships — including with the United States and Israel, she added. To take effect, the legislation still needs to be signed by Polish President Andrzej Duda, who has 21 days to do so. In theory he could veto the bill but on Monday he said: We absolutely cant back down, we have the right to defend the historical truth. He added that he was flabbergasted by Israels violent and very unfavorable reaction. Poland was attacked and occupied by Nazi Germany in World War II, losing six million of its citizens including three million Jews. Muslim World League: Holocaust is a crime that no one can deny or undermine Helping Jews, even offering them a glass of water, was punishable by death in occupied Poland. More than 6,700 Poles — outnumbering any other nationality — have been honored as Righteous Among the Nations, a title given to non-Jews who stood up to the Nazis, by Jerusalems Holocaust memorial Yad Vashem. Yad Vashem said it opposes the Polish bill, as it is liable to blur the historical truths regarding the assistance the Germans received from the Polish population during the Holocaust. But it added that to refer to the extermination camps the Nazis built in Poland as Polish is a historical misrepresentation. American Jewish Committee CEO David Harris urged Polish leaders to withdraw the legislation and focus on education, not criminalization, about inaccurate and harmful speech. Last Update: Thursday, 1 February 2018 KSA 09:53 – GMT 06:53

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Poland approves draft Holocaust law | Euronews

Polish lawmakers have approved draft legislation penalising suggestions of complicity by Poland in the Nazi Holocaust on its soil during World War Two. Violators could face three years in prison for a mention of ‘Polish death camps’. Some experts believe the new law could have the opposite effect and highlight Poland’s collaboration with the Nazi regime. “It is unacceptable for me, an historian and a liberal person, to threaten someone with prison because he or she gives his or her opinion based on research,” says Hungarian historian, Laszlo Karsai. “Polish lawmakers are using the ‘Turkish’ way. They are faking their own history. You can get three years in prison if you say there was an Armenian genocide in Turkey.” The ruling Law and Justice party has a nationalist agenda and has reignited debate on the issue as part of a campaign to fuel patriotism. Andras Domany, a Hungarian journalist and expert in Polish politics, believes the government is using history for its own political means. “History is not considered a science by the Polish government, it is a tool for national awareness,” he says. “They want to cut all discussion on how some Polish people collaborated with the Nazi regime or participated in killing Jews.” Germany occupied Poland in 1939 and later built death camps, including Auschwitz and Treblinka, on Polish soil.

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Holocaust hologram history-making | Local News …

