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Diary of Trump’s first 100 days: Highlights of an unconventional presidency – USA TODAY

USA TODAY 8:42 a.m. ET April 29, 2017

USA TODAY’s Susan Page asks a panel of White House veterans and presidential scholars to offer President Trump advice after his first 100 days in the White House. USA TODAY

Trump is sworn in as president at noon on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol. In his first Oval Office appearance, before heading to inaugural balls, hesigns an executive order directing agencies to find ways to “ease the burden” of Obamacare.

Trump makes an appearance at CIA headquarters, expressing his support for the intelligence community while attacking the media for reporting that he had a “feud” with them over investigations into Russian hacking and the election. He also criticizes media coverage of his inauguration, echoed later by press secretary Sean Spicer in an angry briefing room debut. Meanwhile, millions of people join Women’s March protestsaround the world, including in Washington.

Trump starts the day with tweets touting his inauguration TV ratings and weighing in on the weekend protests against him: “Watched protests yesterday but was under the impression that we just had an election! Why didn’t these people vote?” Top aide Kellyanne Conway makes waves with aMeet the Pressappearance in which she says Spicer “gave alternative facts” in his press briefing in regard to inauguration crowd sizes.

Trump signs three presidential directives: withdrawing U.S. support for a Pacific trade deal; imposing a hiring freeze in civilian agencies; and restoring the so-called Mexico City policy that prohibits U.S. aid from supporting international groups that promote abortion. In a meeting with congressional leaders, Trump revives claims of voter fraud, blaming his popular vote loss on 3 million to 5 million people voting illegally.

Trump signs five executive actions on energy and infrastructure projects, including two memoranda intended to expedite the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines. In a late-night tweet, he references plans to address one of his key campaign promises the following day: “Big day planned on NATIONAL SECURITY tomorrow. Among many other things, we will build the wall!”

Trump starts the day with tweets vowing a “major investigation” into alleged voter fraud. In the afternoon, he visits the Department of Homeland Security and signs executive actions aimed at building a wall on the Mexican border and clamping down on “sanctuary cities.”

Trump floats a proposal for a 20% tax on imports from Mexico to pay for his planned border wall. His plans for the wall drive a divide between the two countries and lead Mexican President Enrique Pea Nieto to cancel a meeting between the two leaders. Trump takes his first Air Force One ride, traveling to Philadelphia to speak at the GOP congressional retreat.

Trump has an hourlong phone call with Mexican President Enrique Pea Nieto. He has his first official meeting with a foreign leader, British Prime Minister Theresa May. During their news conference, Trump declines to say whether he supportsa reduction of sanctions against Russia. He visits the Pentagon to charge his new Defense secretary with rebuilding the military and announce an executive action to clamp down on refugee admissions in the U.S.

Trump’s executive order from the previous evening which suspends the U.S. refugee program for 120 days, bans all immigrants from seven Muslim countries for 90 days, and orders the administration to develop “extreme vetting” measures causes reverberations across the country, with stranded travelers, airport protests and legal challenges. The president makes a round of phone calls to world leaders, including Russian President Vladimir Putin. Trump also signs more executive orders: one to reorganize the National Security Council, another to strengthen ethics rules for the executive branch, and a third directing the military to present him a plan to defeat the Islamic State.

Trump speaks on the phone with Russian President Vladimir Putin in the Oval Office on Jan. 28, 2017.(Photo: Michael Reynolds, European Pressphoto Agency)

Trump, the target of protests, lawsuits and global criticism over his new refugee policy, takes to social media to defend it as a counter-terrorism measure. Some congressional Republicans suggest the order may have been too broad and hastily written. The president also faces blowback after giving chief strategist Steve Bannon an elevated role on the National Security Council.

Amid continued criticism over his temporary travel ban, Trump says that stopping terrorism involves hard choices and adds that he’s following through on campaign pledges. Former president Barack Obama’s office releases a statement that applauds those protesting the ban. That evening, acting Attorney General Sally Yates, a holdover from the Obama administration, says she won’t defend the presidents travel banin court. Three hours later, the White House announces that she’s been relieved of her duties.

The morning after firing his acting attorney general, Trump mocks his Democratic congressional critics and demands that the Senate confirm his attorney general pick, Alabama Sen.Jeff Sessions. He meets with drugmakers and pledges to cut taxes and streamline regulations for the pharmaceutical industry in a bid to drive down drug prices. The president caps off the day with his long-awaited Supreme Court nomination, announcing his selection of Neil Gorsuch to fill the seat of the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Trump says the Senate should “go nuclear” and eliminate Democratic filibuster rights if that’s what it takes to confirm Gorsuch. His nomination of Betsy DeVos for Education secretary takes a hit when two Republican senators say they’ll vote against her. The president makes an unannounced trip to a Delaware military base to receive the remains of a Navy SEAL killed during a counter-terrorism raid.

In remarks at the National Prayer Breakfast, Trump references leaked conversations between himself and Mexican and Australian leaders, telling attendees not to worry about his “tough phone calls” and that the country has to be “tougher” in meeting its challenges. He raises eyebrows by also asking for prayers for his Apprenticesuccessor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and the show’s ratings, which Trump said have gone “down the tubes” in his absence. And he vows to make good on his promise to overturn the so-called Johnson Amendment, which bans public charities including churches from campaigning for or against a candidate for elected office.

The Trump administration imposes new sanctions on Iranian individuals and companies, citing the Tehran government’s missile tests and support for rebels in Yemen. The president signs executive actions rolling back key financial regulations of the Obama era, including restrictions on Wall Street banks and on financial advisers who sell clients expensive financial products with higher commissions.

Trump spends his weekend at Mar-a-Lago, the “Winter White House.” He asks a federal court to overturn a Seattle judges injunction halting his immigration ban, after he criticized the judges ruling as ridiculous and a terrible decision. In excerpts of a Fox News interview with Bill O’Reilly set to air before the Super Bowl the following day, Trump reiterates his desire to improve relations with Russia and dismisses concerns that Putin is a killer.

Trump continues to attack the federal judge who voided his travel ban. “Just cannot believe a judge would put our country in such peril,” he tweets. “If something happens blame him and court system. People pouring in. Bad!” As the Justice Department appeals the judge’s decision, Trump also tweets that he has “instructed Homeland Security to check people coming into our country VERY CAREFULLY. The courts are making the job very difficult!”

President Trump watches the Palm Beach Central High School marching band perform as it greets him upon his arrival to watch the Super Bowl at Trump International Golf Club Palm Beach in West Palm Beach, Fla., on Feb. 5, 2017.(Photo: Mandel Ngan, AFP/Getty Images)

As an appeals court reviews his travel ban, Trump claims that the public is with him, despite polls indicating otherwise. “Any negative polls are fake news, just like the CNN, ABC, NBC polls in the election,” Trump tweets. “Sorry, people want border security and extreme vetting.” In a visit to the headquarters of the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Trump tells troops he is 100% behind them in the fight against “radical Islamic terrorism” and claims that “in many cases the very, very dishonest press doesnt want to report” on terrorist attacks.

Trump tells a group of county sheriffs that he will help them fight terrorism and illegal immigration, and he vows to take his travel ban all the way to the Supreme Court if necessary. DeVosis confirmed as Education secretaryafter a contentious battle in the Senate, with Vice President Pence breaking a 50-50 tie vote. Later that day, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals hears oral arguments over a lower court’s decision to halt Trump’s travel ban.

Trump urges the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to uphold his travel ban, arguing that national security is at stake and suggesting that judges sometimes act politically. The president attacks Nordstrom for dropping daughter Ivanka’s fashion line, drawing criticism for mixing government and his family’s business interests. The Senate debate on the Sessions attorney general nomination turns ugly afterDemocratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren is silenced by the GOP during a speechfor “impugning” Sessions.

Trump accuses Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., of distorting what Gorsuch said about the president’s attacks on judges, even though administration officials and fellow senators confirm the gist of Gorsuch’s comments. The president also uses Twitter to attack Sen. John McCain over his criticism of the White House calling the Yemen raid a huge success.” Watchdog groups file ethics complaints against Conway for promoting Ivanka Trump’s fashion line during a TV interview. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit weighs in that evening,refusing to reinstate Trump’s travel ban.

In a joint news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Trump reaffirms the U.S. commitment to the defense of Japan but says both countries need to contribute more to military cooperation. He says hell take action the following week to strengthen border security in the wake of the appeals court ruling against his travel ban, but he declines to specify what that action might be. Meanwhile, a federal judge in Virginia blasts his travel ban, citing a lack of evidence that travelers from the seven Muslim-majority countries represent a specific threat.

Trump golfs with Abe at Trump National Jupiter Golf Club in Florida, while Melania Trump and Abes wife, Akie, spend the morning touring the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Palm Beach County. It’s a relatively quiet day for the president on Twitter, with Trump vowing that cost estimates for his border wall will “come WAY DOWN” once he is involved with design and negotiations.

Trump takes to Twitter in the morning to again defend his travel ban. In Sunday show appearances, policy adviser Stephen Miller says the president is assessing all of his legal options on the ban, ranging from appealing to the Supreme Court to revising the executive order.

After a day filled with mounting questions and criticism, National Security Adviser Michael Flynn resigns, citing “incomplete information” that he provided White House officials about his dealings with the Russian ambassador. Earlier that day, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visits the White House. Trump pledges “bridges of commerce” with Canada and says he wants relatively minor changes to NAFTA, adding that most of his problems with the trade deal involve the third partner, Mexico.

In the aftermath of Flynn’s exit, Spicer says Trump knew for more than two weeks that Flynn lied about his contact with a Russian ambassador and demanded his resignation because he could no longer trust him. That night, The New York Times reports that phone records and intercepted calls show members of Trump’s campaign team “had repeated contacts with senior Russian intelligence officials in the year before the election.”

Amid the renewed questions about contacts between Trump’s associates and Russia regarding the 2016 election, the president denounces “conspiracy theories” about his relationship with the Russians and said “illegal” news leaks brought down Flynn. Trump hosts Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House for a series of meetings. Andrew Puzder, the presidents embattled pick to become Labor secretary, withdraws his nomination.

President Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hold a joint press conference in the East Room of the White House on Feb. 15, 2017.(Photo: Mandel Ngan, AFP/Getty Images)

In a lengthy, fiery, wide-ranging news conference, Trump defends his administration as a “fine-tuned machine,” laments the “mess” he inherited from his predecessor and excoriates the “fake news” media. He says he asked Flynn to resign because he misled Pence about his phone calls to the Russian ambassador, but Trump says he didn’t believe Flynn did anything wrong by making the calls and faults leakers for providing contents of the intercepted calls to the media.

The Associated Press reports on the details of an internal Department of Homeland Security memo from January that proposes calling up as many as 100,000 National Guard troops to round up undocumented immigrants; it draws an angry response from the White House, with Spicer calling the AP report “100% not true” and insisting the memo is not a White House document. Trump conducts his first presidential visit beyond the Beltway with a stop in the Boeing facility in North Charleston, S.C., where he stresses his “America First” trade and economic policies.

Trump kicks off his third straight weekend at Mar-a-Lago seeking to calm reports of turmoil within his administration. “Don’t believe the main stream (fake news) media.The White House is running VERY WELL. I inherited a MESS and am in the process of fixing it,” he tweets that morning. He holds a campaign-style rally in the evening in Melbourne, Fla.

Trump is ridiculed for apparently denouncing a non-existent terrorist attack in Sweden in his rally the night beforebut says he was referring to a Fox News report on violence in Sweden allegedly perpetrated by refugees. In New York City, more than a thousand people protest Trump’s travel ban in the “I Am A Muslim Too” rally.

Across the country, anti-Trump activists mark Presidents Day with Not My Presidents Day protests. The president spends the holiday at Mar-a-Lago and announces that Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster will be his new national security adviser, replacing Flynn.

President Trump, right, shakes hands with Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., on Feb. 20, 2017, where he announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser.(Photo: Susan Walsh, AP)

Trump speaks out against a series of bomb threats to Jewish community centers across the nation after coming under fire for sidestepping earlier opportunities to condemn severalanti-Semitic acts since he took office. The Department of Homeland Security issues new directives to increase deportations among the country’s 11 million undocumented immigrants.

Trump and his aides say theyll roll out a proposed budget, a revamped health care plan and a new tax reform package over the following two months. The president, while meeting with budget officials, doesn’t give specifics, but he tells reporters that “our moral duty to the taxpayer requires us to make our government leaner and more accountable and we must do a lot more with less. Later that evening, the Trump administration issues new guidance on transgender students’ restroom use, rolling back the policies put in place by the Obama administration last year.

Trump meets with manufacturing executives at the White House and later holds a listening session on human trafficking. The Conservative Political Action Conference kicks off just outside of Washington. White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and Bannon make a joint appearance at the annual confab, in which they dispute media reports casting them as rivals and say they are working together to advance the president’s agenda.

Trump starts off the day criticizing FBI “leakers” as he and aides push back on news reports that his chief of staff asked the bureau to “knock down” stories about investigations into possible contacts between Trump campaign associates and Russian officials. At his CPAC speech later that morning, Trump launches into a full-throated attack on journalism, saying some reporters make up unnamed sources for “fake news” and describing the media as “the enemy” of the American people. News organizations protest a White House decision that afternoon to hold a news briefing by invitation only.

The president takes to Twitter in the morning with further complaints about the media. The media has not reported that the National Debt in my first month went down by $12 billion vs a $200 billion increase in Obama first mo, he tweets. In the evening, he announces via Twitter that he will not attend the annual White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner in April.

The president tweets that the Democratic National Committee election “was of course, totally ‘rigged’ ” and takes another swing at the media, tweeting, “Russia talk is FAKE NEWS put out by the Dems, and played up by the media, in order to mask the big election defeat and the illegal leaks!” In the evening, Trump hosts the nation’s governors for an annual dinner at the White House.

Trump signs off on top-line numbers in a budget outline that bolsters military spending while making deep cuts to other federal agencies. “This defense spending increase will be offset and paid for by finding greater savings and efficiencies across the federal government,” he says. “We’re going to do more with less.” The president rejects the idea of a special prosecutor to look into Russian connections during the election and says, I havent called Russia in 10 years.”

Trump uses his first address to Congress to proclaim American greatness and push an ambitious agenda of economic nationalism, declaring, “The time for small thinking is over. The time for trivial fights is behind us.” He opens the possibility of a comprehensive immigration deal, pitches $1 trillion for “Buy American, Hire American” infrastructure spending, and says he will propose “historic” tax cuts. Earlier that day, the president signs executive orders targeting a water-protection rule and elevating an initiative on historically black colleges and universities.

President Trump speaks before a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28, 2017.(Photo: Andrew P. Scott, USA TODAY)

A day after Trump struck a more conciliatory tone in his address to Congress, critics predict he’ll revert back to the more combative and divisive approach that characterized much of his first month in office. Aides, however, say the president is focused on enacting his campaign agenda. White House Deputy Counsel Stefan Passantino says in a letter thatConway did nothing “nefarious” when she promoted Ivanka Trump’s fashion line on television and that a White House inquiry “concluded that Ms. Conway acted inadvertently and is highly unlikely to do so again.”

The news of Sessions’ 2016 meetings with the Russian ambassador, contradicting his testimony during his confirmation hearing that he had no contact with the Russian government during the campaign, dominates the day. Trump says he “wasn’t aware at all” of the meetings. Speaking to reporters during a tour of the USS Gerald Ford in Newport News, Va., the president says he still had “total” confidence in his attorney general. Later that afternoon, Session recuses himself from the Russia investigation.

Seeking to get past stories about Sessions and Russia, Trump spends the day visiting a school in Florida. He uses Twitter to express his displeasure with Democrats, knocking them over his full Cabinet having not yet been approved and calling Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer a “hypocrite” in a tweet displaying a 2003 photo of Schumer and Putin.

In a morning tweetstorm, Trump accuses Obama of wiretapping him at Trump Tower prior to the November election: “Terrible! Just found out that Obama had my ‘wires tapped’ in Trump Tower just before the victory. Nothing found. This is McCarthyism!” the president tweets. An Obama spokesman rejects the accusation as “simply false.” Thousands of Trump supporters convene near Trump Tower and in other cities around the U.S. in what organizers bill as “March 4 Trump” demonstrations on behalf of the president.

In the morning, the president calls for a congressional investigation of his claims that Obama had him wiretapped during the election while critics accuse Trump of trying to distract from the investigation into his own relationship with Russia. That evening, news reports indicate that FBI Director James Comey over the weekend sought a public rebuke from the Justice Department of Trump’s wiretapping claim.

Trump issues the long-awaited revised version of his travel ban, which no longer restricts travel from Iraq, one of the seven majority Muslim countries listed in his original order. The new order, set to take effect 10 days afterward, includes Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Sudan and Yemen as part of the 90-day ban. Meanwhile, when White House deputy press secretary Sarah Sanders is asked on ABC’s Good Morning Americawhether the president accepts Comey’s statement that Obama did not authorize any wiretaps, she says: “You know, I don’t think he does.”

Trump kicks off the day by using Twitter to again bash Obama this time in a false claim about Guantanamo Bay prisoner releases. He also denies reports of dissension within his staff. “Don’t let the FAKE NEWS tell you that there is big infighting in the Trump Admin,” the president tweets. He praises the House GOP health care bill amid pushback from conservatives attacking the new plan. “We’re going to do something that is great,” the president says during a meeting with House deputy whips. The plan is “complicated, but it’s very simple … it’s called good health care.”

President Trump greets Jack Cornish, 10, of Birmingham, Ala., while Cornish was touring the White House. It was the first day of White House tours for the public since Trump was inaugurated.(Photo: Erik S. Lesser, European Pressphoto Agency)

While refusing to confirm or deny the authenticity of CIA documents released by WikiLeaks, Spicer says that “this alleged leak should concern every single American in terms of the impact it has on our national security” and says there’s a “massive, massive difference” between exposing the emails of Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta and other Democratic officials, and leaking national security secrets. The president dines with former foe Sen. Ted Cruz. Sens. Lindsey Graham and Sheldon Whitehouse send a letter to the FBI director and acting deputy attorney general asking for specific information on Trump’s wiretapping accusation against Obama.

Trump meets with his National Economic Council and representatives of community banks. As GOP leaders try to quell concerns about the new health care legislation, the president tweets, “Despite what you hear in the press, healthcare is coming along great. We are talking to many groups and it will end in a beautiful picture!” Meanwhile, legal challenges mount from several states for Trump’s revised travel ban.

As the president reaches the halfway point of his first 100 days, administration officials kick off a plan to use social media and interviews to promote “50 days of action.” Trump meets with House committee leaders and predicts a fairly rapid approval of the GOP health care bill. “This is the time were going to get it done,” he says. “I think its just something thats going to happen very shortly.” He welcomes a better-than-expected jobs report showing that the economy added 235,000 jobs the previous month.

Trump has lunch with a group of White House staff and Cabinet members at Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Va. His administration moves forward with plans to dismiss 46 U.S. attorneys held over from the Obama administration amid criticism, and news reports emerge that an intruder was arrested on the White House grounds after scaling a fence the previous evening.

Trump administration officials mount a vigorous defense of their effort to repeal and replace Obamacare while bracing for what could be a skeptical assessment from the Congressional Budget Office the next day. Speaking on NBC’s Meet the Press, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price says the bill would lead to “more people covered than are covered right now, and at an average cost that is less.”

The CBO releases its analysis of the GOP health plan, determining that the bill would lead to 14 million fewer Americans with insurance by 2018 and 24 million by 2026. Price calls the projections “just not believable.” Trump launches an ambitious effort to reorganize the federal government, signing an executive order that he said would “make it less wasteful and more productive.”

A senior White House official confirms that Trump paid $38 million in taxes in 2005 on an income of more than $150 million. The rare acknowledgement came in anticipation of a report by MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow in which she disclosed a portion of the return. The news capped off an otherwise relatively quite day for the president during which Spicer pushed back against the CBO analysis of the Obamacare repeal and Trump hosted the deputy crown prince of Saudi Arabia for lunch in the State Dining Room.

A federal judge in Hawaii issues a nationwide halt to Trump’s second travel ban. Earlier that day, the president spars on Twitter with journalist David Cay Johnston over the previous night’s leaked tax return, tweeting, “Does anybody really believe that a reporter, who nobody ever heard of, ‘went to his mailbox’ and found my tax returns?” Trump also travels to Detroit to speak to autoworkers before heading to a rally in Nashville.

In his first formal budget proposal to Congress, Trump seeks to increase defense spending by $54 billion and offsets that with cuts to non-defense spending, including steep cuts to education, environmental protection, health and human services and foreign aid. Senate Intelligence Committee leaders say in a statement that there are “no indications that Trump Tower was the subject of surveillance,” a day after the House Intelligence panel offered a similar assessment. Trump also meets with Irish leader Enda Kenny and attends the Friends of Ireland Luncheon on Capitol Hill.

Disputing media reports that the GOP health care bill is in political trouble, Trump says he is “100% behind” the plan and is working with skeptical conservatives. He welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel to the White House after months of back-and-forth between the two leaders. During their news conference, Trump again defends his surveillance allegations. “At least we have something in common, perhaps,” he says, referencing past disclosures during the Obama administration that Merkel’s cellphone had been monitored.

Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel walk down the Cross Hall to enter the East Room for a joint press conference at the White House on March 17, 2017.(Photo: Michael Reynolds, European Pressphoto Agency)

The president spends the weekend at Mar-a-Lago. In a pair of morning tweets, Trump lashes out at the media and Germany: “Despite what you have heard from the FAKE NEWS, I had a GREAT meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Nevertheless, Germany owes … vast sums of money to NATO & the United States must be paid more for the powerful, and very expensive, defense it provides to Germany!” Meanwhile, at the White House, the Secret Service apprehends a person who jumped a bike rack near the security perimeter.

