Archive for the ‘Israel Apartheid’ Category

The Nuclear Option — Puerto Rico Aftermath: Democrats Blame Republicans for Everything


Is there no third rail of American politics this president fears? Obviously not.

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The Nuclear Option — Puerto Rico Aftermath: Democrats Blame Republicans for Everything

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Jimmy Kimmel on Vegas: Republicans ‘Should Be Praying for God to Forgive Them’


Late-night TV host Jimmy Kimmel opened his program Monday with a ten-minute political rant about Sunday’s mass murder in Las Vegas, saying “now is the time for political debate” about gun control.

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Jimmy Kimmel on Vegas: Republicans ‘Should Be Praying for God to Forgive Them’

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CNN White House Correspondent: Country Music Fans ‘Are Likely Trump Supporters’

CNN WH Correspondent Jeff Zeleny
CNN Senior White House Correspondent Jeff Zeleny pointed out in an interview Monday after the Las Vegas shooting that many country music fans are “likely” supporters of President Donald Trump.

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CNN White House Correspondent: Country Music Fans ‘Are Likely Trump Supporters’

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Live Updates: America Mourns, Searches for Answers After Historic Las Vegas Shooting

LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 2: Mourners attend a candlelight vigil at the corner of Sahara Avenue and Las Vegas Boulevard for the victims of Sunday night's mass shooting, October 2, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Late Sunday night, a lone gunman killed more than 50 people and injured more than 500 people after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest Festival, a three-day country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Two days after the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, the nation is still learning the identities of the 59 people who were murdered and more than 500 who were wounded, stories of heroism from the slain and survivors, and more information about the mysterious killer, Stephen Paddock, who apparently snuck an arsenal of weapons into the 32nd floor of Las Vegas’s Mandalay Bay hotel and casino.

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Live Updates: America Mourns, Searches for Answers After Historic Las Vegas Shooting

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President Trump: ‘We’ll Be Talking About Gun Laws’

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 9: President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with leaders from small community banks in the Roosevelt Room at the White House in Washington, DC on Thursday, March. 09, 2017. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
President Trump reacted on Tuesday to the Las Vegas attack by saying, “We’ll be talking about gun laws as time goes by.”

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President Trump: ‘We’ll Be Talking About Gun Laws’

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A new threat to Israel’s apartheid state: Bedouin toddlers – Arab News

As much of the world engages with a variety of security threats ranging from car rammings, bombings and stabbings to neo-Nazi white supremacist marches, the Israeli army has been dealing with its own security priorities too. This supposed democratic bastion of western civilization does indeed have many legitimate security threats but one does have to wonder how a small Portakabin serving as a Bedouin kindergarten in the West Bank threatened the might of the Israeli army. A kindergarten. Who was it used by? Palestinian refugee children. This was not some military training center or weapons factory but a ramshackle education establishment for toddlers serving the small community of Jabal Al Baba, 4km to the east of Jerusalem. It warranted an early morning visit of Israeli forces that wiped the site clean, taking all the school equipment as well. Nothing was left at all. If you visit this small community of 56 families you see the residue of previous demolitions, even of the threatening animal pens. All in all, their community head tells me, 48 structures have been demolished in the past three years. Originally there were forced out of the Negev desert in Israel in 1950. Intriguingly this small plot of land is part owned by the Vatican, hence the name Jabal Al Baba or Popes mountain. It was in fact a gift from King Hussein of Jordan to the then Pope Paul VI during his 1964 visit. The week before this round of demolitions, Israeli soldiers had been removing threatening solar panels that supplied the kindergarten and elementary school of the neighboring community of Abu Nuwar. The existing classroom is now too hot even to be used and they make use of the local barbershop for elementary school classes. In February 2016, trailers donated by the French government for use as a school were demolished. Back in 2014, I had visited another Bedouin community close by that had had its newly installed swings confiscated because they constituted an illegal construction. An incredible 56 Palestinian schools in Area C communities in the West Bank have Israeli demolition orders outstanding against them. The Israeli excuse is that these buildings do not have permits and are illegal. Who issues, or rather does not issue permits? The Israeli military authorities. Who in the West Bank build illegally, often without permits, without threat of demolition and typically with official assistance? Israeli settlers.

The demolition of a small kindergarten on prime real estate east of Jerusalem is part of a larger settlement project that will make any Palestinian state unviable.

