Archive for the ‘ISIS’ Category

British soldier drowns ISIS thug in puddle after being ambushed in Iraq, report says – Fox News

A brave British soldier reportedly drowned an evil ISIS fighter in a puddle after the terror group surrounded a group of Special Boat Service troopers in Iraq.

After the fearless special forces fighters ran out of bullets, they decided to go out fighting and used their knives and bare hands to kill as many brainwashed extremists as possible.

In an extraordinary survival story, another Brit soldier killed three militant thugs using his rifle as a club, reportsThe Daily Star.

An Iraqi fighter in Mosul on July 3. (REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah)

The heroic members of the Royal Navys Special Boat Service reportedly were convinced they were going to die after being outnumbered and encircled after being ambushed by around 50 ISIS fighters near Mosul.

After killing at least 20 of the terrorists, the elite group realized they had around 10 bullets left between them and were trapped in a small river bed, the report said.

SYRIAN MILITARY DECLARES TEMPORARY CEASE-FIRE

Faced with the prospect of being captured and tortured, the men opted for a soldiers death and decided to fight like crazed warriors to kill as many of the extremists as possible.

Speaking with the Star, the source said: They knew that if they were captured they would be tortured and decapitated.

QATAR CRISIS DEADLINE EXTENDED

Rather than die on their knees, they went for a soldiers death and charged the IS fighters who were moving along the river bed.

They were screaming and swearing as they set about the terrorists.

Click for more from The Sun.

More here:

British soldier drowns ISIS thug in puddle after being ambushed in Iraq, report says – Fox News

Fair Usage Law

July 4, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

Mosul: Iraqi Forces Continue Battle to Retake the Entire City From ISIS – NBCNews.com


NBCNews.com
Mosul: Iraqi Forces Continue Battle to Retake the Entire City From ISIS
NBCNews.com
Mosul: Iraqi Forces Continue Battle to Retake the Entire City From ISIS. Mon, Jul 03. U.S. officials tell NBC Nightly News that ISIS' hold on Mosul is down pockets of resistance after three years of occupation. Richard Engel reports from Iraq. Share

and more »

See the rest here:

Mosul: Iraqi Forces Continue Battle to Retake the Entire City From ISIS – NBCNews.com

Fair Usage Law

July 4, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS Militants Live Among Liberated Civilians in Mosul, Say Residents – NBCNews.com

BAGHDAD, Iraq Residents of ISIS’s former Iraqi stronghold of Mosul have warned that extremists were still living among civilians in parts of the city liberated by U.S.-backed troops.

There are at least 30 ISIS terrorists in my neighborhood. We know them very well, said Mohammed Sinan, an unemployed businessman who lives in the Al-Andulus area in eastern Mosul that was recaptured in January.

Zuher Al-Juburi, a government-appointed city councilor in Mosul, told NBC News there were hundreds of ISIS members living throughout the city. NBC News could not verify these accounts.

The only thing they did is they shaved their beards and changed their clothes, he said late Saturday.

Al-Juburi, who is also the spokesman for Nineveh Hashed, a Sunni militia that fought against ISIS in Mosul, told NBC News that ISIS members remain active in the city.

It is wrong to say that these are sleeping ISIS cells, because they are active and launch terror attacks from time to time, he said.

Not all of the ISIS members still living in Mosul are fighters, according to Al-Juburi. Some simply advocate the group’s extreme interpretation of Islam and support it with money, he said.

Sinan and Al-Juburi spoke to NBC News via the telephone from Mosul, which was captured by ISIS in June, 2014, as the extremists stormed swathes of Iraq and neighboring Syria.

On Thursday, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi declared victory over ISIS’s so-called caliphate in Iraq after troops captured the city’s destroyed Grand al-Nuri Mosque. The win was deeply symbolic: ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi announced the group’s caliphate almost three years ago from the 850-year-old religious site.

The return of Nuri mosque and minaret of Hadba today after being [destroyed] by ISIS marks the end of Daesh State falsehood, said al-Abadi, referring to the group’s name in Arabic. We will continue chasing ISIS until we kill and arrest [every] last one of them.

U.S.-backed forces continued squeezing ISIS militants in Mosul’s Old City through the weekend.

Troops have been battling for months to free the northern city with fighting concentrated in the narrow streets of Mosuls Old City in recent weeks.

Related: Iraqi Forces Push Through ISIS-held Mosul as Civilians Flee

The warren of alleys around the al-Nuri mosque in the west of the city is believed to be ISISs last enclave in Mosul, once Iraq’s second-largest city.

Last week, ISIS fighters targeted a local market in eastern Mosul, detonating their suicide vests among shoppers and traders, according to Al-Juburi.

In the same week 45 ISIS members launched an attack on the Al-Tanak neighborhood in western Mosul killing civilians, he added.

Militants had also conducted targeted killings including the assassination of two mayors in the east of the city, he said.

An Iraqi soldier holds a weapon in front of the ruined Grand al-Nuri mosque in the Old City of Mosul. ERIK DE CASTRO / Reuters

Sinan, the former businessman, says he feels the threat of ISIS on a daily basis.

These terrorists are like a ticking time bomb, they are ready to either explode or to carry out many terror attacks against people,” the 43-year-old said.

Locals are afraid to report the fighters to the authorities, said Sinan.

He told NBC News that last month residents of his neighborhood reported four ISIS fighters to the security forces. Three of whom were released the following week.

I am afraid to go to security authorities [either the police or Iraqi troops] to give them information about a terrorist because he might be released, Sinan said. He might know I was the one who went to the security authorities and then I might be killed.

Al-Juburi said corruption is widespread.

Some of them pay [authorities] $200 to get documents which prove they are not affiliated with ISIS which means they can go everywhere in Iraq free,” he said.

Al-Juburi said he agreed that the caliphate had fallen but warned that ISIS still exists.

Civilians flee the Old City on Saturday as Iraqi forces battled some of the last members of the ISIS in the city. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP – Getty Images

ISIS is defeated as an organisation, but it is not defeated as a terror group. There is no Islamic State anymore but their fighters and supporters are still there and they are ready to carry out terrorist attacks at any time, he said.

One difficulty, Al-Juburi added, was that many families of deceased ISIS fighters still believed in ISISs extremist ideology and would pass on their beliefs to their sons.