A day before a high-stakes hearing featuring Comey’s testimony, the leaders of the House Intelligence Committee say on Sunday talk shows that there’s no evidence to back Trump’s claims that Obama wiretapped him, though the committee’s chairman, Rep. Devin Nunes, says investigators are looking at other types of possible surveillance of Trump and his aides during the campaign.

Appearing before the House Intelligence Committee, Comey says the FBI and DOJ have “no information to support Trumps assertions that Obama wiretapped him, and he also confirms for the first time publicly that the FBI is investigating Russian interference in the election. Trump heads to Kentucky to take part in a rally to build support for the GOP health care bill.

The morning after congressional Republicans released a modified version of their health care legislation seeking to win more conservative votes, Trump meets with GOP lawmakers on Capitol Hill, emphasizing how important it is that they stay united to pass the legislation. The president also signs a $19.5 billion bill to fund NASA programs and reaffirm what he called a “national commitment” to “human space exploration.”

The White House dismisses a report that Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, received a $10 million contract a decade ago to advance the interests of Putin. Nunes says communications involving members of Trump’s transition group were “incidentally collected” by intelligence officials after the election. The president meets with members of the Congressional Black Caucus, and negotiations continue over the looming health care vote in the House.

In a setback to Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan’s efforts to repeal Obamacare, the House postpones its vote on the bill as negotiations continue with both conservative and moderate groups. The president touts the House Intelligence chairman’s assertion that spy agencies engaged in “incidental collection” of Trump associates’ communications, saying it’s evidence to support his claim that Obama “wiretapped” Trump Tower. Trump also holds a listening session on health care at the White House with truckers and trucking CEOs.

President Trump gets in the driver’s seat of an 18-wheeler while meeting with truck drivers and trucking CEOs on the South Portico prior to their meeting to discuss health care at the White House on March 23, 2017.(Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo, European Pressphoto Agency)

As the Obamacare repeal bill bleeds GOP support ahead of its rescheduled vote, Ryan pulls the legislation from consideration a major bump in the road forTrump’s campaign promise to repeal and replace the health care law. The president blames the bill’s failure on the lack of Democratic support. Earlier that day, Trump signs a permit to allow the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, calling it “a great day for American jobs.”

The morning after Republicans’ Obamacare repeal plan fell apart in Congress, Trump tweets, “ObamaCare will explode and we will all get together and piece together a great healthcare plan for THE PEOPLE. Do not worry!” The president stays in the D.C. area for the weekend, venturing to Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Va.

Trump takes aim at the House Freedom Caucus in a morning tweet: “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!” In Sunday show appearances, Priebus and budget director Mick Mulvaney say Trump has not blamedRyan for the failure of the Obamacare repeal bill.

Trump taps son-in-law Jared Kushner to lead a new White House office designed to bring ideas from the private sector into the federal government. The president rolls back more Obama-era regulations, signing four bills that reverse rules on education, land use and federal purchasing, and he holds a meeting at the White House with female small-business owners.

Trump signs an executive order on energy independence, a sweeping repudiation of Obama-era environmental initiatives that substitutes astrategy of combating climate change through international cooperation for an America-first energy policy. Nunes faces pressure to recuse himself or step down as leader of the investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

The president kicks off the day with complaints on Twitter about the media. “Remember when the failing @nytimes apologized to its subscribers, right after the election, because their coverage was so wrong. Now worse!” he tweets. Trump later holds an opioid abuse listening session, joined by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, leader of the White House’s new commission to combat the opioid crisis.

Trump takes to Twitter to threaten the conservative group that opposed him on health care: “The Freedom Caucus will hurt the entire Republican agenda if they don’t get on the team, & fast. We must fight them, & Dems, in 2018! ” Later that day, The New York Times reports that two White House officials played a role in providing intelligence reports to Nunes. The president meets with Denmarks prime minister, Lars Lokke Rasmussen.

President Trump greets Denmark’s prime minister, Lars Lokke Rasmussen, outside the West Wing of the White House on March 30, 2017.(Photo: Brendan Smialowski, AFP/Getty Images)

While Trump encourages Flynn to offer testimony to investigators in exchange for immunity, congressional leaders investigating Russia’s interference in the election signal that it’s too early to consider such an agreement. Trump promises to crack down on “foreign importers that cheat” with two executive orders that he said would lead to a historic reversal of the nation’s trade deficit.

Trump kicks off another Saturday with tweets attacking the media, with NBC’s Chuck Todd as the target: “When will Sleepy Eyes Chuck Todd and @NBCNews start talking about the Obama SURVEILLANCE SCANDAL and stop with the Fake Trump/Russia story?” The president also uses Twitter to praise a New York Times article on Obamacare, though he still describes the newspaper as “failing.”

Trump expresses confidence, both on social media and at the golf course, that he and aides can resurrect their attempt to repeal Obamacare. Before hitting the links with one of his critics on health care, Republican Sen. Rand Paul, the president tweets: “Anybody (especially Fake News media) who thinks that Repeal & Replace of ObamaCare is dead does not know the love and strength in R Party!”

Trump welcomes Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to the White House, praises him for doing a “fantastic job,” and solicits his help in the fight against terrorism. The president donates $78,333.32 his salary since taking office to the National Park Service. Senate Democrats reach the threshold required to block Gorsuch’s confirmation, setting up a major Senate rules change later in the week for the GOP to advance the Supreme Court nomination.

Former national security adviser Susan Rice, appearing on MSNBC, says she didn’t seek to “unmask” the names of Trump associates for political purposes. Meanwhile, in a statement on a chemical attack in Syria, Trump blames the Assad regime and calls it a consequence of the Obama administrations weakness and irresolution. The president promotes his “America First” domestic plan at the North Americas Building Trades Unions national legislative conference.

A senior White House official confirms Trump has removed Bannon from the National Security Council and says Bannon was given the post as a check on Flynn. In an interview with The New York Times, Trump floats the possibility that Rice committed a crime, but he provides no evidence. In a news conference with Jordan’s King Abdullah, the president denounces the chemical attack in Syria and suggests his administration will develop a new policy toward Bashar al-Assad’s government.

Trump orders a cruise missile strike against Syria, saying “no child of God should ever suffer” the horror of the chemical weapons attack Syria launched on its own people. Earlier that day, Trump meets with Wounded Warriors at the White House before heading to Mar-a-Lago to host a summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping, and Senate Republicans invokethe “nuclear option” to strip Democrats of their power to block Trump’s Supreme Court nominee from being confirmed.

President Trump walks to the podium to speak about the missile strike on Syria on April 6, 2017, at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla.(Photo: Alex Brandon, AP)

Trump’s decision to strike Syria in retaliation for a chemical weapons attack draws wide political support, though some lawmakers say he should have consulted with Congress, while Russia said the strike would undermine international cooperation. The president concludes his meetings with the Chinese president at Mar-a-Lago, and his Supreme Court nomineeis confirmed by the Senate.

Trump does not rule out additional military action against Syria, telling Congress that he was acting “in the vital national security and foreign policy interests of the United States” when he ordered the launch of cruise missiles at a Syrian air field. He provides his justification in a letter to Congress under the War Powers Resolution. Kushner and Bannonhold a negotiation session to try to mend a rift that triggered speculation about a White House staff shakeup.

Administration officials confirm that Trump will ask K.T. McFarland to step down as deputy national security adviser and serve instead as ambassador to Singapore, giving McMaster a chance to pick his own lieutenant. The president heads back to D.C. in the afternoon following a weekend at Mar-a-Lago.

Trump takes part in the swearing-in ceremony for Gorsuch. The White House echoes its threat of additional missile strikes against Syria if Assad’s government again uses chemical weapons, and Trump aides say the administration is reworking its tax reform plan and doesn’t know whether it can put together a final proposal before Congress’ August recess.

Spicer makes waves during the daily briefing when he states, while comparing Assad and Adolf Hitler, that Hitler “didn’t even use chemical weapons.” He attempts to clarify by saying Hitler “was not using the gas on his own people the same way that Assad is doing.” In a second attempt to clarify, he says he was “trying to draw a contrast of the tactic of using airplanes to drop chemical weapons on innocent people.” Meanwhile, the White House says there’s overwhelming evidence that Syria used a sarin nerve agent to attack opponents of the government and that Russia is trying to help Assad’s government cover up the illegal use of chemical weapons.

President Trump speaks during a strategic and policy discussion with CEOs in the State Department Library in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington on April 11, 2017.(Photo: Olivier Douliery, Pool/European Pressphoto Agency)

Trump meets with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg and says at a press conference afterward that he’s satisfied that NATO has responded to the criticism he leveledat it during his campaign: “I said it was obsolete. It is no longer obsolete.” He also says relations with Russia “may be at an all-time low” following Syria’s use of chemical weapons the previous week and the U.S. airstrike that followed.

The U.S. military announces an attack on an Islamic State tunnel complex in Afghanistan, and Trump says he endorsed the strike. Asked about the use of the “mother of all bombs,” Trump says “what I do is I authorize my military. … We have given them total authorization and thats what theyre doing and frankly thats why theyve been so successful lately.” The president tweets on foreign policy, including on North Korea: “I have great confidence that China will properly deal with North Korea. If they are unable to do so, the U.S., with its allies, will! U.S.A.”

Trump hits the golf course at Mar-a-Lago as he and his aides braced for what North Korea calls a “big event.” Administration officials say they are hopeful that China can dissuade its communist neighbor from conducting a nuclear explosion or a missile test. The Trump administration saysrecords of visitors to the White House will stay secret until at least five years after Trump leaves office, a reversal of policy quickly denounced by advocates of transparent government.

North Korea attempts to launch a new missile, but the device blows up almost immediately. Pence arrives in Seoul hours after the failed missile test and says U.S. resolve to support and defend South Korea is unwavering “in these troubled times.” Meanwhile, thousands of protesters gather in U.S. cities for Tax Day rallies and marches, demanding that Trump release his tax returns.

The Trump administration takes a low-key approach to the previous day’s failed missile test in North Korea and continues to express hope that China will rein in its nuclear-armed neighbor. The president says he’s unimpressed with tax protests over the weekend and indicates he has no plans to release his tax returns anytime soon. “Someone should look into who paid for the small organized rallies yesterday. The election is over!” Trump tweets. He returns to D.C. after spending Easter weekend in Mar-a-Lago.

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Diary of Trump’s first 100 days: Highlights of an unconventional presidency – USA TODAY

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The fight against lung cancer – Heritage Florida Jewish News

In 1998, I was diagnosed with lung cancer. After chemotherapy and the removal of my left lung, have been cancer free for 19 years. Luckily, I am able to say that I am a lung cancer survivor.

I am one of the lucky ones, because in our country, every five minutes a woman learns she has lung cancer. And the rate of new cases in women has almost doubled in the last 39 years. Yet getting tested for lung cancer is not a top-of-mind cancer concern for 98 percent of women.

For many, early detection is key. Only 16 percent of people are diagnosed at an initial stage, when more treatment options are available. In fact, if lung cancer is caught before it spreads, the chances of survival more than triple.

Patients need quality, affordable healthcare, and to save lives, we need more treatment options and better early detection for lung cancer. Thats why on April 5, I went to Capitol Hill for Advocacy Day with the American Lung Associations LUNG FORCE initiative to advocate for patients to have accessible and quality healthcare and to push for sustained and robust federal funding for cancer research.

I traveled to Washington, D.C., along with others from across the country who have personally felt lung cancers devastation, to ask Senators Nelson, Rubio, and Representatives Murphy, Demings and Deutsch or their staffs for continued investment in research at the National Institutes of Health and to share why quality and affordable healthcare is imperative to lung cancer patients and their families.

Weve made some great progress in the fight against lung cancer: Congress increased National Institutes of Health research funding by five percent in 2016; in the last two years, the FDA approved eight new therapies to treat lung cancer; and people have access to treatments because of key healthcare protections. But now that progress and life-sustaining research is at risk. President Trumps budget FY 2018 proposal calls for a $6 billion, or 18 percent, reduction of funding for NIH. This drastic approach takes research in the wrong direction. It slows progress and delays innovation. Families facing cancer cant wait. Its literally a matter of life and death that people with lung cancer have adequate, accessible and affordable healthcare. As I told the Senators, Representatives or their staffs we must work hard to save the 224,000 Americans who are diagnosed each year with lung cancer. Im very troubled about the American Health Care Act that the House of Representatives considered last month. That bill moved our healthcare system in the wrong direction. Any healthcare legislation that Congress considers must increase the number of Americans who are insured and also cover key health protections, including preventive services like lung cancer screening.

It is clear from the hundreds of thousands of calls that have been made to Congress this year that our collective voices are our strongest weapon in the fight. There is hope in saving more lives by ensuring patients have the healthcare coverage they need, as well as better treatment and early detection options developed through additional research funding.

I am a lung cancer advocate because I know the importance of telling my story. I encourage everyone to visit LUNGFORCE.org to join me in advocating for this patient support and lung cancer research, and sending this message to your senators and representatives in Washington, D.C. Lets defeat lung cancer together.

Shelly Ferrone is a certified financial planner with nearly three decades of experience as a financial advisor. She began her career at Merrill Lynch in 1985 where she worked prior to joining UBS in 2003. Ferrone received an M.B.A. from The University of Central Florida in Orlando, Fla., and a B.A. from Emory University in Atlanta.

Growing up the daughter of an aerospace engineer, Shelly lived all over the United States during her childhood. She settled down in Orlando in 1974. A widow, Shelly has a daughter and two grandchildren, who live in Altamonte Springs, Fla., with whom she enjoys spending time.

Involved in her community, Shelly is on the board for the Central Florida American Lung Association Southeast Region and its executive committee, Board of Directors with Kiwanis of Orlando, and the Womens Executive Council. She also volunteers with the Dr. Phillips Performing Arts Center.

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Fighting Trump-Era Hate Has Made Us More Jewish. Or Is It the Other Way Around? – Fusion

Welcome to the first edition of Soul Searching, a new series about how the most secular generation in history is changing the face of religion.

David A.M. Wilensky had always hated wearing a kippah. By the time he reached his late twenties, he was as Jewish as everhe still went to shul, worked at a Jewish newspaper in the Bay Area, had lots of Jewish friendsbut the ritual of the skull cap never made sense to him. He despised walking into a Conservative synagogue and being told he wasnt dressed correctly. Plus, it seemed sexist. The whole thing bothered me, he says.

That all changed on November 9, when Donald Trumps election seemed to confirm that the blossoming hate against minorities during his campaign wasnt just a bad dream. Wilensky was horrified when he scrolled through whywereafraid.com, a Tumblr that had been cataloguing hate incidents of all kinds during and after the election. For days, he watched the site obsessively: A Muslim psychology student grabbed by her hijab and yanked backward. A woman pumping gas with liberal bumper stickers told that she should be grabbed by the pussy. Reports of swastikas drawn on sidewalks and dorm rooms.

That week, he decided to make his minority status visible by wearing a kippah every day, in solidarity with other targeted groups. The spate of anti-Semitism suddenly made me feel different from other Americans in a new way, he says. Or actually, an old waybut we hadnt been put in a position of feeling it yet.

Between the bomb threats to Jewish centers and the graffiti swastikas and the vandalized Jewish cemeteries and Sean Spicers multiple Holocaust gaffes and known anti-Semite Steve Bannons close (albeit fraught) relationship with the president, Jews are one of the myriad groups who feel targeted by the Trump administration and its supporters. Its startled and shaken many young Jews whove never experienced this sentiment before, and in fact grew up rolling our eyes at parents and grandparents who, in the shadow of the Holocaust, seemed overly vigilant about prejudice.

Hate crime numbers are notoriously hard to pin down, but organizations have been making an effort to track them since Trump was voted into office. After the election, the Southern Poverty Law Center started soliciting reports online of hate incidents across the country for the first time. Out of the 1,863 incidents reported through March, 244 were of anti-Semitic hate. Our sense is that its a significant increase, says deputy legal director David Dinielli, whose job it is to pay attention to these things. The Anti-Defamation League puts that number even higher, at 380 self-reported anti-Semitic incidents from January to March, an 86% increase compared to incidents recorded by the organization in the same months in 2016.

Its not our imagination: Anti-Semitism is making a comeback.

The hate toward Jews so far has manifested in vandalism and harassment rather than discriminatory policies and executive orders. And unless we are very religious or decide to come out like Wilensky did, Jewish people can usually pass as non-Jewish in America. But the resurgence of anti-Semitic rhetoric is noticeable.

It feels awful to acknowledge that, right now, fear is reasonable, and necessary, and real, Zan Romonoff wrote in Buzzfeed last month.

Not every young Jew feels afraid, exactlyat least not in the way, say, Muslims or undocumented immigrants feel afraid. Ever the guilt-ridden overthinkers, progressive young Jews like me who consider themselves allies to more marginalized people are now left wondering how we should feel. Is this a time of genuine physical threat, or does our vulnerability pale in comparison to more obvious scapegoats? Do Jews of color and LGBTQ Jews feel like one identity makes them more of a target than the other? Are we victims or allies, or both?

While some of us certainly feel less safe, theres also just a pervasive feeling of being less mainstream. In more than two dozen interviews since the election with Jews under 40 across the country, I heard the phrase I feel more Jewish over and over.

One 32-year-old woman feels more aware of my Jewish identity now, in New York City, than I did as the only Jewish kid in my rural upstate school 20 years ago. Haley Arden Moss, a secular Jewish doctor who moved from the East Coast to North Carolina just a few months before the election, feels like being Jewish is now suddenly part of my identity in a way it wasnt before. One weekend in January, she considered going to synagogue to make friends and meet liberal, cool people, whereas theres no way I would ever think about doing that in New York City. She was already feeling like a fish out of water as a Jew in the South, but now that the Trump era has arrived, shes craving community. Theres safety in numbers, and comfort in shorthand.

I also feel like the other in a way Ive never felt, even though Im as secular as one can be. And while the hate unnerves me, right now feeling distinct from white America isnt so bad. I find myself doing little things differently: I made latkes multiple times for Hanukkah, Im getting fewer blowouts, Im even more interested in dating Jewish guys. But it has also moved me to engage more in social justice, which I consider just as much a part of my Ashkenazi New York heritage as Passover or the Torahprobably more.

I could never imagine being called a dirty Jew, like my dad had been by a WASP-y classmate in the 1950s. (He says its the only time he ever punched someone.) For the vast majority of the progressive Jews I spoke to, anti-Semitism was abstract growing up, even outside of places like New York or Miami or Boston. There may have been curiosity, even some sideways comments, but outright hate speech and prejudice seemed like a moment in history that had passed us by. My friends and I bristled against older Jews hypersensitivity and rebelled against it; cries of anti-Semitism always struck me as alarmist.

Later, we saw accusations of anti-Semitism lobbed at Jews who criticized Zionism. That conflation seems almost quaint now. Aaron Wagener, a senior at Swarthmore and a member of the colleges Hillel chapter, was freaked out when swastikas were found drawn in the bathroom of the campus library in late November. To think that he had been called anti-Semitic and a self-hating Jew by Zionist alums when he had advocated for a more open Hillel policy on speakers who were critical of Israel. Now there was real anti-Semitism, coming from people who actually hated Jews. With one election, the goalposts had moved.

Of course, not all American Jews are feeling like outsiders. Twenty-four percent of us voted for Trump. Jared Kushner, an Orthodox Jew, is one of the presidents closest advisors. The Zionist Organization of America invited Steve Bannon to speak at its gala in November (amid public outcry, he didnt show).

Many progressive Jews have found themselves aghast at their conservative counterparts who stay silent or dole out excuses for Trump and his supporters. Dvora, a 26-year-old Hasidic mother living in Borough Park, Brooklyn, is surrounded by them. In recent years, Dvora has gone through a secular feminist awakening (she declined to use her real name because she is not yet out to her community). She did not support Trump, but her husband did, and so did her neighbors and her colleagues. She finds it all so hypocritical.

I remember [my community] being so vigilant during the Obama administration, not voting for people because they were supposedly anti-Semitic, she says. Now during the Trump administration, whos doing way, way worse things, theyll find ways to justify it.

Dvora grew up with this very strong narrative that everyone was out to get us. Whenever a Jew from her conservative community clashed with law enforcement, she says, people would blame it on anti-Semitism. And yet, I never experienced it, she says. The hypervigilance really bothered me. I started to think anti-Semitism was a myth.

Now, when its plainly happening, she says her community scrambles to explain that Trump didnt mean it. They say Spicer didnt know. They say they dont care because Trump is good for Israel, hell Make America Great Again. Im just like, How could you? I find it inexplicable.

The paranoia that once felt like a political calculus for conservative Jews has now become a more universal part of the Jewish American experience. Ive started to read into small things, imperceptible things, probably innocent things, in the way my elders often did. When I was traveling in Texas last month, a hotel clerk in the tiny town of Big Spring commented on my unusual last name. Its Jewish, I told her. Oh! she exclaimed. We dont get many Jewish people around here. I obsessed over that interaction for days.

When I got back to New York, I spotted a swastika chalked onto the ground on the first night of Passover. I became despondent, then irate, then I Instagrammed it and told a bunch of people about it. Before the election, I probably would have only taken note for a few moments and moved on. Then again, it might not have been there in the first place.

The next day, I was unexpectedly invited to the most Jewish Passover Ive ever experienced. The singing and reading and eating lasted beyond midnight on a Tuesday. Even though I could have left at any timeI barely knew most of the people thereI didnt. I still had zero affinity to the Haggadahs Lord our God, king of the universe. But I felt very Jewish, and that felt kinda good.