Chris Doyle

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A new threat to Israel’s apartheid state: Bedouin toddlers – Arab News

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MKs ‘snubbed’ on South Africa trip as govt officials refuse meetings – The Jerusalem Post

A delegation of five MKs visited South Africa recently in a bid to meet with government officials, improve ties with the country and connect with the 70,000-strong Jewish community.

The delegation led by the Zionist Unions Nachman Shai also included Amir Ohana and Nurit Koren from the Likud, and Zouheir Bahloul and Michal Biran from the Zionist Union.

However, the MKs were snubbed in Cape Town by the countrys Parliament, where the ruling African National Congress holds the majority. A large contingent of South African parliamentarians openly rejected the delegations visit.

Shai, speaking with The Jerusalem Post on Wednesday, said it was wrong that the South African parliamentarians refused to meet with the delegation and made an issue out of it.

We asked to see them and they refused…Israel-South Africa relations are not hateful there is no animosity. We have a long history with South Africa.

Israels security and military relations with the Apartheid government is not a secret although Israel never supported Apartheid but for the ANC and many South Africans, it [this relationship] is not forgotten, he said.

Since the beginning of the new government [under Nelson Mandela in 1994], Israel has had some difficulties connecting with South Africa BDS there is very strong the [2001 anti-Israel] Durban conference and the very fact that they [Parliament] put out a press release that they dont want to meet with us, is wrong, Shai continued.

Shai said the August 14-22 visit could have been a turning point in relations between the countries as Israel has much to offer South Africa in terms of technology, human resources, health and education.

I believe we should talk about the future the past will not get us anywhere. We should have been received by the government and our fellow [South African] parliamentary colleagues it could have worked very well, Shai told the Post.

Although shunned by Parliament, Shai and the delegation still met with several senior ANC members including former-interim president Kgalema Motlanthe and Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma a presidential candidate, as well as leaders of the opposition parties and the mayor of Johannesburg, Herman Mashaba.

Asked about the discussion with Dlamini- Zuma, Shai said she listened more than she spoke, which was good because Israel doesnt always have access to South Africa.

We spoke about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and Israeli-South Africa relations, he said.

The delegation members, who returned home on Tuesday, said they were not deterred from continuing to improve ties between the countries and to connect with South Africas warm and welcoming Jewish community.

We wanted to talk to them [Jewish community] and hear from them, and they are very eager to hear about whats going on in Israel, Shai said.

For Shai, such meetings were the highlight of the trip. We were warmly received by the Johannesburg and Cape Town [Jewish] communities. I was impressed by the [Jewish] education system how Judaism and Israel are integrated together… I will remember for the rest of my life the conversations and questions we had with the students from Herzlia and King David schools, he said.

Being able to see South Africa and the many different aspects of the country, the Jewish community and the people was fascinating it was a very successful trip, he said.

South Africas community is quite small but it has strong foundations and is strongly Zionist… Just to visit the Jewish community here without political meetings is extremely important sometimes home is very far away and sometimes its close and Israel is the Jewish peoples home the point of these visits is to see what way Israel can help and what way Israel can give to Jewish communities, Shai explained.

Asked if there would be more MK visits to South Africa, Shai said he could not see it happening soon as it takes a lot of effort to organize.

I hope maybe in one or two years this will happen again, maybe if my fellow colleagues here [in Israel], hear our stories, they will want to go as well, he concluded.

The previous official visit by a delegation of MKs to visit South Africa was in 2004, when a group from the Likud met with then-president Thabo Mbeki. He welcomed them as friends a fairly different way from how they were received by the countrys ruling party this time around. The 2004 visit was the first time the Likud held talks with the South African government about Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

The Israeli Embassy in South Africa said the recent delegation was the result of cooperation between the Knesset, the Foreign Ministry and the Jewish Agency.

They have also had positive engagements with the key figures of the Christian and business communities, the embassy said.

The delegation proves that dialogue is key in increasing understanding of the challenges and opportunities between our great nations, Ambassador Lior Keinan said.

The delegation reiterated its commitment to sharing Israels expertise in agriculture, water and hi-tech.

The embassy continues to explore a plethora of avenues for cooperation between Israel and South Africa, and this delegation is a great step toward that goal, it said.

