Archive for the ‘Iran’ Category

Islamic State threatens new attacks in Iran – The Times of Israel

The Islamic State terror group released a video Wednesday threatening new attacks against Tehran and calling on Iranians to rise up against their country.

In a clip bearing the Islamic States Amaq news agency logo, a man wearing a black ski mask and holding an AK-47, threatened a repeat of the deadly attacks in Tehran claimed by the terrorist group in June.

The same way we are cutting the necks of your dogs in Iraq and Syria we will cut your necks in the center of Tehran, the man said, according to a report in Reuters.

Tehran suffered a rare and deadly twin attack on June 7, claimed by IS, when gunmen and suicide bombers attacked the parliament complex and the mausoleum of revolutionary founder Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, killing 17 people.

Iranian security officials have since arrested dozens of suspects linked to the attack, and claim to have killed its chief planner.

On Monday, Iran arrested 27 people plotting attacks for the terror group, including 10 who were detained in a regional country with outside assistance, according to the countrys intelligence ministry.

Intelligence agents succeeded in identifying and arresting a terrorist group linked to Daesh, who intended to conduct terrorist attacks in central provinces and religious cities, a ministry statement said, using the Arabic acronym for IS.

Ten of the suspects were arrested outside of Iran through intelligence-sharing with one of the intelligence services in the region, the statement said, without naming the country or giving further details.

Weapons and ammunition were recovered during the arrests, and the suspects were reportedly trying to smuggle them into Iran inside home appliances.

AP contributed to this report.

Excerpt from:
Islamic State threatens new attacks in Iran – The Times of Israel

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Kissinger Warns Trump: ISIS Is Keeping Iran in Check, You Must Not Let Tehran Fill the Void – Newsweek

Former top U.S. diplomat Henry Kissinger has warned the Trump administration that Iran should not be allowed to fill the power vacuum that will be created when the Islamic State militant group (ISIS) is defeated.

In Iraq, Baghdad’s forces have liberated the northern city of Mosul from the jihadi group and are close to ousting ISIS from all of its population centers. In Syria, a Kurdish-Arab coalition has recaptured almost half of the eastern Syrian city of Raqqa, which became the de facto ISIS capital after the group rose to prominence in mid-2014.

Now, the 94-year-old Kissinger, who served as secretary of state under Richard Nixon,has cautioned that defeating ISIS could lead to a radical Iranian empire across the Middle East.

Daily Emails and Alerts – Get the best of Newsweek delivered to your inbox

In these circumstances, the traditional adage that the enemy of your enemy can be regarded as your friend no longer applies. In the contemporary Middle East, the enemy of your enemy may also be your enemy. The Middle East affects the world by the volatility of its ideologies as much as by its specific actions,he wrote in an article last week forCapX.

The outside worlds war with ISIS can serve as an illustration. Most non-ISIS powersincluding Shia Iran and the leading Sunni statesagree on the need to destroy it. But which entity is supposed to inherit its territory? A coalition of Sunnis? Or a sphere of influence dominated by Iran?

The answer is elusive because Russia and the Nato countries support opposing factions. If the ISIS territory is occupied by Irans Revolutionary Guards or Shia forces trained and directed by it, the result could be a territorial belt reaching from Tehran to Beirut, which could mark the emergence of an Iranian radical empire,he wrote.

President Donald Trump meets with former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in the Oval Office at the White House on May 10, in Washington, D.C. Molly Riley-Pool/Getty

Iran’s elite Revolutionary Guards have been advising the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government and supporting Shiite militias, known as the Popular Mobilization Forces,working with Baghdadto liberate ISIS-held territories in the country.

In Syria, Iran is supporting the regime of President Bashar al-Assad alongside Russia. It has provided ground troops, tactical advisers and Shiite militiamen from countries such as Afghanistan to bolster the dictator’s ranks.

Both Iran and the U.S. are working to degrade ISIS in the two countries, but the U.S. role is limited to special forces on the ground and a coalition of air forces bombing the jihadi group from above. Washington and Tehran rarely recognize the role of the other in combating the threat of ISISand are avoiding any escalation between the two militaries.

This has not extended to the Assad regime. President Donald Trump in April authorized the first American strike against the Syrian government. The U.S. government accusedthe Syrian government of carrying out achemical weapons attackagainst civilians. Both Syria and key ally Russia denied the allegations, despite witness testimony and soil samples gathered by Turkey that showed the presence of a chemical agent in the attack on the Idlib town of Khan Sheikhoun.

The Russian governmentsaid the Syrian militaryhit a weapons depot holding toxic weapons stored by militants. International powers, such as the U.S., Israel, Turkey, France and Britain,accused the Syrian regimeof targeting civilians with chemical weapons.

Read the rest here:
Kissinger Warns Trump: ISIS Is Keeping Iran in Check, You Must Not Let Tehran Fill the Void – Newsweek

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

PM’s Iran speech to Congress left no bad blood, top Democrat says – The Times of Israel

There are no bitter feelings left between the Democratic party and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu after his controversial speech to the US Congress ahead of the signing of the Iran nuclear deal, a top Democratic Congressmen said Tuesday.

All of us together support Israel and there is no residual impact [from Netanyahus speech], whether you were pleased or not pleased, House Democratic Whip Steny H. Hoyer told reporters at a press conference in Jerusalem.

On March 3, 2015, Netanyahu addressed a joint meeting of Congress in which he slammed US-led efforts to sign an agreement that would temporarily curtail Irans nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief, a move seen as a slap in the face to then-president Barack Obama.

The speech, which was made possible by the Republican speaker of the House John Boehner inviting the prime minister, drew a harsh reaction.

Most visits are done in a bipartisan fashion, and this was not done in a bipartisan fashion. Democrats were not happy about that, and we said that, Hoyer said at Tuesdays press conference, held in the King David Hotel.

This is not about Prime Minister Netanyahu or President Obama or President Trump. This is about a relationship between two great democracies, Israel and America. This is about a consensus that Israels security is critical for the security of the United States. This is not about personalities. This is about shared values. And our two countries are partners for peace and security.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shakes hands as he leaves the House chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington,, March 3, 2015, after addressing a joint meeting of Congress. (Photo credit: AP/Andrew Harnik)

Hoyer, who is currently leading a delegation of US congresspeople to Israel, said he attended Netanyahus speech at the time.