Developing a stronger affinity to my roots, while feeling an inkling of the vulnerability others feel, has also made me a more empathetic ally. Many people I spoke with acknowledged Jews relative privilege; most American Jews are light-skinned, and their income and education levels are higher than any other religious group. One of my friends felt truly sick when, during Thanksgiving last year, her aunt remarked, Thank goodness we dont look Jewish or Hispanic. We can blend in and no one will bother us.

For Jews of color, assimilation isnt an option; they may be able to hide their Jewishness, but theyll always be reminded that theyre outsiders. Hannah Sultan, a founding member of the Jews of Color Caucus of Jews for Racial and Economic Justice, is also half-Mexican and has an Arab last name, which she says makes her feel more exposed than her Jewish identity. Sultan says its always been a mistake to rely on Jews ability to mainstreamthis new rise in anti-Semitism shows the false comfort of assimilating into whiteness. Combating the sinister consequences of assimilation are precisely why David A.M. Wilensky decided to start wearing a kippah, making visible something that was already there, but hidden.

As Jews, weve seen what happens when people make the mistake of looking for protection in cooperation with fascism, says Adam Greenberg, a 28-year-old political organizer living in Bostonlike when the Jewish ghetto police colluded with the Nazis during World War II, in some cases helping to undermine resistance movements, only to meet the same fate as their Jewish neighbors. Or the way certain upwardly mobile American Jews, more and more divorced from their working-class labor movement roots, start to identify with the One Percent. Instead, Jews need to be the first line of defense, Greenberg says. We should use our privilege to ally with more disenfranchised minorities rather than cozying up to power.

This renewed sense of allyship is possible in the modern era in a way it wasnt historically, says Barbara Epstein, a professor emeritus at UC Santa Cruz who studies social movements and the Jewish resistance to fascism during World War II. Under Hitler and Stalin, for example, targeted groups barely knew about each other. LGBTQ people werent public about their identity. There was no free press, let alone the internet. On the other hand, the United States is so multicultural and theres an attack on so many different groups right now, it would be surprising if a rise in political activism wasnt accompanied by this moment, Epstein says. Not only that, we have the history of fascism in our heads as a framework.

And Jews in particular have long been key players in civil rights, feminist, and labor struggles, often alongside people who cant easily assimilate. There are various theories as to why Jews, particularly the ones from Eastern Europe and the United States in the past century, historically lean to the left and make good allies. Maybe its because of the Jewish concept of tikkun olamrepair of the worlda sense of universalism not found in, say, the Bible. Or perhaps its because weve always been an international people, with no center and no army. It might be connected to Jews tradition of intellectualism, which many theorize was sparked by being barred from owning land in Catholic feudal Europe, therefore steering them to become literate artisans and merchants.

Whatever the reason, this moment has made me more politically active, which in turn makes me feel like more of a Jew. Or maybe its the other way around.

In February, I went to a rally outside Brooklyns Borough Hall with thousands of Yemeni bodega owners protesting Trumps Muslim ban. They were waving American flags and chanting USA! USA! in between speakers and prayers. It gave me shivers to watch this group of people, whod been actively rejected by their government, be so patriotic. The square was ringed by non-Muslims, mostly white Brooklynites like me. I saw an Orthodox man with a tall hat and a long beard holding a sign that said, Love your Muslim neighbor. I felt a connection with the bodega ownersa group of mostly young men who, like many of my ancestors, had been targeted for their religion.

Still, there was something eerie about that USA! chant, the same refrain of drunken frat boys celebrating bin Ladens death, the same subtle tool of racist intimidation wielded at high school sporting events. It belied an intense and wholly understandable desire to be accepted, the same way my great-grandparents on the Lower East Side wanted to be accepted, the same way everyone does. It reminded me of the peril of that desire, too. Acceptance never lasts forever.

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South Florida events to mark Jewish American Heritage Month – Sun Sentinel

Three South Florida events in celebration of Holocaust survivors, Jews who participated in the Civil Rights Movement and Jews in medicine mark the month of May as Jewish American Heritage Month.

U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-23) will moderate a discussion of Jewish contributions to the Civil Rights Movement in a program titled “Standing Up in the South” on May 7 at 4 p.m. at Hallandale High School in Hallandale Beach.

Speakers and panelists in “Standing Up in the South” include U.S. Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-20), Civil Rights leader Annsheila Turkel and Former Ambassador to the United Nations Andrew Young, Jr.

Dr. Sheldon Cherry will discuss the achievements of American Jews in medicine in his lecture titled “From Maimonides to South Beach: American Jews in Medicine” on May 7 at 2 p.m. at the Jewish Museum of Florida-Florida International University in Miami Beach.

South Florida Holocaust survivors and Jewish war veterans will share their testimonies with high school students on May 15 at 10 a.m. at the David Posnack Jewish Community Center in Davie. This JAHM event is not open to the public.

Wasserman Schultz organized the “Standing Up in the South” JAHM event to focus on the relations between African American and Jewish communities.

“Often referred to as the ‘Golden Age’ of African American and Jewish relations, some of the more pivotal moments occurred during the 20th century’s Civil Rights movement,” said Wasserman Schultz.

“It was a tremendously effective collaboration that culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and it’s a moment that deserves a far brighter spotlight.”

Wasserman Schultz added that the panelists will share their memories of the Civil Rights Movement and the collaboration of African Americans and Jews working together for civil rights.

“There is a long, wonderful and storied history between the two communities and this fight for civil rights is far from over,” said Wasserman Schultz.

Turkel, a member of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), and her late husband Leonard were among many Jews who joined African Americans at staged sit-in protests in Miami against segregation, according to their son Bruce Turkel.

“My parents were the first ones in the Deep South to stage a sit-in on April 29, 1959. Miami in the mid-1950s was a Jim Crow city. Blacks were restricted to living in three neighborhoods,” wrote Turkel on his website bruceturkel.com in 2011.

For more information on the free JAHM event at Hallandale High School, 720 NW 9th Ave. in Hallandale Beach, call 954-845-1179.

In his lecture, Cherry will site the contributions of many American Jews in medical research and practice, including Nobel Prize winners Richard Axel (2004), Julius Axelrod (1970), Stanley Cohen (1986) Gerti Cohen (1947), Joseph Goldstein (1985), among many others.

“There is a focal point to the lecture that attendees will learn, such as why 32% of the Nobel Prize winners are Jewish,” said Cherry.

“What I hope attendees will learn about is the contributions of American Jews in medicine, who are overwhelmingly offspring of immigrants.”

Cherry is known primarily for his numerous papers in reproductive medicine. He is a professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Florida International University Wertheim College of Medicine in Miami.

For more information on the free JAHM event at Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, 301 Washington Ave. in Miami Beach, call 305-672-5044 or go to www.jmof.fiu.edu

The JAHM event focusing on Holocaust survivors and Jewish War Veterans marks the second consecutive year that the survivors and war veterans will jointly share their testimonies to high school students.

Jewish American Heritage Month is celebrated during the month of May as an annual celebration and recognition of Jewish Americans for their achievements and contributions in the United States.

Wasserman Schultz is credited, along with late Senator Arlen Specter (D-PA) and the Jewish Museum of Florida, with founding the annual JAHM celebrations, beginning in 2006.

To learn more about Jewish American Heritage Month, go to www.jewishamericanheritagemonth.us.

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Celebrating Yom Yerushalayim with music – The Jewish Standard

Drew Petersen recently awarded the 2017 American Pianists Award is coming back to Temple Avodat Shalom.

The last time he visited, in 2014, the now 23-year-old highlighted the River Edge synagogues Selichot program. This time, hell be there for Yom Yerushalayim.

So how does the acclaimed performer who has performed solo, concerto, and chamber music recitals in the United States, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East and was a top prizewinner in the Leeds International Piano Competition, Hilton Head International Piano Competition, Kosciuszko Foundation Chopin Competition, and the New York Fryderyk Chopin Piano Competition come to be participating in a program commemorating the reunification of Jerusalem and the establishment of Israeli control over the Old City in June 1967?

No, Im not Jewish, but I have visited Israel, Mr. Petersen said. Ive been lucky to have had a lot of Jewish friends. Some of them brought me to Israel, where I played a recital in Tel Aviv and then went to Jerusalem. It really was a moving experience as a Christian.

Im Armenian, and Ive found over the years that a lot of our Armenian and Jewish histories are very similar, he continued. I can certainly sympathize and understand many aspects of the Jewish culture and faith. Basically, he said, It feels like such a small world, especially in the Middle East. Everything is very connected. For example, he explained, it was fascinating to him to learn about Jerusalems Armenian quarter.

That connection, he finds, is enhanced by music. Music in general is a tool, whether Jewish, or Israeli, or Western European, the bulk of my repertoire. Great art has a way of expressing universal truths and connecting all of us to each other.

Still, to paraphrase a well-worn phrase about politics, in the end, all connections are local.

Mr. Petersen, who grew up in Oradell and continues to live there, began piano lessons when he was 5. Now a masters student at Julliard, he will graduate next month. Its a crazy life, he said, noting that after winning the American Pianists Award he had to go on a media tour. His parents are the most supportive people, he said, and its nice to be home.

According to Mr. Petersen, he got to be the River Edge synagogues pianist on call because his neighbor and longtime family friend Connie Schnoll founder of the synagogues Schnoll Music Fund heard me playing when I was growing up and admired my playing. She wanted me to play more in New Jersey, closer to home, and share my artistry locally. She was very well connected to the temple and was able to convince them to bring me here twice to share some of my music with them. I feel really privileged to share my passion with others.

The May 23 program will contain works by both Israeli composers and American composers of Jewish heritage. Naomi Lewin, a former WQXR commentator, will provide narration between the pieces.

Israel is one of the younger nations on the planet, Mr. Petersen said, and works by Israeli composers tend to be more contemporary. In addition, he said, many of the really quite well known composers of the early and mid-1920s were Jews, such as Gershwin and Copeland. He is not sure yet whose work he will include in his program, but there will be an eclectic grouping of them, featuring both the musical works and commentary on the composers themselves and the historical background of their pieces.

In order to have listeners enjoy his work, I have to enjoy it and be inspired, Mr. Petersen said. Thats what motivates me. Ive been working with the rabbi the synagogues Paul Jacobson over the past few months to come up with a concept for the program. We regularly discuss what our thoughts are and what were going to do. Its a partnership, a real collaboration.

I am fortunate to have these opportunities to explore Judaism and Israel. Its as much a learning experience as a performance. It makes me really happy to be constantly learning.

For his part, Rabbi Jacobson is very excited about the program and the opportunity to work with Mr. Petersen again. While the program is still in formation, the evening may include selections by Paul ben Haim, Alexander Boskovich, Yehezkel Braun, Marc Lavery, George Gershwin, Leonard Bernstein, and Aaron Copeland. The rabbi said that his young guest brings to the evening a warmth, genuineness, passion, and willingness to lend that presence in a positive way.

Rabbi Jacobson has been doing some research on the composers. I found out that Copeland was raised in a Conservative Jewish family, he said. I didnt know he had that background. He pointed out as well that the piano that will be used at the program is being donated by Forte Piano in Paramus, and the entire evening is being subsidized by the Schnoll Music Fund, which was set up so that the congregation can have events such as this.

Rabbi Jacobson has worked with the Princeton-born Ms. Lewin before. Ms. Lewin, a former host of weekday afternoon music on WQXR and of the podcast Conducting Business, has produced intermission features for Metropolitan Opera broadcasts and music programs and feature stories for NPR. She also has been an emcee, host, and moderator for concerts, galas, and other events. And as a singer and actress, she continues to appear onstage and to give talks on operas.

Asked whether the Yom Yerushalayim program might be seen as a political statement about a unified Jersalem, given the political climate today, Rabbi Jacobson said, We cant celebrate or commemorate Jerusalem without it being a political statement. But playing music creates space for people to appreciate that in their own right. It allows them to acknowledge different views.

Music can allow people to celebrate Israel and Jerusalem and acknowledge the significance of the day while leading them to have their own opinions, he said; indeed, Its more effective for being a musical program than strictly a verbalized one.

The program is important, Rabbi Jacobson added. If our Jewish community is not standing with Israel with what we see in the world then people wont stand with us. Weve seen this from the beginning of time.

Who: Pianist Drew Petersen

What: Will perform a program to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yom Yerushalayim

When: On Tuesday, May 23, at7:30 p.m.

Where: At Temple Avodat Shalom, 385 Howland Avenue, River Edge

Cost: $10 per person

Doors open at 7 p.m. Refreshmentsto follow

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Before Rosie the Riveter: L.A. Women and the First World War – KCET

During World War II, the image of Rosie the Riveter, the U.S. governments attempt to promote womens participation in war industry production, dominated the popular imagination. Afterwards she would serve a symbol for the burgeoning feminist movement that emerged in the 1950s and 1960s. However, the opportunities that Rosie the Riveter encapsulated and the movement that followed didnt begin with the Second World War; they were in many ways the descendants of earlier efforts by women during the First.

This year marks a century since the United States entered The Great War, and across the nation, exhibitions dedicated to the conflict are opening. For example, on April 4th, the Library of Congress debuted its exhibition Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I.. Many such pubic remembrances emphasize the critical role that such contributions played in fighting the war, but also in leading to the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which granted women the vote nationwide in 1919. Despite larger reservations about the war, moderate suffragists (women advocating for the right to vote) as represented by the National Womens Suffrage Association (NWSA) committed to the war effort through volunteerism, which proved critical in mobilizing the home front.

Lynn Dumenil, a histoprian at Occidental College and author of the recent book The Second Line of Defense American Women and World War I, knows a great deal about women, World War I, and Los Angeles. In a 2011 article, Dumenil argued that World War I was a watershed [moment] in the history of Los Angeles.[1] Wartime mobilization in Los Angeles deeply affected women, and women in turn deeply impacted mobilization.

Los Angeles women provided crucial labor in making the 19th Amendment a reality. At the same time, they laid the foundation for the Rosie the Riveter feminism that followed decades later.

Even before the war broke out in Europe, Angeleno women played a critical role in national politics. Unlike in most other states, in California women had gained the right to vote in 1911. The state proved decisive in reelecting Woodrow Wilson in 1916, and some, like newspaper editor Desha Breckinridge, credited the vote of women in California and the West with delivering Wilsons victory.[2] By 1917, only 12 states, including California, gave women the right to vote. The war provided the opportunity, some women argued, to demonstrate exactly why they deserved the franchise. Los Angeles women provided crucial labor in making the 19th Amendment a reality. At the same time, they laid the foundation for the Rosie the Riveter feminism that followed decades later.

“For Every Fighter, A Woman Worker,” 1918, by Ernest Hamlin Baker, courtesy of the Charles B. Burdick War Poster Collection,San Jose State University Library Special Collections & Archives.

In the years leading up to Americas entrance into the war, most suffragists opposed intervention. Jane Addams and Carrie Chapman Catt provide just two prominent examples. Once the U.S. entered the war, however, moderate suffragists like Addams and Catt decided the best way to promote womens rights and suffrage would be through contributions to the war effort.

In Los Angeles, one detects this tension persisting even after U.S. intervention in April 1917. The Southern California division of the Womans Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), a womens organization that advocated for alcohol prohibition but also supported suffrage, approved a September 1917 resolution opposing the war, criticizing military training, and calling for a negotiated peace settlement. In a recent interview, Chapman University historian and World War I expert Jennifer Keene told me that such divisions were indicative of nationwide sentiment. Keene noted that the government adopted a heavy handed approach to convince the public of the wars efficacy. So the idea that womens groups were divided, I find that healthy and normal.[3] Despite the local WCTUs statement of militancy, the organization soon fell in line with war efforts, working with the Womens Committee of the National Council of Defense (WCCND) in coordinating local mobilization efforts.[4]

How to pursue suffrage proved a challenge to womens rights advocates, though Los Angeles female residents had a bit more leeway having already gained the franchise. [Southern California] suffrage groups had to consider what their antiwar positions might mean in regard to the larger movement, Keene said. In California they didnt have to factor that into whether or not they would protest or support the war so in that sense it liberated them.[5]

Still, the need for a national constitutional amendment guaranteeing the right to vote remained a central issue for the citys clubwomen. An influential womens group, the Fridays Morning Club, drew directly on this connection when it adopted a resolution arguing that giving women the right to vote nationally was a necessary war measure by which all American womanhood will be encouraged to co-operate in a war service as enfranchised responsible citizens.[6]

Clubwomen, mostly middle-class and upper-class white women with memberships in the WCTU and other organizations like the Young Womens Christian Association (YWCA), proved critical in mobilizing the war effort at home including the promotion of Liberty Loans to fund the war or to encourage voluntary food conservation. In regard to the latter, L.A. led the nations cities in obtaining Pledge Card Enrollments in which families promised to reduce their consumption of food stocks like meat or wheat. Some 15,000 women secured 215,000 pledges by local households to work toward food conservation during the war.[7]

“Buy a Liberty Bond”;”You Buy a Liberty Bond To-Day, I’ll Do the Rest”;”Where’s Your ‘Liberty Bond Button? Your Money Must Win the War”; 1917, courtesy of thePrints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.

“Waste No Food,”Washington DCUS Dept. of Agriculture, ca. 1917, courtesy of theRare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress.

Being tied into the national network of womens clubs, Los Angeles women were particularly well positioned. The California branch of the Womens Committee of the National Council of Defense was especially active; it consisted of 29,000 members.[8]

The Los Angeles committee of the WCCND engaged in an elaborate door to door canvassing, a procedure used elsewhere in the state, writes Dumenil. Referred to as its Womens War Service Army, it enabled the citys clubwomen to conduct a census that aggregated information about residents including names, addresses, military status and citizenship of every man, women and child so that information could be quickly utilized for some specific services, such as food conservation notice, or relief work [9]

Though a diverse city in 1917, Los Angeles embodied the kind of racial hierarchy that existed across urban America at the time. For example, J.T. Anderson, the local chairman of the WCCND, effectively organized some 350 womens groups in the city, which, judging from its elected board members, achieved some level of inclusivity. Representatives hailed from the Catholic Women of Los Angeles, the Jewish Women of Los Angeles and Labor Organizations, however, no women of color appear to have been board members.[10] Mexican-American and Japanese-American women contributed, but did so at the rank and file level, as they were denied access to higher, decision-making roles.[11] As Dumenil and other historians have noted, white clubwomen invoked their wartime service in the language of citizenship and the right to vote, but implicitly defined that citizenship as white and privileged.[12]

Black women also certainly contributed to war efforts. Prior to U.S. involvement, Los Angeles was the hub of [black] club activity and the Sojourner Truth Industrial Club (STIC) had the oldest pedigree and largest membership. During the war, the STIC organized local African-American clubwomen, but white organizations largely ignored them. Negro Women Councils formed by African-American women in Pasadena and San Diego worked with the local WCCNDs supporting the war but also remained attuned to racial issues, such as when they protested D.W. Griffiths The Birth of the Nation, a film that portrayed the Klu Klux Klan positively and promoted noxious racist stereotypes of African-Americans.[13]

Auto repairs, Los Angeles, circa 1915-1920,Bain News Service, courtesy of theGeorge Grantham Bain Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.

Of course, any discussion of womens service during wartime must mention one of the most iconic organizations of the 20th century: the Red Cross. Here, too, L.A. women played a critical role. Both men and women volunteered and worked for the Red Cross; nationally, its leadership positions were dominated by men, but in Los Angeles women made up half its board of directors. Images of nurses on the war front often dominate the public imagination, but many more women sewed or knitted clothes for soldiers, made bandages, assembled care packages and comfort bags, or served coffee, donuts, and other refreshments at railway stations across the U.S. Los Angeles Santa Fe Station served as a hub of this kind of activity during the war.[14]

Poster of a Red Cross nurse (1918) by Harrison Fisher, courtesy of theBancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley.

Santa Fe Hut at Los Angeles, 1918-1919, courtesy of the American National Red Cross Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.

Worried about the disruption to families caused by conscription, the L.A. branch of the Red Cross organized the Home Service responsibility program in fall of 1917. Through it, the Red Cross provided financial aid, medical care, and legal advice dedicated to ensuring that no enlisted mans family shall suffer for any essential thing that it is within [the Red Crosss] power to give.

Female Red Cross volunteers in Los Angeles signed up individually but also through and with their clubs. Though the Red Cross worked well with white middle and upper class clubwomen, it also successfully marshaled, if on admittedly unequal terms, the labor of Jewish, Japanese, Mexican, and African American women in Los Angeles.

Forming their own auxiliaries, Jewish and Japanese women contributed to the local war effort. According to the Los Angeles County war history committee, most Japanese Angelenos joined the Red Cross and provided the most consistent war work and described their contributions as praiseworthy. Mexican-American women worked at the local Catholic settlement house, Brownson House.

Red Cross work at Girls Collegiate School, Los Angeles, 1918, courtesy of the American National Red Cross Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.

African-Americans contributed to efforts through the Harriet Tubman Auxiliary in Los Angeles and the Phyllis Wheatley branch of the Red Cross in nearby Santa Monica. Due to the segregated nature of the military and the large numbers of black service personnel serving in the war (roughly 400,000 African-American men traveled overseas for the army), these organizations viewed their work as including support for their enlisted male counterparts. They held banquets to send off local troops in good spirits. Unfortunately, the Red Cross also suffered from its own racial blind spots. Each group worked individually with little to no contact with each other, and certainly not with their Anglo peers. [15]

Then again, an epic 1918 Red Cross parade through Los Angeles gave these women, white and non-white alike, a public presence that even a decade earlier had been denied to them. Never in Los Angeles had there been a parade where its womanhood took such a conspicuous part, the Los Angeles Times reported. Some 10,000 marchers, most of them women and including Mexican and black participants, walked in the seven-mile parade to celebrate womens war service.

1918 Red Cross parade through Los Angeles. Photo courtesy of the Security Pacific National Bank Collection Los Angeles Public Library.

