Archive for the ‘Holocaust’ Category

91 Important Facts about the Holocaust | Fact Retriever

Over 11 million people were murdered during the Holocaust, including 6 million Jews

Over 1.1 million prisoners died at Auschwitz, of which 90 percent of those murdered were Jewish

The Holocaust would not have been without mass transportation

It took between 3-15 minutes to kill everyone in the gas chamber

Thousands of concentration camp prisoners died within their first week of freedom from malnutrition and disease

The Nazi-era witnessed the direct and indirect theft of over $150 billion of tangible assets of victims of Nazi persecution

When Soviet troops liberated the Auschwitz-Birkenau and Majdanek camps, they found hundreds of thousands of shoes, but very few living prisoners

Soldiers executed women in mass shooting operations at hundreds of locations

The personification of evil, Heinrich Himmler was one of the primary people responsible for the Holocaust

IBM used its punch card technology and its information technology to systematize and accelerate Hitlers anti-Jewish program

Many homosexual Holocaust survivors were re-imprisoned and remained deviants in the eyes of post-war society

Main Concentration Camps and Associated Deaths[2]

Important Dates[2][10]

References

1Altman, Linda Jacobs. Impact of the Holocaust. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishing, Inc, 2004.

2Byers, Ann. The Holocaust Camps. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishing, Inc, 1998.

3Hayes, Peter. Lessons and Legacies: Memory, Memorialization, and Denial. Vol III. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Publishing Press, 1999.

4Ike and the Death Camps. Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission. 2004. Accessed: May 25, 2011.

5Laqueur, Walter, ed. The Holocaust Encyclopedia. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001.

6Levy, Pat. The Holocaust Causes. Austin, TX: Raintree Steck-Vaughn Publishers, 2001.

7Muselman. Jewish Virtual Library. 2010. Accessed: June 14, 2011.

8Muslims Honor Jewish Holocaust Victims at Auschwitz. Reuters. February 1, 2011. Accessed: May 25, 2011.

9Willoughby, Susan.The Holocaust. Chicago, IL: Heinemann Library, 2001.

10Wood, Angela Gluck.Holocaust: The Events and Their Impact on Real People. New York, NY: DK Publishing, Inc, 2007.

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91 Important Facts about the Holocaust | Fact Retriever

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Introduction to the Holocaust

The Holocaust was the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its collaborators. Holocaust is a word of Greek origin meaning “sacrifice by fire.” The Nazis, who came to power in Germany in January 1933, believed that Germans were “racially superior” and that the Jews, deemed “inferior,” were an alien threat to the so-called German racial community.

During the era of the Holocaust, German authorities also targeted other groups because of their perceived “racial inferiority”: Roma (Gypsies), the disabled, and some of the Slavic peoples (Poles, Russians, and others). Other groups were persecuted on political, ideological, and behavioral grounds, among them Communists, Socialists, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and homosexuals.

WHAT WAS THE HOLOCAUST? In 1933, the Jewish population of Europe stood at over nine million. Most European Jews lived in countries that Nazi Germany would occupy or influence during World War II. By 1945, the Germans and their collaborators killed nearly two out of every three European Jews as part of the “Final Solution,” the Nazi policy to murder the Jews of Europe.

Although Jews, whom the Nazis deemed a priority danger to Germany, were the primary victims of Nazi racism, other victims included some 200,000 Roma (Gypsies). At least 200,000 mentally or physically disabled patients, mainly Germans, living in institutional settings, were murdered in the so-called Euthanasia Program.

As Nazi tyranny spread across Europe, the Germans and their collaborators persecuted and murdered millions of other people. Between two and three million Soviet prisoners of war were murdered or died of starvation, disease, neglect, or maltreatment. The Germans targeted the non-Jewish Polish intelligentsia for killing, and deported millions of Polish and Soviet civilians for forced labor in Germany or in occupied Poland, where these individuals worked and often died under deplorable conditions.

From the earliest years of the Nazi regime, German authorities persecuted homosexuals and others whose behavior did not match prescribed social norms. German police officials targeted thousands of political opponents (including Communists, Socialists, and trade unionists) and religious dissidents (such as Jehovah’s Witnesses). Many of these individuals died as a result of incarceration and maltreatment.

ADMINISTRATION OF THE “FINAL SOLUTION” In the early years of the Nazi regime, the National Socialist government established concentration camps to detain real and imagined political and ideological opponents. Increasingly in the years before the outbreak of war, SS and police officials incarcerated Jews, Roma, and other victims of ethnic and racial hatred in these camps.