I thought he spoke very well. I stood and clapped for things I supported, as others did, he said. But the essence is not personalities. Democrats are very supportive of Israel and that is our focus and continues to be our focus.

Hoyer harshly criticized the Iran deal but eventually voted in favor of it.

At Tuesdays press conference, he was asked whether support for Israel can really still be called a bipartisan issue, given that Democratic Senators voted against the nomination of David Friedman as US ambassador to Israel, and in light of the fact that three Democrats voted against a bill to cut American funding to the Palestinians if they do not cease paying terrorists and their families.

Hoyer replied by pointing to a recent law that imposes additional sanctions on Iran, noting that not a single Democrat opposed the bill. The parties are very united, and the fact is that the parties are speaking with one voice, he said.

Like in every parliament, there are differences of opinion between Republicans and Democrats in Congress, he said. But, the veteran legislator added, when you have votes regarding Israels well-being and safety, they are overwhelmingly bipartisan.

Currently on his 15th trip to Israel, Hoyer said he and Republican House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, who is also currently leading a congressional delegation to Israel, agreed to spend some time together to signal that American support for the Jewish state is unwavering and entirely bipartisan.

The Democratic delegation, which arrived first, met with Netanyahu on Monday. He is slated to host the Republicans in his Jerusalem office on Wednesday. Both delegations are sponsored by the American Israel Education Foundation, a nonprofit affiliated with AIPAC.

We have made a point to make sure we have an overlapping time here in Israel together, Republicans and Democrats. Because this is not a partisan issue. This is a bipartisan issue, McCarthy said, stressing that the US has no stronger alliance than that with Israel.

Some of us are Democrats and some of us are Republicans. But were not here as Republicans and Democrats. Were here as Americans who support Israels security, its sovereignty and the safety of its people, Hoyer said, standing in front of the 50-some congresspeople of the two delegations. Were here because the United States and Israel are partners for peace and partners for security.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) meeting at his Jerusalem office with a 19-member delegation of Democratic members of Congress led by House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, August 7, 2017. (GPO)

While congressional delegations usually are divided among party lines, this time they insisted on some overlap because leaders from both sides of the aisle felt the need to send a message of solidarity with Israel and of solidarity with the people of Israel, a solidarity we know is necessary if we are to defeat those, not only in the Middle East about around the world, who [through] terrorism and violence put at risk our democracies and our way of life, Hoyer said.

Most of the 52 congresspeople 33 Republicans and 19 Democrats currently in Israel are freshman lawmakers. They were briefed in Jerusalem and Ramallah and have been touring various sites across the country, including the borders with Lebanon, Jordan and Syria, and received a joint briefing about the Arrow missile defense system at the Palmachim Air Force base.

Read the original here:
PM’s Iran speech to Congress left no bad blood, top Democrat says – The Times of Israel

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Iran’s Zarif hosts Hamas officials – The Times of Israel

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif met on Monday with a delegation of officials from the Palestinian terror group Hamas, which has been struggling with the continued erosion of its foreign backing.

During the meeting, Zarif reiterated Tehrans support for the Palestinians as principled and unchangeable, according to reports in Iranian state media.

The delegation of diaspora-based members of Hamass politburo was visiting Iran to attend the swearing-in ceremony of President Hassan Rouhani on Sunday.

Iran was once Hamass key political and financial backer, but ties began to unravel in 2012, largely due to differences over the civil war in Syria.

In May, Iran agreed in principle to renew its funding for Hamas, and senior Palestinian officials were said to be traveling to Tehran to repair relations.

Irans Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, pictured here in Tehran with Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh. (photo credit: AP)

Last week, Palestinian Authority officials claimed Iran provided aid to Palestinian protesters demonstrating against Israeli security measures at the Temple Mount last month. The aid reportedly included boxes of food and drink, which came with a flyer attached depicting the Dome of the Rock and a quote attributed to Irans Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei reading, With the help of God, Palestine will be freed. Jerusalem is ours.

A PA intelligence official told an Israeli newspaper at the time it was clear the Iranian regime was behind the aid packages, and estimated the initiative cost several million shekels. The move angered the PA leadership, with the unnamed official telling the Israel Hayom daily it was a mistake to allow Iran to reach into the West Bank with its tentacles.

Mondays meeting in Tehran comes as Qatar, one of the other few foreign backers of Hamas, continues to face massive pressure from its Gulf neighbors to cut ties with the terrorist group. If it does, the result could be disastrous for the Gaza Strip, a territory Hamas has ruled for a decade.

Qatar has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in roads, housing and a major hospital in the tiny enclave. Its infrastructure projects are one of the few job-creators in a beleaguered economy.

Gaza already suffers from an Israeli-Egyptian blockade imposed to prevent the group from importing weaponry economic misery and chronic electricity shortages. For Hamas, Qatars money pumping into the economy is a vital lifeline bolstering its rule.

Closer ties between Hamas and Iran are hardly likely to mollify the Gulf states and Egypt. One of the main factors driving the crisis is Qatars close ties to Tehran and fears of expanding Iranian influence further destabilizing the region.

Times of Israel staff contributed to this report.

More here:
Iran’s Zarif hosts Hamas officials – The Times of Israel

Fair Usage Law

August 7, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Column: US needs to stand up to Iran – The Detroit News

Lena Epstein Published 10:48 p.m. ET Aug. 6, 2017

U.S. policy has essentially boosted Tehrans ability to foment terrorism and threaten American interests, Lena Epstein writes.(Photo: Vahid Salemi / AP)

When Sen. Debbie Stabenow joined 41 of her Democratic Senate colleagues to vote for the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, more commonly known as the Iran nuclear deal, back in 2015, they made a catastrophic foreign policy mistake that has left the U.S, Israel, and the international community at large much less secure.

As recently as July 27, their mistake once again became painfully obvious when Iran conducted a successful launch of a long-range missile into space: such a blatant pretext for continued advancement of its ICBM program, youd have to be completely naive not to realize it. But, given the terms of the deal negotiated under President Obama, this type of activity isnt a violation of the nuclear deal.