Public demonstrations like the 1918 march drew publicity and highlighted the critical contributions of women to the war. It also provided justification for the demands of suffragists. Historians like Keene and Woodrow Wilson biographer John Milton Cooper Jr. credit these efforts with forcing the president to support suffrage. The 19th Amendment passed Congress in 1919 and was ratified the following year.

Obviously, limits remained. During World War I, most organizations and even the WCCND denied women real policy influence. Women of color continued to suffer discrimination as many white clubwomen ignored or discounted them entirely. For women generally, suffrage hardly meant equality. For example, one million women found better paying work in industry and elsewhere during the war, but labor union hostility curtailed these gains and the return of soldiers from Europe revealed the temporary nature of such opportunities. Yet, it also accelerated the slow march toward equality.

As symbolized by Rosie the Riveter and evidenced by the feminist movement that followed, women in World War II built on the accomplishments of their World War I counterparts. Given the increasing industrialization in Los Angeles during the interwar years, L.A women played an even larger role in the Second World War. But without the clubwomen of the First, a century ago, the story would have been very different.

Workers at Southern Pacific Stations at Los Angeles, circa 1918-1919, courtesy of the American National Red Cross Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.

[1] Lynn Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, Vol. 10 No. 2 (April 2011): 218.

[2] Desha Breckinridge to Mary Curry, November 10, 1916, Breckinridge Family Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress; John Milton Cooper Jr., Woodrow Wilson: A Biography, (New York, Random House: 2009), 356.

[3] Jennifer Keene, interview with author, March 27, 2017.

[4] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 233.

[5] Keene, interview with author, March 27, 2017

[6] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 223.

[7] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 243.

[8] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 222.

[9] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 220.

[10] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 220.

[11] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 221.

[12] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 221.

[13] Shirley Ann Wilson Moore, Your Life Is Really Just Not Your Own: African American Women in Twentieth Century California in Seeking El Dorado: African Americans in California, Eds. Lawrence B. De Graff, Kevin Mulroy, Quintard Taylor (Los Angeles: Autry Museum of Western Heritage, 1984), 216-217.

[14] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 235-236.

[15] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 236-237.

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Before Rosie the Riveter: L.A. Women and the First World War – KCET

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Students in TX stand strong with Israel – OneNewsNow

Students played an integral role in seeing that the Texas House passed a bill last week barring the state from engaging in business with companies involved with the anti-Israel BDS movement.

HB 89, sponsored by Representative Phil King, passed unanimously, 131-0. The bill strengthens ties with Israel, Texas’ fourth-largest trading partner, according to the Jerusalem Post. Jesse Stock of StandWithUs, a pro-Israel organization, says students did their part in promoting the bill.

“There was a ‘Stand With Israel Day’ at the capitol and we mobilized … close to 50 students who came to the capitol for the day and met with legislators and expressed why this legislation is important,” he shares with OneNewsNow.

Stock says high school students are a “huge part” of what they do in supporting Israel.

“We have five high school interns in Dallas, one in San Antonio, and one in Houston,” he describes. “All of them were active in trying to mobilize their friends to call their legislators as well to educate their peers about the importance.”

Rep. King explained to StandWithUs that he had multiple reasons for taking the lead against what he considers economic warfare against the Jewish nation:

“First, as a Christian, my religious heritage is intrinsically linked to Israel and to the Jewish people. Second, as an American, our national security is dependent in great part on a strong Israel, often our only friend in the Middle East. Third, as a Texas legislator, our state has a substantial Jewish population and this issue is important to them. Texans have historical ties and do a lot of business with Israel. Fourth, it’s just the right thing to do.”

The Senate passed its version of the anti-boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) bill in March. It is expected Gov. Greg Abbott will sign the bill early next month.

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Jewish American Heritage Month – Dr. Sheldon Cherry …

Jewish American Heritage Month – Dr. Sheldon Cherry Event information Start: Sunday, May. 7, 2017, 02:00PM End: Sunday, May. 7, 2017, 03:30PM Venue: Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU From Maimonides to South Beach, American Jews in Medicine In Recognition of Jewish American Heritage Month 2017 Theme: American Jews in Medical Research

Lecture by Dr. Sheldon H. Cherry Associate Dean, Clinical Affairs; and Professor FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Dr. Sheldon H. Cherry has built a national reputation as a clinician in the reproductive and women’s health field and has published numerous papers in reproductive medicine. He was the recipient of an NIH Grant on amniotic fluid physiology, and was a pioneer in the field of intrauterine diagnosis and treatment. As Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, he taught at The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, in New York and belongs to the American College of Surgeons, and the New York Obstetrical Society. Dr. Cherry was the senior editor of “Complications of Pregnancy”, a classic medical textbook in its fourth edition. Dr. Cherry is also the author of several lay books on woman’s health. He is a frequent expert guest on various media including television, such as “Good Morning America” and the “Today Show”. He has in the past been the monthly columnist for Parents Magazine on pregnancy and childbirth. He has been consistently named as a “Top Doctor In America” and named in “Who’s Who In The World”. Dr. Cherry was born in New York City and received his medical training at Columbia University.

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Every single movie coming out this summer – Los Angeles Times

The 2017 Summer Movie Preview is a snapshot of the films opening through early September. Release dates and other details are subject to change.

April 28

A fashion editor finds herself drawn into a steamy affair with another woman. With Natalie Krill, Sebastian Pigott, Erika Linder. Written by Stephanie Fabrizi. Directed by April Mullen. Gunpowder & Sky

A couple discover an evil, lustful presence inhabiting the basement of their new home. With Natasha Henstridge, Luke Hassel, Lin Shaye, Dominique Swain. Written and directed by Rolfe Kanefsky. Cleopatra Entertainment

The LAPD recruits a Russian police officer to help hunt a serial killer. With Alexander Nevsky, Kristanna Loken, Adrian Paul, Robert Davi, Matthias Hues. Written by Brent Huff, George Saunders. Directed by Nevsky. ITN Distribution

Meta-documentary by Kitty Green on the 1996 killing of 6-year-old JonBent Ramsey. Netflix

SEE OUR COMPLETE SUMMER MOVIE PREVIEW

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A young woman experiences success at the world’s largest technology and social media company and is encouraged to live her life completely in the open. With Emma Watson, Tom Hanks, John Boyega, Patton Oswalt, Bill Paxton, Karen Gillan, Ellar Coltrane. Written and directed by James Ponsoldt, based on the novel by Dave Eggers. STX Entertainment

Documentary explores the mid-20th-century battles between urbanization critic and activist Jane Jacobs and New York master builder Robert Moses. Directed by Matt Tyrnauer. Sundance Selects

Female war correspondent Alex Quade chronicles the stories of U.S. Special Operations Forces in the third film in the “Heroes of Valor” docu-action series. Featuring Wendy R. Anderson. Written by Eli Baldridge and Quade. Directed by Christian Tureaud and David Salzberg. Gravitas Ventures

In a cabin in northern Wales, two lost souls experiment with black magic. With Steve Oram, Catherine Walker. Written and directed by Liam Gavin. IFC Midnight

A physics student time travels as she attempts to solve her boyfriend’s murder. With Courtney Hope, Bruce Davison, Susan Blakely, Sarah Douglas, Lou Richards, Karan Oberoi, Christopher Backus. Written and directed by Kenneth Mader. Arcadia Releasing Group

A Boston homicide detective hunts his partner’s killer on Nantucket Island. With Eric Dane, Natalie Zea, Adrian Lester, Carolyn Stotesbery, Chris Meyer, Rebecca Gayheart. Written and directed by John Shea. Beacon Pictures / Broadvision Entertainment

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Eugenio Derbez stars as a struggling middle-aged gigolo forced to move in with his sister and nephew. With Salma Hayek, Rob Lowe, Kristen Bell, Raquel Welch, Rob Corddry, Rob Riggle, Michael Cera, Raphael Alejandro. Written by Chris Spain, Jon Zack. Directed by Ken Marino. Pantelion

During Koreas Joseon Dynasty, King Yejong and his assistant investigate rumors that there will be an attempt on the throne. With Lee Sun-kyun, Ahn Jae-hong. Written by Kang Hyun-sung. Directed by Moon Hyung-sung. CJ Entertainment

The Los Angeles uprising after the Rodney King verdict is explored through archival footage in this documentary marking the 25th anniversary. Directed by Daniel Lindsay, T.J. Martin. National Geographic

At the end of the traditional Jewish mourning period after the death of his son, a middle-aged Israeli man chooses to see what makes life meaningful rather than return to his regular routine. With Shai Avivi, Evgenia Dodina, Tomer Kapon. Written and directed by Asaph Polonsky. Oscilloscope Laboratories

A single mom is abducted and learns she has a genetic abnormality that could cause her true alien nature to be revealed. With Noomi Rapace, Michael Chiklis, Peter Stormare, Kerry Bishe. Written by Steven Shainberg and Brian Nelson. Directed by Shainberg. AMBI Media Group

An eccentric family spend its summer in a coastal villa in early 20th century France. With Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi. Written and directed by Bruno Dumont. Kino Lorber

A young street magician must use his mystical ways to rescue his kidnapped sister. With Jacob Latimore, Storm Reid, Seychelle Gabriel, Dul Hill, Sasheer Zamata, Cameron Esposito. Written and directed by J.D Dillard. BH Tilt

A young nurse in 1950s Tuscany believes the wealthy young mute she cares for is possessed by something within the walls of an isolated castle. With Emilia Clarke, Marton Csokas. Written by Andrew Shaw, based on a novel by Silvio Raffo. Directed by Eric D. Howell. Momentum Pictures

May 5

Biographical documentary on the songwriter and record producer whose hits included Twist and Shout, Hang on Sloopy, Here Comes the Night and Piece of My Heart. Narrated by Steve Van Zandt. Featuring Ronald Isley, Ben E. King, Solomon Burke, Van Morrison, Keith Richards, Paul McCartney. Directed by Brett Berns and Bob Sarles. Abramorama

Liev Schreiber stars as Chuck Wepner, the underdog boxer who inspired “Rocky.” With Naomi Watts, Elisabeth Moss, Ron Perlman, Jim Gaffigan, Michael Rapaport, Pooch Hall, Morgan Spector. Written by Jeff Feuerzeig, Jerry Stahl, Michael Cristofer, Schreiber. Directed by Philippe Falardeau. IFC Films

A gubernatorial candidate, his estranged brother and their wives confront a terrible crime committed by their teenage sons. With Rebecca Hall, Chlo Sevigny, Richard Gere, Laura Linney, Steve Coogan. Written and directed by Oren Moverman, based on a novel by Herman Koch. The Orchard

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Filmmaker James Gunn delivers Mixtape #2 as the team explores the mystery of Peter Quill’s heritage and fights galactic baddies. With Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Vin Diesel, Bradley Cooper, Michael Rooker, Karen Gillan, Pom Klementieff, Elizabeth Debicki, Chris Sullivan, Sean Gunn, Tommy Flanagan, Laura Haddock, Sylvester Stallone, Kurt Russell. Walt Disney Pictures

The life and work of the painter and filmmaker are chronicled in this documentary. Featuring Mary Boone, Jeff Koons, Vito Schnabel, Willem Dafoe, Bono. Directed by Pappi Corsicato. Cohen Media Group

Debra Winger and Tracy Letts star as a long-married couple whose serious affairs with other people rekindle a spark in their own relationship. With Aidan Gillen, Melora Walters, Tyler Ross, Jessica Sula. Written and directed by Azazel Jacobs. A24

Documentary on the work of the New York Times obituary writers. Written and directed by Vanessa Gould. Kino Lorber

A voyeur is framed for murder by a young lady in this restored version of the1946 adaptation of Georges Simenons Mr. Hire’s Engagement. With Michel Simon, Viviane Romance, Paul Bernard, Max Dalban. Written by Julien Duvivier, Charles Spaak. Directed by Duvivier. Rialto Pictures

Oscar-winning filmmaker Laura Poitras documentary on Julian Assange. Neon

Pat Healy directs and stars in a black comedy about a man who specializes in simulated abductions. With Taylor Schilling. Written by Mike Makowsky. The Orchard

Elle Fanning, Naomi Watts and Susan Sarandon star as a family living under one roof in New York adjusting to a teen’s decision to transition from female to male. Written by Nikole Beckwith. Directed by Gaby Dellal. Weinstein Company

Also: Alienate Horror/Sci-fi. Gravitas Ventures Black Site Delta Action. XLrator Media Buster’s Mal Heart Sci-fi thriller. With Rami Malek. Well Go USA Elian Documentary. Gravitas Ventures Enter the Warriors Gate Fantasy adventure co-written by Luc Besson. EuropaCorp The Founders Sports documentary. Level 33 Lady Bloodfight Martial arts action. Vertical Entertainment Mom and Me Documentary. Uncorkd Entertainment Tomorrow Ever After Sci-fi comedy. Thier Productions

May 12

Artist Chris Burden, whose work included dangerous stunts, iconic sculptures and installations, and the vintage streetlights outside LACMA, is profiled in this documentary. Directed by Timothy Marrinan & Richard Dewey. Magnolia Pictures

Documentary recounts the romantic and creative partnership of storyboard artist Harold Michelson and film researcher Lillian Michelson. Featuring Danny DeVito, Mel Brooks, Francis Ford Coppola. Directed by Daniel Raim. Zeitgeist Films

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A new imagining of the Excalibur myth finds Arthur once more searching for his rightful place in the kingdom. With Charlie Hunnam, Astrid Bergs-Frisbey, Djimon Hounsou, Aidan Gillen, Jude Law, Eric Bana. Written by Joby Harold and Guy Ritchie & Lionel Wigram; story by David Dobkin and Joby Harold. Directed by Ritchie. Warner Bros.

Two women find deep friendship at an Italian mental hospital and help each other navigate in the real world when they inadvertently gain their freedom. With Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Micaela Ramazzotti. Written and directed by Paolo Virzi. Strand Releasing

An East L.A. street artist feels caught between the old-school car culture of his father and ex-con brother and his own means of self-expression. With Gabriel Chavarria, Demin Bichir, Eva Longoria, Theo Rossi, Melissa Benoist, Tony Revolori. Written by Cheo Hodari Coker & Elgin James. Directed by Ricardo de Montreuil. Telemundo Films / BH Tilt

A Frenchman restores the love of life for a neglected American wife. With Diane Lane, Arnaud Viard, Alec Baldwin. Written and directed by Eleanor Coppola. Sony Pictures Classics

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Amy Schumer stars as an impulsive young woman who recruits her rigid mother, played by Goldie Hawn, for a jungle vacation. With Joan Cusack, Ike Barinholtz, Wanda Sykes, Christopher Meloni. Written by Katie Dippold. Directed by Jonathan Levine. 20th Century Fox

Two U.S. soldiers are trapped with only a crumbling structure between them and an Iraqi sniper. With Aaron Taylor-Johnson, John Cena. Written by Dwain Worrell. Directed by Doug Liman. Amazon Studios / Roadside Attractions

Residents of a Scottish island attempt to liberate 50,000 cases of whisky from a stranded ship in this remake of the 1949 Alexander Mackendrick comedy. With Eddie Izzard, Ellie Kendrick, James Cosmo. Written by Peter McDougall, based on the novel by Compton Mackenzie. Directed by Gillies MacKinnon. Arrow Films

A young woman’s privileged life in 19th century Normandy is slowly eroded by her husband’s unfaithfulness and pressure from family and community. With Judith Chemla, Jean-Pierre Darroussin, Yolande Moreau, Swann Arlaud. Written by Stphane Briz and Florence Vignon, based on a novel by Guy de Maupassant. Directed by Briz. Kino Lorber

Also: Angkor Awakens Documentary. Directed by Robert H. Lieberman. Photosynthesis Productions Dead Awake Horror. FilmRise Folk Hero & Funny Guy Comedy with Alex Karpovsky. Gravitas Ventures Get Me Roger Stone Documentary. Netflix Hounds of Love Horror. Gunpowder & Sky Long Live the King Documentary. Indie Rights Sacred Documentary directed by Thomas Lennon. Argot Pictures Tracktown Drama with Alexi Pappas. Samuel Goldwyn Films Urban Hymn Crime drama. Level 33 Violet Drama. Ryan Bruce Levey Film Distribution

May 19

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The crew of a colony ship makes a terrifying discovery after landing on what seems to be an uncharted paradise on the far side of the galaxy. With Michael Fassbender, Katherine Waterston, Billy Crudup, Danny McBride, Demin Bichir. Written by John Logan. Directed by Ridley Scott. 20th Century Fox

An affair threatens the idealistic cooperative an upscale Copenhagen couple establish in their home. With Ulrich Thomsen, Trine Dyrholm, Fares Fares. Written by Tobias Lindholm, Thomas Vinterberg. Directed by Vinterberg. Magnolia Pictures

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The family takes a road trip and Greg schemes to become famous as a new cast takes over for the fourth installment based on Jeff Kinney’s comic youth novels. With Jason Ian Drucker, Charlie Wright, Owen Asztalos, Tom Everett Scott, Alicia Silverstone. Written by Kinney and director David Bowers. 20th Century Fox

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An 18-year-old woman, confined to her house in a protected environment because of an illness, forms an attachment to the boy next door and yearns to experience the outside world. With Amandla Stenberg, Nick Robinson, Ana De La Reguera, Anika Noni Rose. Written by J. Mills Goodloe, based on the book by Nicola Yoon. Directed by Stella Meghie. Warner Bros./ MGM

Directors Sebastian Junger and Nick Quested map the regions turmoil in this documentary. National Geographic

Verit documentary follows three White Helmets volunteer first responders who rush in to some of the most dangerous areas in Syria. Directed by Firas Fayyad, Steen Johannessen. Grasshopper Film

The suicide of a young artist brings together his girlfriend and mother as they confront their grief. With Janet McTeer, Alia Shawkat, Rhys Wakefield, Nancy Kwan, Emily Rios, Alfred Molina. Written by Amber Tamblyn, Ed Dougherty, based on the novel by Janet Fitch. Directed by Amber Tamblyn. Imagination Worldwide

The nuptials are set, but an Orthodox woman has only one month to find a groom. With Noa Koler, Amos Tamam, Oz Zehavi. Written and directed by Rama Burshtein. In Hebrew with English subtitles. (1:50) NR. Roadside Attractions

Also: Devil’s Domain Horror film with Michael Madsen. Cleopatra Entertainment Fight for Space Documentary. Gravitas Ventures If You’re Not in the Obit, Eat Breakfast Documentary. With Carl Reiner. HBO Documentary Films The Last Shaman Documentary. Abramorama 7 Witches Horror. Indican Pictures Solaris (1972) and Stalker (1979) Re-release of Andrei Tarkovsky films Janus Films The Survivalist Post-apocalyptic thriller. IFC Midnight

May 26

A renowned and uncompromising artist struggles against authoritarianism in post-World War II Communist Poland in director Andrzej Wajdas final film. With Boguslaw Linda. Written by Andrzej Mularczyk. Film Movement

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Dwayne Johnson steps into the formidable flip flops of David Hasselhoff as lifeguard Mitch Buchanan in this adaptation of the 1990s TV series. With Zac Efron, Priyanka Chopra, Alexandra Daddario, Jon Bass, Kelly Rohrbach, Ilfenesh Hadera. Written by Damian Shannon & Mark Swift, story by Jay Scherick & David Ronn and Thomas Lennon & Robert Ben Garant, based on the series created by Michael Berk & Douglas Schwartz and Gregory J. Bonann. Directed by Seth Gordon. Paramount Pictures

The 30-year trek of the Grateful Dead as their organic approach to touring and getting the word out turned them into one of the most successful and popular live acts in rock n roll is chronicled in this documentary. Featuring Jerry Garcia, Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann, Phil Lesh, Bob Weir. Directed by Amir Bar-Lev. Amazon Studios

Cate Blanchett plays multiple roles in a series of vignettes inspired by artist manifestos. Written and directed by Julian Rosefeldt. FilmRise

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Captain Jack is down-on-his-luck and his survival depends on an alliance with an attractive astronomer and a Royal Navy sailor. With Johnny Depp, Javier Bardem, Brenton Thwaites, Kaya Scodelario, Kevin R. McNally, Golshifteh Farahani, David Wenham, Stephen Graham and Geoffrey Rush. Written by Jeff Nathanson, story by Nathanson and Terry Rossio. Directed by Joachim Rnning and Espen Sandberg. Walt Disney Pictures

Bryan Cranston stars as a successful but overwhelmed businessman whose disappearance is not what it appears. With Jennifer Garner, Jason O’Mara, Beverly D’Angelo, Ian Anthony Dale, Pippa Bennett-Warner, Isaac Leyva, Victoria Bruno, Ellery Sprayberry, Tracey Walter. Written and directed by Robin Swicord. IFC Films

A four-star U.S. general is charged with ending the country’s involvement in Afghanistan. With Brad Pitt, Ben Kingsley, Tilda Swinton, Topher Grace, Anthony Michael Hall, Will Poulter, Keith Stanfield. Written and directed by David Michod, based on the book The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of Americas War in Afghanistan by Michael Hastings. Netflix

Also: Berlin Syndrome Psychological thriller. Vertical Entertainment Black Butterfly Thriller with Antonio Banderas, Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Piper Perabo. Lionsgate Premiere Drone Thriller. Screen Media Films Legion of Brothers Documentary. Gravitas Ventures Spirit Game: Pride of a Nation Sports documentary. XLrator Media

May TBD

Also: Aida’s Secrets Documentary. Music Box Films Bugs Documentary. Kino Lorber NISE: The Heart of Madness Brazilian drama. Outsider Pictures / Strand Releasing The Penguin Counters Documentary. First Run Features