To truly rid Mosul of ISIS militants, security forces needed to check each neighborhood for supporters by talking to locals as they liberated each area, Al-Juburi said.

He added that Mosul needed a prison so suspects could be detained before being tried in court. In the short-term the suspected militants should be sent to the Iraqi capital Baghdad to be imprisoned, he said.

An NBC News producer reported from Baghdad. Saphora Smith reported from London.

See the rest here:

ISIS Militants Live Among Liberated Civilians in Mosul, Say Residents – NBCNews.com

Fair Usage Law

July 2, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS fighters’ wives reveal their concerns about husbands spoiling sex slaves with lipstick but say they had no … – The Sun

Group of terror brides speak of their jealousy over trafficked sex slaves being traded using sick phone apps

ISIS brides have revealed their jealousy of their terrorist husbands obsession with sex slaves but have not condemned their murderous ideology.

Dubbed the Desperate Housewives of ISIS, the seven women are being looked after at a Syrian refugee camp after fleeing from Raqqa.

Reuters

The so-called capital of the Islamic States crumbling caliphate is on the verge of being liberated by Western backed Iraqi and Kurdish forces.

They told an Arabic TV channel that they were concerned with their twisted partners buying lipstick and clothes for other trafficked women.

And they revealed that sick ISIS thugs would trade in slaves using APPS on their phone to share photos and barter in trapped girls.

But they failed to show any emotion when questioned about ISISs brutal campaign of torture and execution.

There was a lot of tension between the wives and the sex slaves, an ISIS bride originally from Lebannon said according to The Times.

Some of the wives even divorced their husbands because of that. They were spending too much on the sex slaves, buying them the best make-up, clothes and accessories.

Reuters

On the sick sex slave app, she added: It was a market for sex slaves.

They were sharing photos of the sex slaves with the best make-up and clothes, and asking $2,000 for this one, $3,000 for that one. A virgin cost $10,000.

One even let slip that many women were attracted to evil Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi the self-styled ISIS chief who was last month reported to have been killed in a Russian airstrike.

Only Baghdadi satisfies me, she said, before another responded: Dont bother, he is already taken.

Reuters

When asked by reporterJenan Moussa if they would condemn the terrorists unparalleled brutality, they responded that it had nothing to do with them.

ISIS deceived us with propaganda, one replied.

The women, who were picked up as they attempted to cross into Turkey, are all being kept in a separate part of the camp atAin Issa, north of Raqqa, Syria over fears they may be attacked for their ISIS connections.

Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us attips@the-sun.co.ukor call 0207 782 4368

See the article here:

ISIS fighters’ wives reveal their concerns about husbands spoiling sex slaves with lipstick but say they had no … – The Sun

Fair Usage Law

July 2, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

VIDEO: ISIS blows up Syrian military helicopter with ATGM in Deir Ezzor – AMN Al-Masdar News (registration)

BEIRUT, LEBANON (3:40 P.M.) Today the ISIS-linked Amaq news agency released footage of an Islamic State anti-tank guided missile (ATGM) team hitting, at extreme range, a Syrian Arab Air Force (SyAAF) Mi-8 (or Mi-17) transport helicopter landing near the al-Assad Hospital in the western sector of the city of Deir Ezzor.

Although besieged pro-government forces in Deir Ezzor remain in control of key zones which protect the western and southern approaches to the government-held sections of the city namely the 137th Brigade Base and Deir Ezzor Military Airport from ISIS attacks, the overall strategic situation for pro-government forces remains exceptionally uncomfortable. The indisputable territorial advantage held by ISIS over the Deir Ezzor battlespace (i.e. the terrorist groups total surrounding of pro-government forces) means that pro-government forces remain very vulnerable to such attacks as shown in the video below.

In mid-January of this year, ISIS launched a massive offensive against pro-government forces in Deir Ezzor, managing to split the besieged pocket into two, isolating the military airport from the government-held sections of the city and the 137th Brigade Base to a distance of several kilometres. Further erosion of the Deir Ezzor bastion took place again in June when ISIS captured key points south of the 137th Brigade Base, including the Panorama Driving School and the SyriaTel hill; the capture of the latter area in particular gave ISIS fire control over the 137th Brigade Base helicopter landing pads, compelling pro-government forces to build a new landing zone out of the jihadist militant groups line-of-sight. Pro-government forces are yet to reverse any of the major gains made by ISIS since the beginning of 2017.

ALSO READ Ahrar al-Sham publishes info-graphic on battle against ISIS in Daraa

Advertisement

Here is the original post:

VIDEO: ISIS blows up Syrian military helicopter with ATGM in Deir Ezzor – AMN Al-Masdar News (registration)

Fair Usage Law

July 2, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

Analysis: Can ISIS be ousted from Syria without Assad’s help? – Military Times

BEIRUT As the U.S.-led coalition tightens the noose around the Islamic State group in Syria, President Bashar Assad’s Iranian-backed troops are also seizing back territory from the militants with little protest from Washington, a sign of how American options are limited without a powerful ally on the ground.

Washington is loath to cooperate with Assad’s internationally ostracized government. But it will be difficult to uproot ISIS militants and keep them out with only the Kurdish and Arab militias backed by the U.S. and a coalition spokesman pointed out that Assad’s gains ease the burden on those forces.

Letting Assad grab ISIS territory, however, risks being seen as the U.S. legitimizing his continued rule and would likely strengthen his hand in his war against the already struggling rebellion. It also threatens to further empower Assad’s allies, Iran and the Lebanese Hezbollah, which both have forces alongside his troops in the assault into ISIS-held territory.

In this photo released on the official Facebook page of the Syrian Presidency, Syrian President Bashar Assad inspects the Russian Hmeimim air base in the province of Latakia, Syria, Tuesday, June 27, 2017. Photo Credit: Syrian Presidency/Facebook via AP Within the Trump administration, there is a split over whether to aggressively try to stem Assad’s advances, said a senior U.S. official, who wasn’t authorized to speak to reporters and requested anonymity.

Army Col. Ryan Dillon, the spokesman for the anti-ISIS coalition, said Syrian government forces are welcome to reclaim ISIS-held territory and fill the vacuum once the extremist group is gone.

The statement was startling even more so because soon after President Donald Trump this week warned Assad he would pay “a heavy price,” claiming “potential” evidence that Syria was preparing for another chemical weapons attack.