Iran is free to continue testing and perfecting its nuclear delivery systems, just as long as it doesnt enrich uranium or plutonium to dangerous levels. This is not what I consider a comprehensive plan to keep nuclear weapons out of the hands of the worlds most prolific state sponsor of terror, the same state that has explicitly called for the annihilation of the state of Israel.

As a result of the deal, Iran has experienced a windfall of cash flowing into its coffers. With sanctions eased and foreign assets unfrozen, Iran has had an influx of over $100 billion, which it has used to double down on terrorist activities, and dramatically expand its military budget.

The consequences can be felt throughout the already unstable Middle East as Iran provides support to Hamas and Hezbollah, and actively works to further destabilize Syria by sending thousands of its Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) to support Bashar al-Assads brutal regime that has slaughtered and displaced millions of Syrians. U.S. policy has essentially bolstered Irans ability to carry out these terrorist activities and threaten American interests in the region, including putting American service members, stationed in the Middle East, at risk.

This cannot continue. A nuclear-armed Iran poses an existential threat to one of our closest allies, Israel, and puts American security in jeopardy. Both of our U.S. senators here in Michigan Stabenow and Gary Peters voted in favor of this reprehensible deal.

Stabenows vote on the Iran deal is one of the key factors that spurred me, an American, a Jewish woman, and a staunch supporter of Israel, to enter the U.S. Senate race and take her on next November. A member of Congress is no friend of Israel if he or she doesnt vote in our close allys best interest when it counts the most when there is a deal on the table that puts the Jewish states very existence in danger.

The American people opposed the Iran deal by a 2 to 1 margin, and yet were in this perilous situation because Stabenow pushed it through anyway. We cant keep sending the same people back to Washington and expect different results.

We need elected officials who support Israel because its a moral obligation, not because its politically expedient.

Lena Epstein is the third-generation owner and general manager of Southfield-based Vesco Oil Corp.

Read or Share this story: http://detne.ws/2ufgmsn

Continue reading here:
Column: US needs to stand up to Iran – The Detroit News

Fair Usage Law

August 7, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Trump’s Alice-in-Wonderland approach to the Iran deal – Los Angeles Times

Heres an international crisis you can, unusually, put on your calendar ahead of time: In October, President Trump wants to declare Iran in violation of the 2015 agreement to limit its nuclear program a decision that would allow the United States to reimpose tough economic sanctions on anyone trading with Tehran.

Its a bad idea. The nuclear deal isnt perfect it doesnt end Irans nuclear research, only limits it for a period of years but its much better than nothing. Before the agreement, Tehran was believed to be less than a year from making nuclear weapons that would have threatened Israel and Saudi Arabia. Thanks to the accord, that doomsday problem has at least been postponed.

That hasnt stopped Trump from calling the pact the worst deal ever and ordering aides to supply him with evidence that will allow him to declare it invalid. The most likely moment for his decision will come in October, the next time he is required to notify Congress whether Iran is in compliance.

If it was up to me, I would have had them noncompliant 180 days ago, Trump told the Wall Street Journal last month. Next time, he added, I do not expect that they will be compliant.

The president didnt offer any substantive reason to declare Iran out of compliance with the deal because there isnt one. His own aides told him last month that, while Iran has tested the edges of the agreement, none of its actions was a material breach, the legal standard that would allow sanctions to snap back.

When Trump was warned that he couldnt simply walk away from the deal, he had a bit of a meltdown, an official told the New York Times. He chewed out the secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, who apparently brought him the bad news. And he ordered his staff to begin work on a new study one that will supply him with the excuses he needs.

Thats an Alice-in-Wonderland approach to foreign policy: Verdict first, evidence later. And its not likely to work.

No matter what the president thinks, the facts will get in the way. U.S. officials say Iran has been carefully upholding its main obligations under the nuclear agreement: reducing its uranium stocks and limiting its enrichment program.

And none of the other six countries that negotiated the deal agree with Trump that the accord should be abrogated.

The deal is working, and we believe it represents the best option for the international community, British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson wrote last month (and his government is friendlier to Trump than most).

As a result, if Trump declares in October that Iran is in breach, most of the world including Britain, Germany and France will blame him for the consequences, not Tehran.

That will create a major obstacle for the next step in Trumps course, which is to reimpose U.S. economic sanctions on foreign businesses that deal with Iran. (The nuclear deal didnt affect the embargo between the U.S. and Iran, which remains in effect.)

If the United States is viewed as responsible for breaking the deal, other countries may refuse to go along with Trumps unilateral sanctions, making them largely toothless.

Nobody else wants the deal to fail, said Elizabeth Rosenberg of the Center for New American Security, who worked on sanctions in the Obama administration. If the U.S. is the only one that walks away, who is going to enforce new sanctions? You could easily see European leaders deciding to defend their own companies instead.

Last month, the French energy giant Total signed a contract for a $5-billion natural gas project in Iran. If Trump tries to impose sanctions on deals like that, the result wont be merely a confrontation with Iran; it will be a clash with the EU.

There is an alternative Trump could try. Its called diplomacy.

He could press for stricter enforcement of the nuclear agreement, beginning with the restrictions Iran has placed on international inspectors access to military bases.

He could seek stronger international sanctions on Iran for its ballistic missile tests, which arent covered by the nuclear deal.

And he could begin negotiations toward a new agreement to maintain the curbs on Irans nuclear program after 2026, when the current limits begin to expire.

But the president hasnt pursued those options, even though theyve been offered to him by his own aides. Instead, he appears hellbent on fulfilling a bad campaign promise he should now have the wisdom to abandon. (Thats a prayer more than a hope.)

Tearing up the deal wont bring down Irans regime most of Tehrans ruling clerics welcome the enmity of the United States but it will set up a collision between the Trump administration and most of the world, including China, Russia and U.S. allies in Europe.

The most likely losers would be the Western alliance, already battered by Trumps disdain, and whatever remains of the United States tattered claim to international leadership.