June 2

Director Errol Morris profiles portrait photographer Elsa Dorfman through her work with the Polaroid Land 20×24 camera and her Cambridge, Mass., studio, where she captured families, Beat poets, rock stars and Harvard standouts. Neon

A young couple attempt to work their marital woes out by starting a band and turning their fights into songs. With Adam Pally, Fred Armisen, Susie Essman, Hannah Simone, Ravi Patel, Jorma Taccone, Jesse Williams, Brooklyn Decker, Jaime Chung, Chris DElia, Colin Hanks. Written and directed by Zoe Lister-Jones. IFC Films

Animated adaptation of the hit illustrated book series by Dav Pilkey about a pair of wildly imaginative boys and their creation of a not-so-bright superhero. Voices by Kevin Hart, Ed Helms, Thomas Middleditch, Nick Kroll, Jordan Peele, Kristen Schaal. Written by Nicholas Stoller. Directed by David Soren. 20th Century Fox / DreamWorks Animation

Brian Cox stars as the British prime minister in the tense days leading up to the D-Day invasion. With Miranda Richardson, John Slattery, Julian Wadham, James Purefoy, Ella Purnell, Richard Durden. Written by Alex von Tunzelmann. Directed by Jonathan Teplitzky. Cohen Media Group

Demetri Martin writes, directs and stars with Kevin Kline as a father-and-son dealing with grief and attendant life changes. With Gillian Jacobs. CBS Films

During WWII, a German soldier is sent to occupied Holland to monitor espionage surrounding the exiled Kaiser Wilhelm II. With Christopher Plummer, Jai Courtney, Lily James. Written by Simon Burke, based on a novel by Alan Judd. Directed by David Leveaux. A24

A love triangle emerges in the drag queen bars of Tokyo in this restoration of writer-director Toshio Matsumoto’s 1969 drama. With Pt, Osamu Ogasawara, Yoshimi J. Cinelicious Pictures

A Newcastle carpenter with a heart condition battles government bureaucracy after he is denied benefits and aids a struggling single mom with two children. Winner of the Palme dOr at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival. With Dave Johns, Hayley Squires. Written by Paul Laverty. Directed by Ken Loach. Sundance Selects

A pre-World War I Cambridge man battles his homosexual urges in this 1987 adaptation of the E.M. Forster novel by producer Ismail Merchant and director James Ivory. With James Wilby, Hugh Grant, Rupert Graves, Ben Kingsley, Phoebe Nicholls. Written by Kit Hesketh-Harvey and Ivory. Cohen Media Group

The art worlds enfant terrible is followed from his early years through a recent Guggenheim retrospective. Directed by Maura Axelrod. Bond / 360

Two sisters in 1977 Jerusalem probe their stern father’s unspoken experiences in World War II Poland. With Nelly Tagar, Joy Rieger, Doron Tavory and Evgenia Dodina. Written and directed by Avi Nesher. Samuel Goldwyn Films

In 1930s Sweden, an indigenous teenage girl feels the sting of racism and vows to escape. With Lene Cecilia Sparrok, Mia Erika Sparrok, Maj-Doris Rimpi. Written and directed by Amanda Kernell. Synergetic Distribution

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The Amazonian princess gets her own movie and leaves her island paradise to fight a war to end all wars. With Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Robin Wright, Danny Huston, David Thewlis, Connie Nielsen, Elena Anaya, Ewen Bremner, Lucy Davis, Lisa Loven Kongsli, Eugene Brave Rock, Sad Taghmaoui. Written by Allan Heinberg, story by Zack Snyder & Allan Heinberg and Jason Fuchs, based on characters from DC. Wonder Woman created by William Moulton Marston. Directed by Patty Jenkins. Warner Bros.

Also: All About the Money Action comedy with Eddie Griffin. Gravitas Ventures Dark Signal Horror. XLrator Media Handsome Devil Drama. Breaking Glass Pictures Vincent-n-Roxxy Romantic drama with Emile Hirsh, Zo Kravitz, Zoey Deutch. Vertical Entertainment

Documentary on the Chinese immigrant Sung family, owners of the only U.S. bank to face criminal charges stemming from the 2008 financial crisis. Directed by Steve James. PBS Films

A writer deals with the death of her wife, a deep desire to become a mother and falls into a love triangle with her two best friends. With Laura Heisler, Bryan Dechart, Annie Potts, Raoul Bhaneja, Anna Fitzwater. Written by Gretchen M. Michelfeld. Directed by Heather de Michele. First Run Features

Writer Mike White and director Miguel Arteta reteam for a satire about a dinner party where a successful immigrant health practitioner butts heads with a smug billionaire. With Salma Hayek, John Lithgow, Chlo Sevigny, Connie Britton, David Warshofsky, Amy Landecker, Jay Duplass, John Early. Roadside Attractions

A washed-up western actor changes his priorities after a cancer diagnosis. With Sam Elliott, Laura Prepon, Krysten Ritter, Nick Offerman, Katharine Ross. Written by Brett Haley, Marc Basch. Directed by Haley. The Orchard

Adult brother and sister twins confront their lack of emotional development when they date the same man. With Lucas Neff, Artemis Pebdani, Angela Trimbur. Written by Kristin Archibald and Doug Archibald. Directed by Doug Archibald. Magnolia Pictures

Writer-director Trey Edward Shults follows “Krisha” with a dystopian horror story about a man and his family under siege. With Joel Edgerton, Riley Keough, Christopher Abbott, Carmen Ejogo and Kelvin Harrison Jr. A24

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Link:
Every single movie coming out this summer – Los Angeles Times

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Diary of Trump’s first 100 days: Highlights of an unconventional presidency – USA TODAY

USA TODAY 8:42 a.m. ET April 29, 2017 USA TODAY’s Susan Page asks a panel of White House veterans and presidential scholars to offer President Trump advice after his first 100 days in the White House. USA TODAY Trump is sworn in as president at noon on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol. In his first Oval Office appearance, before heading to inaugural balls, hesigns an executive order directing agencies to find ways to “ease the burden” of Obamacare. Trump makes an appearance at CIA headquarters, expressing his support for the intelligence community while attacking the media for reporting that he had a “feud” with them over investigations into Russian hacking and the election. He also criticizes media coverage of his inauguration, echoed later by press secretary Sean Spicer in an angry briefing room debut. Meanwhile, millions of people join Women’s March protestsaround the world, including in Washington. Trump starts the day with tweets touting his inauguration TV ratings and weighing in on the weekend protests against him: “Watched protests yesterday but was under the impression that we just had an election! Why didn’t these people vote?” Top aide Kellyanne Conway makes waves with aMeet the Pressappearance in which she says Spicer “gave alternative facts” in his press briefing in regard to inauguration crowd sizes. Trump signs three presidential directives: withdrawing U.S. support for a Pacific trade deal; imposing a hiring freeze in civilian agencies; and restoring the so-called Mexico City policy that prohibits U.S. aid from supporting international groups that promote abortion. In a meeting with congressional leaders, Trump revives claims of voter fraud, blaming his popular vote loss on 3 million to 5 million people voting illegally. Trump signs five executive actions on energy and infrastructure projects, including two memoranda intended to expedite the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines. In a late-night tweet, he references plans to address one of his key campaign promises the following day: “Big day planned on NATIONAL SECURITY tomorrow. Among many other things, we will build the wall!” Trump starts the day with tweets vowing a “major investigation” into alleged voter fraud. In the afternoon, he visits the Department of Homeland Security and signs executive actions aimed at building a wall on the Mexican border and clamping down on “sanctuary cities.” Trump floats a proposal for a 20% tax on imports from Mexico to pay for his planned border wall. His plans for the wall drive a divide between the two countries and lead Mexican President Enrique Pea Nieto to cancel a meeting between the two leaders. Trump takes his first Air Force One ride, traveling to Philadelphia to speak at the GOP congressional retreat. Trump has an hourlong phone call with Mexican President Enrique Pea Nieto. He has his first official meeting with a foreign leader, British Prime Minister Theresa May. During their news conference, Trump declines to say whether he supportsa reduction of sanctions against Russia. He visits the Pentagon to charge his new Defense secretary with rebuilding the military and announce an executive action to clamp down on refugee admissions in the U.S. Trump’s executive order from the previous evening which suspends the U.S. refugee program for 120 days, bans all immigrants from seven Muslim countries for 90 days, and orders the administration to develop “extreme vetting” measures causes reverberations across the country, with stranded travelers, airport protests and legal challenges. The president makes a round of phone calls to world leaders, including Russian President Vladimir Putin. Trump also signs more executive orders: one to reorganize the National Security Council, another to strengthen ethics rules for the executive branch, and a third directing the military to present him a plan to defeat the Islamic State. Trump speaks on the phone with Russian President Vladimir Putin in the Oval Office on Jan. 28, 2017.(Photo: Michael Reynolds, European Pressphoto Agency) Trump, the target of protests, lawsuits and global criticism over his new refugee policy, takes to social media to defend it as a counter-terrorism measure. Some congressional Republicans suggest the order may have been too broad and hastily written. The president also faces blowback after giving chief strategist Steve Bannon an elevated role on the National Security Council. Amid continued criticism over his temporary travel ban, Trump says that stopping terrorism involves hard choices and adds that he’s following through on campaign pledges. Former president Barack Obama’s office releases a statement that applauds those protesting the ban. That evening, acting Attorney General Sally Yates, a holdover from the Obama administration, says she won’t defend the presidents travel banin court. Three hours later, the White House announces that she’s been relieved of her duties. The morning after firing his acting attorney general, Trump mocks his Democratic congressional critics and demands that the Senate confirm his attorney general pick, Alabama Sen.Jeff Sessions. He meets with drugmakers and pledges to cut taxes and streamline regulations for the pharmaceutical industry in a bid to drive down drug prices. The president caps off the day with his long-awaited Supreme Court nomination, announcing his selection of Neil Gorsuch to fill the seat of the late Justice Antonin Scalia. Trump says the Senate should “go nuclear” and eliminate Democratic filibuster rights if that’s what it takes to confirm Gorsuch. His nomination of Betsy DeVos for Education secretary takes a hit when two Republican senators say they’ll vote against her. The president makes an unannounced trip to a Delaware military base to receive the remains of a Navy SEAL killed during a counter-terrorism raid. In remarks at the National Prayer Breakfast, Trump references leaked conversations between himself and Mexican and Australian leaders, telling attendees not to worry about his “tough phone calls” and that the country has to be “tougher” in meeting its challenges. He raises eyebrows by also asking for prayers for his Apprenticesuccessor, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and the show’s ratings, which Trump said have gone “down the tubes” in his absence. And he vows to make good on his promise to overturn the so-called Johnson Amendment, which bans public charities including churches from campaigning for or against a candidate for elected office. The Trump administration imposes new sanctions on Iranian individuals and companies, citing the Tehran government’s missile tests and support for rebels in Yemen. The president signs executive actions rolling back key financial regulations of the Obama era, including restrictions on Wall Street banks and on financial advisers who sell clients expensive financial products with higher commissions. Trump spends his weekend at Mar-a-Lago, the “Winter White House.” He asks a federal court to overturn a Seattle judges injunction halting his immigration ban, after he criticized the judges ruling as ridiculous and a terrible decision. In excerpts of a Fox News interview with Bill O’Reilly set to air before the Super Bowl the following day, Trump reiterates his desire to improve relations with Russia and dismisses concerns that Putin is a killer. Trump continues to attack the federal judge who voided his travel ban. “Just cannot believe a judge would put our country in such peril,” he tweets. “If something happens blame him and court system. People pouring in. Bad!” As the Justice Department appeals the judge’s decision, Trump also tweets that he has “instructed Homeland Security to check people coming into our country VERY CAREFULLY. The courts are making the job very difficult!” President Trump watches the Palm Beach Central High School marching band perform as it greets him upon his arrival to watch the Super Bowl at Trump International Golf Club Palm Beach in West Palm Beach, Fla., on Feb. 5, 2017.(Photo: Mandel Ngan, AFP/Getty Images) As an appeals court reviews his travel ban, Trump claims that the public is with him, despite polls indicating otherwise. “Any negative polls are fake news, just like the CNN, ABC, NBC polls in the election,” Trump tweets. “Sorry, people want border security and extreme vetting.” In a visit to the headquarters of the U.S. Central Command in Tampa, Trump tells troops he is 100% behind them in the fight against “radical Islamic terrorism” and claims that “in many cases the very, very dishonest press doesnt want to report” on terrorist attacks. Trump tells a group of county sheriffs that he will help them fight terrorism and illegal immigration, and he vows to take his travel ban all the way to the Supreme Court if necessary. DeVosis confirmed as Education secretaryafter a contentious battle in the Senate, with Vice President Pence breaking a 50-50 tie vote. Later that day, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals hears oral arguments over a lower court’s decision to halt Trump’s travel ban. Trump urges the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to uphold his travel ban, arguing that national security is at stake and suggesting that judges sometimes act politically. The president attacks Nordstrom for dropping daughter Ivanka’s fashion line, drawing criticism for mixing government and his family’s business interests. The Senate debate on the Sessions attorney general nomination turns ugly afterDemocratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren is silenced by the GOP during a speechfor “impugning” Sessions. Trump accuses Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., of distorting what Gorsuch said about the president’s attacks on judges, even though administration officials and fellow senators confirm the gist of Gorsuch’s comments. The president also uses Twitter to attack Sen. John McCain over his criticism of the White House calling the Yemen raid a huge success.” Watchdog groups file ethics complaints against Conway for promoting Ivanka Trump’s fashion line during a TV interview. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit weighs in that evening,refusing to reinstate Trump’s travel ban. In a joint news conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Trump reaffirms the U.S. commitment to the defense of Japan but says both countries need to contribute more to military cooperation. He says hell take action the following week to strengthen border security in the wake of the appeals court ruling against his travel ban, but he declines to specify what that action might be. Meanwhile, a federal judge in Virginia blasts his travel ban, citing a lack of evidence that travelers from the seven Muslim-majority countries represent a specific threat. Trump golfs with Abe at Trump National Jupiter Golf Club in Florida, while Melania Trump and Abes wife, Akie, spend the morning touring the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Palm Beach County. It’s a relatively quiet day for the president on Twitter, with Trump vowing that cost estimates for his border wall will “come WAY DOWN” once he is involved with design and negotiations. Trump takes to Twitter in the morning to again defend his travel ban. In Sunday show appearances, policy adviser Stephen Miller says the president is assessing all of his legal options on the ban, ranging from appealing to the Supreme Court to revising the executive order. After a day filled with mounting questions and criticism, National Security Adviser Michael Flynn resigns, citing “incomplete information” that he provided White House officials about his dealings with the Russian ambassador. Earlier that day, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visits the White House. Trump pledges “bridges of commerce” with Canada and says he wants relatively minor changes to NAFTA, adding that most of his problems with the trade deal involve the third partner, Mexico. In the aftermath of Flynn’s exit, Spicer says Trump knew for more than two weeks that Flynn lied about his contact with a Russian ambassador and demanded his resignation because he could no longer trust him. That night, The New York Times reports that phone records and intercepted calls show members of Trump’s campaign team “had repeated contacts with senior Russian intelligence officials in the year before the election.” Amid the renewed questions about contacts between Trump’s associates and Russia regarding the 2016 election, the president denounces “conspiracy theories” about his relationship with the Russians and said “illegal” news leaks brought down Flynn. Trump hosts Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House for a series of meetings. Andrew Puzder, the presidents embattled pick to become Labor secretary, withdraws his nomination. President Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hold a joint press conference in the East Room of the White House on Feb. 15, 2017.(Photo: Mandel Ngan, AFP/Getty Images) In a lengthy, fiery, wide-ranging news conference, Trump defends his administration as a “fine-tuned machine,” laments the “mess” he inherited from his predecessor and excoriates the “fake news” media. He says he asked Flynn to resign because he misled Pence about his phone calls to the Russian ambassador, but Trump says he didn’t believe Flynn did anything wrong by making the calls and faults leakers for providing contents of the intercepted calls to the media. The Associated Press reports on the details of an internal Department of Homeland Security memo from January that proposes calling up as many as 100,000 National Guard troops to round up undocumented immigrants; it draws an angry response from the White House, with Spicer calling the AP report “100% not true” and insisting the memo is not a White House document. Trump conducts his first presidential visit beyond the Beltway with a stop in the Boeing facility in North Charleston, S.C., where he stresses his “America First” trade and economic policies. Trump kicks off his third straight weekend at Mar-a-Lago seeking to calm reports of turmoil within his administration. “Don’t believe the main stream (fake news) media.The White House is running VERY WELL. I inherited a MESS and am in the process of fixing it,” he tweets that morning. He holds a campaign-style rally in the evening in Melbourne, Fla. Trump is ridiculed for apparently denouncing a non-existent terrorist attack in Sweden in his rally the night beforebut says he was referring to a Fox News report on violence in Sweden allegedly perpetrated by refugees. In New York City, more than a thousand people protest Trump’s travel ban in the “I Am A Muslim Too” rally. Across the country, anti-Trump activists mark Presidents Day with Not My Presidents Day protests. The president spends the holiday at Mar-a-Lago and announces that Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster will be his new national security adviser, replacing Flynn. President Trump, right, shakes hands with Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., on Feb. 20, 2017, where he announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser.(Photo: Susan Walsh, AP) Trump speaks out against a series of bomb threats to Jewish community centers across the nation after coming under fire for sidestepping earlier opportunities to condemn severalanti-Semitic acts since he took office. The Department of Homeland Security issues new directives to increase deportations among the country’s 11 million undocumented immigrants. Trump and his aides say theyll roll out a proposed budget, a revamped health care plan and a new tax reform package over the following two months. The president, while meeting with budget officials, doesn’t give specifics, but he tells reporters that “our moral duty to the taxpayer requires us to make our government leaner and more accountable and we must do a lot more with less. Later that evening, the Trump administration issues new guidance on transgender students’ restroom use, rolling back the policies put in place by the Obama administration last year. Trump meets with manufacturing executives at the White House and later holds a listening session on human trafficking. The Conservative Political Action Conference kicks off just outside of Washington. White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and Bannon make a joint appearance at the annual confab, in which they dispute media reports casting them as rivals and say they are working together to advance the president’s agenda. Trump starts off the day criticizing FBI “leakers” as he and aides push back on news reports that his chief of staff asked the bureau to “knock down” stories about investigations into possible contacts between Trump campaign associates and Russian officials. At his CPAC speech later that morning, Trump launches into a full-throated attack on journalism, saying some reporters make up unnamed sources for “fake news” and describing the media as “the enemy” of the American people. News organizations protest a White House decision that afternoon to hold a news briefing by invitation only. The president takes to Twitter in the morning with further complaints about the media. The media has not reported that the National Debt in my first month went down by $12 billion vs a $200 billion increase in Obama first mo, he tweets. In the evening, he announces via Twitter that he will not attend the annual White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner in April. The president tweets that the Democratic National Committee election “was of course, totally ‘rigged’ ” and takes another swing at the media, tweeting, “Russia talk is FAKE NEWS put out by the Dems, and played up by the media, in order to mask the big election defeat and the illegal leaks!” In the evening, Trump hosts the nation’s governors for an annual dinner at the White House. Trump signs off on top-line numbers in a budget outline that bolsters military spending while making deep cuts to other federal agencies. “This defense spending increase will be offset and paid for by finding greater savings and efficiencies across the federal government,” he says. “We’re going to do more with less.” The president rejects the idea of a special prosecutor to look into Russian connections during the election and says, I havent called Russia in 10 years.” Trump uses his first address to Congress to proclaim American greatness and push an ambitious agenda of economic nationalism, declaring, “The time for small thinking is over. The time for trivial fights is behind us.” He opens the possibility of a comprehensive immigration deal, pitches $1 trillion for “Buy American, Hire American” infrastructure spending, and says he will propose “historic” tax cuts. Earlier that day, the president signs executive orders targeting a water-protection rule and elevating an initiative on historically black colleges and universities. President Trump speaks before a joint session of Congress on Feb. 28, 2017.(Photo: Andrew P. Scott, USA TODAY) A day after Trump struck a more conciliatory tone in his address to Congress, critics predict he’ll revert back to the more combative and divisive approach that characterized much of his first month in office. Aides, however, say the president is focused on enacting his campaign agenda. White House Deputy Counsel Stefan Passantino says in a letter thatConway did nothing “nefarious” when she promoted Ivanka Trump’s fashion line on television and that a White House inquiry “concluded that Ms. Conway acted inadvertently and is highly unlikely to do so again.” The news of Sessions’ 2016 meetings with the Russian ambassador, contradicting his testimony during his confirmation hearing that he had no contact with the Russian government during the campaign, dominates the day. Trump says he “wasn’t aware at all” of the meetings. Speaking to reporters during a tour of the USS Gerald Ford in Newport News, Va., the president says he still had “total” confidence in his attorney general. Later that afternoon, Session recuses himself from the Russia investigation. Seeking to get past stories about Sessions and Russia, Trump spends the day visiting a school in Florida. He uses Twitter to express his displeasure with Democrats, knocking them over his full Cabinet having not yet been approved and calling Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer a “hypocrite” in a tweet displaying a 2003 photo of Schumer and Putin. In a morning tweetstorm, Trump accuses Obama of wiretapping him at Trump Tower prior to the November election: “Terrible! Just found out that Obama had my ‘wires tapped’ in Trump Tower just before the victory. Nothing found. This is McCarthyism!” the president tweets. An Obama spokesman rejects the accusation as “simply false.” Thousands of Trump supporters convene near Trump Tower and in other cities around the U.S. in what organizers bill as “March 4 Trump” demonstrations on behalf of the president. In the morning, the president calls for a congressional investigation of his claims that Obama had him wiretapped during the election while critics accuse Trump of trying to distract from the investigation into his own relationship with Russia. That evening, news reports indicate that FBI Director James Comey over the weekend sought a public rebuke from the Justice Department of Trump’s wiretapping claim. Trump issues the long-awaited revised version of his travel ban, which no longer restricts travel from Iraq, one of the seven majority Muslim countries listed in his original order. The new order, set to take effect 10 days afterward, includes Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria, Sudan and Yemen as part of the 90-day ban. Meanwhile, when White House deputy press secretary Sarah Sanders is asked on ABC’s Good Morning Americawhether the president accepts Comey’s statement that Obama did not authorize any wiretaps, she says: “You know, I don’t think he does.” Trump kicks off the day by using Twitter to again bash Obama this time in a false claim about Guantanamo Bay prisoner releases. He also denies reports of dissension within his staff. “Don’t let the FAKE NEWS tell you that there is big infighting in the Trump Admin,” the president tweets. He praises the House GOP health care bill amid pushback from conservatives attacking the new plan. “We’re going to do something that is great,” the president says during a meeting with House deputy whips. The plan is “complicated, but it’s very simple … it’s called good health care.” President Trump greets Jack Cornish, 10, of Birmingham, Ala., while Cornish was touring the White House. It was the first day of White House tours for the public since Trump was inaugurated.(Photo: Erik S. Lesser, European Pressphoto Agency) While refusing to confirm or deny the authenticity of CIA documents released by WikiLeaks, Spicer says that “this alleged leak should concern every single American in terms of the impact it has on our national security” and says there’s a “massive, massive difference” between exposing the emails of Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta and other Democratic officials, and leaking national security secrets. The president dines with former foe Sen. Ted Cruz. Sens. Lindsey Graham and Sheldon Whitehouse send a letter to the FBI director and acting deputy attorney general asking for specific information on Trump’s wiretapping accusation against Obama. Trump meets with his National Economic Council and representatives of community banks. As GOP leaders try to quell concerns about the new health care legislation, the president tweets, “Despite what you hear in the press, healthcare is coming along great. We are talking to many groups and it will end in a beautiful picture!” Meanwhile, legal challenges mount from several states for Trump’s revised travel ban. As the president reaches the halfway point of his first 100 days, administration officials kick off a plan to use social media and interviews to promote “50 days of action.” Trump meets with House committee leaders and predicts a fairly rapid approval of the GOP health care bill. “This is the time were going to get it done,” he says. “I think its just something thats going to happen very shortly.” He welcomes a better-than-expected jobs report showing that the economy added 235,000 jobs the previous month. Trump has lunch with a group of White House staff and Cabinet members at Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Va. His administration moves forward with plans to dismiss 46 U.S. attorneys held over from the Obama administration amid criticism, and news reports emerge that an intruder was arrested on the White House grounds after scaling a fence the previous evening. Trump administration officials mount a vigorous defense of their effort to repeal and replace Obamacare while bracing for what could be a skeptical assessment from the Congressional Budget Office the next day. Speaking on NBC’s Meet the Press, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price says the bill would lead to “more people covered than are covered right now, and at an average cost that is less.” The CBO releases its analysis of the GOP health plan, determining that the bill would lead to 14 million fewer Americans with insurance by 2018 and 24 million by 2026. Price calls the projections “just not believable.” Trump launches an ambitious effort to reorganize the federal government, signing an executive order that he said would “make it less wasteful and more productive.” A senior White House official confirms that Trump paid $38 million in taxes in 2005 on an income of more than $150 million. The rare acknowledgement came in anticipation of a report by MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow in which she disclosed a portion of the return. The news capped off an otherwise relatively quite day for the president during which Spicer pushed back against the CBO analysis of the Obamacare repeal and Trump hosted the deputy crown prince of Saudi Arabia for lunch in the State Dining Room. A federal judge in Hawaii issues a nationwide halt to Trump’s second travel ban. Earlier that day, the president spars on Twitter with journalist David Cay Johnston over the previous night’s leaked tax return, tweeting, “Does anybody really believe that a reporter, who nobody ever heard of, ‘went to his mailbox’ and found my tax returns?” Trump also travels to Detroit to speak to autoworkers before heading to a rally in Nashville. In his first formal budget proposal to Congress, Trump seeks to increase defense spending by $54 billion and offsets that with cuts to non-defense spending, including steep cuts to education, environmental protection, health and human services and foreign aid. Senate Intelligence Committee leaders say in a statement that there are “no indications that Trump Tower was the subject of surveillance,” a day after the House Intelligence panel offered a similar assessment. Trump also meets with Irish leader Enda Kenny and attends the Friends of Ireland Luncheon on Capitol Hill. Disputing media reports that the GOP health care bill is in political trouble, Trump says he is “100% behind” the plan and is working with skeptical conservatives. He welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel to the White House after months of back-and-forth between the two leaders. During their news conference, Trump again defends his surveillance allegations. “At least we have something in common, perhaps,” he says, referencing past disclosures during the Obama administration that Merkel’s cellphone had been monitored. Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel walk down the Cross Hall to enter the East Room for a joint press conference at the White House on March 17, 2017.(Photo: Michael Reynolds, European Pressphoto Agency) The president spends the weekend at Mar-a-Lago. In a pair of morning tweets, Trump lashes out at the media and Germany: “Despite what you have heard from the FAKE NEWS, I had a GREAT meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Nevertheless, Germany owes … vast sums of money to NATO & the United States must be paid more for the powerful, and very expensive, defense it provides to Germany!” Meanwhile, at the White House, the Secret Service apprehends a person who jumped a bike rack near the security perimeter. A day before a high-stakes hearing featuring Comey’s testimony, the leaders of the House Intelligence Committee say on Sunday talk shows that there’s no evidence to back Trump’s claims that Obama wiretapped him, though the committee’s chairman, Rep. Devin Nunes, says investigators are looking at other types of possible surveillance of Trump and his aides during the campaign. Appearing before the House Intelligence Committee, Comey says the FBI and DOJ have “no information to support Trumps assertions that Obama wiretapped him, and he also confirms for the first time publicly that the FBI is investigating Russian interference in the election. Trump heads to Kentucky to take part in a rally to build support for the GOP health care bill. The morning after congressional Republicans released a modified version of their health care legislation seeking to win more conservative votes, Trump meets with GOP lawmakers on Capitol Hill, emphasizing how important it is that they stay united to pass the legislation. The president also signs a $19.5 billion bill to fund NASA programs and reaffirm what he called a “national commitment” to “human space exploration.” The White House dismisses a report that Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, received a $10 million contract a decade ago to advance the interests of Putin. Nunes says communications involving members of Trump’s transition group were “incidentally collected” by intelligence officials after the election. The president meets with members of the Congressional Black Caucus, and negotiations continue over the looming health care vote in the House. In a setback to Trump and Speaker Paul Ryan’s efforts to repeal Obamacare, the House postpones its vote on the bill as negotiations continue with both conservative and moderate groups. The president touts the House Intelligence chairman’s assertion that spy agencies engaged in “incidental collection” of Trump associates’ communications, saying it’s evidence to support his claim that Obama “wiretapped” Trump Tower. Trump also holds a listening session on health care at the White House with truckers and trucking CEOs. President Trump gets in the driver’s seat of an 18-wheeler while meeting with truck drivers and trucking CEOs on the South Portico prior to their meeting to discuss health care at the White House on March 23, 2017.(Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo, European Pressphoto Agency) As the Obamacare repeal bill bleeds GOP support ahead of its rescheduled vote, Ryan pulls the legislation from consideration a major bump in the road forTrump’s campaign promise to repeal and replace the health care law. The president blames the bill’s failure on the lack of Democratic support. Earlier that day, Trump signs a permit to allow the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, calling it “a great day for American jobs.” The morning after Republicans’ Obamacare repeal plan fell apart in Congress, Trump tweets, “ObamaCare will explode and we will all get together and piece together a great healthcare plan for THE PEOPLE. Do not worry!” The president stays in the D.C. area for the weekend, venturing to Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Va. Trump takes aim at the House Freedom Caucus in a morning tweet: “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!” In Sunday show appearances, Priebus and budget director Mick Mulvaney say Trump has not blamedRyan for the failure of the Obamacare repeal bill. Trump taps son-in-law Jared Kushner to lead a new White House office designed to bring ideas from the private sector into the federal government. The president rolls back more Obama-era regulations, signing four bills that reverse rules on education, land use and federal purchasing, and he holds a meeting at the White House with female small-business owners. Trump signs an executive order on energy independence, a sweeping repudiation of Obama-era environmental initiatives that substitutes astrategy of combating climate change through international cooperation for an America-first energy policy. Nunes faces pressure to recuse himself or step down as leader of the investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election. The president kicks off the day with complaints on Twitter about the media. “Remember when the failing @nytimes apologized to its subscribers, right after the election, because their coverage was so wrong. Now worse!” he tweets. Trump later holds an opioid abuse listening session, joined by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, leader of the White House’s new commission to combat the opioid crisis. Trump takes to Twitter to threaten the conservative group that opposed him on health care: “The Freedom Caucus will hurt the entire Republican agenda if they don’t get on the team, & fast. We must fight them, & Dems, in 2018! ” Later that day, The New York Times reports that two White House officials played a role in providing intelligence reports to Nunes. The president meets with Denmarks prime minister, Lars Lokke Rasmussen. President Trump greets Denmark’s prime minister, Lars Lokke Rasmussen, outside the West Wing of the White House on March 30, 2017.(Photo: Brendan Smialowski, AFP/Getty Images) While Trump encourages Flynn to offer testimony to investigators in exchange for immunity, congressional leaders investigating Russia’s interference in the election signal that it’s too early to consider such an agreement. Trump promises to crack down on “foreign importers that cheat” with two executive orders that he said would lead to a historic reversal of the nation’s trade deficit. Trump kicks off another Saturday with tweets attacking the media, with NBC’s Chuck Todd as the target: “When will Sleepy Eyes Chuck Todd and @NBCNews start talking about the Obama SURVEILLANCE SCANDAL and stop with the Fake Trump/Russia story?” The president also uses Twitter to praise a New York Times article on Obamacare, though he still describes the newspaper as “failing.” Trump expresses confidence, both on social media and at the golf course, that he and aides can resurrect their attempt to repeal Obamacare. Before hitting the links with one of his critics on health care, Republican Sen. Rand Paul, the president tweets: “Anybody (especially Fake News media) who thinks that Repeal & Replace of ObamaCare is dead does not know the love and strength in R Party!” Trump welcomes Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to the White House, praises him for doing a “fantastic job,” and solicits his help in the fight against terrorism. The president donates $78,333.32 his salary since taking office to the National Park Service. Senate Democrats reach the threshold required to block Gorsuch’s confirmation, setting up a major Senate rules change later in the week for the GOP to advance the Supreme Court nomination. Former national security adviser Susan Rice, appearing on MSNBC, says she didn’t seek to “unmask” the names of Trump associates for political purposes. Meanwhile, in a statement on a chemical attack in Syria, Trump blames the Assad regime and calls it a consequence of the Obama administrations weakness and irresolution. The president promotes his “America First” domestic plan at the North Americas Building Trades Unions national legislative conference. A senior White House official confirms Trump has removed Bannon from the National Security Council and says Bannon was given the post as a check on Flynn. In an interview with The New York Times, Trump floats the possibility that Rice committed a crime, but he provides no evidence. In a news conference with Jordan’s King Abdullah, the president denounces the chemical attack in Syria and suggests his administration will develop a new policy toward Bashar al-Assad’s government. Trump orders a cruise missile strike against Syria, saying “no child of God should ever suffer” the horror of the chemical weapons attack Syria launched on its own people. Earlier that day, Trump meets with Wounded Warriors at the White House before heading to Mar-a-Lago to host a summit with Chinese President Xi Jinping, and Senate Republicans invokethe “nuclear option” to strip Democrats of their power to block Trump’s Supreme Court nominee from being confirmed. President Trump walks to the podium to speak about the missile strike on Syria on April 6, 2017, at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla.(Photo: Alex Brandon, AP) Trump’s decision to strike Syria in retaliation for a chemical weapons attack draws wide political support, though some lawmakers say he should have consulted with Congress, while Russia said the strike would undermine international cooperation. The president concludes his meetings with the Chinese president at Mar-a-Lago, and his Supreme Court nomineeis confirmed by the Senate. Trump does not rule out additional military action against Syria, telling Congress that he was acting “in the vital national security and foreign policy interests of the United States” when he ordered the launch of cruise missiles at a Syrian air field. He provides his justification in a letter to Congress under the War Powers Resolution. Kushner and Bannonhold a negotiation session to try to mend a rift that triggered speculation about a White House staff shakeup. Administration officials confirm that Trump will ask K.T. McFarland to step down as deputy national security adviser and serve instead as ambassador to Singapore, giving McMaster a chance to pick his own lieutenant. The president heads back to D.C. in the afternoon following a weekend at Mar-a-Lago. Trump takes part in the swearing-in ceremony for Gorsuch. The White House echoes its threat of additional missile strikes against Syria if Assad’s government again uses chemical weapons, and Trump aides say the administration is reworking its tax reform plan and doesn’t know whether it can put together a final proposal before Congress’ August recess. Spicer makes waves during the daily briefing when he states, while comparing Assad and Adolf Hitler, that Hitler “didn’t even use chemical weapons.” He attempts to clarify by saying Hitler “was not using the gas on his own people the same way that Assad is doing.” In a second attempt to clarify, he says he was “trying to draw a contrast of the tactic of using airplanes to drop chemical weapons on innocent people.” Meanwhile, the White House says there’s overwhelming evidence that Syria used a sarin nerve agent to attack opponents of the government and that Russia is trying to help Assad’s government cover up the illegal use of chemical weapons. President Trump speaks during a strategic and policy discussion with CEOs in the State Department Library in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington on April 11, 2017.(Photo: Olivier Douliery, Pool/European Pressphoto Agency) Trump meets with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg and says at a press conference afterward that he’s satisfied that NATO has responded to the criticism he leveledat it during his campaign: “I said it was obsolete. It is no longer obsolete.” He also says relations with Russia “may be at an all-time low” following Syria’s use of chemical weapons the previous week and the U.S. airstrike that followed. The U.S. military announces an attack on an Islamic State tunnel complex in Afghanistan, and Trump says he endorsed the strike. Asked about the use of the “mother of all bombs,” Trump says “what I do is I authorize my military. … We have given them total authorization and thats what theyre doing and frankly thats why theyve been so successful lately.” The president tweets on foreign policy, including on North Korea: “I have great confidence that China will properly deal with North Korea. If they are unable to do so, the U.S., with its allies, will! U.S.A.” Trump hits the golf course at Mar-a-Lago as he and his aides braced for what North Korea calls a “big event.” Administration officials say they are hopeful that China can dissuade its communist neighbor from conducting a nuclear explosion or a missile test. The Trump administration saysrecords of visitors to the White House will stay secret until at least five years after Trump leaves office, a reversal of policy quickly denounced by advocates of transparent government. North Korea attempts to launch a new missile, but the device blows up almost immediately. Pence arrives in Seoul hours after the failed missile test and says U.S. resolve to support and defend South Korea is unwavering “in these troubled times.” Meanwhile, thousands of protesters gather in U.S. cities for Tax Day rallies and marches, demanding that Trump release his tax returns. The Trump administration takes a low-key approach to the previous day’s failed missile test in North Korea and continues to express hope that China will rein in its nuclear-armed neighbor. The president says he’s unimpressed with tax protests over the weekend and indicates he has no plans to release his tax returns anytime soon. “Someone should look into who paid for the small organized rallies yesterday. The election is over!” Trump tweets. He returns to D.C. after spending Easter weekend in Mar-a-Lago.