The mixed messages reveal a discomfiting fact that most policy makers would rather not spell out: Assad is a pariah but he is also a convenient tool to secure and govern territory in majority-Arab cities in a complex terrain.

The situation in Syria is a contrast to Iraq, where the coalition and the Iraqi government, working hand in glove, appear to be on the verge of retaking the main ISIS redoubt in city of Mosul.

The Syrian government has repeatedly suggested that everyone is welcome to work with it to defeat ISIS.

Mohammad Kheir Akkam, a Syrian lawmaker, questioned U.S. support for the Kurdish-led forces “despite the fact that the Syrian-Russian cooperation has achieved more results in combating terrorism,” while U.S. efforts have “had the opposite result.”

The U.S. so far has shunned any cooperation with the Syrian leader, whom Trump described as an “animal.” Instead, it has partnered with local Kurdish and Arab forces known as the Syrian Democratic Forces, or SDF.

But U.S. support for the Kurdish-led group has angered Turkey, which views it as an extension of a Kurdish insurgency within its own territory. The SDF is also viewed with suspicion by the predominantly Arab residents of Raqqa and Deir el-Zour.

Furthermore, the SDF, numbering around 50,000 fighters, is already risking overstretch and is in no way ready for the more challenging battle in Deir el-Zour.

The symbolism was striking this week as a smiling Assad paid a visit to central Hama, driving his own car, and to a Russian air base in western Syria, where he posed alongside Russian generals and inside the cockpit of a Russian SU-35 fighter jet.

Syrian troops have positioned themselves on Raqqa’s southwestern flanks, and officials have vowed to retake the city eventually.

The U.S. has insisted that the city should be handed over to a local council that would handle its administration post-liberation and it has made clear it will not tolerate the Syrian government and its allies cashing in on the fight. U.S. forces recently shot down a Syrian aircraft as well as drones believed connected to Iranian-supported forces as tensions escalated near a base where the coalition trains Syrian rebels.

But the senior American official said there was significant disagreement about how aggressively the U.S. should try to prevent Assad from reclaiming the territory ISIS vacates, with some in the White House pushing a more forceful approach while the State Department and the Pentagon warn of the risks.

Smoke rises from buildings following a reported air strike on a rebel-held area in the southern Syrian city of Daraa, on May 22, 2017. Photo Credit: Mohamad Abazeed/AFP via Getty Images Keeping Assad’s territory to a minimum would ensure his hand isn’t strengthened in an eventual political deal to end the conflict, making it more likely the U.S. could deliver on its longstanding desire to see him leave power. Limiting his control in eastern Syria would also prevent Iranian-backed forces from securing a wide corridor through Iraq to Syria and all the way into Lebanon.

The more risk-averse voices in Trump’s administration are wary about letting the U.S. slip into a more direct fight with Assad, the official said.

Dillon, the coalition spokesman, told reporters at the Pentagon that the U.S. goal is to defeat ISIS wherever it exists. If others, including the Syrian government and its Iranian and Russian allies, want to fight the extremists, “we absolutely have no problem with that.”

Frederic C. Hof, director of the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, said the comments reflect the narrow U.S. view of the Syria war, focused very specifically on the neutralization of IS.

In the coalition view, “it is all about killing ISIS in Raqqa.” Hof wrote in an article this week. “Creating conditions that would keep it dead? That, presumably, would be someone else’s job.”

Karam is the AP’s news director for Lebanon and Syria and has covered Syria since 1996. Lederman, who reported from Washington, has covered the White House and national politics for The Associated Press since 2012.

Read more here:

Analysis: Can ISIS be ousted from Syria without Assad’s help? – Military Times

Fair Usage Law

July 2, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS Revenue Falls 80 Percent as Militants Lose Ground in Iraq, Syria – NBCNews.com

An Iraqi soldier stands inside a compound ISIS used as a prison in Mosul. Alkis Konstantinidis / Reuters

Agriculture is not an unimportant source of income for them, he told NBC News.

Woertz explained that ISIS had previously been able to seize the wages of civil servants who lived in militant-held zones but were still being paid government wages. However, Iraq had ended the practice of paying wages into ISIS-controlled areas, cutting off a revenue stream to the militants.

It is also not a winning brand anymore, Woertz said. When it was gaining control of areas it had an image of invincibility for a little while or was able to project that image on social media but now it is a losing brand that attracts less overseas support in the form of donations.

Related:

As far as they want to be a state, they have failed, or are about to fail, Woertz said.

However, despite ISIS’s “caliphate” project appearing increasingly unsustainable, experts warned that conditions in the region were still ripe for Islamist violence.

“A great deal will depend on effective governance in areas [liberated from ISIS],” said Butter of Chatham House. “But it is still quite a mess. There are a lot of people pushing ISIS-style ideology and they may find some receptiveness in Iraq if the country continues to be governed in the way it has been.

“ISIS as weve known it is looking very much on the way out, but something else could replace it,” he added. “The ideology behind it is quite virulent.

Continued here:

ISIS Revenue Falls 80 Percent as Militants Lose Ground in Iraq, Syria – NBCNews.com

Fair Usage Law

July 1, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

Fight against ISIS ‘far from over’ despite terrorist group’s loss of Mosul – USA TODAY

A soldier aims an automatic rifle through a peephole in a wall at Raqqa city, Syria, on June, 11 2017.(Photo: Youssef Rabie Youssef, EPA)

The Islamic State remains a formidable global threat and still clings to large swaths of territory in Iraq and Syria despite the groups imminent loss of Mosul, Iraqs second-largest city.

This fight is far from over, said Jennifer Cafarella, an analyst at the Institute for the Study of War.

The Islamic State, which is also called ISIS, has proved capable of plotting terror attacks even as it has lost significant territory. Many of its leaders have already escaped Raqqa, its capital in Syria, and have fled to other strongholds inside the country.

Weve consistently been chasing ISIS communications node around the battlefield, Cafarella said.

Still, U.S. officials and analysts say pushing militants out of their major strongholds in Iraq and Syria is a critical first step to an overall defeat of the militant group, which emerged as a worldwide menacethree years ago when it swept through parts of Iraq and Syria.

The defeat of ISISin Mosul also frees thousands of Iraqis from the groups brutal rule. IraqPrime Minister Haider al-Abadi said this week that the groups self-proclaimed caliphate was finished and hailed it as a major victory over the terror group.

