Archive for the ‘Holocaust’ Category

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Continues Efforts to Help Holocaust Survivors – Sunshine State News

Towards the end of last week, retiring U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., the first woman to ever lead the House Foreign Affairs Committee and currently the chairwoman of the House Middle East and North Africa Subcommittee, continued her calls for Germany to do more for Holocaust survivors.

With the German government meeting the Claims Conference for the latest annual agreement over how much to provide Holocaust survivors, Ros-Lehtinen said that nation needed to do more.

Last fall, both the House and the Senate unanimously agreed that Germany must do more to ensure that all Holocaust survivors can live their remaining years in the comfort and dignity that they deserve, Ros-Lehtinen said on Thursday. We urged our partners, Germany, to reaffirm its commitment to comprehensively address the medical, mental health, and long-term care needs of survivors by guaranteeing full funding to meet those needs.

Now Germany has an opportunity to step up when it concludes its upcoming negotiations with the Claims Conference, and the Claims Conference leaders must recognize that Germany can do more for survivors, she added. Those leaders at the Claims Conference must not accept anything less than a comprehensive, permanent, and accountable commitment to fully fund survivors medically prescribed needs. Allowing once again for a modest increase when so much more is needed is not consistent with Germanys past statements of responsibility, would defeat the purpose of the Claims Conference, and would tragically force tens of thousands of Holocaust survivors to continue to suffer when we all know the resources exist to provide the care and dignity that survivors worldwide deserve. I urge the Claims Conference and the German government to do the right thing and not settle for anything less than what is really and truly needed.

In recent months, Ros-Lehtinen has focused on trying to help Holocaust survivors.Last year, Ros-Lehtinen and other members of the Florida delegation called on Germany provide more financial assistance to Holocaust survivors and they cheered when that nation announced it would lift caps on assistance to Holocaust survivors for home care.In April 2016, Ros-Lehtinen joined Florida Democrats U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch to bring out a measure urging Germany to fulfill its moral responsibility to Holocaust survivors and urgently provide the financial resources necessary to ensure that Survivors live in dignity and comfort in their remaining years. They were joined by Susan Collins, a Maine Republican, in the Senate. Back in 2014, Nelson and Collins held a meeting of the Senate Aging Committee focused on Holocaust survivors.

In October, Nelson and Ros-Lehtinen teamed up to introduce a bill helping Holocaust survivors and their heirs with insurance claims.Nelson and Ros-Lehtinen brought out the Holocaust Insurance Accountability Act of 2016 with U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and California Democrats U.S. Reps. John Garemendi and Brad Sherman as co-sponsors. After World War Two, many Holocaust victims families and survivors filed insurance claims only to find them rejected due to a lack of paperwork including death certificates and policy papers which were often seized or destroyed by the Nazis and their allies. Nelsons and Ros-Lehtinens bill would make insurance companies reveal Holocaust-era policyholders and permit beneficiaries of Holocaust insurance policies and their heirs to bring suits in U.S. courts to recover any proceeds under the policies to which they may be entitled.

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How these teachers learned to teach the Holocaust | The Times of … – The Times of Israel

NEW YORK (JTA) When Megan Corbin was in school, she learned about the Holocaust as an optimistic story.

Her grade school, she said, highlighted Anne Frank as the voice of hope, and that really wasnt the reality.

Now, as an eighth-grade language arts teacher outside of Seattle, she teaches about victims, perpetrators and civilians who were bystanders to the genocide or who rescued Jews. She asks her students some of whom are refugees from dictatorships to delve into questions of right and wrong that arose during the Holocaust. Next year, Corbin plans to devote more time to examining Jewish life in Europe before 1939, and the context that allowed the Holocaust to occur.

To understand the Holocaust is not just to understand what happened during the years we talk about, she said. Its to understand a much broader context of what happened before, and understand anti-Semitism and how it was so ingrained into society. It didnt just happen out of thin air.

To understand the Holocaust is not just to understand what happened during the years we talk about

Corbin was one of 23 teachers who attended a seminar in New York this week on how to teach the Holocaust to public school students. The program aimed to expand the educators understanding beyond, as one teacher put it, boxcars from Berlin to Birkenau, and give students pedagogical tools to communicate the scope and depth of one of historys worst humanitarian crimes.

Many teachers, while they might try to teach the Holocaust, if they dont know the history, they might have trouble teaching it well, said Stanlee Stahl, executive vice president of the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous, which supports families of non-Jewish families that rescued Holocaust victims and runs the seminar for teachers.

Many teachers who teach Anne Frank give it a happy ending: In spite of everything, I still believe that people really are good at heart, Stahl said, quoting Franks diary. I think she would have rather lived. Rescue is part of the narrative, [but] it is a small part of the narrative. You should not go in and teach rescue and nothing else.

Megan Corbin, shown in front center with her Seattle-area language arts class, emphasizes the individual choices involved in the Holocaust. (Courtesy of Corbin/via JTA)

Eight states now mandate genocide education beginning in either kindergarten or middle school, and running through high school. Legislators from 20 additional states have pledged to introduce legislation that would require public schools to teach about the Holocaust, the Armenian genocide and other genocides.

The seminar approached the Holocaust topic by topic, ranging from medical practices in the Third Reich to life in the ghettos to civilian collaborators in occupied countries. Much of the curriculum was devoted to providing context around the genocide itself. In one lecture Michael Steinlauf, director of the Gratz College Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program in Philadelphia, provided a detailed portrayal of Jewish life in Europe on the eve of the Holocaust, then spoke about life in the Nazi ghettos.

Were not looking at a world that was primarily old Jews with payes

Steinlauf told JTA that his goal is to move students beyond a Fiddler on the Roof picture of European Jewry. While the image people have is usually of religious shtetls, he noted that European Jews were largely young and cosmopolitan, living mostly in cities.

Were not looking at a world that was primarily old Jews with payes, he said, referring to the sidecurls sported by religious Jewish men. They had camps, they had study groups, they had libraries, they went hiking together.

After every lecture, the teachers gathered in groups to discuss the best pedagogical methods to communicate what they had just learned. After the Steinlauf lecture, teachers suggestions included having the class produce a newspaper about Jewish life in the ghettos and comparing the elements of daily life in the ghettos and Japanese internment camps in America.

But the teachers dont bring everything they learn back to the classroom. Sometimes, said Ginni Stickney of Kansas City, Missouri, teaching the most gruesome details of the Holocaust to children can end up seeming disrespectful to the victims.

Anne Frank (L) plays with her friend Hanneli Goslar (R) on the Merwedeplein square in Amsterdam, May 1941. (AP Photo/Anne Frank House Amsterdam/Anne Frank Fonds Basel photo collections)

I started to censor the images, said Stickney, who teaches social studies to eighth-graders. It was really important for us to see every victim as a person. When youre showing these graphic images, you start to think, If this was my family member, is this how I would want my family to be remembered?

The lessons of the Holocaust hit closer to home for teachers whose schools either have gangs for whom violence is a daily part of life or a large number of refugee children. Corbin teaches children from Myanmar, whose regime has been accused of genocide against stateless Rohingya Muslims, a connection she notes in class.

This is a communal effort. It doesnt just stay within the classroom

I will call it out and I will say, These things or similar experiences are so real for some of us in the room, for people in our community who live next door to us, she said. This is a communal effort. It doesnt just stay within the classroom.

Stahl said the seminar doesnt take political positions, but does note parallels between US refugee policy in the 1930s and today. The goal, she said, is to make the lessons of the Holocaust relevant to all Americans.

Teachers must be relevant to today, and by using the lessons from the past, they can teach the present into the future, she said. When you look at refugee policy, you see the doors of the world were closed to the Jews, and teachers can take it and extrapolate it to today.

Jews arriving at Auschwitz in 1944. (Wikimedia Commons/via JTA)

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR: An ongoing holocaust – The Northwest Florida Daily News

Re: Letter, June 18, Trump is not Hitler

The letter writer is correct: Trump is not Hitler and neither was Obama before him. Bush was not Hitler either, and neither were the tea partiers, no matter what House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said.