And the most likely winner, oddly enough, would be Vladimir Putins Russia, the beneficiary of yet another wedge between United States and its NATO allies this one driven by Trump alone, without Moscows help.

doyle.mcmanus@latimes.com

Twitter: @DoyleMcManus

Follow the Opinion section on Twitter @latimesopinion or Facebook

Continued here:
Trump’s Alice-in-Wonderland approach to the Iran deal – Los Angeles Times

Fair Usage Law

August 6, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Israel offers to take Iranian blogger from Turkey – Reuters

JERUSALEM (Reuters) – Israel offered asylum on Sunday to a Turkey-based Iranian blogger who it said faced forcible deportation to Iran, where she would be at risk given her work for an Israeli news site.

The Times of Israel has said that Neda Amin, its Persian-language blogger, left Iran in 2014 for Turkey. She has been in a court battle to prevent her repatriation and has sought other countries that might take her in as a refugee, the site said.

Hostility between the two countries means that Iranians are generally not admitted to Israel.

But following appeals by Israel’s journalist federations, Interior Minister Aryeh Deri said he would issue 32-year-old Amin with a special visa.

“This is a journalist whose life is in real danger,” Deri said in a statement. “Given the clear humanitarian circumstances, I authorized her entry without delay.”

Writing by Dan Williams; Editing by Richard Balmforth

Go here to see the original:
Israel offers to take Iranian blogger from Turkey – Reuters

Fair Usage Law

August 6, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Rouhani gets Iranian supreme leader’s nod as second-term president, faces risks – Reuters

ANKARA (Reuters) – Hassan Rouhani won the endorsement of Iran’s supreme leader for his second term of president on Thursday after an easy election win, pledging to open Iran to foreign trade and investment but facing internal hardline resistance and renewed U.S. antagonism.

Under Rouhani’s watch, Iran emerged from international isolation in 2015 when it struck a deal with six world powers to curb its disputed nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of financial and economic sanctions in place for a decade.

But his quest to parlay fragile detente with the West into financial infusions to rebuild Iran’s oil-based economy has been slowed by investors’ fears of pre-existing U.S. sanctions and suspicions among powerful hardline acolytes of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei of any rise in Western influence.

The new U.S. sanctions could embolden Rouhani’s conservative rivals who say the nuclear deal was a form of capitulation.

An elite insider who has held senior political and military posts since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, Rouhani comes off as a pragmatist unlike Khamenei and his allies, and analysts have cast doubt on his ability to balance their demands and the expectations of his often young and more liberal supporters.

Khamenei, who has the last word on all major issues of state, formally endorsed Rouhani as president in a ceremony broadcast live on state television on Thursday, after the pragmatist romped to re-election on May 19.

Addressing religious, military and political leaders, Khamenei prayed for “the success of a worthy person”.

Handing the presidential mandate to Rouhani, Khamenei kissed him on the cheek and the president kissed the Supreme Leader on his shoulder, a sign of supplication.

Khamenei again called for economic self-sufficiency and a “resistance economy”, a stance arising from his repeated criticism of the halting pace of economic recovery since most international sanctions on Iran were lifted early last year.

Rouhani will be sworn in on Saturday and then have two weeks to present his cabinet to parliament for a vote of confidence.

“The government’s aim is to improve Iran’s image in the world …, to safeguard people’s rights…, to end poverty…, to protect the religious democracy and our people’s votes,” Rouhani said in a speech at the ceremony.

Analysts said Rouhani may struggle to make a significant impact given sharpening divisions in the dual clerical-republican power structure, and Washington’s return to an aggressive Iran policy since Donald Trump took office.

“Hardliners will try even harder than in Rouhani’s first term to make him look like a lame duck president … It will be very difficult for Rouhani to deliver on the economy,” said Meir Javdanfar, an Iranian-born expert on the Islamic Republic at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya in Israel.

Rouhani’s own supporters have expressed concern over his inability to include women as ministers in his new cabinet because of pressure from religious hardliners.

Javdanfar said the new U.S. sanctions on Iran signed by Trump into law on Wednesday, along with measures against Russia and North Korea would likely deter foreign investors and so undermine Rouhani’s efforts to boost the economy.

Rouhani stuck to an upbeat outlook in his speech. “The nuclear deal is a sign of Iran’s goodwill on the international stage…Iran will never be isolated,” he said.

During his 2016 election campaign, Trump blasted the nuclear agreement – negotiated under his predecessor Barack Obama – as “the worst deal ever” but not followed through on threats to pull the United States out of it.

But Iran’s deputy foreign minister said the fresh sanctions violated provisions of the nuclear deal and vowed an “appropriate and proportional” response.

“Imposing new sanctions on Iran by America is a reactionary, illegitimate and irrational move,” state television quoted Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Qassemi as saying on Thursday.

Reporting by Parisa Hafezi; Editing by Mark Heinrich

View post:
Rouhani gets Iranian supreme leader’s nod as second-term president, faces risks – Reuters

Fair Usage Law

August 3, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Iran’s ties to US universities an infiltration to fear – Washington Times

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Rep. Dan Donovan wants the feds to look into some curious grants given to the likes of Columbia, Harvard and Princeton that came from a foundation with a pro-Iran, anti-Israel slant.

This is an investigation that should definitely go forth, and the sooner, the far better.

The Alavi Foundation was deemed in June by jurors in Manhattans federal court of illegally managing 650 Fifth Ave. on behalf of Iran. Now, its this same group, the Alavi Foundation, thats been tied to the funding of certain professors at these Ivy American schools and others around the U.S. who are decidedly anti-Israel and pro-Iran in their teachings.

As Donovan said, the New York Post reported: Did this foundation attempt to subvert American academic institutions?

Good question. And one that raises the knee-jerk reaction that better vetting of donors by university folk is needed.

But this goes deeper than a funding concern.

Critics are worried the foundation dollars may have been used to purposely plant pro-Iran professors within the U.S. university system. Its not out of the realm of possibility.

This is what acting U.S. Attorney Joon Kim said in late June, while making the case against Alavi: For over a decade, hiding in plain sight, this 36-story Manhattan office tower secretly served as as front for the Iranian government and as a gateway for millions of dollars to be funneled to Iran in clear violation of U.S. sanctions laws.

And now, this same group has reportedly sent millions of dollars into dozens of Americas top-ranking colleges and universities?

For what purposes?