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April 29, 2017   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

The fight against lung cancer – Heritage Florida Jewish News

In 1998, I was diagnosed with lung cancer. After chemotherapy and the removal of my left lung, have been cancer free for 19 years. Luckily, I am able to say that I am a lung cancer survivor. I am one of the lucky ones, because in our country, every five minutes a woman learns she has lung cancer. And the rate of new cases in women has almost doubled in the last 39 years. Yet getting tested for lung cancer is not a top-of-mind cancer concern for 98 percent of women. For many, early detection is key. Only 16 percent of people are diagnosed at an initial stage, when more treatment options are available. In fact, if lung cancer is caught before it spreads, the chances of survival more than triple. Patients need quality, affordable healthcare, and to save lives, we need more treatment options and better early detection for lung cancer. Thats why on April 5, I went to Capitol Hill for Advocacy Day with the American Lung Associations LUNG FORCE initiative to advocate for patients to have accessible and quality healthcare and to push for sustained and robust federal funding for cancer research. I traveled to Washington, D.C., along with others from across the country who have personally felt lung cancers devastation, to ask Senators Nelson, Rubio, and Representatives Murphy, Demings and Deutsch or their staffs for continued investment in research at the National Institutes of Health and to share why quality and affordable healthcare is imperative to lung cancer patients and their families. Weve made some great progress in the fight against lung cancer: Congress increased National Institutes of Health research funding by five percent in 2016; in the last two years, the FDA approved eight new therapies to treat lung cancer; and people have access to treatments because of key healthcare protections. But now that progress and life-sustaining research is at risk. President Trumps budget FY 2018 proposal calls for a $6 billion, or 18 percent, reduction of funding for NIH. This drastic approach takes research in the wrong direction. It slows progress and delays innovation. Families facing cancer cant wait. Its literally a matter of life and death that people with lung cancer have adequate, accessible and affordable healthcare. As I told the Senators, Representatives or their staffs we must work hard to save the 224,000 Americans who are diagnosed each year with lung cancer. Im very troubled about the American Health Care Act that the House of Representatives considered last month. That bill moved our healthcare system in the wrong direction. Any healthcare legislation that Congress considers must increase the number of Americans who are insured and also cover key health protections, including preventive services like lung cancer screening. It is clear from the hundreds of thousands of calls that have been made to Congress this year that our collective voices are our strongest weapon in the fight. There is hope in saving more lives by ensuring patients have the healthcare coverage they need, as well as better treatment and early detection options developed through additional research funding. I am a lung cancer advocate because I know the importance of telling my story. I encourage everyone to visit LUNGFORCE.org to join me in advocating for this patient support and lung cancer research, and sending this message to your senators and representatives in Washington, D.C. Lets defeat lung cancer together. Shelly Ferrone is a certified financial planner with nearly three decades of experience as a financial advisor. She began her career at Merrill Lynch in 1985 where she worked prior to joining UBS in 2003. Ferrone received an M.B.A. from The University of Central Florida in Orlando, Fla., and a B.A. from Emory University in Atlanta. Growing up the daughter of an aerospace engineer, Shelly lived all over the United States during her childhood. She settled down in Orlando in 1974. A widow, Shelly has a daughter and two grandchildren, who live in Altamonte Springs, Fla., with whom she enjoys spending time. Involved in her community, Shelly is on the board for the Central Florida American Lung Association Southeast Region and its executive committee, Board of Directors with Kiwanis of Orlando, and the Womens Executive Council. She also volunteers with the Dr. Phillips Performing Arts Center.