With all the comparisons to Hitler, we lose sight of the one evil in our society that does compare to the Nazi Holocaust. While some 20 million people died in Nazi death camps over five years, twice that many are killed by abortion every year around the world. In this country, 60 million innocent human beings have been killed by abortion since 1973 three times the Nazis death toll.

This modern holocaust of abortion has a leading organization: Planned Parenthood. Like the Nazi party, Planned Parenthood dehumanizes a group of people. For the Nazis it was Jews; for Planned Parenthood it is the unborn. Like the Nazis, Planned Parenthood spreads its big lie with an active propaganda machine. Like the Nazis, Planned Parenthood claims to benefit society. Like the Nazis, Planned Parenthood has a willing audience of people who long for an easy solution to their problems.

And like the Nazis, the way of Planned Parenthood ends in death and destruction.

John F. Fay, Mary Esther

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR: An ongoing holocaust – The Northwest Florida Daily News

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The coach who rose from the Holocaust’s ashes to dominate European soccer – The Times of Israel

LONDON On May 23, 1990, Eusbio da Silva Ferreira considered by many to be one of the greatest soccer players of all time took a short trip to the Jewish section of Viennas central cemetery to pray by the grave of the late Bla Guttmann, a Hungarian Jew and soccer legend, buried there in 1981.

Eusbio, as he was known to fans, along with the rest of his Portuguese soccer squad, Benefica, were to take on Italian football giants AC Milan in Viennas Prater stadium later that day in the European Cup final.

The former Benfica player was hoping to break a losing streak that had supposedly cursed Benfica for nearly three decades.

In May 1962, with Guttmann as manager, Benfica had trounced the mighty Real Madrid 5-3 in the Olympic stadium in Amsterdam as the club claimed their second European Cup in a row.

But Benficas astounding success in Europe was short lived. Following his two consecutive European Cup victories with Benfica in 61 and 62, Guttmann walked out on the club when the board of directors rejected his demand for a pay rise.

Apparently Guttmann told those holding the purse strings of the club at the time that Benfica would not win another European Cup for another 100 years.

David Bolchover, author of The Greatest Comeback. (Daniel Spellar Photography)

The story is most likely an urban myth, but since 1962 Benfica have appeared in eight European finals and have lost every single one.

Whatever the real truth of this sporting mythology, there can be no denying that Guttmann was a born winner.

Guttmann holds an astounding record of success in European football that no other Jewish coach has even come close to before or after.

I would say Guttmann is the the greatest Jewish coach, and probably the greatest Jew in the history of football, says British writer David Bolchover, as we sit down to discuss his new biography on Guttmann entitled The Greatest Comeback: From Genocide To Football Glory.

It would be very difficult to argue against that. No other Jewish coach has won the European Cup. And Gutmann won it twice, he adds.

Guttmann was pretty typical of a Jewish sportsman of his time, living a peripatetic lifestyle with no loyalty to any club or state.

No other Jewish coach has won the European Cup. And Gutmann won it twice

There were a lot of Jews who moved around [in football] a bit before the war, says Bolchover. But nobody moved around quite like Guttmann. He crossed borders 21 times in his career. And he lived in 14 countries. He was the first to really push in a public way for the value of the football coach.

Whenever Gutmann was challenged at a club, he would just say, Right, Im off. He felt no loyalty to any country or any team. And felt no rootedness in that respect, he says.

The stats from Guttmanns career speak volumes. In addition to his two cups, his victories as a coach include three Hungarian league championships and three Portuguese league championships.

Bela Guttmans Vienna tombstone, with his Hebrew name, Baruch ben Moshe Avraham. (Courtesy)

He managed clubs across a number of countries, including positions at So Paulo, Ciocanul Bucharest, and AC Milan. Guttmann even coached the Austrian national team for a short time.

His brief stint in the world of international management ended in public controversy. Guttmann took on the role in 1964 and it was his first job in Austria since he had fled the Nazis there in 1938. The Austrian team recorded home victories against Hungary and the Soviet Union.

Pretty quickly, however, Guttmann sensed from both the Austrian Football Association, the press, and his own team, open feelings of anti-Semitism that were pretty typical of post war Austria. He was even accused by some as acting like a wonder Rabbi in training sessions.

Bela Guttman coaching in Austria. (Courtesy)

Guttmann gave a candid interview to an Austrian weekly shortly after his resignation, where he said, I always thought that it doesnt matter at all in sport if somebody is Catholic, Protestant or Jewish. But now, when I have to endure the exact opposite, I am really sad.

Guttmanns biographer says that while his latest book is one that documents the career of a European soccer legend, its also a story about Jewish history in Europe.

Cover of The Greatest Comeback by British writer David Bolchover. (courtesy)

Guttmann suffered from discrimination and racism throughout his career, says Bolchover.

But he put these things aside and managed to conquer the demons in European society and achieve the success he did. The Guttmann story really mirrors the Jewish story as a whole in the 20th century, he adds.

Guttmanns achievements as a player, meanwhile, included a Hungarian league championship; an Austrian league championship; a United States Open Cup, and 4 international cups for Hungary.

And yet, in his native country despite the fact he is the only Hungarian-born coach to lift the European Cup Guttmann barely gets a passing footnote in the countrys sporting history.

Bela Guttman in his Milan uniform. (Courtesy)

The communists took over Hungary [between 1947 and] 1949, and they set their own mythology, says Bolchover. The heroes of Hungarian football were the Golden Team of the 1950s because they were projected as this great football team that had these great communist values. And also the fact that Guttmann was a Jew.

Anti-Semitism was still very strong in Hungary at this time, and hence why he is not lionized throughout Hungary and indeed the world, Bolchover says.

Bolchover claims understanding Guttmanns Jewishness is central to the mans life, achievements, and often forgotten legacy.

Moreover, to really understand the Guttmann story in all of its complexity, tragedy, and glory, one really needs to go back to Fin-de-Sicle, Budapest.

The central European city that Guttmann was born into on January 1899 was one bursting with a vibrant Jewish life. The city had even earned the nickname Judapest among some anti-Semites of the time such was the domination of Jews amongst the urban chattering classes, in professions like law and journalism in particular.

In sports, Jews played a similar role too.

The Hakoah Vienna football club with the Star of David featuring prominently on their uniforms and flag. (Courtesy)

Guttmann played two seasons in the early 1920s with Hungarian club MTK, a football club that had Jewish origins. Jews dominated the MTK team during these golden years, where Gutmann helped the club stroll to the championship in 1920-21.

By 1922, at age 23, Guttmann would transfer to a football club called Hakoah Vienna, in the Austrian capital located just 250 kilometers (155 miles) away from Budapest.

Sporing the blue and white colors of the Jewish national movement, and with a large Star of David on their shirts, the team was more of a Jewish sporting movement than simply a football club.

Bela Guttman. (Courtesy)

Bolchover says this was primarily because its political ethos was grounded in Zionism.

There was more of a Zionist movement in the highly politically charged Vienna than there was in Budapest at that time, he says.

And that created this football club, Hakoah Vienna, who were founded in 1909, when Karl Lueger the anti-Semitic mayor in Vienna was in power, and when Adolf Hitler was living there too, he adds.

The team inspired great passion and popularity among young Zionists and Jews in Vienna at the time. It inspired hatred from the local population, too.

Jews were very prominent in the world of football during this period of history. And Hakoah Vienna was a club that was leading the charge, Bolchover explains.

Hakoah Vienna used to tour around the Jewish world and were hugely successful. They won the Austrian league, which was the first fully professional league in mainland Europe, he says.

They broke the attendance records for soccer tours they played in the US. And when they arrived in Warsaw in 1924, for example, 10,000 people met them at the train station. There was this hysteria about Hakoah Vienna. And of course, Gutmann was one of the star players on that team.