If the money came with strings attached say, stipulations that certain professors must be hired, or that certain doctrines should be taught then this is a radical infiltration of dangerous proportions, pure and simple.

Donovan said hes going to contact the secretary of the Department of Education, along with various congressional committees, and ask for an investigation.

One needs to be conducted, and pronto. And if untoward infiltration has occurred, then justice beginning with firings of compromised professors and complicit administrators should be both swift and harsh.

See original here:
Iran’s ties to US universities an infiltration to fear – Washington Times

Fair Usage Law

August 3, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Islamic State threatens new attacks in Iran – The Times of Israel

The Islamic State terror group released a video Wednesday threatening new attacks against Tehran and calling on Iranians to rise up against their country. In a clip bearing the Islamic States Amaq news agency logo, a man wearing a black ski mask and holding an AK-47, threatened a repeat of the deadly attacks in Tehran claimed by the terrorist group in June. The same way we are cutting the necks of your dogs in Iraq and Syria we will cut your necks in the center of Tehran, the man said, according to a report in Reuters. Tehran suffered a rare and deadly twin attack on June 7, claimed by IS, when gunmen and suicide bombers attacked the parliament complex and the mausoleum of revolutionary founder Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, killing 17 people. Iranian security officials have since arrested dozens of suspects linked to the attack, and claim to have killed its chief planner. On Monday, Iran arrested 27 people plotting attacks for the terror group, including 10 who were detained in a regional country with outside assistance, according to the countrys intelligence ministry. Intelligence agents succeeded in identifying and arresting a terrorist group linked to Daesh, who intended to conduct terrorist attacks in central provinces and religious cities, a ministry statement said, using the Arabic acronym for IS. Ten of the suspects were arrested outside of Iran through intelligence-sharing with one of the intelligence services in the region, the statement said, without naming the country or giving further details. Weapons and ammunition were recovered during the arrests, and the suspects were reportedly trying to smuggle them into Iran inside home appliances. AP contributed to this report.

Fair Usage Law

August 10, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Kissinger Warns Trump: ISIS Is Keeping Iran in Check, You Must Not Let Tehran Fill the Void – Newsweek

Former top U.S. diplomat Henry Kissinger has warned the Trump administration that Iran should not be allowed to fill the power vacuum that will be created when the Islamic State militant group (ISIS) is defeated. In Iraq, Baghdad’s forces have liberated the northern city of Mosul from the jihadi group and are close to ousting ISIS from all of its population centers. In Syria, a Kurdish-Arab coalition has recaptured almost half of the eastern Syrian city of Raqqa, which became the de facto ISIS capital after the group rose to prominence in mid-2014. Now, the 94-year-old Kissinger, who served as secretary of state under Richard Nixon,has cautioned that defeating ISIS could lead to a radical Iranian empire across the Middle East. Daily Emails and Alerts – Get the best of Newsweek delivered to your inbox In these circumstances, the traditional adage that the enemy of your enemy can be regarded as your friend no longer applies. In the contemporary Middle East, the enemy of your enemy may also be your enemy. The Middle East affects the world by the volatility of its ideologies as much as by its specific actions,he wrote in an article last week forCapX. The outside worlds war with ISIS can serve as an illustration. Most non-ISIS powersincluding Shia Iran and the leading Sunni statesagree on the need to destroy it. But which entity is supposed to inherit its territory? A coalition of Sunnis? Or a sphere of influence dominated by Iran? The answer is elusive because Russia and the Nato countries support opposing factions. If the ISIS territory is occupied by Irans Revolutionary Guards or Shia forces trained and directed by it, the result could be a territorial belt reaching from Tehran to Beirut, which could mark the emergence of an Iranian radical empire,he wrote. President Donald Trump meets with former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger in the Oval Office at the White House on May 10, in Washington, D.C. Molly Riley-Pool/Getty Iran’s elite Revolutionary Guards have been advising the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government and supporting Shiite militias, known as the Popular Mobilization Forces,working with Baghdadto liberate ISIS-held territories in the country. In Syria, Iran is supporting the regime of President Bashar al-Assad alongside Russia. It has provided ground troops, tactical advisers and Shiite militiamen from countries such as Afghanistan to bolster the dictator’s ranks. Both Iran and the U.S. are working to degrade ISIS in the two countries, but the U.S. role is limited to special forces on the ground and a coalition of air forces bombing the jihadi group from above. Washington and Tehran rarely recognize the role of the other in combating the threat of ISISand are avoiding any escalation between the two militaries. This has not extended to the Assad regime. President Donald Trump in April authorized the first American strike against the Syrian government. The U.S. government accusedthe Syrian government of carrying out achemical weapons attackagainst civilians. Both Syria and key ally Russia denied the allegations, despite witness testimony and soil samples gathered by Turkey that showed the presence of a chemical agent in the attack on the Idlib town of Khan Sheikhoun. The Russian governmentsaid the Syrian militaryhit a weapons depot holding toxic weapons stored by militants. International powers, such as the U.S., Israel, Turkey, France and Britain,accused the Syrian regimeof targeting civilians with chemical weapons.

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

PM’s Iran speech to Congress left no bad blood, top Democrat says – The Times of Israel