To concentrate and monitor the Jewish population as well as to facilitate later deportation of the Jews, the Germans and their collaborators created ghettos, transit camps, and forced-labor camps for Jews during the war years. The German authorities also established numerous forced-labor camps, both in the so-called Greater German Reich and in German-occupied territory, for non-Jews whose labor the Germans sought to exploit.

Following the invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, Einsatzgruppen (mobile killing units) and, later, militarized battalions of Order Police officials, moved behind German lines to carry out mass-murder operations against Jews, Roma, and Soviet state and Communist Party officials. German SS and police units, supported by units of the Wehrmacht and the Waffen SS, murdered more than a million Jewish men, women, and children, and hundreds of thousands of others.

Between 1941 and 1944, Nazi German authorities deported millions of Jews from Germany, from occupied territories, and from the countries of many of its Axis allies to ghettos and to killing centers, often called extermination camps, where they were murdered in specially developed gassing facilities.

THE END OF THE HOLOCAUST In the final months of the war, SS guards moved camp inmates by train or on forced marches, often called death marches, in an attempt to prevent the Allied liberation of large numbers of prisoners. As Allied forces moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Germany, they began to encounter and liberate concentration camp prisoners, as well as prisoners en route by forced march from one camp to another. The marches continued until May 7, 1945, the day the German armed forces surrendered unconditionally to the Allies.

For the western Allies, World War II officially ended in Europe on the next day, May 8 (V-E Day), while Soviet forces announced their Victory Day on May 9, 1945.

In the aftermath of the Holocaust, many of the survivors found shelter in displaced persons (DP) camps administered by the Allied powers. Between 1948 and 1951, almost 700,000 Jews emigrated to Israel, including 136,000 Jewish displaced persons from Europe. Other Jewish DPs emigrated to the United States and other nations. The last DP camp closed in 1957.

The crimes committed during the Holocaust devastated most European Jewish communities and eliminated hundreds of Jewish communities in occupied eastern Europe entirely.

Further Reading

Bergen, Doris. War & Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003

Dawidowicz, Lucy S. The War Against the Jews, 1933-1945. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1975.

Gilbert, Martin. The Holocaust: A History of the Jews of Europe During the Second World War. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1986.

Gutman, Israel, editor. Encyclopedia of the Holocaust. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1990.

Hilberg, Raul. The Destruction of the European Jews. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2003.

Yahil, Leni. The Holocaust: The Fate of European Jewry, 1932-1945. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990.

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Flynn: Rich! Harvey Weinstein Reminds Hillary Clinton of Donald Trump, Not Bill Clinton


Hillary Clinton reacted to the abuse scandal embroiling Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein by saying the American people elected someone guilty of sexual assault to the presidency.

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Flynn: Rich! Harvey Weinstein Reminds Hillary Clinton of Donald Trump, Not Bill Clinton

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Illegal Alien Preying on Children of Single Moms, Say Feds

Tomas Gutierrez wanted for alleged sexual abuse of a child.
Federal authorities are searching for an illegal alien they say is preying on the children of single mothers.

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Illegal Alien Preying on Children of Single Moms, Say Feds

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German Soccer Team ‘Takes a Knee’ in Show of Solidarity with NFL Players


BERLIN (AP) — Hertha Berlin nodded to social struggles in the United States by kneeling before its Bundesliga game at home on Saturday.

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German Soccer Team ‘Takes a Knee’ in Show of Solidarity with NFL Players

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Sebastian Gorka: Steve Bannon Like Obi-Wan Kenobi — ‘If You Strike Me Down Now, I Will Be More Powerful’


The war against the Washington establishment is only beginning, chief strategist for the MAGA coalition Dr. Sebastian Gorka told the Value Voters Summit on Saturday.

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Sebastian Gorka: Steve Bannon Like Obi-Wan Kenobi — ‘If You Strike Me Down Now, I Will Be More Powerful’

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Motion Picture Academy Expels Harvey Weinstein

Harvey Weinstein arrives at the Oscars on Sunday, March 2, 2014, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein’s membership in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has been revoked by its board.

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Motion Picture Academy Expels Harvey Weinstein

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Alibaba Founder Jack Ma Wants You to Relax About the Robot Revolution

The hand of humanoid robot AILA (artificial intelligence lightweight android) operates a switchboard during a demonstration by the German research centre for artificial intelligence at the CeBit computer fair in Hanover March, 5, 2013. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch/Files
As his half-trillion dollar corporation prepares to dive headfirst into the age of artificial employees, Alibaba founder Jack Ma would appreciate it if the millions of potentially displaced workers around the world would set aside what he called “empty worries” about robots.