I hear Jews all the time saying, we make better accountants than sportspeople, dont we?

Bolchover says the more research he carried out for this book, the more surprised he became to learn that so few people know about the influence Jews had on prewar European football.

I hear Jews all the time saying, We make better accountants than sportspeople, dont we? Well, that might be the case in Europe now, but thats because there are not many Jews left. But that wasnt the case before the war. Jews were at the forefront of the football world back then, says Bolchover.

Principally, Jewish influence in European football ended because of the Holocaust.

Bolchover cites, for instance, how Dr. Lhner-Beda the Jewish founder of Hakoah Vienna was just one of many Hungarian Jews with a passionate interest in football who was later murdered in Auschwitz.

Bela Guttmann with the Hakoah Vienna club. (Courtesy)

The Jews who could have talked about this [great football era] were murdered. And the ones who did survive were scattered around the world and just wanted to get on with their lives, says Bolchover.

Guttmann was one of those survivors. But how exactly he escaped the Holocaust is a narrative that up until recently has been clouded in rumor, half truth, and false facts.

The Jews who could have talked about this [great football era] were murdered

Some accounts hitherto including articles posted on CNN and the New York Times website of Guttmanns time during the war claim he escaped to Switzerland. But the truth is that Guttmann actually stayed in the jpest district of Budapest, while his fellow Jews were being rounded up to be slaughtered.

Guttmann survived the [Holocaust] by hiding in the attic of his girlfriends brother, who was a hairdresser. Later that year he was in a labor camp and he escaped, says Bolchover.

When exactly Guttmann attempted to run from the Nazis in Budapest is hard to pinpoint. But Bolchover believes a good estimate places him going into hiding sometime in the weeks leading up to May 1944, just as the Hungarian Holocaust was about to reach its hellish apotheosis.

Guttmanns survival tale is all the more remarkable when one considers that nearly half of the Jewish population in Budapest in 1944 250,000 were all murdered in the Holocaust, and that conservative estimates put 600,000 Hungarian Jews total, among them Guttmanns father and sister, murdered by the Nazis.

Bela Guttmann with a New York Hakoah banner in New York City. (Courtesy)

Guttmanns life after the war continued to be one filled with drama, where the smell of death was never too far away.

On Saturday, April 2, 1955, six weeks after being sacked from a managerial position at AC Milan, Guttmann lost control of a car he was driving, killing one teenager and seriously injuring another.

The owner of the car, sitting in the passenger seat, was Dezso Solti, who was later involved in the biggest match fixing scandal in the history of football by bribing Italian referees on behalf of clubs in the 1960s and 1970s.

Both Guttmann and Solti fled the scene, says Bolchover.

Eventually Guttmann was given a sentence of six months in prison. But he was given an immediate pardon of six months, and a fine. What is interesting is that very few people talked about it in the Italian press at the time, Bolchover adds.

Bolchover claims Guttmann always lived life in the fast lane and close to the edge. When living in New York as a player for both the New York Giants and New York Hakoah Guttmann became involved in an illegal speakeasy business that sold booze during the prohibition era. It earned him a substantial amount of money. And it was around this time too in Las Vegas that Guttmann developed a serious addiction to gambling.

It was a habit the Jewish player and coach would sustain right up until his death in Vienna in 1981.

From the evidence that we have, I suspect that Guttmann was a big gambler. He lost a lot of his money. There might have been some left by the time he retired. He also worked until he was 75 in jobs that really didnt make sense for such a great coach. So I suspect he might have needed the money, Bolchover concludes.

Bela Guttmann, to the right of the man in the suit, and the Hakoah Vienna football club with a trophy. (Courtesy)

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These Holocaust Survivors Just Got A Prom, 70 Years Later – Huffington Post Canada

If you’ve lived through the worst of what humans can do to one another, do you really care about a little dance you didn’t get to attend 60-plus years ago?

Oh yes. You absolutely do.

This week at Toronto’s Baycrest, the Jewish Home for the Aged, they held a prom for approximately 300 residents, many of whom are survivors of the Holocaust.

This is the second year the home has held such an event, with a specific eye to giving the people who live there a chance at this rite of passage so many of them missed out on in their teen years.

Keeping that in mind, they also opted for a 1950s theme, complete with an Elvis impersonator, corsages and a photo booth.

“It represents an era where there was renewed optimism in the western world; where many immigrants and Holocaust survivors set out to make new lives for themselves after the horrors of the Second World War,” explains Cindy Kaizer, therapist and recreation specialist at Baycrest’s Arts, Culture and Innovation department.

“Also, the music of the 1950s has happy connotations for many residents and clients of Baycrest. Studies are showing that listening to music can bring back positive memories and feelings, which is therapeutic to many in attendance.”

According to the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre, as of 2015, there were approximately 10,000 Holocaust survivors in Canada, though their advanced age means that number has decreased since then. Baycrest is home to one of the largest groups of that population in North America, and that makes them particularly attuned to their unique needs.

“When these people were at the age of prom, they were actually slaves,” Nechas Jakubowicz, daughter of resident Adela Grinbaum, who was in Auschwitz, told the Toronto Star.

Similar events have been put on by various groups in the past, including another Toronto-based one called the Yellow Rose Project. The name for the group, which pairs millennials with concentration camp survivors to increase education, specifically invokes a quote by Auschwitz survivor Franka Kon at the prom in 2011: “I no longer have to wear a yellow star. I can finally celebrate with a yellow rose.”

Here’s hoping they keep celebrating for years and years to come.

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Israel: ‘Shame on’ Germany for comparing Palestinians to Holocaust victims – The Jerusalem Post

Israels Ambassador to the UNESCO Carmel Shama HaCohen listens during a past heari ng at UNESCO. (photo credit:Courtesy)

Israel accused Germany of shameful contempt for Holocaust victims as an argument over the dueling narrative of Jewish and Palestinian victimhood once more broke out on the floor of the World Heritage Committee on Friday.

Ambassador of Germany, I ask you, how could you have allowed the contempt of the memory of the Holocaust knowing what you know, what we all know? Israel’s representative, Carmel Shama HaCohen, asked.

Is there no difference between Anne Frank and a Palestinian teenager stabbing innocent Jewish children with knives? he asked.

Shama HaCohen was referring to an incident three days earlier, when he had asked the World Heritage Committee to stand for a moment of silence for Holocaust victims. He made this request after the Committee approved a resolution disavowing Israeli sovereignty in Jerusalem at its annual meeting, which this year was held in Krakow, Poland.

Just as Hitler, the Nazis and their partner [ Jerusalem Mufti] Hajj Amin El Husseini did not succeed, you will not succeed as well in denying the Holocaust or in your efforts to destroy Israel or Jewish history,”Shama HaCohen said.

In response, Cuban diplomats, who refrained from standing for the Holocaust victims, requested to pay homage to Palestinians who had died.

Shama HaCohen objected to the comparison and sat during the moment of silence for the Palestinians. He was particularly incensed to see that Germany stood for both moments of silence.

I am obligated to ask you, do you, in your shameful act, represent the official stance of the German government? Shama HaCohen asked the German representative. Does Germany really see no difference between the victims of the Holocaust and Palestinian murderers and terrorists?

Shama HaCohen said he did not regret sitting down while others stood for the Palestinians.

Let me make it clear, the Holocaust stands alone [among] atrocities, Shama HaCohen said. “It cant be compared to victims of a political confrontation.”

“To the Cuban representative I will say only this,”ShamaHaCohen said. “You did not stand in silence in memory of the millions murdered in the Holocaust. You turned your back away, claiming that gesture to be a political act.”

He called Cuba, which drew the link, a state whose glory stands only for being a criminal dictatorship and a violator of human rights.

He went on to condemn the PalestinianAuthority for its celebration of those who murder civilians.

Are they the kind of people you expect me to pay tribute to? Fatah, Hamas, ISIS, Al Qaida? he charged on.