There are no bitter feelings left between the Democratic party and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu after his controversial speech to the US Congress ahead of the signing of the Iran nuclear deal, a top Democratic Congressmen said Tuesday. All of us together support Israel and there is no residual impact [from Netanyahus speech], whether you were pleased or not pleased, House Democratic Whip Steny H. Hoyer told reporters at a press conference in Jerusalem. On March 3, 2015, Netanyahu addressed a joint meeting of Congress in which he slammed US-led efforts to sign an agreement that would temporarily curtail Irans nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief, a move seen as a slap in the face to then-president Barack Obama. The speech, which was made possible by the Republican speaker of the House John Boehner inviting the prime minister, drew a harsh reaction. Most visits are done in a bipartisan fashion, and this was not done in a bipartisan fashion. Democrats were not happy about that, and we said that, Hoyer said at Tuesdays press conference, held in the King David Hotel. This is not about Prime Minister Netanyahu or President Obama or President Trump. This is about a relationship between two great democracies, Israel and America. This is about a consensus that Israels security is critical for the security of the United States. This is not about personalities. This is about shared values. And our two countries are partners for peace and security. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shakes hands as he leaves the House chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington,, March 3, 2015, after addressing a joint meeting of Congress. (Photo credit: AP/Andrew Harnik) Hoyer, who is currently leading a delegation of US congresspeople to Israel, said he attended Netanyahus speech at the time. I thought he spoke very well. I stood and clapped for things I supported, as others did, he said. But the essence is not personalities. Democrats are very supportive of Israel and that is our focus and continues to be our focus. Hoyer harshly criticized the Iran deal but eventually voted in favor of it. At Tuesdays press conference, he was asked whether support for Israel can really still be called a bipartisan issue, given that Democratic Senators voted against the nomination of David Friedman as US ambassador to Israel, and in light of the fact that three Democrats voted against a bill to cut American funding to the Palestinians if they do not cease paying terrorists and their families. Hoyer replied by pointing to a recent law that imposes additional sanctions on Iran, noting that not a single Democrat opposed the bill. The parties are very united, and the fact is that the parties are speaking with one voice, he said. Like in every parliament, there are differences of opinion between Republicans and Democrats in Congress, he said. But, the veteran legislator added, when you have votes regarding Israels well-being and safety, they are overwhelmingly bipartisan. Currently on his 15th trip to Israel, Hoyer said he and Republican House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, who is also currently leading a congressional delegation to Israel, agreed to spend some time together to signal that American support for the Jewish state is unwavering and entirely bipartisan. The Democratic delegation, which arrived first, met with Netanyahu on Monday. He is slated to host the Republicans in his Jerusalem office on Wednesday. Both delegations are sponsored by the American Israel Education Foundation, a nonprofit affiliated with AIPAC. We have made a point to make sure we have an overlapping time here in Israel together, Republicans and Democrats. Because this is not a partisan issue. This is a bipartisan issue, McCarthy said, stressing that the US has no stronger alliance than that with Israel. Some of us are Democrats and some of us are Republicans. But were not here as Republicans and Democrats. Were here as Americans who support Israels security, its sovereignty and the safety of its people, Hoyer said, standing in front of the 50-some congresspeople of the two delegations. Were here because the United States and Israel are partners for peace and partners for security. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (C) meeting at his Jerusalem office with a 19-member delegation of Democratic members of Congress led by House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, August 7, 2017. (GPO) While congressional delegations usually are divided among party lines, this time they insisted on some overlap because leaders from both sides of the aisle felt the need to send a message of solidarity with Israel and of solidarity with the people of Israel, a solidarity we know is necessary if we are to defeat those, not only in the Middle East about around the world, who [through] terrorism and violence put at risk our democracies and our way of life, Hoyer said. Most of the 52 congresspeople 33 Republicans and 19 Democrats currently in Israel are freshman lawmakers. They were briefed in Jerusalem and Ramallah and have been touring various sites across the country, including the borders with Lebanon, Jordan and Syria, and received a joint briefing about the Arrow missile defense system at the Palmachim Air Force base.

Fair Usage Law

August 8, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Iran’s Zarif hosts Hamas officials – The Times of Israel

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif met on Monday with a delegation of officials from the Palestinian terror group Hamas, which has been struggling with the continued erosion of its foreign backing. During the meeting, Zarif reiterated Tehrans support for the Palestinians as principled and unchangeable, according to reports in Iranian state media. The delegation of diaspora-based members of Hamass politburo was visiting Iran to attend the swearing-in ceremony of President Hassan Rouhani on Sunday. Iran was once Hamass key political and financial backer, but ties began to unravel in 2012, largely due to differences over the civil war in Syria. In May, Iran agreed in principle to renew its funding for Hamas, and senior Palestinian officials were said to be traveling to Tehran to repair relations. Irans Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, pictured here in Tehran with Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh. (photo credit: AP) Last week, Palestinian Authority officials claimed Iran provided aid to Palestinian protesters demonstrating against Israeli security measures at the Temple Mount last month. The aid reportedly included boxes of food and drink, which came with a flyer attached depicting the Dome of the Rock and a quote attributed to Irans Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei reading, With the help of God, Palestine will be freed. Jerusalem is ours. A PA intelligence official told an Israeli newspaper at the time it was clear the Iranian regime was behind the aid packages, and estimated the initiative cost several million shekels. The move angered the PA leadership, with the unnamed official telling the Israel Hayom daily it was a mistake to allow Iran to reach into the West Bank with its tentacles. Mondays meeting in Tehran comes as Qatar, one of the other few foreign backers of Hamas, continues to face massive pressure from its Gulf neighbors to cut ties with the terrorist group. If it does, the result could be disastrous for the Gaza Strip, a territory Hamas has ruled for a decade. Qatar has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in roads, housing and a major hospital in the tiny enclave. Its infrastructure projects are one of the few job-creators in a beleaguered economy. Gaza already suffers from an Israeli-Egyptian blockade imposed to prevent the group from importing weaponry economic misery and chronic electricity shortages. For Hamas, Qatars money pumping into the economy is a vital lifeline bolstering its rule. Closer ties between Hamas and Iran are hardly likely to mollify the Gulf states and Egypt. One of the main factors driving the crisis is Qatars close ties to Tehran and fears of expanding Iranian influence further destabilizing the region. Times of Israel staff contributed to this report.