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Alibaba Founder Jack Ma Wants You to Relax About the Robot Revolution

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EXCLUSIVE–Tony Perkins: Trump’s Commitment to Religious Liberty is Most Important Promise He’s Kept


President of the Family Research Council Tony Perkins said that President Donald Trump is committed to protecting religious liberty

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EXCLUSIVE–Tony Perkins: Trump’s Commitment to Religious Liberty is Most Important Promise He’s Kept

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91 Important Facts about the Holocaust | Fact Retriever

Over 11 million people were murdered during the Holocaust, including 6 million Jews Over 1.1 million prisoners died at Auschwitz, of which 90 percent of those murdered were Jewish The Holocaust would not have been without mass transportation It took between 3-15 minutes to kill everyone in the gas chamber Thousands of concentration camp prisoners died within their first week of freedom from malnutrition and disease The Nazi-era witnessed the direct and indirect theft of over $150 billion of tangible assets of victims of Nazi persecution When Soviet troops liberated the Auschwitz-Birkenau and Majdanek camps, they found hundreds of thousands of shoes, but very few living prisoners Soldiers executed women in mass shooting operations at hundreds of locations The personification of evil, Heinrich Himmler was one of the primary people responsible for the Holocaust IBM used its punch card technology and its information technology to systematize and accelerate Hitlers anti-Jewish program Many homosexual Holocaust survivors were re-imprisoned and remained deviants in the eyes of post-war society Main Concentration Camps and Associated Deaths[2] Important Dates[2][10] References 1Altman, Linda Jacobs. Impact of the Holocaust. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishing, Inc, 2004. 2Byers, Ann. The Holocaust Camps. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishing, Inc, 1998. 3Hayes, Peter. Lessons and Legacies: Memory, Memorialization, and Denial. Vol III. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Publishing Press, 1999. 4Ike and the Death Camps. Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission. 2004. Accessed: May 25, 2011. 5Laqueur, Walter, ed. The Holocaust Encyclopedia. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2001. 6Levy, Pat. The Holocaust Causes. Austin, TX: Raintree Steck-Vaughn Publishers, 2001. 7Muselman. Jewish Virtual Library. 2010. Accessed: June 14, 2011. 8Muslims Honor Jewish Holocaust Victims at Auschwitz. Reuters. February 1, 2011. Accessed: May 25, 2011. 9Willoughby, Susan.The Holocaust. Chicago, IL: Heinemann Library, 2001. 10Wood, Angela Gluck.Holocaust: The Events and Their Impact on Real People. New York, NY: DK Publishing, Inc, 2007.

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Introduction to the Holocaust