To Palestinian Ambassador Elias Sanbar, who stood for both peoples, he said, I will be the first to stand and the last to sit in memory of one childs life lost, in memory of innocents whose lives were taken, Palestinians and Israelis alike.

The German representative responded by stating: Everyone who knows German policy, and everyone who knows me at UNESCO for the last two years, knows that the behavior of the German Ambassador to UNESCO in this room three days ago cannot be misinterpreted.

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‘This is heaven:’ Baycrest gives Holocaust survivors their prom – Toronto Star

Mendel Good, who was born in Poland in 1925 and was in concentration camps and ghettos between 1939 and 1946, enjoys the Baycrest Health Sciences prom event Thursday with Adela Grinbaum. ( Vince Talotta / Toronto Star ) | Order this photo

By Scott WheelerStaff Reporter

Thu., July 6, 2017

Mendel Good has been through hell, but hes found heaven at Baycrests Jewish old age home.

On Thursday, Baycrest hosted a prom for nearly 300 patients and residents, including many who were unable to attend their own because of the Holocaust and the Second World War.

Good, now 92, was among them.

Born in Poland in 1925, he endured two ghettos and five concentration camps as a teenager and young man from 1939 to 1946.

This is supposed to be an old age home but it is heaven. Ive been to another (old age home) which was very nice; I couldnt say one bad word, but no comparison to what we have here. This is heaven, said Good, crying from his wheelchair, a fedora on his head and a flower in his lapel.

The staff is loving. When I sit there and have lunch or dinner or breakfast, I look at the attention that people are given and my heart grows.

The 1950s-inspired day included era clothing, dancing, blackjack tables and music from an Elvis impersonator at the Apotex Centre in North York, home to one of the largest groups of Holocaust survivors in North America. Its the second time Baycrest has hosted a prom.

I had the longest time in the concentration camp, Good said of his seven years in Auschwitz and other camps.

Adela Grinbaum, seated to his left and dressed up by her daughter in a dark blue gown, was in Auschwitz at the same time as Good. Now they live on the same floor and sit at the same table for meals.

On his first day at Baycrest, another man said he recognized Good.

He recognized me from the day of liberation. He came over to me. He says you were liberated with me, I know you! Its incredible. We became friends, said Good, tapping his heart and pointing around Baycrests auditorium to others who were with him in the camps.

Now, once a month, all of the other Holocaust survivors get together for what they call caf.

When I see those people, I cry, he said, pushing up his glasses to wipe away a tear before reaching over to hold Grinbaums arm.

I am so happy.

Even in their 90s, prom holds a special meaning to Grinbaum and Good.

When these people were at the age of prom, they were actually slaves, said Nechas Jakubowicz, Grinbaums daughter, lifting her mothers sleeve to reveal the branded number that remains in her skin.

They didnt have any formal schooling. They didnt have any fun.

To see all those people smiling, theres nobody here less than 90, Good added, laughing and noticing Jakubowiczs raised hand.

I see those people enjoying, clapping, dancing and their smiles make me very happy.

But the survivors bond means more than any ceremony or celebration could.

Three times a day theyre together, which is nice. Its camaraderie, Jakubowicz said on behalf of Grinbaum, who now struggles to speak.

Just the fact that she was dressed the way I dressed her. That was enough to put a smile on her face.

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Ivanka Trump visits Polish Holocaust memorial – CNN International

Ahead of the President’s speech, Trump, who serves as an adviser to the President, laid a wreath at the Monument to the Ghetto Heroes and toured the POLIN Museum of the History of the Polish Jews, according to deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. No press accompanied her on her visit, and the media was not made aware of the visit until after she had visited.

Ivanka Trump posted a photo of the wreath laying and called the experience “deeply moving” in a statement provided by the White House.

“It was a privilege to pay my respects and remember, with gratitude, those who tenaciously fought against all odds. The monument, erected on the rubble of the Warsaw Ghetto, symbolizes the fight for freedom. I am profoundly grateful for those who fought and all those who continue to fight today,” she said in the statement.

President Donald Trump was criticized for not visiting the Monument to the Heroes of the Warsaw Ghetto himself, breaking a decades-long precedent. Trump was in Poland for less than 18 hours.

Leaders of three prominent Jewish organizations in Warsaw, including the chief Rabbi of Poland, issued a statement criticizing Trump for not visiting the monument. The statement was issued prior to his daughter’s visit.

“Ever since the fall of communism in 1989, all US presidents and vice-presidents visiting Warsaw had made a point of visiting the monument to the heroes of the Warsaw Ghetto. They did this in the name of the American people, who had played such a central role in bringing down fascism, and in that of the universal commemoration of the victims of the Shoah (Holocaust), and condemnation of its perpetrators, that people of all nationalities and religions express,” it reads in part. “We deeply regret that President Donald Trump, though speaking in public barely a mile away from the monument, chose to break with that laudable tradition. We trust that this slight does not reflect the attitudes and feelings of the American people.”

“When it comes to fighting genocide and standing with Israel, President Trump has been admirable and deserves our thanks,” he wrote in part.

The first daughter, who converted to Orthodox Judaism ahead of her 2009 marriage to Jared Kushner, previously toured the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe when in Berlin in April, and made a solemn visit to the Western Wall when in Jerusalem in May.

She speaks about her faith very rarely, calling conversion “a very personal decision” in an interview with Fox News last month.

“I tend to not talk about my faith too openly. It’s one of the few things in my life that is truly my own, especially these days,” she said, adding that her religion serves as “a great reminder of core values.”

The visit comes amid a wave of anti-Semitism in Europe and at home in the United States, where there were 100 threats to Jewish community centers in January and February, according to CNN reporting. The Anti-Defamation League Audit of Anti-Semitic incidents, published in late April, showed the occurrences had increased by 34% nationally from 2015 to 2016.

Trump was present for her father’s speech in Warsaw’s Krasinski Square, and continued to Germany on Air Force One, where the President will participate in the G20 summit. She has been involved in preparation for the summit, including remarks he will give in a session on women’s economic empowerment.

CNN’s Jennifer Hansler and Allie Malloy contributed to this report.

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Ivanka Trump visits Polish Holocaust memorial – CNN International

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Holocaust survivor who burned nurse to death is fit for trial – The Times of Israel

A Tel Aviv District Court psychiatrist concluded Wednesday that an elderly Holocaust survivor who burned a nurse to death was responsible for his actions at the time of the attack and is therefore fit to stand trial.

On March 14, 78-year-old Asher Faraj doused his local HMO clinic in the city of Holon with flammable liquid and set it alight, killing nurse Tova Kararo. The 55-year-old career nurse was declared dead at the scene by emergency workers.

Faraj told police he didnt intend to harm anyone, but merely to cause damage to property at the clinic.

But according to the court indictment against him, Faraj became angry after the flu shot he received from Kararo last week made him feel weak and unwell. Faraj told Channel 2 news he believed he might have been poisoned.

Tova Kararo, the nurse killed by her patient on March 14, 2017. (Facebook)

Staff members said Faraj had returned to the clinic every day since his inoculation to angrily confront staff, and refused to believe them when they explained he was experiencing routine side effects of the vaccine.

Faraj fled the scene in his car, but was caught by police at the citys exit after a chase.

Police said that in the hours immediately following the incident, Faraj was unable to explain what he had done.

Later, during questioning, he reportedly told investigators, I didnt want to harm anyone only to throw a burning bottle.

The incident prompted much of Israels health care, education and social work systems to shut down for two hours on the day after the attack, in protest of recent acts of violence directed at staff.

Health care officials said violence against doctors and others by angry patients and family members is a chronic issue in Israel.

According to official government figures, there were 3,000 reported cases of violence or abuse against health personnel in hospitals, clinics and emergency services between 2014 and 2016.

Approximately 75 percent of those attacks were verbal abuse. One-quarter of the attacks were physical assaults against medical staff or their security. Three-quarters of the attacks took place in hospitals, especially in emergency rooms.