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April 28, 2017   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

Fighting Trump-Era Hate Has Made Us More Jewish. Or Is It the Other Way Around? – Fusion

Welcome to the first edition of Soul Searching, a new series about how the most secular generation in history is changing the face of religion. David A.M. Wilensky had always hated wearing a kippah. By the time he reached his late twenties, he was as Jewish as everhe still went to shul, worked at a Jewish newspaper in the Bay Area, had lots of Jewish friendsbut the ritual of the skull cap never made sense to him. He despised walking into a Conservative synagogue and being told he wasnt dressed correctly. Plus, it seemed sexist. The whole thing bothered me, he says. That all changed on November 9, when Donald Trumps election seemed to confirm that the blossoming hate against minorities during his campaign wasnt just a bad dream. Wilensky was horrified when he scrolled through whywereafraid.com, a Tumblr that had been cataloguing hate incidents of all kinds during and after the election. For days, he watched the site obsessively: A Muslim psychology student grabbed by her hijab and yanked backward. A woman pumping gas with liberal bumper stickers told that she should be grabbed by the pussy. Reports of swastikas drawn on sidewalks and dorm rooms. That week, he decided to make his minority status visible by wearing a kippah every day, in solidarity with other targeted groups. The spate of anti-Semitism suddenly made me feel different from other Americans in a new way, he says. Or actually, an old waybut we hadnt been put in a position of feeling it yet. Between the bomb threats to Jewish centers and the graffiti swastikas and the vandalized Jewish cemeteries and Sean Spicers multiple Holocaust gaffes and known anti-Semite Steve Bannons close (albeit fraught) relationship with the president, Jews are one of the myriad groups who feel targeted by the Trump administration and its supporters. Its startled and shaken many young Jews whove never experienced this sentiment before, and in fact grew up rolling our eyes at parents and grandparents who, in the shadow of the Holocaust, seemed overly vigilant about prejudice. Hate crime numbers are notoriously hard to pin down, but organizations have been making an effort to track them since Trump was voted into office. After the election, the Southern Poverty Law Center started soliciting reports online of hate incidents across the country for the first time. Out of the 1,863 incidents reported through March, 244 were of anti-Semitic hate. Our sense is that its a significant increase, says deputy legal director David Dinielli, whose job it is to pay attention to these things. The Anti-Defamation League puts that number even higher, at 380 self-reported anti-Semitic incidents from January to March, an 86% increase compared to incidents recorded by the organization in the same months in 2016. Its not our imagination: Anti-Semitism is making a comeback. The hate toward Jews so far has manifested in vandalism and harassment rather than discriminatory policies and executive orders. And unless we are very religious or decide to come out like Wilensky did, Jewish people can usually pass as non-Jewish in America. But the resurgence of anti-Semitic rhetoric is noticeable. It feels awful to acknowledge that, right now, fear is reasonable, and necessary, and real, Zan Romonoff wrote in Buzzfeed last month. Not every young Jew feels afraid, exactlyat least not in the way, say, Muslims or undocumented immigrants feel afraid. Ever the guilt-ridden overthinkers, progressive young Jews like me who consider themselves allies to more marginalized people are now left wondering how we should feel. Is this a time of genuine physical threat, or does our vulnerability pale in comparison to more obvious scapegoats? Do Jews of color and LGBTQ Jews feel like one identity makes them more of a target than the other? Are we victims or allies, or both? While some of us certainly feel less safe, theres also just a pervasive feeling of being less mainstream. In more than two dozen interviews since the election with Jews under 40 across the country, I heard the phrase I feel more Jewish over and over. One 32-year-old woman feels more aware of my Jewish identity now, in New York City, than I did as the only Jewish kid in my rural upstate school 20 years ago. Haley Arden Moss, a secular Jewish doctor who moved from the East Coast to North Carolina just a few months before the election, feels like being Jewish is now suddenly part of my identity in a way it wasnt before. One weekend in January, she considered going to synagogue to make friends and meet liberal, cool people, whereas theres no way I would ever think about doing that in New York City. She was already feeling like a fish out of water as a Jew in the South, but now that the Trump era has arrived, shes craving community. Theres safety in numbers, and comfort in shorthand. I also feel like the other in a way Ive never felt, even though Im as secular as one can be. And while the hate unnerves me, right now feeling distinct from white America isnt so bad. I find myself doing little things differently: I made latkes multiple times for Hanukkah, Im getting fewer blowouts, Im even more interested in dating Jewish guys. But it has also moved me to engage more in social justice, which I consider just as much a part of my Ashkenazi New York heritage as Passover or the Torahprobably more. I could never imagine being called a dirty Jew, like my dad had been by a WASP-y classmate in the 1950s. (He says its the only time he ever punched someone.) For the vast majority of the progressive Jews I spoke to, anti-Semitism was abstract growing up, even outside of places like New York or Miami or Boston. There may have been curiosity, even some sideways comments, but outright hate speech and prejudice seemed like a moment in history that had passed us by. My friends and I bristled against older Jews hypersensitivity and rebelled against it; cries of anti-Semitism always struck me as alarmist. Later, we saw accusations of anti-Semitism lobbed at Jews who criticized Zionism. That conflation seems almost quaint now. Aaron Wagener, a senior at Swarthmore and a member of the colleges Hillel chapter, was freaked out when swastikas were found drawn in the bathroom of the campus library in late November. To think that he had been called anti-Semitic and a self-hating Jew by Zionist alums when he had advocated for a more open Hillel policy on speakers who were critical of Israel. Now there was real anti-Semitism, coming from people who actually hated Jews. With one election, the goalposts had moved. Of course, not all American Jews are feeling like outsiders. Twenty-four percent of us voted for Trump. Jared Kushner, an Orthodox Jew, is one of the presidents closest advisors. The Zionist Organization of America invited Steve Bannon to speak at its gala in November (amid public outcry, he didnt show). Many progressive Jews have found themselves aghast at their conservative counterparts who stay silent or dole out excuses for Trump and his supporters. Dvora, a 26-year-old Hasidic mother living in Borough Park, Brooklyn, is surrounded by them. In recent years, Dvora has gone through a secular feminist awakening (she declined to use her real name because she is not yet out to her community). She did not support Trump, but her husband did, and so did her neighbors and her colleagues. She finds it all so hypocritical. I remember [my community] being so vigilant during the Obama administration, not voting for people because they were supposedly anti-Semitic, she says. Now during the Trump administration, whos doing way, way worse things, theyll find ways to justify it. Dvora grew up with this very strong narrative that everyone was out to get us. Whenever a Jew from her conservative community clashed with law enforcement, she says, people would blame it on anti-Semitism. And yet, I never experienced it, she says. The hypervigilance really bothered me. I started to think anti-Semitism was a myth. Now, when its plainly happening, she says her community scrambles to explain that Trump didnt mean it. They say Spicer didnt know. They say they dont care because Trump is good for Israel, hell Make America Great Again. Im just like, How could you? I find it inexplicable. The paranoia that once felt like a political calculus for conservative Jews has now become a more universal part of the Jewish American experience. Ive started to read into small things, imperceptible things, probably innocent things, in the way my elders often did. When I was traveling in Texas last month, a hotel clerk in the tiny town of Big Spring commented on my unusual last name. Its Jewish, I told her. Oh! she exclaimed. We dont get many Jewish people around here. I obsessed over that interaction for days. When I got back to New York, I spotted a swastika chalked onto the ground on the first night of Passover. I became despondent, then irate, then I Instagrammed it and told a bunch of people about it. Before the election, I probably would have only taken note for a few moments and moved on. Then again, it might not have been there in the first place. The next day, I was unexpectedly invited to the most Jewish Passover Ive ever experienced. The singing and reading and eating lasted beyond midnight on a Tuesday. Even though I could have left at any timeI barely knew most of the people thereI didnt. I still had zero affinity to the Haggadahs Lord our God, king of the universe. But I felt very Jewish, and that felt kinda good. Developing a stronger affinity to my roots, while feeling an inkling of the vulnerability others feel, has also made me a more empathetic ally. Many people I spoke with acknowledged Jews relative privilege; most American Jews are light-skinned, and their income and education levels are higher than any other religious group. One of my friends felt truly sick when, during Thanksgiving last year, her aunt remarked, Thank goodness we dont look Jewish or Hispanic. We can blend in and no one will bother us. For Jews of color, assimilation isnt an option; they may be able to hide their Jewishness, but theyll always be reminded that theyre outsiders. Hannah Sultan, a founding member of the Jews of Color Caucus of Jews for Racial and Economic Justice, is also half-Mexican and has an Arab last name, which she says makes her feel more exposed than her Jewish identity. Sultan says its always been a mistake to rely on Jews ability to mainstreamthis new rise in anti-Semitism shows the false comfort of assimilating into whiteness. Combating the sinister consequences of assimilation are precisely why David A.M. Wilensky decided to start wearing a kippah, making visible something that was already there, but hidden. As Jews, weve seen what happens when people make the mistake of looking for protection in cooperation with fascism, says Adam Greenberg, a 28-year-old political organizer living in Bostonlike when the Jewish ghetto police colluded with the Nazis during World War II, in some cases helping to undermine resistance movements, only to meet the same fate as their Jewish neighbors. Or the way certain upwardly mobile American Jews, more and more divorced from their working-class labor movement roots, start to identify with the One Percent. Instead, Jews need to be the first line of defense, Greenberg says. We should use our privilege to ally with more disenfranchised minorities rather than cozying up to power. This renewed sense of allyship is possible in the modern era in a way it wasnt historically, says Barbara Epstein, a professor emeritus at UC Santa Cruz who studies social movements and the Jewish resistance to fascism during World War II. Under Hitler and Stalin, for example, targeted groups barely knew about each other. LGBTQ people werent public about their identity. There was no free press, let alone the internet. On the other hand, the United States is so multicultural and theres an attack on so many different groups right now, it would be surprising if a rise in political activism wasnt accompanied by this moment, Epstein says. Not only that, we have the history of fascism in our heads as a framework. And Jews in particular have long been key players in civil rights, feminist, and labor struggles, often alongside people who cant easily assimilate. There are various theories as to why Jews, particularly the ones from Eastern Europe and the United States in the past century, historically lean to the left and make good allies. Maybe its because of the Jewish concept of tikkun olamrepair of the worlda sense of universalism not found in, say, the Bible. Or perhaps its because weve always been an international people, with no center and no army. It might be connected to Jews tradition of intellectualism, which many theorize was sparked by being barred from owning land in Catholic feudal Europe, therefore steering them to become literate artisans and merchants. Whatever the reason, this moment has made me more politically active, which in turn makes me feel like more of a Jew. Or maybe its the other way around. In February, I went to a rally outside Brooklyns Borough Hall with thousands of Yemeni bodega owners protesting Trumps Muslim ban. They were waving American flags and chanting USA! USA! in between speakers and prayers. It gave me shivers to watch this group of people, whod been actively rejected by their government, be so patriotic. The square was ringed by non-Muslims, mostly white Brooklynites like me. I saw an Orthodox man with a tall hat and a long beard holding a sign that said, Love your Muslim neighbor. I felt a connection with the bodega ownersa group of mostly young men who, like many of my ancestors, had been targeted for their religion. Still, there was something eerie about that USA! chant, the same refrain of drunken frat boys celebrating bin Ladens death, the same subtle tool of racist intimidation wielded at high school sporting events. It belied an intense and wholly understandable desire to be accepted, the same way my great-grandparents on the Lower East Side wanted to be accepted, the same way everyone does. It reminded me of the peril of that desire, too. Acceptance never lasts forever.

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April 27, 2017   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

South Florida events to mark Jewish American Heritage Month – Sun Sentinel

Three South Florida events in celebration of Holocaust survivors, Jews who participated in the Civil Rights Movement and Jews in medicine mark the month of May as Jewish American Heritage Month. U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-23) will moderate a discussion of Jewish contributions to the Civil Rights Movement in a program titled “Standing Up in the South” on May 7 at 4 p.m. at Hallandale High School in Hallandale Beach. Speakers and panelists in “Standing Up in the South” include U.S. Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-20), Civil Rights leader Annsheila Turkel and Former Ambassador to the United Nations Andrew Young, Jr. Dr. Sheldon Cherry will discuss the achievements of American Jews in medicine in his lecture titled “From Maimonides to South Beach: American Jews in Medicine” on May 7 at 2 p.m. at the Jewish Museum of Florida-Florida International University in Miami Beach. South Florida Holocaust survivors and Jewish war veterans will share their testimonies with high school students on May 15 at 10 a.m. at the David Posnack Jewish Community Center in Davie. This JAHM event is not open to the public. Wasserman Schultz organized the “Standing Up in the South” JAHM event to focus on the relations between African American and Jewish communities. “Often referred to as the ‘Golden Age’ of African American and Jewish relations, some of the more pivotal moments occurred during the 20th century’s Civil Rights movement,” said Wasserman Schultz. “It was a tremendously effective collaboration that culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and it’s a moment that deserves a far brighter spotlight.” Wasserman Schultz added that the panelists will share their memories of the Civil Rights Movement and the collaboration of African Americans and Jews working together for civil rights. “There is a long, wonderful and storied history between the two communities and this fight for civil rights is far from over,” said Wasserman Schultz. Turkel, a member of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), and her late husband Leonard were among many Jews who joined African Americans at staged sit-in protests in Miami against segregation, according to their son Bruce Turkel. “My parents were the first ones in the Deep South to stage a sit-in on April 29, 1959. Miami in the mid-1950s was a Jim Crow city. Blacks were restricted to living in three neighborhoods,” wrote Turkel on his website bruceturkel.com in 2011. For more information on the free JAHM event at Hallandale High School, 720 NW 9th Ave. in Hallandale Beach, call 954-845-1179. In his lecture, Cherry will site the contributions of many American Jews in medical research and practice, including Nobel Prize winners Richard Axel (2004), Julius Axelrod (1970), Stanley Cohen (1986) Gerti Cohen (1947), Joseph Goldstein (1985), among many others. “There is a focal point to the lecture that attendees will learn, such as why 32% of the Nobel Prize winners are Jewish,” said Cherry. “What I hope attendees will learn about is the contributions of American Jews in medicine, who are overwhelmingly offspring of immigrants.” Cherry is known primarily for his numerous papers in reproductive medicine. He is a professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Florida International University Wertheim College of Medicine in Miami. For more information on the free JAHM event at Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, 301 Washington Ave. in Miami Beach, call 305-672-5044 or go to www.jmof.fiu.edu The JAHM event focusing on Holocaust survivors and Jewish War Veterans marks the second consecutive year that the survivors and war veterans will jointly share their testimonies to high school students. Jewish American Heritage Month is celebrated during the month of May as an annual celebration and recognition of Jewish Americans for their achievements and contributions in the United States. Wasserman Schultz is credited, along with late Senator Arlen Specter (D-PA) and the Jewish Museum of Florida, with founding the annual JAHM celebrations, beginning in 2006. To learn more about Jewish American Heritage Month, go to www.jewishamericanheritagemonth.us.

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April 27, 2017   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

Celebrating Yom Yerushalayim with music – The Jewish Standard

Drew Petersen recently awarded the 2017 American Pianists Award is coming back to Temple Avodat Shalom. The last time he visited, in 2014, the now 23-year-old highlighted the River Edge synagogues Selichot program. This time, hell be there for Yom Yerushalayim. So how does the acclaimed performer who has performed solo, concerto, and chamber music recitals in the United States, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East and was a top prizewinner in the Leeds International Piano Competition, Hilton Head International Piano Competition, Kosciuszko Foundation Chopin Competition, and the New York Fryderyk Chopin Piano Competition come to be participating in a program commemorating the reunification of Jerusalem and the establishment of Israeli control over the Old City in June 1967? No, Im not Jewish, but I have visited Israel, Mr. Petersen said. Ive been lucky to have had a lot of Jewish friends. Some of them brought me to Israel, where I played a recital in Tel Aviv and then went to Jerusalem. It really was a moving experience as a Christian. Im Armenian, and Ive found over the years that a lot of our Armenian and Jewish histories are very similar, he continued. I can certainly sympathize and understand many aspects of the Jewish culture and faith. Basically, he said, It feels like such a small world, especially in the Middle East. Everything is very connected. For example, he explained, it was fascinating to him to learn about Jerusalems Armenian quarter. That connection, he finds, is enhanced by music. Music in general is a tool, whether Jewish, or Israeli, or Western European, the bulk of my repertoire. Great art has a way of expressing universal truths and connecting all of us to each other. Still, to paraphrase a well-worn phrase about politics, in the end, all connections are local. Mr. Petersen, who grew up in Oradell and continues to live there, began piano lessons when he was 5. Now a masters student at Julliard, he will graduate next month. Its a crazy life, he said, noting that after winning the American Pianists Award he had to go on a media tour. His parents are the most supportive people, he said, and its nice to be home. According to Mr. Petersen, he got to be the River Edge synagogues pianist on call because his neighbor and longtime family friend Connie Schnoll founder of the synagogues Schnoll Music Fund heard me playing when I was growing up and admired my playing. She wanted me to play more in New Jersey, closer to home, and share my artistry locally. She was very well connected to the temple and was able to convince them to bring me here twice to share some of my music with them. I feel really privileged to share my passion with others. The May 23 program will contain works by both Israeli composers and American composers of Jewish heritage. Naomi Lewin, a former WQXR commentator, will provide narration between the pieces. Israel is one of the younger nations on the planet, Mr. Petersen said, and works by Israeli composers tend to be more contemporary. In addition, he said, many of the really quite well known composers of the early and mid-1920s were Jews, such as Gershwin and Copeland. He is not sure yet whose work he will include in his program, but there will be an eclectic grouping of them, featuring both the musical works and commentary on the composers themselves and the historical background of their pieces. In order to have listeners enjoy his work, I have to enjoy it and be inspired, Mr. Petersen said. Thats what motivates me. Ive been working with the rabbi the synagogues Paul Jacobson over the past few months to come up with a concept for the program. We regularly discuss what our thoughts are and what were going to do. Its a partnership, a real collaboration. I am fortunate to have these opportunities to explore Judaism and Israel. Its as much a learning experience as a performance. It makes me really happy to be constantly learning. For his part, Rabbi Jacobson is very excited about the program and the opportunity to work with Mr. Petersen again. While the program is still in formation, the evening may include selections by Paul ben Haim, Alexander Boskovich, Yehezkel Braun, Marc Lavery, George Gershwin, Leonard Bernstein, and Aaron Copeland. The rabbi said that his young guest brings to the evening a warmth, genuineness, passion, and willingness to lend that presence in a positive way. Rabbi Jacobson has been doing some research on the composers. I found out that Copeland was raised in a Conservative Jewish family, he said. I didnt know he had that background. He pointed out as well that the piano that will be used at the program is being donated by Forte Piano in Paramus, and the entire evening is being subsidized by the Schnoll Music Fund, which was set up so that the congregation can have events such as this. Rabbi Jacobson has worked with the Princeton-born Ms. Lewin before. Ms. Lewin, a former host of weekday afternoon music on WQXR and of the podcast Conducting Business, has produced intermission features for Metropolitan Opera broadcasts and music programs and feature stories for NPR. She also has been an emcee, host, and moderator for concerts, galas, and other events. And as a singer and actress, she continues to appear onstage and to give talks on operas. Asked whether the Yom Yerushalayim program might be seen as a political statement about a unified Jersalem, given the political climate today, Rabbi Jacobson said, We cant celebrate or commemorate Jerusalem without it being a political statement. But playing music creates space for people to appreciate that in their own right. It allows them to acknowledge different views. Music can allow people to celebrate Israel and Jerusalem and acknowledge the significance of the day while leading them to have their own opinions, he said; indeed, Its more effective for being a musical program than strictly a verbalized one. The program is important, Rabbi Jacobson added. If our Jewish community is not standing with Israel with what we see in the world then people wont stand with us. Weve seen this from the beginning of time. Who: Pianist Drew Petersen What: Will perform a program to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yom Yerushalayim When: On Tuesday, May 23, at7:30 p.m. Where: At Temple Avodat Shalom, 385 Howland Avenue, River Edge Cost: $10 per person Doors open at 7 p.m. Refreshmentsto follow

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April 27, 2017   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