Fair Usage Law

August 7, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Column: US needs to stand up to Iran – The Detroit News

Lena Epstein Published 10:48 p.m. ET Aug. 6, 2017 U.S. policy has essentially boosted Tehrans ability to foment terrorism and threaten American interests, Lena Epstein writes.(Photo: Vahid Salemi / AP) When Sen. Debbie Stabenow joined 41 of her Democratic Senate colleagues to vote for the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, more commonly known as the Iran nuclear deal, back in 2015, they made a catastrophic foreign policy mistake that has left the U.S, Israel, and the international community at large much less secure. As recently as July 27, their mistake once again became painfully obvious when Iran conducted a successful launch of a long-range missile into space: such a blatant pretext for continued advancement of its ICBM program, youd have to be completely naive not to realize it. But, given the terms of the deal negotiated under President Obama, this type of activity isnt a violation of the nuclear deal. Iran is free to continue testing and perfecting its nuclear delivery systems, just as long as it doesnt enrich uranium or plutonium to dangerous levels. This is not what I consider a comprehensive plan to keep nuclear weapons out of the hands of the worlds most prolific state sponsor of terror, the same state that has explicitly called for the annihilation of the state of Israel. As a result of the deal, Iran has experienced a windfall of cash flowing into its coffers. With sanctions eased and foreign assets unfrozen, Iran has had an influx of over $100 billion, which it has used to double down on terrorist activities, and dramatically expand its military budget. The consequences can be felt throughout the already unstable Middle East as Iran provides support to Hamas and Hezbollah, and actively works to further destabilize Syria by sending thousands of its Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) to support Bashar al-Assads brutal regime that has slaughtered and displaced millions of Syrians. U.S. policy has essentially bolstered Irans ability to carry out these terrorist activities and threaten American interests in the region, including putting American service members, stationed in the Middle East, at risk. This cannot continue. A nuclear-armed Iran poses an existential threat to one of our closest allies, Israel, and puts American security in jeopardy. Both of our U.S. senators here in Michigan Stabenow and Gary Peters voted in favor of this reprehensible deal. Stabenows vote on the Iran deal is one of the key factors that spurred me, an American, a Jewish woman, and a staunch supporter of Israel, to enter the U.S. Senate race and take her on next November. A member of Congress is no friend of Israel if he or she doesnt vote in our close allys best interest when it counts the most when there is a deal on the table that puts the Jewish states very existence in danger. The American people opposed the Iran deal by a 2 to 1 margin, and yet were in this perilous situation because Stabenow pushed it through anyway. We cant keep sending the same people back to Washington and expect different results. We need elected officials who support Israel because its a moral obligation, not because its politically expedient. Lena Epstein is the third-generation owner and general manager of Southfield-based Vesco Oil Corp. Read or Share this story: http://detne.ws/2ufgmsn

Fair Usage Law

August 7, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Trump’s Alice-in-Wonderland approach to the Iran deal – Los Angeles Times

Heres an international crisis you can, unusually, put on your calendar ahead of time: In October, President Trump wants to declare Iran in violation of the 2015 agreement to limit its nuclear program a decision that would allow the United States to reimpose tough economic sanctions on anyone trading with Tehran. Its a bad idea. The nuclear deal isnt perfect it doesnt end Irans nuclear research, only limits it for a period of years but its much better than nothing. Before the agreement, Tehran was believed to be less than a year from making nuclear weapons that would have threatened Israel and Saudi Arabia. Thanks to the accord, that doomsday problem has at least been postponed. That hasnt stopped Trump from calling the pact the worst deal ever and ordering aides to supply him with evidence that will allow him to declare it invalid. The most likely moment for his decision will come in October, the next time he is required to notify Congress whether Iran is in compliance. If it was up to me, I would have had them noncompliant 180 days ago, Trump told the Wall Street Journal last month. Next time, he added, I do not expect that they will be compliant. The president didnt offer any substantive reason to declare Iran out of compliance with the deal because there isnt one. His own aides told him last month that, while Iran has tested the edges of the agreement, none of its actions was a material breach, the legal standard that would allow sanctions to snap back. When Trump was warned that he couldnt simply walk away from the deal, he had a bit of a meltdown, an official told the New York Times. He chewed out the secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, who apparently brought him the bad news. And he ordered his staff to begin work on a new study one that will supply him with the excuses he needs. Thats an Alice-in-Wonderland approach to foreign policy: Verdict first, evidence later. And its not likely to work. No matter what the president thinks, the facts will get in the way. U.S. officials say Iran has been carefully upholding its main obligations under the nuclear agreement: reducing its uranium stocks and limiting its enrichment program. And none of the other six countries that negotiated the deal agree with Trump that the accord should be abrogated. The deal is working, and we believe it represents the best option for the international community, British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson wrote last month (and his government is friendlier to Trump than most). As a result, if Trump declares in October that Iran is in breach, most of the world including Britain, Germany and France will blame him for the consequences, not Tehran. That will create a major obstacle for the next step in Trumps course, which is to reimpose U.S. economic sanctions on foreign businesses that deal with Iran. (The nuclear deal didnt affect the embargo between the U.S. and Iran, which remains in effect.) If the United States is viewed as responsible for breaking the deal, other countries may refuse to go along with Trumps unilateral sanctions, making them largely toothless. Nobody else wants the deal to fail, said Elizabeth Rosenberg of the Center for New American Security, who worked on sanctions in the Obama administration. If the U.S. is the only one that walks away, who is going to enforce new sanctions? You could easily see European leaders deciding to defend their own companies instead. Last month, the French energy giant Total signed a contract for a $5-billion natural gas project in Iran. If Trump tries to impose sanctions on deals like that, the result wont be merely a confrontation with Iran; it will be a clash with the EU. There is an alternative Trump could try. Its called diplomacy. He could press for stricter enforcement of the nuclear agreement, beginning with the restrictions Iran has placed on international inspectors access to military bases. He could seek stronger international sanctions on Iran for its ballistic missile tests, which arent covered by the nuclear deal. And he could begin negotiations toward a new agreement to maintain the curbs on Irans nuclear program after 2026, when the current limits begin to expire. But the president hasnt pursued those options, even though theyve been offered to him by his own aides. Instead, he appears hellbent on fulfilling a bad campaign promise he should now have the wisdom to abandon. (Thats a prayer more than a hope.) Tearing up the deal wont bring down Irans regime most of Tehrans ruling clerics welcome the enmity of the United States but it will set up a collision between the Trump administration and most of the world, including China, Russia and U.S. allies in Europe. The most likely losers would be the Western alliance, already battered by Trumps disdain, and whatever remains of the United States tattered claim to international leadership. And the most likely winner, oddly enough, would be Vladimir Putins Russia, the beneficiary of yet another wedge between United States and its NATO allies this one driven by Trump alone, without Moscows help. doyle.mcmanus@latimes.com Twitter: @DoyleMcManus Follow the Opinion section on Twitter @latimesopinion or Facebook

Fair Usage Law

August 6, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Israel offers to take Iranian blogger from Turkey – Reuters