Stanley Bernath estimates that he tells the story of how he survived the Holocaust 10 to 15 times a year. Hes recounted his experience in front of students and professionals at schools, colleges and businesses for more than 40 years, along the way providing insight thats helped shape and inform countless perspectives. But the 91-year-old Lyndhurst resident understands that, like all survivors, the day will come when he can no longer share his story. At least not in person, that is. This past August in Los Angeles, Bernath participated in a program that will forever preserve his story of survival, which includes his experience in the ghetto and how a Nazi soldier dropped bits of food to Bernath from a guard tower at Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria. Stanley Bernath, 91, of Lyndhurst shares his Holocaust experience with a group of students at the auditorium in the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Beachwood. In a Hollywood studio, Bernath sat under a dome similar in structure to a playground geometric dome climber fitted with more than 6,000 lights and 100 cameras. There, he answered 430 questions during a 10-hour, two-day span for the USC Shoah Foundations New Dimensions in Testimony oral history project a project he said he was honored to take part in. The project has recorded 15 Holocaust survivors biographies that will be turned into interactive holograms that allow people to have lifelike conversations with survivors. Eight years from now, 10 years from now, there will be no survivors left, Bernath said. Now if you want to see me … you can go (to a museum) and ask me questions. About two years ago, the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Beachwood heard of the foundations project and reached out to collaborate. Through this relationship, the Maltz Museum selected four survivors in March 2017 to be sent to Los Angeles and the Shoah Foundation chose Bernath the following April for the level of cognizance he displayed and his personality. When one bears witness to (Bernaths) survival of the Holocaust, his voice and storytelling draw you in like he is talking directly to you, and his personal story is inspiring, said Kia Hays, who is program manager of the Shoah Foundations New Dimensions in Testimony. We knew that this sense of presence would make his New Dimensions in Testimony interview extraordinarily compelling. He also has a great sense of humor which we thought might make its way into his testimony, and it did. The images of the survivors are produced by the University of Southern Californias Institute for Creative Technologies in cooperation with the USC Shoah Foundation, which is a nonprofit founded in 1994 by Jewish film director Steven Spielberg to preserve Holocaust and other genocide survivor testimonies. While the images may be perceived as holograms, the technology hasnt quite reached that point. Instead, the image is produced using a special illusionary technique and two-dimensional technology to give the appearance of a hologram. However, the testimonies are recorded at various angles so that if holographic technology advances, the recordings can be reproduced and keep up with the technology. In tandem with its Shoah Foundation partnership, the Maltz Museum is embarking on its own Survivor Memory Project to preserve survivors stories with this new technology. These survivors are dying out, and if we dont tell their story, the naysayers will find a way to say (the Holocaust) never really happened, said Ken Liffman, who chairs the Survivor Memory Project. This is the wave, right now, of the future for learning techniques. “These survivors are dying out, and if we don’t tell their story, the naysayers will find a way to say (the Holocaust) never really happened.” Ken Liffman, Chair Survivor Memory Project When future students visit the museum, they will be able to ask Bernath questions like, Where wereyou born? Do you believe in God? and How did you survive? Those questions are processed by technology similar to Apples Siri, an intelligent personal assistant that uses voice queries and a language-user interface, and are turned into video segments that can play back Bernaths recorded responses verbatim, as if he were actually there. You have to be able to communicate (their experiences) to the kids in a way that they will comprehend, Liffman said. That story may need to be told more than once, and it may need additional individuals. But I cant think of a better way to raise awareness of what happened than through this particular program. Students from Facing History New Tech in Cleveland hug and thank 91-year-old Holocaust survivor Stanley Bernath after he shared his experience as a teenager during the Holocaust at the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Beachwood. The plan is to have a beta test of the hologram image come to the Maltz Museum during the summer in a temporary location, where visitors can pose questions to Bernath. The museum is in phase one of its campaign to create a permanent exhibit, which includes acquiring and setting up the technology and included sending Bernath to Los Angeles because that is the only location that can currently film the testimonies. The goal of phase one is to raise $400,000, and Liffman said the museum is more than halfway there and plans to roll out the permanent exhibit within the year. While the museum hasnt decided where this technology would be housed in its building, Liffman said they wanted to start gathering testimony from survivors while they are still able to tell their stories. Through his speaker appearances, Bernath said he passes on three lessons hes learned and hopes it will continue when hes gone. Never give up, no matter how bad it seems, always believe in yourself and no one is any better than I am and Im not better than anyone else, he said. Hatred is off my shoulder. You cant live with hatred because that is like a parasite infecting your brain. Recording Holocaust survivors and turning their testimonies into holograms is one part of the Shoah Foundations New Dimensions in Testimony project. According to its website, the foundation has interviewed other witnesses to genocide, like the 1937 Nanjing Massacre, and intends to continue gathering survivors to educate future generations. Completed holograms of other Holocaust survivors can be seen at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.; Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie, Ill.; CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Terre Haute, Ind.; Holocaust Museum Houston in Houston; and the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre in Toronto, Canada.

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Polands Senate Approves Holocaust Law – voanews.com

WASHINGTON Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki says Poland will “never limit the debate” on the Holocaust, saying the country owes it to the victims. Morawiecki gave a televised address Thursday just after the Senate passed a controversial law making it a crime to call the Nazi genocide of Jews a Polish crime and Nazi death camps Polish death camps, even though some of the most brutal Nazi atrocities took place in Poland. The law awaits President Andrzej Duda’s signature. WATCH: Poland’s Holocaust Bill Causes Diplomatic Spat With Israel “Our government condemns all the crimes of the Second World War committed on Polish soil regardless of the nationalities of their perpetrators and to which nation the victims belonged,” the prime minister said. “Fighting against false claims about the participation of the Polish state in the German war machine, Poland stands on the side of the truth.” Poland regards itself as having been a victim of Nazi terror. Morawiecki pointed out that six million Poles were killed during World War II, three million of them Jews. Morawiecki’s televised speech was also aimed at easing concerns of the United States and cooling down the outrage in Israel. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has said Israel will not tolerate “distortion of the truth, rewriting history, and denial of the Holocaust.” Some experts fear the new Polish law could also mean jail for Holocaust survivors when talking about their ordeals. Duda, the Polish president, said this week there was no institutional participation by Poland in the Holocaust, but it did recognize criminal actions toward Jews by some individual Poles. “There were wicked people who sold their neighbors for money. But it was not the Polish nation, it was not an organized action,” Duda said. He pointed out that some Poles sacrificed their own lives to save Jews from the Nazis, and that the Polish underground and government in exile resisted efforts to wipe out European Jewry. Poland was home to one of the worlds most thriving Jewish populations before Nazi Germany invaded in 1939. However, some historians say many Poles collaborated with the Nazis in persecuting Jews. Holocaust survivors who returned to Poland after the war found themselves victims of further anti-Semitism.