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MKs ‘snubbed’ on South Africa trip as govt officials refuse meetings – The Jerusalem Post

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New York Times distorts reality of Israel’s apartheid walls – Mintpress News (blog)

Isabel Kershner,writing inThe New York Times, claims the aboveground fences and sections of concrete wall [that] run along and through parts of the West Bank are a legacy of Palestinian suicide bombings during the second intifada. But she fails to note many observers contention that due to the fact85 percentof the barrier runsinsidethe occupied West Bank, Israels construction of it appears to be far more of aland grabthan anything to do with security.

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New York Times distorts reality of Israel’s apartheid walls – Mintpress News (blog)

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Portuguese photographers launch Israel boycott pledge – Mondoweiss

Palestinian Reuters photographer Mohammed Salem, bottom left, is carried by his colleagues after being shot by the Israeli army, while covering the Israeli prisoner release at the Erez crossing in the Gaza Strip. October 2, 2007. (Photo: APA Images)

On World Photography Day, over 40 Portuguese photographers, teachers of photography and photography students have launched a pledge not to accept professional invitations or financing from the State of Israel and to refuse to collaborate with Israeli cultural institutions complicit in Israels regime of occupation, colonialism and apartheid.

The pledge is the first of its kind and follows similar pledges to boycott Israel culturally by hundreds of high-profile artists in the US, UK, South Africa, Canada, Switzerland and France. The photographers pledge to boycott Israel until itcomplies with international law and respects the human rights of Palestinians.

Among the pledge supporters are Joo Pina, winner of the 2017 Prmio Estao Imagem Viana do Castelo, Portugals only photojournalism award and Nuno Lobito, TV personality and one of the most traveled Portuguese of all times (204 countries, 193 recognized).

The pledge comes in response to the 2004 call from Palestinian artists and cultural workers, including journalists and photographers, for a cultural boycott of Israel due to its use of culture to whitewash the oppression of Palestinians.

The cultural boycott of Israel is part of the global the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, which is modeled after the South African anti-apartheid boycott campaign. The Palestinian-led BDS movement has seen impressive growth into the mainstream in the past few years.

Miguel Carrio, winner of the 2012 Concelho da Bienal de Vila Franca de Xira award, urged fellow photographers to join the call:

Having witnessed first-hand the crimes Israel is committing daily against Palestinians, signing up to this initiative has become a natural step. It is fundamental to promote this effort through all means possible.

Palestinian photography artists are not exempt from the brutality of Israels occupation. Artists have been denied visas by the Israeli military establishment, preventing them from participating in conferences and performances internationally. Artists have also been detained at checkpoints, arrested, had their equipment broken, and exposed to the same violence perpetrated by the Israeli army on all Palestinians.

In 2014, Israel was considered the second most lethal country for journalists. Israel continues to step up its attacks against journalists in 2017. Last April, Israeli police fractured the ribs of AFP photographer Ahmad Gharabli and smashed two of his cameras. He was among six photographers targeted by the Israeli authorities on the same day. In May, an Israeli settler shot Majdi Mohamed, a photographer for the Associated Press, while he was covering an Israeli incursion in Nablus. Israels attacks against Palestinian and international photographers are part of a systematic policy and have been perpetrated with impunity.

Traveller-photographer Nuno Lobito said:

It is time for Israels brand of apartheid to enjoy the same treatment as South African apartheid and be target of a comprehensive international boycott until it respects human rights. Photographers can no longer be silent about the treatment of their Palestinian colleagues living under an indefensible occupation that has lasted for over half a century. Palestinians have called for solidarity through boycotts and this pledge is our practical contribution to their struggle.

Signatory Jos Soudo, a veteran Photography teacher and Historian, commented:

The history of photography is full of examples, from the 19th century to today, of photographers who gave their sight to the service of the oppressed and destitute.

For Joo Henriques, winner of the 2015 Fnac New Talents Award, to participate in this solidarity initiative for Palestine is to believe in the power of photography to provide testimony, to create conscience and to have empathy for the Other.

Support for the cultural boycott of Israel enjoys broad support internationally, among them Roger Waters, Ken Loach, Mike Leigh, Lauryn Hill, Mark Rylance, Emma Thompson, Alice Walker, Naomi Klein, Elvis Costello, Brian Eno, Jean Luc Godard and Mira Nair.

In 2011, Queer Lisboa International LGBT Festival dropped its Israel sponsorship following a BDS campaign. This year, BDS activists called on the Almada Festival to cancel a collaboration with the Israeli government and its Brand Israel whitewash campaign.