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Holocaust survivor who burned nurse to death is fit for trial – The Times of Israel

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Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Continues Efforts to Help Holocaust Survivors – Sunshine State News

Towards the end of last week, retiring U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., the first woman to ever lead the House Foreign Affairs Committee and currently the chairwoman of the House Middle East and North Africa Subcommittee, continued her calls for Germany to do more for Holocaust survivors. With the German government meeting the Claims Conference for the latest annual agreement over how much to provide Holocaust survivors, Ros-Lehtinen said that nation needed to do more. Last fall, both the House and the Senate unanimously agreed that Germany must do more to ensure that all Holocaust survivors can live their remaining years in the comfort and dignity that they deserve, Ros-Lehtinen said on Thursday. We urged our partners, Germany, to reaffirm its commitment to comprehensively address the medical, mental health, and long-term care needs of survivors by guaranteeing full funding to meet those needs. Now Germany has an opportunity to step up when it concludes its upcoming negotiations with the Claims Conference, and the Claims Conference leaders must recognize that Germany can do more for survivors, she added. Those leaders at the Claims Conference must not accept anything less than a comprehensive, permanent, and accountable commitment to fully fund survivors medically prescribed needs. Allowing once again for a modest increase when so much more is needed is not consistent with Germanys past statements of responsibility, would defeat the purpose of the Claims Conference, and would tragically force tens of thousands of Holocaust survivors to continue to suffer when we all know the resources exist to provide the care and dignity that survivors worldwide deserve. I urge the Claims Conference and the German government to do the right thing and not settle for anything less than what is really and truly needed. In recent months, Ros-Lehtinen has focused on trying to help Holocaust survivors.Last year, Ros-Lehtinen and other members of the Florida delegation called on Germany provide more financial assistance to Holocaust survivors and they cheered when that nation announced it would lift caps on assistance to Holocaust survivors for home care.In April 2016, Ros-Lehtinen joined Florida Democrats U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch to bring out a measure urging Germany to fulfill its moral responsibility to Holocaust survivors and urgently provide the financial resources necessary to ensure that Survivors live in dignity and comfort in their remaining years. They were joined by Susan Collins, a Maine Republican, in the Senate. Back in 2014, Nelson and Collins held a meeting of the Senate Aging Committee focused on Holocaust survivors. In October, Nelson and Ros-Lehtinen teamed up to introduce a bill helping Holocaust survivors and their heirs with insurance claims.Nelson and Ros-Lehtinen brought out the Holocaust Insurance Accountability Act of 2016 with U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and California Democrats U.S. Reps. John Garemendi and Brad Sherman as co-sponsors. After World War Two, many Holocaust victims families and survivors filed insurance claims only to find them rejected due to a lack of paperwork including death certificates and policy papers which were often seized or destroyed by the Nazis and their allies. Nelsons and Ros-Lehtinens bill would make insurance companies reveal Holocaust-era policyholders and permit beneficiaries of Holocaust insurance policies and their heirs to bring suits in U.S. courts to recover any proceeds under the policies to which they may be entitled.

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How these teachers learned to teach the Holocaust | The Times of … – The Times of Israel

NEW YORK (JTA) When Megan Corbin was in school, she learned about the Holocaust as an optimistic story. Her grade school, she said, highlighted Anne Frank as the voice of hope, and that really wasnt the reality. Now, as an eighth-grade language arts teacher outside of Seattle, she teaches about victims, perpetrators and civilians who were bystanders to the genocide or who rescued Jews. She asks her students some of whom are refugees from dictatorships to delve into questions of right and wrong that arose during the Holocaust. Next year, Corbin plans to devote more time to examining Jewish life in Europe before 1939, and the context that allowed the Holocaust to occur. To understand the Holocaust is not just to understand what happened during the years we talk about, she said. Its to understand a much broader context of what happened before, and understand anti-Semitism and how it was so ingrained into society. It didnt just happen out of thin air. To understand the Holocaust is not just to understand what happened during the years we talk about Corbin was one of 23 teachers who attended a seminar in New York this week on how to teach the Holocaust to public school students. The program aimed to expand the educators understanding beyond, as one teacher put it, boxcars from Berlin to Birkenau, and give students pedagogical tools to communicate the scope and depth of one of historys worst humanitarian crimes. Many teachers, while they might try to teach the Holocaust, if they dont know the history, they might have trouble teaching it well, said Stanlee Stahl, executive vice president of the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous, which supports families of non-Jewish families that rescued Holocaust victims and runs the seminar for teachers. Many teachers who teach Anne Frank give it a happy ending: In spite of everything, I still believe that people really are good at heart, Stahl said, quoting Franks diary. I think she would have rather lived. Rescue is part of the narrative, [but] it is a small part of the narrative. You should not go in and teach rescue and nothing else. Megan Corbin, shown in front center with her Seattle-area language arts class, emphasizes the individual choices involved in the Holocaust. (Courtesy of Corbin/via JTA) Eight states now mandate genocide education beginning in either kindergarten or middle school, and running through high school. Legislators from 20 additional states have pledged to introduce legislation that would require public schools to teach about the Holocaust, the Armenian genocide and other genocides. The seminar approached the Holocaust topic by topic, ranging from medical practices in the Third Reich to life in the ghettos to civilian collaborators in occupied countries. Much of the curriculum was devoted to providing context around the genocide itself. In one lecture Michael Steinlauf, director of the Gratz College Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program in Philadelphia, provided a detailed portrayal of Jewish life in Europe on the eve of the Holocaust, then spoke about life in the Nazi ghettos. Were not looking at a world that was primarily old Jews with payes Steinlauf told JTA that his goal is to move students beyond a Fiddler on the Roof picture of European Jewry. While the image people have is usually of religious shtetls, he noted that European Jews were largely young and cosmopolitan, living mostly in cities. Were not looking at a world that was primarily old Jews with payes, he said, referring to the sidecurls sported by religious Jewish men. They had camps, they had study groups, they had libraries, they went hiking together. After every lecture, the teachers gathered in groups to discuss the best pedagogical methods to communicate what they had just learned. After the Steinlauf lecture, teachers suggestions included having the class produce a newspaper about Jewish life in the ghettos and comparing the elements of daily life in the ghettos and Japanese internment camps in America. But the teachers dont bring everything they learn back to the classroom. Sometimes, said Ginni Stickney of Kansas City, Missouri, teaching the most gruesome details of the Holocaust to children can end up seeming disrespectful to the victims. Anne Frank (L) plays with her friend Hanneli Goslar (R) on the Merwedeplein square in Amsterdam, May 1941. (AP Photo/Anne Frank House Amsterdam/Anne Frank Fonds Basel photo collections) I started to censor the images, said Stickney, who teaches social studies to eighth-graders. It was really important for us to see every victim as a person. When youre showing these graphic images, you start to think, If this was my family member, is this how I would want my family to be remembered? The lessons of the Holocaust hit closer to home for teachers whose schools either have gangs for whom violence is a daily part of life or a large number of refugee children. Corbin teaches children from Myanmar, whose regime has been accused of genocide against stateless Rohingya Muslims, a connection she notes in class. This is a communal effort. It doesnt just stay within the classroom I will call it out and I will say, These things or similar experiences are so real for some of us in the room, for people in our community who live next door to us, she said. This is a communal effort. It doesnt just stay within the classroom. Stahl said the seminar doesnt take political positions, but does note parallels between US refugee policy in the 1930s and today. The goal, she said, is to make the lessons of the Holocaust relevant to all Americans. Teachers must be relevant to today, and by using the lessons from the past, they can teach the present into the future, she said. When you look at refugee policy, you see the doors of the world were closed to the Jews, and teachers can take it and extrapolate it to today. Jews arriving at Auschwitz in 1944. (Wikimedia Commons/via JTA)

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR: An ongoing holocaust – The Northwest Florida Daily News