Several hundred militants remain in the city, but they are surrounded and losing more territory by the day. In Syria, U.S.-backed local forces have surrounded Raqqa and have begun an assault into the city.

The offensives in Raqqa and Mosul have put the terror group on the run and have forced the group to relinquish much of the territory it controlled at its peak in 2014.

But the group has also proved stubbornly resilient.

Some ISIS leaders have already fled to militant-controlled areas along the Euphrates River Valley south of Raqqa, which have become a key stronghold for the militants now that Mosul and Raqqa are under military pressure.

In Iraq, ISIS fighters still control Tal Afar a town west of Mosul in northern Iraq anddesert towns in the far reaches of western Iraq.

There still remains ISIS holdouts in both Iraq and Syria, said Col. Ryan Dillon, a U.S. military spokesman in Baghdad. We’ll continue to support and stand shoulder to shoulder with our partners in those fights.

The next stage of the battlein Iraq will be determined by Iraq’s government, the Pentagon said. The U.S. military said it would continue to provide advisers, airstrikes and other support for Iraq’s military.

Theres plenty of work left in this country, said Maj. Gen. Joseph Martin, a top coalition commander in Iraq.

The U.S. military has deployed about5,500 troops in Iraq to advise and train Iraqi forces and nearly 1,000 troops in Syria to support the Syrian Democratic Forces. The U.S.-led coalition has launched daily airstrikes that have crippled the Islamic State’s finances and leadership.

The Pentagon has said that ISISwill likely revert to a more conventional terror organization that operates from caves or other hiding places as it loses territory. But the loss of a caliphate will at minimum take away a key selling point to get recruits from around the world.

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

The sheer resiliency of the militantshave commanders concerned, however.The Islamic State’s anti-West ideology continues to appeal to some young people across the Middle East and the terror group has also capitalized on local grievances to gain support in some areas.

When I consider how much damage weve inflicted, and theyre still operational, theyre still capable of pulling off things like some of these recent terrorist attacks weve seen internationally, I think we have to conclude that we do not yet fully appreciate the scale or strength of this phenomenon, Lt. Gen. Michael Nagata, an official at the National Counterterrorism Center, said in an interview published by theCombating Terrorism Center at West Point.

Read more:

Iraqi military declares famed Mosul mosque captured, ISIS caliphate ‘has fallen’

ISIS spreads fake news about destroyed al-Nuri mosque

Desperate ISIS fighters using human shields as battle nears end in Mosul

Read or Share this story: https://usat.ly/2u7IZbz

Excerpt from:

Fight against ISIS ‘far from over’ despite terrorist group’s loss of Mosul – USA TODAY

Fair Usage Law

July 1, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

Why It’s Better to Capture Than Kill ISIS Terrorists – Newsweek

This article first appeared on the American Enterprise Institute site.

The Obama policy of killing high-value terrorists with airstrikes has continued unabated in the early months of the Trump administration. Last week, The New York Times reported:

Every couple of weeks, the United States Central Command, which oversees combat operations in the Middle East, announces the death of an Islamic State leader who has been killed in airstrikes.

Daily Emails and Alerts- Get the best of Newsweek delivered to your inbox

On Tuesday, it was Turki al-Binali, whom the American-led coalition called the self-proclaimed grand mufti or chief cleric of the Islamic State, killed in a May 31 airstrike in Mayadin, Syria. Two weeks before that, it was Samir Idris, whom the Defense Department said was a key Islamic State financier of attacks around the world, also killed near Mayadin.

On Friday, it was [Fawaz Muhammad Jubayr] Rawi, a Syrian labeled by the Pentagon an experienced terrorist financial facilitator, who moved millions of dollars for the Islamic States attack and logistics network.

Mr. Rawi owned a currency exchange that he used, along with a network of global financial contacts, to move money into and out of ISIS-controlled territory and across borders, a Defense Department statement said, using an acronym for the Islamic State. The Treasury Department had imposed sanctions on Mr. Rawi and his company in December.

The world is better with a man like Rawi off the battlefield, but the intelligence lost in such strikes is immense. Every time we vaporize a terrorist leader, we vaporize all the intelligence in their brains. We need that intelligence to keep the country safe. Dead terrorists cannot tell us their plans for new attacks.

A fighter from the Syriac Military Council (SMC), a small minority of Christian fighters supporting the Syrian Democratic Forces in the combat against ISIS, looks on as he guards a look out point in the suburb of al-Rumaniya on the western outskirts of Raqqa on June 27, 2017 after the area was seized from the jihadists. As the fightback against ISIS intensified the Syriac Military Council (SMC)formed in 2013 to defend the community during Syria’s civil warjoined with the SDF. After a months-long operation to encircle Raqqa, the SDF burst into the city on June 6 and are chipping away at jihadist-held districts, with help from heavy US-led coalition air strikes. DELIL SOULEIMAN/AFP/Getty

But there are signs the policy may be shifting. In a front page story Sunday, The Times also reported:

One late afternoon in April, helicopter-borne American commandos intercepted a vehicle in southeastern Syria carrying a close associate of the Islamic States supreme leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

The associate, Abdurakhmon Uzbeki, was a rare prize whom United States Special Operations forces had been tracking for months: a midlevel but highly trusted operative skilled in raising money; spiriting insurgent leaders out of Raqqa, the Islamic States besieged capital in Syria; and plotting attacks against the West. Captured alive, Mr. Uzbeki could be an intelligence bonanza. Federal prosecutors had already begun preparing criminal charges against him for possible prosecution in the United States.

As the commandos swooped in, however, a firefight broke out. Mr. Uzbeki, a combat-hardened veteran of shadow wars in Syria and Pakistan, died in the gun battle, thwarting the militarys hopes of extracting from him any information about Islamic State operations, leaders and strategy.

New details about the operation, and a similar episode in January that sought to seize another mid-level Islamic State operative, offer a rare glimpse into the handful of secret and increasingly risky commando raids of the secretive, nearly three-year American ground war against the Islamic State. Cellphones and other material swept up by Special Operations forces proved valuable for future raids, though the missions fell short of their goal to capture, not kill, terrorist leaders in order to obtain fresh, firsthand information about the inner circle and war council of the group, also known as ISIS.