JERUSALEM (Reuters) – Israel offered asylum on Sunday to a Turkey-based Iranian blogger who it said faced forcible deportation to Iran, where she would be at risk given her work for an Israeli news site. The Times of Israel has said that Neda Amin, its Persian-language blogger, left Iran in 2014 for Turkey. She has been in a court battle to prevent her repatriation and has sought other countries that might take her in as a refugee, the site said. Hostility between the two countries means that Iranians are generally not admitted to Israel. But following appeals by Israel’s journalist federations, Interior Minister Aryeh Deri said he would issue 32-year-old Amin with a special visa. “This is a journalist whose life is in real danger,” Deri said in a statement. “Given the clear humanitarian circumstances, I authorized her entry without delay.” Writing by Dan Williams; Editing by Richard Balmforth

Fair Usage Law

August 6, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Rouhani gets Iranian supreme leader’s nod as second-term president, faces risks – Reuters

ANKARA (Reuters) – Hassan Rouhani won the endorsement of Iran’s supreme leader for his second term of president on Thursday after an easy election win, pledging to open Iran to foreign trade and investment but facing internal hardline resistance and renewed U.S. antagonism. Under Rouhani’s watch, Iran emerged from international isolation in 2015 when it struck a deal with six world powers to curb its disputed nuclear program in exchange for the lifting of financial and economic sanctions in place for a decade. But his quest to parlay fragile detente with the West into financial infusions to rebuild Iran’s oil-based economy has been slowed by investors’ fears of pre-existing U.S. sanctions and suspicions among powerful hardline acolytes of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei of any rise in Western influence. The new U.S. sanctions could embolden Rouhani’s conservative rivals who say the nuclear deal was a form of capitulation. An elite insider who has held senior political and military posts since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, Rouhani comes off as a pragmatist unlike Khamenei and his allies, and analysts have cast doubt on his ability to balance their demands and the expectations of his often young and more liberal supporters. Khamenei, who has the last word on all major issues of state, formally endorsed Rouhani as president in a ceremony broadcast live on state television on Thursday, after the pragmatist romped to re-election on May 19. Addressing religious, military and political leaders, Khamenei prayed for “the success of a worthy person”. Handing the presidential mandate to Rouhani, Khamenei kissed him on the cheek and the president kissed the Supreme Leader on his shoulder, a sign of supplication. Khamenei again called for economic self-sufficiency and a “resistance economy”, a stance arising from his repeated criticism of the halting pace of economic recovery since most international sanctions on Iran were lifted early last year. Rouhani will be sworn in on Saturday and then have two weeks to present his cabinet to parliament for a vote of confidence. “The government’s aim is to improve Iran’s image in the world …, to safeguard people’s rights…, to end poverty…, to protect the religious democracy and our people’s votes,” Rouhani said in a speech at the ceremony. Analysts said Rouhani may struggle to make a significant impact given sharpening divisions in the dual clerical-republican power structure, and Washington’s return to an aggressive Iran policy since Donald Trump took office. “Hardliners will try even harder than in Rouhani’s first term to make him look like a lame duck president … It will be very difficult for Rouhani to deliver on the economy,” said Meir Javdanfar, an Iranian-born expert on the Islamic Republic at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya in Israel. Rouhani’s own supporters have expressed concern over his inability to include women as ministers in his new cabinet because of pressure from religious hardliners. Javdanfar said the new U.S. sanctions on Iran signed by Trump into law on Wednesday, along with measures against Russia and North Korea would likely deter foreign investors and so undermine Rouhani’s efforts to boost the economy. Rouhani stuck to an upbeat outlook in his speech. “The nuclear deal is a sign of Iran’s goodwill on the international stage…Iran will never be isolated,” he said. During his 2016 election campaign, Trump blasted the nuclear agreement – negotiated under his predecessor Barack Obama – as “the worst deal ever” but not followed through on threats to pull the United States out of it. But Iran’s deputy foreign minister said the fresh sanctions violated provisions of the nuclear deal and vowed an “appropriate and proportional” response. “Imposing new sanctions on Iran by America is a reactionary, illegitimate and irrational move,” state television quoted Foreign Ministry spokesman Bahram Qassemi as saying on Thursday. Reporting by Parisa Hafezi; Editing by Mark Heinrich

Fair Usage Law

August 3, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed

Iran’s ties to US universities an infiltration to fear – Washington Times

ANALYSIS/OPINION: Rep. Dan Donovan wants the feds to look into some curious grants given to the likes of Columbia, Harvard and Princeton that came from a foundation with a pro-Iran, anti-Israel slant. This is an investigation that should definitely go forth, and the sooner, the far better. The Alavi Foundation was deemed in June by jurors in Manhattans federal court of illegally managing 650 Fifth Ave. on behalf of Iran. Now, its this same group, the Alavi Foundation, thats been tied to the funding of certain professors at these Ivy American schools and others around the U.S. who are decidedly anti-Israel and pro-Iran in their teachings. As Donovan said, the New York Post reported: Did this foundation attempt to subvert American academic institutions? Good question. And one that raises the knee-jerk reaction that better vetting of donors by university folk is needed. But this goes deeper than a funding concern. Critics are worried the foundation dollars may have been used to purposely plant pro-Iran professors within the U.S. university system. Its not out of the realm of possibility. This is what acting U.S. Attorney Joon Kim said in late June, while making the case against Alavi: For over a decade, hiding in plain sight, this 36-story Manhattan office tower secretly served as as front for the Iranian government and as a gateway for millions of dollars to be funneled to Iran in clear violation of U.S. sanctions laws. And now, this same group has reportedly sent millions of dollars into dozens of Americas top-ranking colleges and universities? For what purposes? If the money came with strings attached say, stipulations that certain professors must be hired, or that certain doctrines should be taught then this is a radical infiltration of dangerous proportions, pure and simple. Donovan said hes going to contact the secretary of the Department of Education, along with various congressional committees, and ask for an investigation. One needs to be conducted, and pronto. And if untoward infiltration has occurred, then justice beginning with firings of compromised professors and complicit administrators should be both swift and harsh.

Fair Usage Law

August 3, 2017   Posted in: Iran  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."