Re: Letter, June 18, Trump is not Hitler The letter writer is correct: Trump is not Hitler and neither was Obama before him. Bush was not Hitler either, and neither were the tea partiers, no matter what House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said. With all the comparisons to Hitler, we lose sight of the one evil in our society that does compare to the Nazi Holocaust. While some 20 million people died in Nazi death camps over five years, twice that many are killed by abortion every year around the world. In this country, 60 million innocent human beings have been killed by abortion since 1973 three times the Nazis death toll. This modern holocaust of abortion has a leading organization: Planned Parenthood. Like the Nazi party, Planned Parenthood dehumanizes a group of people. For the Nazis it was Jews; for Planned Parenthood it is the unborn. Like the Nazis, Planned Parenthood spreads its big lie with an active propaganda machine. Like the Nazis, Planned Parenthood claims to benefit society. Like the Nazis, Planned Parenthood has a willing audience of people who long for an easy solution to their problems. And like the Nazis, the way of Planned Parenthood ends in death and destruction. John F. Fay, Mary Esther

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The coach who rose from the Holocaust’s ashes to dominate European soccer – The Times of Israel

LONDON On May 23, 1990, Eusbio da Silva Ferreira considered by many to be one of the greatest soccer players of all time took a short trip to the Jewish section of Viennas central cemetery to pray by the grave of the late Bla Guttmann, a Hungarian Jew and soccer legend, buried there in 1981. Eusbio, as he was known to fans, along with the rest of his Portuguese soccer squad, Benefica, were to take on Italian football giants AC Milan in Viennas Prater stadium later that day in the European Cup final. The former Benfica player was hoping to break a losing streak that had supposedly cursed Benfica for nearly three decades. In May 1962, with Guttmann as manager, Benfica had trounced the mighty Real Madrid 5-3 in the Olympic stadium in Amsterdam as the club claimed their second European Cup in a row. But Benficas astounding success in Europe was short lived. Following his two consecutive European Cup victories with Benfica in 61 and 62, Guttmann walked out on the club when the board of directors rejected his demand for a pay rise. Apparently Guttmann told those holding the purse strings of the club at the time that Benfica would not win another European Cup for another 100 years. David Bolchover, author of The Greatest Comeback. (Daniel Spellar Photography) The story is most likely an urban myth, but since 1962 Benfica have appeared in eight European finals and have lost every single one. Whatever the real truth of this sporting mythology, there can be no denying that Guttmann was a born winner. Guttmann holds an astounding record of success in European football that no other Jewish coach has even come close to before or after. I would say Guttmann is the the greatest Jewish coach, and probably the greatest Jew in the history of football, says British writer David Bolchover, as we sit down to discuss his new biography on Guttmann entitled The Greatest Comeback: From Genocide To Football Glory. It would be very difficult to argue against that. No other Jewish coach has won the European Cup. And Gutmann won it twice, he adds. Guttmann was pretty typical of a Jewish sportsman of his time, living a peripatetic lifestyle with no loyalty to any club or state. No other Jewish coach has won the European Cup. And Gutmann won it twice There were a lot of Jews who moved around [in football] a bit before the war, says Bolchover. But nobody moved around quite like Guttmann. He crossed borders 21 times in his career. And he lived in 14 countries. He was the first to really push in a public way for the value of the football coach. Whenever Gutmann was challenged at a club, he would just say, Right, Im off. He felt no loyalty to any country or any team. And felt no rootedness in that respect, he says. The stats from Guttmanns career speak volumes. In addition to his two cups, his victories as a coach include three Hungarian league championships and three Portuguese league championships. Bela Guttmans Vienna tombstone, with his Hebrew name, Baruch ben Moshe Avraham. (Courtesy) He managed clubs across a number of countries, including positions at So Paulo, Ciocanul Bucharest, and AC Milan. Guttmann even coached the Austrian national team for a short time. His brief stint in the world of international management ended in public controversy. Guttmann took on the role in 1964 and it was his first job in Austria since he had fled the Nazis there in 1938. The Austrian team recorded home victories against Hungary and the Soviet Union. Pretty quickly, however, Guttmann sensed from both the Austrian Football Association, the press, and his own team, open feelings of anti-Semitism that were pretty typical of post war Austria. He was even accused by some as acting like a wonder Rabbi in training sessions. Bela Guttman coaching in Austria. (Courtesy) Guttmann gave a candid interview to an Austrian weekly shortly after his resignation, where he said, I always thought that it doesnt matter at all in sport if somebody is Catholic, Protestant or Jewish. But now, when I have to endure the exact opposite, I am really sad. Guttmanns biographer says that while his latest book is one that documents the career of a European soccer legend, its also a story about Jewish history in Europe. Cover of The Greatest Comeback by British writer David Bolchover. (courtesy) Guttmann suffered from discrimination and racism throughout his career, says Bolchover. But he put these things aside and managed to conquer the demons in European society and achieve the success he did. The Guttmann story really mirrors the Jewish story as a whole in the 20th century, he adds. Guttmanns achievements as a player, meanwhile, included a Hungarian league championship; an Austrian league championship; a United States Open Cup, and 4 international cups for Hungary. And yet, in his native country despite the fact he is the only Hungarian-born coach to lift the European Cup Guttmann barely gets a passing footnote in the countrys sporting history. Bela Guttman in his Milan uniform. (Courtesy) The communists took over Hungary [between 1947 and] 1949, and they set their own mythology, says Bolchover. The heroes of Hungarian football were the Golden Team of the 1950s because they were projected as this great football team that had these great communist values. And also the fact that Guttmann was a Jew. Anti-Semitism was still very strong in Hungary at this time, and hence why he is not lionized throughout Hungary and indeed the world, Bolchover says. Bolchover claims understanding Guttmanns Jewishness is central to the mans life, achievements, and often forgotten legacy. Moreover, to really understand the Guttmann story in all of its complexity, tragedy, and glory, one really needs to go back to Fin-de-Sicle, Budapest. The central European city that Guttmann was born into on January 1899 was one bursting with a vibrant Jewish life. The city had even earned the nickname Judapest among some anti-Semites of the time such was the domination of Jews amongst the urban chattering classes, in professions like law and journalism in particular. In sports, Jews played a similar role too. The Hakoah Vienna football club with the Star of David featuring prominently on their uniforms and flag. (Courtesy) Guttmann played two seasons in the early 1920s with Hungarian club MTK, a football club that had Jewish origins. Jews dominated the MTK team during these golden years, where Gutmann helped the club stroll to the championship in 1920-21. By 1922, at age 23, Guttmann would transfer to a football club called Hakoah Vienna, in the Austrian capital located just 250 kilometers (155 miles) away from Budapest. Sporing the blue and white colors of the Jewish national movement, and with a large Star of David on their shirts, the team was more of a Jewish sporting movement than simply a football club. Bela Guttman. (Courtesy) Bolchover says this was primarily because its political ethos was grounded in Zionism. There was more of a Zionist movement in the highly politically charged Vienna than there was in Budapest at that time, he says. And that created this football club, Hakoah Vienna, who were founded in 1909, when Karl Lueger the anti-Semitic mayor in Vienna was in power, and when Adolf Hitler was living there too, he adds. The team inspired great passion and popularity among young Zionists and Jews in Vienna at the time. It inspired hatred from the local population, too. Jews were very prominent in the world of football during this period of history. And Hakoah Vienna was a club that was leading the charge, Bolchover explains. Hakoah Vienna used to tour around the Jewish world and were hugely successful. They won the Austrian league, which was the first fully professional league in mainland Europe, he says. They broke the attendance records for soccer tours they played in the US. And when they arrived in Warsaw in 1924, for example, 10,000 people met them at the train station. There was this hysteria about Hakoah Vienna. And of course, Gutmann was one of the star players on that team. I hear Jews all the time saying, we make better accountants than sportspeople, dont we? Bolchover says the more research he carried out for this book, the more surprised he became to learn that so few people know about the influence Jews had on prewar European football. I hear Jews all the time saying, We make better accountants than sportspeople, dont we? Well, that might be the case in Europe now, but thats because there are not many Jews left. But that wasnt the case before the war. Jews were at the forefront of the football world back then, says Bolchover. Principally, Jewish influence in European football ended because of the Holocaust. Bolchover cites, for instance, how Dr. Lhner-Beda the Jewish founder of Hakoah Vienna was just one of many Hungarian Jews with a passionate interest in football who was later murdered in Auschwitz. Bela Guttmann with the Hakoah Vienna club. (Courtesy) The Jews who could have talked about this [great football era] were murdered. And the ones who did survive were scattered around the world and just wanted to get on with their lives, says Bolchover. Guttmann was one of those survivors. But how exactly he escaped the Holocaust is a narrative that up until recently has been clouded in rumor, half truth, and false facts. The Jews who could have talked about this [great football era] were murdered Some accounts hitherto including articles posted on CNN and the New York Times website of Guttmanns time during the war claim he escaped to Switzerland. But the truth is that Guttmann actually stayed in the jpest district of Budapest, while his fellow Jews were being rounded up to be slaughtered. Guttmann survived the [Holocaust] by hiding in the attic of his girlfriends brother, who was a hairdresser. Later that year he was in a labor camp and he escaped, says Bolchover. When exactly Guttmann attempted to run from the Nazis in Budapest is hard to pinpoint. But Bolchover believes a good estimate places him going into hiding sometime in the weeks leading up to May 1944, just as the Hungarian Holocaust was about to reach its hellish apotheosis. Guttmanns survival tale is all the more remarkable when one considers that nearly half of the Jewish population in Budapest in 1944 250,000 were all murdered in the Holocaust, and that conservative estimates put 600,000 Hungarian Jews total, among them Guttmanns father and sister, murdered by the Nazis. Bela Guttmann with a New York Hakoah banner in New York City. (Courtesy) Guttmanns life after the war continued to be one filled with drama, where the smell of death was never too far away. On Saturday, April 2, 1955, six weeks after being sacked from a managerial position at AC Milan, Guttmann lost control of a car he was driving, killing one teenager and seriously injuring another. The owner of the car, sitting in the passenger seat, was Dezso Solti, who was later involved in the biggest match fixing scandal in the history of football by bribing Italian referees on behalf of clubs in the 1960s and 1970s. Both Guttmann and Solti fled the scene, says Bolchover. Eventually Guttmann was given a sentence of six months in prison. But he was given an immediate pardon of six months, and a fine. What is interesting is that very few people talked about it in the Italian press at the time, Bolchover adds. Bolchover claims Guttmann always lived life in the fast lane and close to the edge. When living in New York as a player for both the New York Giants and New York Hakoah Guttmann became involved in an illegal speakeasy business that sold booze during the prohibition era. It earned him a substantial amount of money. And it was around this time too in Las Vegas that Guttmann developed a serious addiction to gambling. It was a habit the Jewish player and coach would sustain right up until his death in Vienna in 1981. From the evidence that we have, I suspect that Guttmann was a big gambler. He lost a lot of his money. There might have been some left by the time he retired. He also worked until he was 75 in jobs that really didnt make sense for such a great coach. So I suspect he might have needed the money, Bolchover concludes. Bela Guttmann, to the right of the man in the suit, and the Hakoah Vienna football club with a trophy. (Courtesy)