##

Full text of the pledge:

We support the Palestinian struggle for freedom, justice and equality. In response to the call from Palestinian photographers, journalists and cultural workers for a cultural boycott of Israel, we pledge to accept neither professional invitations to Israel, nor funding, from the Israeli state and to refuse to collaborate with Israeli cultural institutions linked to its government until Israel complies with international law and respects the human rights of Palestinians.

The photographers pledge to boycott Israel is work-in-progress. Portuguese photographers wishing to add their name to this initiative should write a message: [emailprotected]g

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Portuguese photographers launch Israel boycott pledge – Mondoweiss

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The Nuclear Option — Puerto Rico Aftermath: Democrats Blame Republicans for Everything

Is there no third rail of American politics this president fears? Obviously not.

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Jimmy Kimmel on Vegas: Republicans ‘Should Be Praying for God to Forgive Them’

Late-night TV host Jimmy Kimmel opened his program Monday with a ten-minute political rant about Sunday’s mass murder in Las Vegas, saying “now is the time for political debate” about gun control.

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CNN White House Correspondent: Country Music Fans ‘Are Likely Trump Supporters’

CNN Senior White House Correspondent Jeff Zeleny pointed out in an interview Monday after the Las Vegas shooting that many country music fans are “likely” supporters of President Donald Trump.

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Live Updates: America Mourns, Searches for Answers After Historic Las Vegas Shooting

Two days after the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, the nation is still learning the identities of the 59 people who were murdered and more than 500 who were wounded, stories of heroism from the slain and survivors, and more information about the mysterious killer, Stephen Paddock, who apparently snuck an arsenal of weapons into the 32nd floor of Las Vegas’s Mandalay Bay hotel and casino.

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President Trump: ‘We’ll Be Talking About Gun Laws’

President Trump reacted on Tuesday to the Las Vegas attack by saying, “We’ll be talking about gun laws as time goes by.”

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A new threat to Israel’s apartheid state: Bedouin toddlers – Arab News

As much of the world engages with a variety of security threats ranging from car rammings, bombings and stabbings to neo-Nazi white supremacist marches, the Israeli army has been dealing with its own security priorities too. This supposed democratic bastion of western civilization does indeed have many legitimate security threats but one does have to wonder how a small Portakabin serving as a Bedouin kindergarten in the West Bank threatened the might of the Israeli army. A kindergarten. Who was it used by? Palestinian refugee children. This was not some military training center or weapons factory but a ramshackle education establishment for toddlers serving the small community of Jabal Al Baba, 4km to the east of Jerusalem. It warranted an early morning visit of Israeli forces that wiped the site clean, taking all the school equipment as well. Nothing was left at all. If you visit this small community of 56 families you see the residue of previous demolitions, even of the threatening animal pens. All in all, their community head tells me, 48 structures have been demolished in the past three years. Originally there were forced out of the Negev desert in Israel in 1950. Intriguingly this small plot of land is part owned by the Vatican, hence the name Jabal Al Baba or Popes mountain. It was in fact a gift from King Hussein of Jordan to the then Pope Paul VI during his 1964 visit. The week before this round of demolitions, Israeli soldiers had been removing threatening solar panels that supplied the kindergarten and elementary school of the neighboring community of Abu Nuwar. The existing classroom is now too hot even to be used and they make use of the local barbershop for elementary school classes. In February 2016, trailers donated by the French government for use as a school were demolished. Back in 2014, I had visited another Bedouin community close by that had had its newly installed swings confiscated because they constituted an illegal construction. An incredible 56 Palestinian schools in Area C communities in the West Bank have Israeli demolition orders outstanding against them. The Israeli excuse is that these buildings do not have permits and are illegal. Who issues, or rather does not issue permits? The Israeli military authorities. Who in the West Bank build illegally, often without permits, without threat of demolition and typically with official assistance? Israeli settlers. The demolition of a small kindergarten on prime real estate east of Jerusalem is part of a larger settlement project that will make any Palestinian state unviable. Chris Doyle

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MKs ‘snubbed’ on South Africa trip as govt officials refuse meetings – The Jerusalem Post