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Holocaust Remembrance and the Rise of Hate | Israel …

Every year on January 27 is Holocaust Remembrance Day, when people from across the globe commemorate the tragedy which took place during World War II. The notable day is intended to honor the victims who suffered through and because of the Holocaust, remembering the widespread genocide which occurred with the unfortunate combination of hatred, ignorance and silence. In todays world, it seems we need to do much more than simply remember. With thousands of Holocaust survivors remaining and aging, it is crucial to continue educating and discussing in the future, especially amidst the exponential rise of antisemitism currently in spring across the globe. The World Jewish Congress launched a campaign which spans across six continents, with the aim of inspiring six million people to use the hashtag #WeRemember and spread the global word to remember the Holocaust. Robert Lauder, President of the World Jewish Congress says, In todays digital age, social media is the only tool that can allow us to connect the world together with this message. While the #WeRemember social media campaign has created a large trend of honoring Holocaust Remembrance Day, it should still be noted that 2017 showed record high hatred against Jews on a global scale. The Anti-Defamation League reported a 67% rise in anti-Semitic acts in America, Britain saw a 78% increase in physical violence alone, and there was a stark increase of anti-Semitic incidents since November 2016 after Trump stepped into the presidency, and began normalizing hatred and inciting violence in the mainstream media. Today social media enables Neo-Nazi and anti-Semitic groups to form, train, recruit and amplify their malicious messages. From physical violence to vandalism to cold blooded murder, hate crimes are rising across America and Europe, particularly in Germany, Ukraine, France and Britain. The worldwide Jewish bullying continues even with global institutions like the UN and UNESCO, which are allegedly dedicated to unification, however, have expanded to both anti-Jewish and anti-Israel sentiment. While we may never experience a Holocaust similar to that which took place across Germany in the 1930s, hatred, violence, brainwashing and murder is on the rise and before history is allowed to repeat itself, one of the greatest lessons we can all learn is that silence is certainly not the answer.

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Controversial Holocaust bill is passed in Poland | Euronews

The Polish senate has approved a law that makes it illegal to suggest that Poland played any part in the Nazi Holocaust, which took place on its soil during World War Two. The law would make the term “Polish death camps” punishable by up to three years in jail. The Auschwitz and Treblinka concentration camps were built on Polish soil. The bill has already caused a rift with Israel. On Sunday Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu accused Poland of attempting to change history. In a statement he said: “I strongly oppose it. One cannot change history and the Holocaust cannot be denied.” Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center, called the legislation “problematic”. “This law is liable to blur historical truths due to limitations it places on expressions regarding the complicity of segments of the Polish population in crimes against Jews committed by its own people, either directly or indirectly, on Polish soil during the Holocaust,” the center said in a statement. While the Yad Vashem said the term “Polish death camps” is “erroneous”, it emphasised that historical misrepresentations and statements like that should not be criminalised, adding the law “jeopardizes the free and open discussion of the part of the Polish people in the persecution of the Jews at the time.” Poland’s deputy justice minister said: “Talking about the past and analysing this past, even the darkest, shameful part of the Polish past is not threatened in any way” The role of Poland in the atrocities has always been a tough topic for the country, which after being invaded by Nazi Germany saw 90% of its Jewish population killed. The move to absolve Poles and the Polish state of that responsibility now has momentum, with the bill passing in parliament with 57 votes to 23.

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