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These Holocaust Survivors Just Got A Prom, 70 Years Later – Huffington Post Canada

If you’ve lived through the worst of what humans can do to one another, do you really care about a little dance you didn’t get to attend 60-plus years ago? Oh yes. You absolutely do. This week at Toronto’s Baycrest, the Jewish Home for the Aged, they held a prom for approximately 300 residents, many of whom are survivors of the Holocaust. This is the second year the home has held such an event, with a specific eye to giving the people who live there a chance at this rite of passage so many of them missed out on in their teen years. Keeping that in mind, they also opted for a 1950s theme, complete with an Elvis impersonator, corsages and a photo booth. “It represents an era where there was renewed optimism in the western world; where many immigrants and Holocaust survivors set out to make new lives for themselves after the horrors of the Second World War,” explains Cindy Kaizer, therapist and recreation specialist at Baycrest’s Arts, Culture and Innovation department. “Also, the music of the 1950s has happy connotations for many residents and clients of Baycrest. Studies are showing that listening to music can bring back positive memories and feelings, which is therapeutic to many in attendance.” According to the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre, as of 2015, there were approximately 10,000 Holocaust survivors in Canada, though their advanced age means that number has decreased since then. Baycrest is home to one of the largest groups of that population in North America, and that makes them particularly attuned to their unique needs. “When these people were at the age of prom, they were actually slaves,” Nechas Jakubowicz, daughter of resident Adela Grinbaum, who was in Auschwitz, told the Toronto Star. Similar events have been put on by various groups in the past, including another Toronto-based one called the Yellow Rose Project. The name for the group, which pairs millennials with concentration camp survivors to increase education, specifically invokes a quote by Auschwitz survivor Franka Kon at the prom in 2011: “I no longer have to wear a yellow star. I can finally celebrate with a yellow rose.” Here’s hoping they keep celebrating for years and years to come. Also on HuffPost:

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Israel: ‘Shame on’ Germany for comparing Palestinians to Holocaust victims – The Jerusalem Post

Israels Ambassador to the UNESCO Carmel Shama HaCohen listens during a past heari ng at UNESCO. (photo credit:Courtesy) Israel accused Germany of shameful contempt for Holocaust victims as an argument over the dueling narrative of Jewish and Palestinian victimhood once more broke out on the floor of the World Heritage Committee on Friday. Ambassador of Germany, I ask you, how could you have allowed the contempt of the memory of the Holocaust knowing what you know, what we all know? Israel’s representative, Carmel Shama HaCohen, asked. Is there no difference between Anne Frank and a Palestinian teenager stabbing innocent Jewish children with knives? he asked. Shama HaCohen was referring to an incident three days earlier, when he had asked the World Heritage Committee to stand for a moment of silence for Holocaust victims. He made this request after the Committee approved a resolution disavowing Israeli sovereignty in Jerusalem at its annual meeting, which this year was held in Krakow, Poland. Just as Hitler, the Nazis and their partner [ Jerusalem Mufti] Hajj Amin El Husseini did not succeed, you will not succeed as well in denying the Holocaust or in your efforts to destroy Israel or Jewish history,”Shama HaCohen said. In response, Cuban diplomats, who refrained from standing for the Holocaust victims, requested to pay homage to Palestinians who had died. Shama HaCohen objected to the comparison and sat during the moment of silence for the Palestinians. He was particularly incensed to see that Germany stood for both moments of silence. I am obligated to ask you, do you, in your shameful act, represent the official stance of the German government? Shama HaCohen asked the German representative. Does Germany really see no difference between the victims of the Holocaust and Palestinian murderers and terrorists? Shama HaCohen said he did not regret sitting down while others stood for the Palestinians. Let me make it clear, the Holocaust stands alone [among] atrocities, Shama HaCohen said. “It cant be compared to victims of a political confrontation.” “To the Cuban representative I will say only this,”ShamaHaCohen said. “You did not stand in silence in memory of the millions murdered in the Holocaust. You turned your back away, claiming that gesture to be a political act.” He called Cuba, which drew the link, a state whose glory stands only for being a criminal dictatorship and a violator of human rights. He went on to condemn the PalestinianAuthority for its celebration of those who murder civilians. Are they the kind of people you expect me to pay tribute to? Fatah, Hamas, ISIS, Al Qaida? he charged on. To Palestinian Ambassador Elias Sanbar, who stood for both peoples, he said, I will be the first to stand and the last to sit in memory of one childs life lost, in memory of innocents whose lives were taken, Palestinians and Israelis alike. The German representative responded by stating: Everyone who knows German policy, and everyone who knows me at UNESCO for the last two years, knows that the behavior of the German Ambassador to UNESCO in this room three days ago cannot be misinterpreted. Share on facebook