This is good news. Shifting from air strikes to special operations raids carries risk, to be sure, but the rewards can be extraordinary even if the target is killed in a firefight, as Uzbeki was.

There is enormous value in the pocket litter terrorists leave behind cell phones, computers, thumb drives, diaries, and other documents which can provide insight into ISIS plans and operations.

When the US sends a drone to take out an ISIS leader, this vital intelligence is vaporized with the dead terrorist. When we send JSOC teams, it is preserved even if the terrorist is not.

Eventually, well capture one alive and, if the target is right, that will indeed be an intelligence bonanza.

Marc A. Thiessen is Resident Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

See more here:

Why It’s Better to Capture Than Kill ISIS Terrorists – Newsweek

Fair Usage Law

July 1, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

British soldier drowns ISIS thug in puddle after being ambushed in Iraq, report says – Fox News

A brave British soldier reportedly drowned an evil ISIS fighter in a puddle after the terror group surrounded a group of Special Boat Service troopers in Iraq. After the fearless special forces fighters ran out of bullets, they decided to go out fighting and used their knives and bare hands to kill as many brainwashed extremists as possible. In an extraordinary survival story, another Brit soldier killed three militant thugs using his rifle as a club, reportsThe Daily Star. An Iraqi fighter in Mosul on July 3. (REUTERS/Ahmed Jadallah) The heroic members of the Royal Navys Special Boat Service reportedly were convinced they were going to die after being outnumbered and encircled after being ambushed by around 50 ISIS fighters near Mosul. After killing at least 20 of the terrorists, the elite group realized they had around 10 bullets left between them and were trapped in a small river bed, the report said. SYRIAN MILITARY DECLARES TEMPORARY CEASE-FIRE Faced with the prospect of being captured and tortured, the men opted for a soldiers death and decided to fight like crazed warriors to kill as many of the extremists as possible. Speaking with the Star, the source said: They knew that if they were captured they would be tortured and decapitated. QATAR CRISIS DEADLINE EXTENDED Rather than die on their knees, they went for a soldiers death and charged the IS fighters who were moving along the river bed. They were screaming and swearing as they set about the terrorists. Click for more from The Sun.

Fair Usage Law

July 4, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

Mosul: Iraqi Forces Continue Battle to Retake the Entire City From ISIS – NBCNews.com

NBCNews.com Mosul: Iraqi Forces Continue Battle to Retake the Entire City From ISIS NBCNews.com Mosul: Iraqi Forces Continue Battle to Retake the Entire City From ISIS . Mon, Jul 03. U.S. officials tell NBC Nightly News that ISIS ' hold on Mosul is down pockets of resistance after three years of occupation. Richard Engel reports from Iraq. Share … and more »

Fair Usage Law

July 4, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS Militants Live Among Liberated Civilians in Mosul, Say Residents – NBCNews.com

BAGHDAD, Iraq Residents of ISIS’s former Iraqi stronghold of Mosul have warned that extremists were still living among civilians in parts of the city liberated by U.S.-backed troops. There are at least 30 ISIS terrorists in my neighborhood. We know them very well, said Mohammed Sinan, an unemployed businessman who lives in the Al-Andulus area in eastern Mosul that was recaptured in January. Zuher Al-Juburi, a government-appointed city councilor in Mosul, told NBC News there were hundreds of ISIS members living throughout the city. NBC News could not verify these accounts. The only thing they did is they shaved their beards and changed their clothes, he said late Saturday. Al-Juburi, who is also the spokesman for Nineveh Hashed, a Sunni militia that fought against ISIS in Mosul, told NBC News that ISIS members remain active in the city. It is wrong to say that these are sleeping ISIS cells, because they are active and launch terror attacks from time to time, he said. Not all of the ISIS members still living in Mosul are fighters, according to Al-Juburi. Some simply advocate the group’s extreme interpretation of Islam and support it with money, he said. Sinan and Al-Juburi spoke to NBC News via the telephone from Mosul, which was captured by ISIS in June, 2014, as the extremists stormed swathes of Iraq and neighboring Syria. On Thursday, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi declared victory over ISIS’s so-called caliphate in Iraq after troops captured the city’s destroyed Grand al-Nuri Mosque. The win was deeply symbolic: ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi announced the group’s caliphate almost three years ago from the 850-year-old religious site. The return of Nuri mosque and minaret of Hadba today after being [destroyed] by ISIS marks the end of Daesh State falsehood, said al-Abadi, referring to the group’s name in Arabic. We will continue chasing ISIS until we kill and arrest [every] last one of them. U.S.-backed forces continued squeezing ISIS militants in Mosul’s Old City through the weekend. Troops have been battling for months to free the northern city with fighting concentrated in the narrow streets of Mosuls Old City in recent weeks. Related: Iraqi Forces Push Through ISIS-held Mosul as Civilians Flee The warren of alleys around the al-Nuri mosque in the west of the city is believed to be ISISs last enclave in Mosul, once Iraq’s second-largest city. Last week, ISIS fighters targeted a local market in eastern Mosul, detonating their suicide vests among shoppers and traders, according to Al-Juburi. In the same week 45 ISIS members launched an attack on the Al-Tanak neighborhood in western Mosul killing civilians, he added. Militants had also conducted targeted killings including the assassination of two mayors in the east of the city, he said. An Iraqi soldier holds a weapon in front of the ruined Grand al-Nuri mosque in the Old City of Mosul. ERIK DE CASTRO / Reuters Sinan, the former businessman, says he feels the threat of ISIS on a daily basis. These terrorists are like a ticking time bomb, they are ready to either explode or to carry out many terror attacks against people,” the 43-year-old said. Locals are afraid to report the fighters to the authorities, said Sinan. He told NBC News that last month residents of his neighborhood reported four ISIS fighters to the security forces. Three of whom were released the following week. I am afraid to go to security authorities [either the police or Iraqi troops] to give them information about a terrorist because he might be released, Sinan said. He might know I was the one who went to the security authorities and then I might be killed. Al-Juburi said corruption is widespread. Some of them pay [authorities] $200 to get documents which prove they are not affiliated with ISIS which means they can go everywhere in Iraq free,” he said. Al-Juburi said he agreed that the caliphate had fallen but warned that ISIS still exists. Civilians flee the Old City on Saturday as Iraqi forces battled some of the last members of the ISIS in the city. AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP – Getty Images ISIS is defeated as an organisation, but it is not defeated as a terror group. There is no Islamic State anymore but their fighters and supporters are still there and they are ready to carry out terrorist attacks at any time, he said. One difficulty, Al-Juburi added, was that many families of deceased ISIS fighters still believed in ISISs extremist ideology and would pass on their beliefs to their sons. To truly rid Mosul of ISIS militants, security forces needed to check each neighborhood for supporters by talking to locals as they liberated each area, Al-Juburi said. He added that Mosul needed a prison so suspects could be detained before being tried in court. In the short-term the suspected militants should be sent to the Iraqi capital Baghdad to be imprisoned, he said. An NBC News producer reported from Baghdad. Saphora Smith reported from London.