A delegation of five MKs visited South Africa recently in a bid to meet with government officials, improve ties with the country and connect with the 70,000-strong Jewish community. The delegation led by the Zionist Unions Nachman Shai also included Amir Ohana and Nurit Koren from the Likud, and Zouheir Bahloul and Michal Biran from the Zionist Union. However, the MKs were snubbed in Cape Town by the countrys Parliament, where the ruling African National Congress holds the majority. A large contingent of South African parliamentarians openly rejected the delegations visit. Shai, speaking with The Jerusalem Post on Wednesday, said it was wrong that the South African parliamentarians refused to meet with the delegation and made an issue out of it. We asked to see them and they refused…Israel-South Africa relations are not hateful there is no animosity. We have a long history with South Africa. Israels security and military relations with the Apartheid government is not a secret although Israel never supported Apartheid but for the ANC and many South Africans, it [this relationship] is not forgotten, he said. Since the beginning of the new government [under Nelson Mandela in 1994], Israel has had some difficulties connecting with South Africa BDS there is very strong the [2001 anti-Israel] Durban conference and the very fact that they [Parliament] put out a press release that they dont want to meet with us, is wrong, Shai continued. Shai said the August 14-22 visit could have been a turning point in relations between the countries as Israel has much to offer South Africa in terms of technology, human resources, health and education. I believe we should talk about the future the past will not get us anywhere. We should have been received by the government and our fellow [South African] parliamentary colleagues it could have worked very well, Shai told the Post. Although shunned by Parliament, Shai and the delegation still met with several senior ANC members including former-interim president Kgalema Motlanthe and Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma a presidential candidate, as well as leaders of the opposition parties and the mayor of Johannesburg, Herman Mashaba. Asked about the discussion with Dlamini- Zuma, Shai said she listened more than she spoke, which was good because Israel doesnt always have access to South Africa. We spoke about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and Israeli-South Africa relations, he said. The delegation members, who returned home on Tuesday, said they were not deterred from continuing to improve ties between the countries and to connect with South Africas warm and welcoming Jewish community. We wanted to talk to them [Jewish community] and hear from them, and they are very eager to hear about whats going on in Israel, Shai said. For Shai, such meetings were the highlight of the trip. We were warmly received by the Johannesburg and Cape Town [Jewish] communities. I was impressed by the [Jewish] education system how Judaism and Israel are integrated together… I will remember for the rest of my life the conversations and questions we had with the students from Herzlia and King David schools, he said. Being able to see South Africa and the many different aspects of the country, the Jewish community and the people was fascinating it was a very successful trip, he said. South Africas community is quite small but it has strong foundations and is strongly Zionist… Just to visit the Jewish community here without political meetings is extremely important sometimes home is very far away and sometimes its close and Israel is the Jewish peoples home the point of these visits is to see what way Israel can help and what way Israel can give to Jewish communities, Shai explained. Asked if there would be more MK visits to South Africa, Shai said he could not see it happening soon as it takes a lot of effort to organize. I hope maybe in one or two years this will happen again, maybe if my fellow colleagues here [in Israel], hear our stories, they will want to go as well, he concluded. The previous official visit by a delegation of MKs to visit South Africa was in 2004, when a group from the Likud met with then-president Thabo Mbeki. He welcomed them as friends a fairly different way from how they were received by the countrys ruling party this time around. The 2004 visit was the first time the Likud held talks with the South African government about Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The Israeli Embassy in South Africa said the recent delegation was the result of cooperation between the Knesset, the Foreign Ministry and the Jewish Agency. They have also had positive engagements with the key figures of the Christian and business communities, the embassy said. The delegation proves that dialogue is key in increasing understanding of the challenges and opportunities between our great nations, Ambassador Lior Keinan said. The delegation reiterated its commitment to sharing Israels expertise in agriculture, water and hi-tech. The embassy continues to explore a plethora of avenues for cooperation between Israel and South Africa, and this delegation is a great step toward that goal, it said. Share on facebook

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New York Times distorts reality of Israel’s apartheid walls – Mintpress News (blog)

Isabel Kershner,writing inThe New York Times, claims the aboveground fences and sections of concrete wall [that] run along and through parts of the West Bank are a legacy of Palestinian suicide bombings during the second intifada. But she fails to note many observers contention that due to the fact85 percentof the barrier runsinsidethe occupied West Bank, Israels construction of it appears to be far more of aland grabthan anything to do with security.