The Holocaust was the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its collaborators. Holocaust is a word of Greek origin meaning “sacrifice by fire.” The Nazis, who came to power in Germany in January 1933, believed that Germans were “racially superior” and that the Jews, deemed “inferior,” were an alien threat to the so-called German racial community. During the era of the Holocaust, German authorities also targeted other groups because of their perceived “racial inferiority”: Roma (Gypsies), the disabled, and some of the Slavic peoples (Poles, Russians, and others). Other groups were persecuted on political, ideological, and behavioral grounds, among them Communists, Socialists, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and homosexuals. WHAT WAS THE HOLOCAUST? In 1933, the Jewish population of Europe stood at over nine million. Most European Jews lived in countries that Nazi Germany would occupy or influence during World War II. By 1945, the Germans and their collaborators killed nearly two out of every three European Jews as part of the “Final Solution,” the Nazi policy to murder the Jews of Europe. Although Jews, whom the Nazis deemed a priority danger to Germany, were the primary victims of Nazi racism, other victims included some 200,000 Roma (Gypsies). At least 200,000 mentally or physically disabled patients, mainly Germans, living in institutional settings, were murdered in the so-called Euthanasia Program. As Nazi tyranny spread across Europe, the Germans and their collaborators persecuted and murdered millions of other people. Between two and three million Soviet prisoners of war were murdered or died of starvation, disease, neglect, or maltreatment. The Germans targeted the non-Jewish Polish intelligentsia for killing, and deported millions of Polish and Soviet civilians for forced labor in Germany or in occupied Poland, where these individuals worked and often died under deplorable conditions. From the earliest years of the Nazi regime, German authorities persecuted homosexuals and others whose behavior did not match prescribed social norms. German police officials targeted thousands of political opponents (including Communists, Socialists, and trade unionists) and religious dissidents (such as Jehovah’s Witnesses). Many of these individuals died as a result of incarceration and maltreatment. ADMINISTRATION OF THE “FINAL SOLUTION” In the early years of the Nazi regime, the National Socialist government established concentration camps to detain real and imagined political and ideological opponents. Increasingly in the years before the outbreak of war, SS and police officials incarcerated Jews, Roma, and other victims of ethnic and racial hatred in these camps. To concentrate and monitor the Jewish population as well as to facilitate later deportation of the Jews, the Germans and their collaborators created ghettos, transit camps, and forced-labor camps for Jews during the war years. The German authorities also established numerous forced-labor camps, both in the so-called Greater German Reich and in German-occupied territory, for non-Jews whose labor the Germans sought to exploit. Following the invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, Einsatzgruppen (mobile killing units) and, later, militarized battalions of Order Police officials, moved behind German lines to carry out mass-murder operations against Jews, Roma, and Soviet state and Communist Party officials. German SS and police units, supported by units of the Wehrmacht and the Waffen SS, murdered more than a million Jewish men, women, and children, and hundreds of thousands of others. Between 1941 and 1944, Nazi German authorities deported millions of Jews from Germany, from occupied territories, and from the countries of many of its Axis allies to ghettos and to killing centers, often called extermination camps, where they were murdered in specially developed gassing facilities. THE END OF THE HOLOCAUST In the final months of the war, SS guards moved camp inmates by train or on forced marches, often called death marches, in an attempt to prevent the Allied liberation of large numbers of prisoners. As Allied forces moved across Europe in a series of offensives against Germany, they began to encounter and liberate concentration camp prisoners, as well as prisoners en route by forced march from one camp to another. The marches continued until May 7, 1945, the day the German armed forces surrendered unconditionally to the Allies. For the western Allies, World War II officially ended in Europe on the next day, May 8 (V-E Day), while Soviet forces announced their Victory Day on May 9, 1945. In the aftermath of the Holocaust, many of the survivors found shelter in displaced persons (DP) camps administered by the Allied powers. Between 1948 and 1951, almost 700,000 Jews emigrated to Israel, including 136,000 Jewish displaced persons from Europe. Other Jewish DPs emigrated to the United States and other nations. The last DP camp closed in 1957. The crimes committed during the Holocaust devastated most European Jewish communities and eliminated hundreds of Jewish communities in occupied eastern Europe entirely. Further Reading Bergen, Doris. War & Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2003 Dawidowicz, Lucy S. The War Against the Jews, 1933-1945. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1975. Gilbert, Martin. The Holocaust: A History of the Jews of Europe During the Second World War. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1986. Gutman, Israel, editor. Encyclopedia of the Holocaust. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company, 1990. Hilberg, Raul. The Destruction of the European Jews. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2003. Yahil, Leni. The Holocaust: The Fate of European Jewry, 1932-1945. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990.

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Flynn: Rich! Harvey Weinstein Reminds Hillary Clinton of Donald Trump, Not Bill Clinton

Hillary Clinton reacted to the abuse scandal embroiling Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein by saying the American people elected someone guilty of sexual assault to the presidency.

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Illegal Alien Preying on Children of Single Moms, Say Feds

Federal authorities are searching for an illegal alien they say is preying on the children of single mothers.

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German Soccer Team ‘Takes a Knee’ in Show of Solidarity with NFL Players

BERLIN (AP) — Hertha Berlin nodded to social struggles in the United States by kneeling before its Bundesliga game at home on Saturday.

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Sebastian Gorka: Steve Bannon Like Obi-Wan Kenobi — ‘If You Strike Me Down Now, I Will Be More Powerful’

The war against the Washington establishment is only beginning, chief strategist for the MAGA coalition Dr. Sebastian Gorka told the Value Voters Summit on Saturday.

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Motion Picture Academy Expels Harvey Weinstein

Disgraced movie mogul Harvey Weinstein’s membership in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has been revoked by its board.

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Alibaba Founder Jack Ma Wants You to Relax About the Robot Revolution

As his half-trillion dollar corporation prepares to dive headfirst into the age of artificial employees, Alibaba founder Jack Ma would appreciate it if the millions of potentially displaced workers around the world would set aside what he called “empty worries” about robots.

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EXCLUSIVE–Tony Perkins: Trump’s Commitment to Religious Liberty is Most Important Promise He’s Kept

President of the Family Research Council Tony Perkins said that President Donald Trump is committed to protecting religious liberty

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