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‘This is heaven:’ Baycrest gives Holocaust survivors their prom – Toronto Star

Mendel Good, who was born in Poland in 1925 and was in concentration camps and ghettos between 1939 and 1946, enjoys the Baycrest Health Sciences prom event Thursday with Adela Grinbaum. ( Vince Talotta / Toronto Star ) | Order this photo By Scott WheelerStaff Reporter Thu., July 6, 2017 Mendel Good has been through hell, but hes found heaven at Baycrests Jewish old age home. On Thursday, Baycrest hosted a prom for nearly 300 patients and residents, including many who were unable to attend their own because of the Holocaust and the Second World War. Good, now 92, was among them. Born in Poland in 1925, he endured two ghettos and five concentration camps as a teenager and young man from 1939 to 1946. This is supposed to be an old age home but it is heaven. Ive been to another (old age home) which was very nice; I couldnt say one bad word, but no comparison to what we have here. This is heaven, said Good, crying from his wheelchair, a fedora on his head and a flower in his lapel. The staff is loving. When I sit there and have lunch or dinner or breakfast, I look at the attention that people are given and my heart grows. The 1950s-inspired day included era clothing, dancing, blackjack tables and music from an Elvis impersonator at the Apotex Centre in North York, home to one of the largest groups of Holocaust survivors in North America. Its the second time Baycrest has hosted a prom. I had the longest time in the concentration camp, Good said of his seven years in Auschwitz and other camps. Adela Grinbaum, seated to his left and dressed up by her daughter in a dark blue gown, was in Auschwitz at the same time as Good. Now they live on the same floor and sit at the same table for meals. On his first day at Baycrest, another man said he recognized Good. He recognized me from the day of liberation. He came over to me. He says you were liberated with me, I know you! Its incredible. We became friends, said Good, tapping his heart and pointing around Baycrests auditorium to others who were with him in the camps. Now, once a month, all of the other Holocaust survivors get together for what they call caf. When I see those people, I cry, he said, pushing up his glasses to wipe away a tear before reaching over to hold Grinbaums arm. I am so happy. Even in their 90s, prom holds a special meaning to Grinbaum and Good. When these people were at the age of prom, they were actually slaves, said Nechas Jakubowicz, Grinbaums daughter, lifting her mothers sleeve to reveal the branded number that remains in her skin. They didnt have any formal schooling. They didnt have any fun. To see all those people smiling, theres nobody here less than 90, Good added, laughing and noticing Jakubowiczs raised hand. I see those people enjoying, clapping, dancing and their smiles make me very happy. But the survivors bond means more than any ceremony or celebration could. Three times a day theyre together, which is nice. Its camaraderie, Jakubowicz said on behalf of Grinbaum, who now struggles to speak. Just the fact that she was dressed the way I dressed her. That was enough to put a smile on her face. The Toronto Star and thestar.com, each property of Toronto Star Newspapers Limited, One Yonge Street, 4th Floor, Toronto, ON, M5E1E6. You can unsubscribe at any time. Please contact us or see our privacy policy for more information.

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July 6, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed

Ivanka Trump visits Polish Holocaust memorial – CNN International

Ahead of the President’s speech, Trump, who serves as an adviser to the President, laid a wreath at the Monument to the Ghetto Heroes and toured the POLIN Museum of the History of the Polish Jews, according to deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. No press accompanied her on her visit, and the media was not made aware of the visit until after she had visited. Ivanka Trump posted a photo of the wreath laying and called the experience “deeply moving” in a statement provided by the White House. “It was a privilege to pay my respects and remember, with gratitude, those who tenaciously fought against all odds. The monument, erected on the rubble of the Warsaw Ghetto, symbolizes the fight for freedom. I am profoundly grateful for those who fought and all those who continue to fight today,” she said in the statement. President Donald Trump was criticized for not visiting the Monument to the Heroes of the Warsaw Ghetto himself, breaking a decades-long precedent. Trump was in Poland for less than 18 hours. Leaders of three prominent Jewish organizations in Warsaw, including the chief Rabbi of Poland, issued a statement criticizing Trump for not visiting the monument. The statement was issued prior to his daughter’s visit. “Ever since the fall of communism in 1989, all US presidents and vice-presidents visiting Warsaw had made a point of visiting the monument to the heroes of the Warsaw Ghetto. They did this in the name of the American people, who had played such a central role in bringing down fascism, and in that of the universal commemoration of the victims of the Shoah (Holocaust), and condemnation of its perpetrators, that people of all nationalities and religions express,” it reads in part. “We deeply regret that President Donald Trump, though speaking in public barely a mile away from the monument, chose to break with that laudable tradition. We trust that this slight does not reflect the attitudes and feelings of the American people.” “When it comes to fighting genocide and standing with Israel, President Trump has been admirable and deserves our thanks,” he wrote in part. The first daughter, who converted to Orthodox Judaism ahead of her 2009 marriage to Jared Kushner, previously toured the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe when in Berlin in April, and made a solemn visit to the Western Wall when in Jerusalem in May. She speaks about her faith very rarely, calling conversion “a very personal decision” in an interview with Fox News last month. “I tend to not talk about my faith too openly. It’s one of the few things in my life that is truly my own, especially these days,” she said, adding that her religion serves as “a great reminder of core values.” The visit comes amid a wave of anti-Semitism in Europe and at home in the United States, where there were 100 threats to Jewish community centers in January and February, according to CNN reporting. The Anti-Defamation League Audit of Anti-Semitic incidents, published in late April, showed the occurrences had increased by 34% nationally from 2015 to 2016. Trump was present for her father’s speech in Warsaw’s Krasinski Square, and continued to Germany on Air Force One, where the President will participate in the G20 summit. She has been involved in preparation for the summit, including remarks he will give in a session on women’s economic empowerment. CNN’s Jennifer Hansler and Allie Malloy contributed to this report.

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July 6, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed

Holocaust survivor who burned nurse to death is fit for trial – The Times of Israel

A Tel Aviv District Court psychiatrist concluded Wednesday that an elderly Holocaust survivor who burned a nurse to death was responsible for his actions at the time of the attack and is therefore fit to stand trial. On March 14, 78-year-old Asher Faraj doused his local HMO clinic in the city of Holon with flammable liquid and set it alight, killing nurse Tova Kararo. The 55-year-old career nurse was declared dead at the scene by emergency workers. Faraj told police he didnt intend to harm anyone, but merely to cause damage to property at the clinic. But according to the court indictment against him, Faraj became angry after the flu shot he received from Kararo last week made him feel weak and unwell. Faraj told Channel 2 news he believed he might have been poisoned. Tova Kararo, the nurse killed by her patient on March 14, 2017. (Facebook) Staff members said Faraj had returned to the clinic every day since his inoculation to angrily confront staff, and refused to believe them when they explained he was experiencing routine side effects of the vaccine. Faraj fled the scene in his car, but was caught by police at the citys exit after a chase. Police said that in the hours immediately following the incident, Faraj was unable to explain what he had done. Later, during questioning, he reportedly told investigators, I didnt want to harm anyone only to throw a burning bottle. The incident prompted much of Israels health care, education and social work systems to shut down for two hours on the day after the attack, in protest of recent acts of violence directed at staff. Health care officials said violence against doctors and others by angry patients and family members is a chronic issue in Israel. According to official government figures, there were 3,000 reported cases of violence or abuse against health personnel in hospitals, clinics and emergency services between 2014 and 2016. Approximately 75 percent of those attacks were verbal abuse. One-quarter of the attacks were physical assaults against medical staff or their security. Three-quarters of the attacks took place in hospitals, especially in emergency rooms.

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July 5, 2017   Posted in: Holocaust  Comments Closed


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