Fair Usage Law

July 2, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS fighters’ wives reveal their concerns about husbands spoiling sex slaves with lipstick but say they had no … – The Sun

Group of terror brides speak of their jealousy over trafficked sex slaves being traded using sick phone apps ISIS brides have revealed their jealousy of their terrorist husbands obsession with sex slaves but have not condemned their murderous ideology. Dubbed the Desperate Housewives of ISIS, the seven women are being looked after at a Syrian refugee camp after fleeing from Raqqa. Reuters The so-called capital of the Islamic States crumbling caliphate is on the verge of being liberated by Western backed Iraqi and Kurdish forces. They told an Arabic TV channel that they were concerned with their twisted partners buying lipstick and clothes for other trafficked women. And they revealed that sick ISIS thugs would trade in slaves using APPS on their phone to share photos and barter in trapped girls. But they failed to show any emotion when questioned about ISISs brutal campaign of torture and execution. There was a lot of tension between the wives and the sex slaves, an ISIS bride originally from Lebannon said according to The Times. Some of the wives even divorced their husbands because of that. They were spending too much on the sex slaves, buying them the best make-up, clothes and accessories. Reuters On the sick sex slave app, she added: It was a market for sex slaves. They were sharing photos of the sex slaves with the best make-up and clothes, and asking $2,000 for this one, $3,000 for that one. A virgin cost $10,000. One even let slip that many women were attracted to evil Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi the self-styled ISIS chief who was last month reported to have been killed in a Russian airstrike. Only Baghdadi satisfies me, she said, before another responded: Dont bother, he is already taken. Reuters When asked by reporterJenan Moussa if they would condemn the terrorists unparalleled brutality, they responded that it had nothing to do with them. ISIS deceived us with propaganda, one replied. The women, who were picked up as they attempted to cross into Turkey, are all being kept in a separate part of the camp atAin Issa, north of Raqqa, Syria over fears they may be attacked for their ISIS connections. Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us attips@the-sun.co.ukor call 0207 782 4368

Fair Usage Law

July 2, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

VIDEO: ISIS blows up Syrian military helicopter with ATGM in Deir Ezzor – AMN Al-Masdar News (registration)

BEIRUT, LEBANON (3:40 P.M.) Today the ISIS-linked Amaq news agency released footage of an Islamic State anti-tank guided missile (ATGM) team hitting, at extreme range, a Syrian Arab Air Force (SyAAF) Mi-8 (or Mi-17) transport helicopter landing near the al-Assad Hospital in the western sector of the city of Deir Ezzor. Although besieged pro-government forces in Deir Ezzor remain in control of key zones which protect the western and southern approaches to the government-held sections of the city namely the 137th Brigade Base and Deir Ezzor Military Airport from ISIS attacks, the overall strategic situation for pro-government forces remains exceptionally uncomfortable. The indisputable territorial advantage held by ISIS over the Deir Ezzor battlespace (i.e. the terrorist groups total surrounding of pro-government forces) means that pro-government forces remain very vulnerable to such attacks as shown in the video below. In mid-January of this year, ISIS launched a massive offensive against pro-government forces in Deir Ezzor, managing to split the besieged pocket into two, isolating the military airport from the government-held sections of the city and the 137th Brigade Base to a distance of several kilometres. Further erosion of the Deir Ezzor bastion took place again in June when ISIS captured key points south of the 137th Brigade Base, including the Panorama Driving School and the SyriaTel hill; the capture of the latter area in particular gave ISIS fire control over the 137th Brigade Base helicopter landing pads, compelling pro-government forces to build a new landing zone out of the jihadist militant groups line-of-sight. Pro-government forces are yet to reverse any of the major gains made by ISIS since the beginning of 2017. ALSO READ Ahrar al-Sham publishes info-graphic on battle against ISIS in Daraa Advertisement