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Portuguese photographers launch Israel boycott pledge – Mondoweiss

Palestinian Reuters photographer Mohammed Salem, bottom left, is carried by his colleagues after being shot by the Israeli army, while covering the Israeli prisoner release at the Erez crossing in the Gaza Strip. October 2, 2007. (Photo: APA Images) On World Photography Day, over 40 Portuguese photographers, teachers of photography and photography students have launched a pledge not to accept professional invitations or financing from the State of Israel and to refuse to collaborate with Israeli cultural institutions complicit in Israels regime of occupation, colonialism and apartheid. The pledge is the first of its kind and follows similar pledges to boycott Israel culturally by hundreds of high-profile artists in the US, UK, South Africa, Canada, Switzerland and France. The photographers pledge to boycott Israel until itcomplies with international law and respects the human rights of Palestinians. Among the pledge supporters are Joo Pina, winner of the 2017 Prmio Estao Imagem Viana do Castelo, Portugals only photojournalism award and Nuno Lobito, TV personality and one of the most traveled Portuguese of all times (204 countries, 193 recognized). The pledge comes in response to the 2004 call from Palestinian artists and cultural workers, including journalists and photographers, for a cultural boycott of Israel due to its use of culture to whitewash the oppression of Palestinians. The cultural boycott of Israel is part of the global the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, which is modeled after the South African anti-apartheid boycott campaign. The Palestinian-led BDS movement has seen impressive growth into the mainstream in the past few years. Miguel Carrio, winner of the 2012 Concelho da Bienal de Vila Franca de Xira award, urged fellow photographers to join the call: Having witnessed first-hand the crimes Israel is committing daily against Palestinians, signing up to this initiative has become a natural step. It is fundamental to promote this effort through all means possible. Palestinian photography artists are not exempt from the brutality of Israels occupation. Artists have been denied visas by the Israeli military establishment, preventing them from participating in conferences and performances internationally. Artists have also been detained at checkpoints, arrested, had their equipment broken, and exposed to the same violence perpetrated by the Israeli army on all Palestinians. In 2014, Israel was considered the second most lethal country for journalists. Israel continues to step up its attacks against journalists in 2017. Last April, Israeli police fractured the ribs of AFP photographer Ahmad Gharabli and smashed two of his cameras. He was among six photographers targeted by the Israeli authorities on the same day. In May, an Israeli settler shot Majdi Mohamed, a photographer for the Associated Press, while he was covering an Israeli incursion in Nablus. Israels attacks against Palestinian and international photographers are part of a systematic policy and have been perpetrated with impunity. Traveller-photographer Nuno Lobito said: It is time for Israels brand of apartheid to enjoy the same treatment as South African apartheid and be target of a comprehensive international boycott until it respects human rights. Photographers can no longer be silent about the treatment of their Palestinian colleagues living under an indefensible occupation that has lasted for over half a century. Palestinians have called for solidarity through boycotts and this pledge is our practical contribution to their struggle. Signatory Jos Soudo, a veteran Photography teacher and Historian, commented: The history of photography is full of examples, from the 19th century to today, of photographers who gave their sight to the service of the oppressed and destitute. For Joo Henriques, winner of the 2015 Fnac New Talents Award, to participate in this solidarity initiative for Palestine is to believe in the power of photography to provide testimony, to create conscience and to have empathy for the Other. Support for the cultural boycott of Israel enjoys broad support internationally, among them Roger Waters, Ken Loach, Mike Leigh, Lauryn Hill, Mark Rylance, Emma Thompson, Alice Walker, Naomi Klein, Elvis Costello, Brian Eno, Jean Luc Godard and Mira Nair. In 2011, Queer Lisboa International LGBT Festival dropped its Israel sponsorship following a BDS campaign. This year, BDS activists called on the Almada Festival to cancel a collaboration with the Israeli government and its Brand Israel whitewash campaign. ## Full text of the pledge: We support the Palestinian struggle for freedom, justice and equality. In response to the call from Palestinian photographers, journalists and cultural workers for a cultural boycott of Israel, we pledge to accept neither professional invitations to Israel, nor funding, from the Israeli state and to refuse to collaborate with Israeli cultural institutions linked to its government until Israel complies with international law and respects the human rights of Palestinians. The photographers pledge to boycott Israel is work-in-progress. Portuguese photographers wishing to add their name to this initiative should write a message: [emailprotected]g

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