Fair Usage Law

July 2, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

Analysis: Can ISIS be ousted from Syria without Assad’s help? – Military Times

BEIRUT As the U.S.-led coalition tightens the noose around the Islamic State group in Syria, President Bashar Assad’s Iranian-backed troops are also seizing back territory from the militants with little protest from Washington, a sign of how American options are limited without a powerful ally on the ground. Washington is loath to cooperate with Assad’s internationally ostracized government. But it will be difficult to uproot ISIS militants and keep them out with only the Kurdish and Arab militias backed by the U.S. and a coalition spokesman pointed out that Assad’s gains ease the burden on those forces. Letting Assad grab ISIS territory, however, risks being seen as the U.S. legitimizing his continued rule and would likely strengthen his hand in his war against the already struggling rebellion. It also threatens to further empower Assad’s allies, Iran and the Lebanese Hezbollah, which both have forces alongside his troops in the assault into ISIS-held territory. In this photo released on the official Facebook page of the Syrian Presidency, Syrian President Bashar Assad inspects the Russian Hmeimim air base in the province of Latakia, Syria, Tuesday, June 27, 2017. Photo Credit: Syrian Presidency/Facebook via AP Within the Trump administration, there is a split over whether to aggressively try to stem Assad’s advances, said a senior U.S. official, who wasn’t authorized to speak to reporters and requested anonymity. Army Col. Ryan Dillon, the spokesman for the anti-ISIS coalition, said Syrian government forces are welcome to reclaim ISIS-held territory and fill the vacuum once the extremist group is gone. The statement was startling even more so because soon after President Donald Trump this week warned Assad he would pay “a heavy price,” claiming “potential” evidence that Syria was preparing for another chemical weapons attack. The mixed messages reveal a discomfiting fact that most policy makers would rather not spell out: Assad is a pariah but he is also a convenient tool to secure and govern territory in majority-Arab cities in a complex terrain. The situation in Syria is a contrast to Iraq, where the coalition and the Iraqi government, working hand in glove, appear to be on the verge of retaking the main ISIS redoubt in city of Mosul. The Syrian government has repeatedly suggested that everyone is welcome to work with it to defeat ISIS. Mohammad Kheir Akkam, a Syrian lawmaker, questioned U.S. support for the Kurdish-led forces “despite the fact that the Syrian-Russian cooperation has achieved more results in combating terrorism,” while U.S. efforts have “had the opposite result.” The U.S. so far has shunned any cooperation with the Syrian leader, whom Trump described as an “animal.” Instead, it has partnered with local Kurdish and Arab forces known as the Syrian Democratic Forces, or SDF. But U.S. support for the Kurdish-led group has angered Turkey, which views it as an extension of a Kurdish insurgency within its own territory. The SDF is also viewed with suspicion by the predominantly Arab residents of Raqqa and Deir el-Zour. Furthermore, the SDF, numbering around 50,000 fighters, is already risking overstretch and is in no way ready for the more challenging battle in Deir el-Zour. The symbolism was striking this week as a smiling Assad paid a visit to central Hama, driving his own car, and to a Russian air base in western Syria, where he posed alongside Russian generals and inside the cockpit of a Russian SU-35 fighter jet. Syrian troops have positioned themselves on Raqqa’s southwestern flanks, and officials have vowed to retake the city eventually. The U.S. has insisted that the city should be handed over to a local council that would handle its administration post-liberation and it has made clear it will not tolerate the Syrian government and its allies cashing in on the fight. U.S. forces recently shot down a Syrian aircraft as well as drones believed connected to Iranian-supported forces as tensions escalated near a base where the coalition trains Syrian rebels. But the senior American official said there was significant disagreement about how aggressively the U.S. should try to prevent Assad from reclaiming the territory ISIS vacates, with some in the White House pushing a more forceful approach while the State Department and the Pentagon warn of the risks. Smoke rises from buildings following a reported air strike on a rebel-held area in the southern Syrian city of Daraa, on May 22, 2017. Photo Credit: Mohamad Abazeed/AFP via Getty Images Keeping Assad’s territory to a minimum would ensure his hand isn’t strengthened in an eventual political deal to end the conflict, making it more likely the U.S. could deliver on its longstanding desire to see him leave power. Limiting his control in eastern Syria would also prevent Iranian-backed forces from securing a wide corridor through Iraq to Syria and all the way into Lebanon. The more risk-averse voices in Trump’s administration are wary about letting the U.S. slip into a more direct fight with Assad, the official said. Dillon, the coalition spokesman, told reporters at the Pentagon that the U.S. goal is to defeat ISIS wherever it exists. If others, including the Syrian government and its Iranian and Russian allies, want to fight the extremists, “we absolutely have no problem with that.” Frederic C. Hof, director of the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, said the comments reflect the narrow U.S. view of the Syria war, focused very specifically on the neutralization of IS. In the coalition view, “it is all about killing ISIS in Raqqa.” Hof wrote in an article this week. “Creating conditions that would keep it dead? That, presumably, would be someone else’s job.” Karam is the AP’s news director for Lebanon and Syria and has covered Syria since 1996. Lederman, who reported from Washington, has covered the White House and national politics for The Associated Press since 2012.

Fair Usage Law

July 2, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

ISIS Revenue Falls 80 Percent as Militants Lose Ground in Iraq, Syria – NBCNews.com

An Iraqi soldier stands inside a compound ISIS used as a prison in Mosul. Alkis Konstantinidis / Reuters Agriculture is not an unimportant source of income for them, he told NBC News. Woertz explained that ISIS had previously been able to seize the wages of civil servants who lived in militant-held zones but were still being paid government wages. However, Iraq had ended the practice of paying wages into ISIS-controlled areas, cutting off a revenue stream to the militants. It is also not a winning brand anymore, Woertz said. When it was gaining control of areas it had an image of invincibility for a little while or was able to project that image on social media but now it is a losing brand that attracts less overseas support in the form of donations. Related: As far as they want to be a state, they have failed, or are about to fail, Woertz said. However, despite ISIS’s “caliphate” project appearing increasingly unsustainable, experts warned that conditions in the region were still ripe for Islamist violence. “A great deal will depend on effective governance in areas [liberated from ISIS],” said Butter of Chatham House. “But it is still quite a mess. There are a lot of people pushing ISIS-style ideology and they may find some receptiveness in Iraq if the country continues to be governed in the way it has been. “ISIS as weve known it is looking very much on the way out, but something else could replace it,” he added. “The ideology behind it is quite virulent.

Fair Usage Law

July 1, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

Fight against ISIS ‘far from over’ despite terrorist group’s loss of Mosul – USA TODAY

A soldier aims an automatic rifle through a peephole in a wall at Raqqa city, Syria, on June, 11 2017.(Photo: Youssef Rabie Youssef, EPA) The Islamic State remains a formidable global threat and still clings to large swaths of territory in Iraq and Syria despite the groups imminent loss of Mosul, Iraqs second-largest city. This fight is far from over, said Jennifer Cafarella, an analyst at the Institute for the Study of War. The Islamic State, which is also called ISIS, has proved capable of plotting terror attacks even as it has lost significant territory. Many of its leaders have already escaped Raqqa, its capital in Syria, and have fled to other strongholds inside the country. Weve consistently been chasing ISIS communications node around the battlefield, Cafarella said. Still, U.S. officials and analysts say pushing militants out of their major strongholds in Iraq and Syria is a critical first step to an overall defeat of the militant group, which emerged as a worldwide menacethree years ago when it swept through parts of Iraq and Syria. The defeat of ISISin Mosul also frees thousands of Iraqis from the groups brutal rule. IraqPrime Minister Haider al-Abadi said this week that the groups self-proclaimed caliphate was finished and hailed it as a major victory over the terror group. Several hundred militants remain in the city, but they are surrounded and losing more territory by the day. In Syria, U.S.-backed local forces have surrounded Raqqa and have begun an assault into the city. The offensives in Raqqa and Mosul have put the terror group on the run and have forced the group to relinquish much of the territory it controlled at its peak in 2014. But the group has also proved stubbornly resilient. Some ISIS leaders have already fled to militant-controlled areas along the Euphrates River Valley south of Raqqa, which have become a key stronghold for the militants now that Mosul and Raqqa are under military pressure. In Iraq, ISIS fighters still control Tal Afar a town west of Mosul in northern Iraq anddesert towns in the far reaches of western Iraq. There still remains ISIS holdouts in both Iraq and Syria, said Col. Ryan Dillon, a U.S. military spokesman in Baghdad. We’ll continue to support and stand shoulder to shoulder with our partners in those fights. The next stage of the battlein Iraq will be determined by Iraq’s government, the Pentagon said. The U.S. military said it would continue to provide advisers, airstrikes and other support for Iraq’s military. Theres plenty of work left in this country, said Maj. Gen. Joseph Martin, a top coalition commander in Iraq. The U.S. military has deployed about5,500 troops in Iraq to advise and train Iraqi forces and nearly 1,000 troops in Syria to support the Syrian Democratic Forces. The U.S.-led coalition has launched daily airstrikes that have crippled the Islamic State’s finances and leadership. The Pentagon has said that ISISwill likely revert to a more conventional terror organization that operates from caves or other hiding places as it loses territory. But the loss of a caliphate will at minimum take away a key selling point to get recruits from around the world. Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions The sheer resiliency of the militantshave commanders concerned, however.The Islamic State’s anti-West ideology continues to appeal to some young people across the Middle East and the terror group has also capitalized on local grievances to gain support in some areas. When I consider how much damage weve inflicted, and theyre still operational, theyre still capable of pulling off things like some of these recent terrorist attacks weve seen internationally, I think we have to conclude that we do not yet fully appreciate the scale or strength of this phenomenon, Lt. Gen. Michael Nagata, an official at the National Counterterrorism Center, said in an interview published by theCombating Terrorism Center at West Point. Read more: Iraqi military declares famed Mosul mosque captured, ISIS caliphate ‘has fallen’ ISIS spreads fake news about destroyed al-Nuri mosque Desperate ISIS fighters using human shields as battle nears end in Mosul Read or Share this story: https://usat.ly/2u7IZbz

Fair Usage Law

July 1, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed

Why It’s Better to Capture Than Kill ISIS Terrorists – Newsweek

This article first appeared on the American Enterprise Institute site. The Obama policy of killing high-value terrorists with airstrikes has continued unabated in the early months of the Trump administration. Last week, The New York Times reported: Every couple of weeks, the United States Central Command, which oversees combat operations in the Middle East, announces the death of an Islamic State leader who has been killed in airstrikes. Daily Emails and Alerts- Get the best of Newsweek delivered to your inbox On Tuesday, it was Turki al-Binali, whom the American-led coalition called the self-proclaimed grand mufti or chief cleric of the Islamic State, killed in a May 31 airstrike in Mayadin, Syria. Two weeks before that, it was Samir Idris, whom the Defense Department said was a key Islamic State financier of attacks around the world, also killed near Mayadin. On Friday, it was [Fawaz Muhammad Jubayr] Rawi, a Syrian labeled by the Pentagon an experienced terrorist financial facilitator, who moved millions of dollars for the Islamic States attack and logistics network. Mr. Rawi owned a currency exchange that he used, along with a network of global financial contacts, to move money into and out of ISIS-controlled territory and across borders, a Defense Department statement said, using an acronym for the Islamic State. The Treasury Department had imposed sanctions on Mr. Rawi and his company in December. The world is better with a man like Rawi off the battlefield, but the intelligence lost in such strikes is immense. Every time we vaporize a terrorist leader, we vaporize all the intelligence in their brains. We need that intelligence to keep the country safe. Dead terrorists cannot tell us their plans for new attacks. A fighter from the Syriac Military Council (SMC), a small minority of Christian fighters supporting the Syrian Democratic Forces in the combat against ISIS, looks on as he guards a look out point in the suburb of al-Rumaniya on the western outskirts of Raqqa on June 27, 2017 after the area was seized from the jihadists. As the fightback against ISIS intensified the Syriac Military Council (SMC)formed in 2013 to defend the community during Syria’s civil warjoined with the SDF. After a months-long operation to encircle Raqqa, the SDF burst into the city on June 6 and are chipping away at jihadist-held districts, with help from heavy US-led coalition air strikes. DELIL SOULEIMAN/AFP/Getty But there are signs the policy may be shifting. In a front page story Sunday, The Times also reported: One late afternoon in April, helicopter-borne American commandos intercepted a vehicle in southeastern Syria carrying a close associate of the Islamic States supreme leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. The associate, Abdurakhmon Uzbeki, was a rare prize whom United States Special Operations forces had been tracking for months: a midlevel but highly trusted operative skilled in raising money; spiriting insurgent leaders out of Raqqa, the Islamic States besieged capital in Syria; and plotting attacks against the West. Captured alive, Mr. Uzbeki could be an intelligence bonanza. Federal prosecutors had already begun preparing criminal charges against him for possible prosecution in the United States. As the commandos swooped in, however, a firefight broke out. Mr. Uzbeki, a combat-hardened veteran of shadow wars in Syria and Pakistan, died in the gun battle, thwarting the militarys hopes of extracting from him any information about Islamic State operations, leaders and strategy. New details about the operation, and a similar episode in January that sought to seize another mid-level Islamic State operative, offer a rare glimpse into the handful of secret and increasingly risky commando raids of the secretive, nearly three-year American ground war against the Islamic State. Cellphones and other material swept up by Special Operations forces proved valuable for future raids, though the missions fell short of their goal to capture, not kill, terrorist leaders in order to obtain fresh, firsthand information about the inner circle and war council of the group, also known as ISIS. This is good news. Shifting from air strikes to special operations raids carries risk, to be sure, but the rewards can be extraordinary even if the target is killed in a firefight, as Uzbeki was. There is enormous value in the pocket litter terrorists leave behind cell phones, computers, thumb drives, diaries, and other documents which can provide insight into ISIS plans and operations. When the US sends a drone to take out an ISIS leader, this vital intelligence is vaporized with the dead terrorist. When we send JSOC teams, it is preserved even if the terrorist is not. Eventually, well capture one alive and, if the target is right, that will indeed be an intelligence bonanza. Marc A. Thiessen is Resident Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

Fair Usage Law

July 1, 2017   Posted in: ISIS  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."