Before Rosie the Riveter: L.A. Women and the First World War – KCET

During World War II, the image of Rosie the Riveter, the U.S. governments attempt to promote womens participation in war industry production, dominated the popular imagination. Afterwards she would serve a symbol for the burgeoning feminist movement that emerged in the 1950s and 1960s. However, the opportunities that Rosie the Riveter encapsulated and the movement that followed didnt begin with the Second World War; they were in many ways the descendants of earlier efforts by women during the First. This year marks a century since the United States entered The Great War, and across the nation, exhibitions dedicated to the conflict are opening. For example, on April 4th, the Library of Congress debuted its exhibition Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I.. Many such pubic remembrances emphasize the critical role that such contributions played in fighting the war, but also in leading to the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which granted women the vote nationwide in 1919. Despite larger reservations about the war, moderate suffragists (women advocating for the right to vote) as represented by the National Womens Suffrage Association (NWSA) committed to the war effort through volunteerism, which proved critical in mobilizing the home front. Lynn Dumenil, a histoprian at Occidental College and author of the recent book The Second Line of Defense American Women and World War I, knows a great deal about women, World War I, and Los Angeles. In a 2011 article, Dumenil argued that World War I was a watershed [moment] in the history of Los Angeles.[1] Wartime mobilization in Los Angeles deeply affected women, and women in turn deeply impacted mobilization. Los Angeles women provided crucial labor in making the 19th Amendment a reality. At the same time, they laid the foundation for the Rosie the Riveter feminism that followed decades later. Even before the war broke out in Europe, Angeleno women played a critical role in national politics. Unlike in most other states, in California women had gained the right to vote in 1911. The state proved decisive in reelecting Woodrow Wilson in 1916, and some, like newspaper editor Desha Breckinridge, credited the vote of women in California and the West with delivering Wilsons victory.[2] By 1917, only 12 states, including California, gave women the right to vote. The war provided the opportunity, some women argued, to demonstrate exactly why they deserved the franchise. Los Angeles women provided crucial labor in making the 19th Amendment a reality. At the same time, they laid the foundation for the Rosie the Riveter feminism that followed decades later. “For Every Fighter, A Woman Worker,” 1918, by Ernest Hamlin Baker, courtesy of the Charles B. Burdick War Poster Collection,San Jose State University Library Special Collections & Archives. In the years leading up to Americas entrance into the war, most suffragists opposed intervention. Jane Addams and Carrie Chapman Catt provide just two prominent examples. Once the U.S. entered the war, however, moderate suffragists like Addams and Catt decided the best way to promote womens rights and suffrage would be through contributions to the war effort. In Los Angeles, one detects this tension persisting even after U.S. intervention in April 1917. The Southern California division of the Womans Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), a womens organization that advocated for alcohol prohibition but also supported suffrage, approved a September 1917 resolution opposing the war, criticizing military training, and calling for a negotiated peace settlement. In a recent interview, Chapman University historian and World War I expert Jennifer Keene told me that such divisions were indicative of nationwide sentiment. Keene noted that the government adopted a heavy handed approach to convince the public of the wars efficacy. So the idea that womens groups were divided, I find that healthy and normal.[3] Despite the local WCTUs statement of militancy, the organization soon fell in line with war efforts, working with the Womens Committee of the National Council of Defense (WCCND) in coordinating local mobilization efforts.[4] How to pursue suffrage proved a challenge to womens rights advocates, though Los Angeles female residents had a bit more leeway having already gained the franchise. [Southern California] suffrage groups had to consider what their antiwar positions might mean in regard to the larger movement, Keene said. In California they didnt have to factor that into whether or not they would protest or support the war so in that sense it liberated them.[5] Still, the need for a national constitutional amendment guaranteeing the right to vote remained a central issue for the citys clubwomen. An influential womens group, the Fridays Morning Club, drew directly on this connection when it adopted a resolution arguing that giving women the right to vote nationally was a necessary war measure by which all American womanhood will be encouraged to co-operate in a war service as enfranchised responsible citizens.[6] Clubwomen, mostly middle-class and upper-class white women with memberships in the WCTU and other organizations like the Young Womens Christian Association (YWCA), proved critical in mobilizing the war effort at home including the promotion of Liberty Loans to fund the war or to encourage voluntary food conservation. In regard to the latter, L.A. led the nations cities in obtaining Pledge Card Enrollments in which families promised to reduce their consumption of food stocks like meat or wheat. Some 15,000 women secured 215,000 pledges by local households to work toward food conservation during the war.[7] “Buy a Liberty Bond”;”You Buy a Liberty Bond To-Day, I’ll Do the Rest”;”Where’s Your ‘Liberty Bond Button? Your Money Must Win the War”; 1917, courtesy of thePrints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. “Waste No Food,”Washington DCUS Dept. of Agriculture, ca. 1917, courtesy of theRare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress. Being tied into the national network of womens clubs, Los Angeles women were particularly well positioned. The California branch of the Womens Committee of the National Council of Defense was especially active; it consisted of 29,000 members.[8] The Los Angeles committee of the WCCND engaged in an elaborate door to door canvassing, a procedure used elsewhere in the state, writes Dumenil. Referred to as its Womens War Service Army, it enabled the citys clubwomen to conduct a census that aggregated information about residents including names, addresses, military status and citizenship of every man, women and child so that information could be quickly utilized for some specific services, such as food conservation notice, or relief work [9] Though a diverse city in 1917, Los Angeles embodied the kind of racial hierarchy that existed across urban America at the time. For example, J.T. Anderson, the local chairman of the WCCND, effectively organized some 350 womens groups in the city, which, judging from its elected board members, achieved some level of inclusivity. Representatives hailed from the Catholic Women of Los Angeles, the Jewish Women of Los Angeles and Labor Organizations, however, no women of color appear to have been board members.[10] Mexican-American and Japanese-American women contributed, but did so at the rank and file level, as they were denied access to higher, decision-making roles.[11] As Dumenil and other historians have noted, white clubwomen invoked their wartime service in the language of citizenship and the right to vote, but implicitly defined that citizenship as white and privileged.[12] Black women also certainly contributed to war efforts. Prior to U.S. involvement, Los Angeles was the hub of [black] club activity and the Sojourner Truth Industrial Club (STIC) had the oldest pedigree and largest membership. During the war, the STIC organized local African-American clubwomen, but white organizations largely ignored them. Negro Women Councils formed by African-American women in Pasadena and San Diego worked with the local WCCNDs supporting the war but also remained attuned to racial issues, such as when they protested D.W. Griffiths The Birth of the Nation, a film that portrayed the Klu Klux Klan positively and promoted noxious racist stereotypes of African-Americans.[13] Auto repairs, Los Angeles, circa 1915-1920,Bain News Service, courtesy of theGeorge Grantham Bain Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Of course, any discussion of womens service during wartime must mention one of the most iconic organizations of the 20th century: the Red Cross. Here, too, L.A. women played a critical role. Both men and women volunteered and worked for the Red Cross; nationally, its leadership positions were dominated by men, but in Los Angeles women made up half its board of directors. Images of nurses on the war front often dominate the public imagination, but many more women sewed or knitted clothes for soldiers, made bandages, assembled care packages and comfort bags, or served coffee, donuts, and other refreshments at railway stations across the U.S. Los Angeles Santa Fe Station served as a hub of this kind of activity during the war.[14] Poster of a Red Cross nurse (1918) by Harrison Fisher, courtesy of theBancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Santa Fe Hut at Los Angeles, 1918-1919, courtesy of the American National Red Cross Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Worried about the disruption to families caused by conscription, the L.A. branch of the Red Cross organized the Home Service responsibility program in fall of 1917. Through it, the Red Cross provided financial aid, medical care, and legal advice dedicated to ensuring that no enlisted mans family shall suffer for any essential thing that it is within [the Red Crosss] power to give. Female Red Cross volunteers in Los Angeles signed up individually but also through and with their clubs. Though the Red Cross worked well with white middle and upper class clubwomen, it also successfully marshaled, if on admittedly unequal terms, the labor of Jewish, Japanese, Mexican, and African American women in Los Angeles. Forming their own auxiliaries, Jewish and Japanese women contributed to the local war effort. According to the Los Angeles County war history committee, most Japanese Angelenos joined the Red Cross and provided the most consistent war work and described their contributions as praiseworthy. Mexican-American women worked at the local Catholic settlement house, Brownson House. Red Cross work at Girls Collegiate School, Los Angeles, 1918, courtesy of the American National Red Cross Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. African-Americans contributed to efforts through the Harriet Tubman Auxiliary in Los Angeles and the Phyllis Wheatley branch of the Red Cross in nearby Santa Monica. Due to the segregated nature of the military and the large numbers of black service personnel serving in the war (roughly 400,000 African-American men traveled overseas for the army), these organizations viewed their work as including support for their enlisted male counterparts. They held banquets to send off local troops in good spirits. Unfortunately, the Red Cross also suffered from its own racial blind spots. Each group worked individually with little to no contact with each other, and certainly not with their Anglo peers. [15] Then again, an epic 1918 Red Cross parade through Los Angeles gave these women, white and non-white alike, a public presence that even a decade earlier had been denied to them. Never in Los Angeles had there been a parade where its womanhood took such a conspicuous part, the Los Angeles Times reported. Some 10,000 marchers, most of them women and including Mexican and black participants, walked in the seven-mile parade to celebrate womens war service. 1918 Red Cross parade through Los Angeles. Photo courtesy of the Security Pacific National Bank Collection Los Angeles Public Library. Public demonstrations like the 1918 march drew publicity and highlighted the critical contributions of women to the war. It also provided justification for the demands of suffragists. Historians like Keene and Woodrow Wilson biographer John Milton Cooper Jr. credit these efforts with forcing the president to support suffrage. The 19th Amendment passed Congress in 1919 and was ratified the following year. Obviously, limits remained. During World War I, most organizations and even the WCCND denied women real policy influence. Women of color continued to suffer discrimination as many white clubwomen ignored or discounted them entirely. For women generally, suffrage hardly meant equality. For example, one million women found better paying work in industry and elsewhere during the war, but labor union hostility curtailed these gains and the return of soldiers from Europe revealed the temporary nature of such opportunities. Yet, it also accelerated the slow march toward equality. As symbolized by Rosie the Riveter and evidenced by the feminist movement that followed, women in World War II built on the accomplishments of their World War I counterparts. Given the increasing industrialization in Los Angeles during the interwar years, L.A women played an even larger role in the Second World War. But without the clubwomen of the First, a century ago, the story would have been very different. Workers at Southern Pacific Stations at Los Angeles, circa 1918-1919, courtesy of the American National Red Cross Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. [1] Lynn Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, Vol. 10 No. 2 (April 2011): 218. [2] Desha Breckinridge to Mary Curry, November 10, 1916, Breckinridge Family Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress; John Milton Cooper Jr., Woodrow Wilson: A Biography, (New York, Random House: 2009), 356. [3] Jennifer Keene, interview with author, March 27, 2017. [4] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 233. [5] Keene, interview with author, March 27, 2017 [6] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 223. [7] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 243. [8] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 222. [9] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 220. [10] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 220. [11] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 221. [12] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 221. [13] Shirley Ann Wilson Moore, Your Life Is Really Just Not Your Own: African American Women in Twentieth Century California in Seeking El Dorado: African Americans in California, Eds. Lawrence B. De Graff, Kevin Mulroy, Quintard Taylor (Los Angeles: Autry Museum of Western Heritage, 1984), 216-217. [14] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 235-236. [15] Dumenil, Womens Reform Organizations and Wartime Mobilization in World War I Era Los Angeles, 236-237.

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April 26, 2017   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

Students in TX stand strong with Israel – OneNewsNow

Students played an integral role in seeing that the Texas House passed a bill last week barring the state from engaging in business with companies involved with the anti-Israel BDS movement. HB 89, sponsored by Representative Phil King, passed unanimously, 131-0. The bill strengthens ties with Israel, Texas’ fourth-largest trading partner, according to the Jerusalem Post. Jesse Stock of StandWithUs, a pro-Israel organization, says students did their part in promoting the bill. “There was a ‘Stand With Israel Day’ at the capitol and we mobilized … close to 50 students who came to the capitol for the day and met with legislators and expressed why this legislation is important,” he shares with OneNewsNow. Stock says high school students are a “huge part” of what they do in supporting Israel. “We have five high school interns in Dallas, one in San Antonio, and one in Houston,” he describes. “All of them were active in trying to mobilize their friends to call their legislators as well to educate their peers about the importance.” Rep. King explained to StandWithUs that he had multiple reasons for taking the lead against what he considers economic warfare against the Jewish nation: “First, as a Christian, my religious heritage is intrinsically linked to Israel and to the Jewish people. Second, as an American, our national security is dependent in great part on a strong Israel, often our only friend in the Middle East. Third, as a Texas legislator, our state has a substantial Jewish population and this issue is important to them. Texans have historical ties and do a lot of business with Israel. Fourth, it’s just the right thing to do.” The Senate passed its version of the anti-boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) bill in March. It is expected Gov. Greg Abbott will sign the bill early next month. We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article – NOT another reader’s comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved.

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April 25, 2017   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

Jewish American Heritage Month – Dr. Sheldon Cherry …

Jewish American Heritage Month – Dr. Sheldon Cherry Event information Start: Sunday, May. 7, 2017, 02:00PM End: Sunday, May. 7, 2017, 03:30PM Venue: Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU From Maimonides to South Beach, American Jews in Medicine In Recognition of Jewish American Heritage Month 2017 Theme: American Jews in Medical Research Lecture by Dr. Sheldon H. Cherry Associate Dean, Clinical Affairs; and Professor FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Dr. Sheldon H. Cherry has built a national reputation as a clinician in the reproductive and women’s health field and has published numerous papers in reproductive medicine. He was the recipient of an NIH Grant on amniotic fluid physiology, and was a pioneer in the field of intrauterine diagnosis and treatment. As Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, he taught at The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, in New York and belongs to the American College of Surgeons, and the New York Obstetrical Society. Dr. Cherry was the senior editor of “Complications of Pregnancy”, a classic medical textbook in its fourth edition. Dr. Cherry is also the author of several lay books on woman’s health. He is a frequent expert guest on various media including television, such as “Good Morning America” and the “Today Show”. He has in the past been the monthly columnist for Parents Magazine on pregnancy and childbirth. He has been consistently named as a “Top Doctor In America” and named in “Who’s Who In The World”. Dr. Cherry was born in New York City and received his medical training at Columbia University.

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April 23, 2017   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

Every single movie coming out this summer – Los Angeles Times

The 2017 Summer Movie Preview is a snapshot of the films opening through early September. Release dates and other details are subject to change. April 28 A fashion editor finds herself drawn into a steamy affair with another woman. With Natalie Krill, Sebastian Pigott, Erika Linder. Written by Stephanie Fabrizi. Directed by April Mullen. Gunpowder & Sky A couple discover an evil, lustful presence inhabiting the basement of their new home. With Natasha Henstridge, Luke Hassel, Lin Shaye, Dominique Swain. Written and directed by Rolfe Kanefsky. Cleopatra Entertainment The LAPD recruits a Russian police officer to help hunt a serial killer. With Alexander Nevsky, Kristanna Loken, Adrian Paul, Robert Davi, Matthias Hues. Written by Brent Huff, George Saunders. Directed by Nevsky. ITN Distribution Meta-documentary by Kitty Green on the 1996 killing of 6-year-old JonBent Ramsey. Netflix SEE OUR COMPLETE SUMMER MOVIE PREVIEW 92137734 A young woman experiences success at the world’s largest technology and social media company and is encouraged to live her life completely in the open. With Emma Watson, Tom Hanks, John Boyega, Patton Oswalt, Bill Paxton, Karen Gillan, Ellar Coltrane. Written and directed by James Ponsoldt, based on the novel by Dave Eggers. STX Entertainment Documentary explores the mid-20th-century battles between urbanization critic and activist Jane Jacobs and New York master builder Robert Moses. Directed by Matt Tyrnauer. Sundance Selects Female war correspondent Alex Quade chronicles the stories of U.S. Special Operations Forces in the third film in the “Heroes of Valor” docu-action series. Featuring Wendy R. Anderson. Written by Eli Baldridge and Quade. Directed by Christian Tureaud and David Salzberg. Gravitas Ventures In a cabin in northern Wales, two lost souls experiment with black magic. With Steve Oram, Catherine Walker. Written and directed by Liam Gavin. IFC Midnight A physics student time travels as she attempts to solve her boyfriend’s murder. With Courtney Hope, Bruce Davison, Susan Blakely, Sarah Douglas, Lou Richards, Karan Oberoi, Christopher Backus. Written and directed by Kenneth Mader. Arcadia Releasing Group A Boston homicide detective hunts his partner’s killer on Nantucket Island. With Eric Dane, Natalie Zea, Adrian Lester, Carolyn Stotesbery, Chris Meyer, Rebecca Gayheart. Written and directed by John Shea. Beacon Pictures / Broadvision Entertainment 92595644 Eugenio Derbez stars as a struggling middle-aged gigolo forced to move in with his sister and nephew. With Salma Hayek, Rob Lowe, Kristen Bell, Raquel Welch, Rob Corddry, Rob Riggle, Michael Cera, Raphael Alejandro. Written by Chris Spain, Jon Zack. Directed by Ken Marino. Pantelion During Koreas Joseon Dynasty, King Yejong and his assistant investigate rumors that there will be an attempt on the throne. With Lee Sun-kyun, Ahn Jae-hong. Written by Kang Hyun-sung. Directed by Moon Hyung-sung. CJ Entertainment The Los Angeles uprising after the Rodney King verdict is explored through archival footage in this documentary marking the 25th anniversary. Directed by Daniel Lindsay, T.J. Martin. National Geographic At the end of the traditional Jewish mourning period after the death of his son, a middle-aged Israeli man chooses to see what makes life meaningful rather than return to his regular routine. With Shai Avivi, Evgenia Dodina, Tomer Kapon. Written and directed by Asaph Polonsky. Oscilloscope Laboratories A single mom is abducted and learns she has a genetic abnormality that could cause her true alien nature to be revealed. With Noomi Rapace, Michael Chiklis, Peter Stormare, Kerry Bishe. Written by Steven Shainberg and Brian Nelson. Directed by Shainberg. AMBI Media Group An eccentric family spend its summer in a coastal villa in early 20th century France. With Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi. Written and directed by Bruno Dumont. Kino Lorber A young street magician must use his mystical ways to rescue his kidnapped sister. With Jacob Latimore, Storm Reid, Seychelle Gabriel, Dul Hill, Sasheer Zamata, Cameron Esposito. Written and directed by J.D Dillard. BH Tilt A young nurse in 1950s Tuscany believes the wealthy young mute she cares for is possessed by something within the walls of an isolated castle. With Emilia Clarke, Marton Csokas. Written by Andrew Shaw, based on a novel by Silvio Raffo. Directed by Eric D. Howell. Momentum Pictures May 5 Biographical documentary on the songwriter and record producer whose hits included Twist and Shout, Hang on Sloopy, Here Comes the Night and Piece of My Heart. Narrated by Steve Van Zandt. Featuring Ronald Isley, Ben E. King, Solomon Burke, Van Morrison, Keith Richards, Paul McCartney. Directed by Brett Berns and Bob Sarles. Abramorama Liev Schreiber stars as Chuck Wepner, the underdog boxer who inspired “Rocky.” With Naomi Watts, Elisabeth Moss, Ron Perlman, Jim Gaffigan, Michael Rapaport, Pooch Hall, Morgan Spector. Written by Jeff Feuerzeig, Jerry Stahl, Michael Cristofer, Schreiber. Directed by Philippe Falardeau. IFC Films A gubernatorial candidate, his estranged brother and their wives confront a terrible crime committed by their teenage sons. With Rebecca Hall, Chlo Sevigny, Richard Gere, Laura Linney, Steve Coogan. Written and directed by Oren Moverman, based on a novel by Herman Koch. The Orchard 92699670 Filmmaker James Gunn delivers Mixtape #2 as the team explores the mystery of Peter Quill’s heritage and fights galactic baddies. With Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Vin Diesel, Bradley Cooper, Michael Rooker, Karen Gillan, Pom Klementieff, Elizabeth Debicki, Chris Sullivan, Sean Gunn, Tommy Flanagan, Laura Haddock, Sylvester Stallone, Kurt Russell. Walt Disney Pictures The life and work of the painter and filmmaker are chronicled in this documentary. Featuring Mary Boone, Jeff Koons, Vito Schnabel, Willem Dafoe, Bono. Directed by Pappi Corsicato. Cohen Media Group Debra Winger and Tracy Letts star as a long-married couple whose serious affairs with other people rekindle a spark in their own relationship. With Aidan Gillen, Melora Walters, Tyler Ross, Jessica Sula. Written and directed by Azazel Jacobs. A24 Documentary on the work of the New York Times obituary writers. Written and directed by Vanessa Gould. Kino Lorber A voyeur is framed for murder by a young lady in this restored version of the1946 adaptation of Georges Simenons Mr. Hire’s Engagement. With Michel Simon, Viviane Romance, Paul Bernard, Max Dalban. Written by Julien Duvivier, Charles Spaak. Directed by Duvivier. Rialto Pictures Oscar-winning filmmaker Laura Poitras documentary on Julian Assange. Neon Pat Healy directs and stars in a black comedy about a man who specializes in simulated abductions. With Taylor Schilling. Written by Mike Makowsky. The Orchard Elle Fanning, Naomi Watts and Susan Sarandon star as a family living under one roof in New York adjusting to a teen’s decision to transition from female to male. Written by Nikole Beckwith. Directed by Gaby Dellal. Weinstein Company Also: Alienate Horror/Sci-fi. Gravitas Ventures Black Site Delta Action. XLrator Media Buster’s Mal Heart Sci-fi thriller. With Rami Malek. Well Go USA Elian Documentary. Gravitas Ventures Enter the Warriors Gate Fantasy adventure co-written by Luc Besson. EuropaCorp The Founders Sports documentary. Level 33 Lady Bloodfight Martial arts action. Vertical Entertainment Mom and Me Documentary. Uncorkd Entertainment Tomorrow Ever After Sci-fi comedy. Thier Productions May 12 Artist Chris Burden, whose work included dangerous stunts, iconic sculptures and installations, and the vintage streetlights outside LACMA, is profiled in this documentary. Directed by Timothy Marrinan & Richard Dewey. Magnolia Pictures Documentary recounts the romantic and creative partnership of storyboard artist Harold Michelson and film researcher Lillian Michelson. Featuring Danny DeVito, Mel Brooks, Francis Ford Coppola. Directed by Daniel Raim. Zeitgeist Films 92956819 A new imagining of the Excalibur myth finds Arthur once more searching for his rightful place in the kingdom. With Charlie Hunnam, Astrid Bergs-Frisbey, Djimon Hounsou, Aidan Gillen, Jude Law, Eric Bana. Written by Joby Harold and Guy Ritchie & Lionel Wigram; story by David Dobkin and Joby Harold. Directed by Ritchie. Warner Bros. Two women find deep friendship at an Italian mental hospital and help each other navigate in the real world when they inadvertently gain their freedom. With Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Micaela Ramazzotti. Written and directed by Paolo Virzi. Strand Releasing An East L.A. street artist feels caught between the old-school car culture of his father and ex-con brother and his own means of self-expression. With Gabriel Chavarria, Demin Bichir, Eva Longoria, Theo Rossi, Melissa Benoist, Tony Revolori. Written by Cheo Hodari Coker & Elgin James. Directed by Ricardo de Montreuil. Telemundo Films / BH Tilt A Frenchman restores the love of life for a neglected American wife. With Diane Lane, Arnaud Viard, Alec Baldwin. Written and directed by Eleanor Coppola. Sony Pictures Classics 92143244 Amy Schumer stars as an impulsive young woman who recruits her rigid mother, played by Goldie Hawn, for a jungle vacation. With Joan Cusack, Ike Barinholtz, Wanda Sykes, Christopher Meloni. Written by Katie Dippold. Directed by Jonathan Levine. 20th Century Fox Two U.S. soldiers are trapped with only a crumbling structure between them and an Iraqi sniper. With Aaron Taylor-Johnson, John Cena. Written by Dwain Worrell. Directed by Doug Liman. Amazon Studios / Roadside Attractions Residents of a Scottish island attempt to liberate 50,000 cases of whisky from a stranded ship in this remake of the 1949 Alexander Mackendrick comedy. With Eddie Izzard, Ellie Kendrick, James Cosmo. Written by Peter McDougall, based on the novel by Compton Mackenzie. Directed by Gillies MacKinnon. Arrow Films A young woman’s privileged life in 19th century Normandy is slowly eroded by her husband’s unfaithfulness and pressure from family and community. With Judith Chemla, Jean-Pierre Darroussin, Yolande Moreau, Swann Arlaud. Written by Stphane Briz and Florence Vignon, based on a novel by Guy de Maupassant. Directed by Briz. Kino Lorber Also: Angkor Awakens Documentary. Directed by Robert H. Lieberman. Photosynthesis Productions Dead Awake Horror. FilmRise Folk Hero & Funny Guy Comedy with Alex Karpovsky. Gravitas Ventures Get Me Roger Stone Documentary. Netflix Hounds of Love Horror. Gunpowder & Sky Long Live the King Documentary. Indie Rights Sacred Documentary directed by Thomas Lennon. Argot Pictures Tracktown Drama with Alexi Pappas. Samuel Goldwyn Films Urban Hymn Crime drama. Level 33 Violet Drama. Ryan Bruce Levey Film Distribution May 19 92690423 The crew of a colony ship makes a terrifying discovery after landing on what seems to be an uncharted paradise on the far side of the galaxy. With Michael Fassbender, Katherine Waterston, Billy Crudup, Danny McBride, Demin Bichir. Written by John Logan. Directed by Ridley Scott. 20th Century Fox An affair threatens the idealistic cooperative an upscale Copenhagen couple establish in their home. With Ulrich Thomsen, Trine Dyrholm, Fares Fares. Written by Tobias Lindholm, Thomas Vinterberg. Directed by Vinterberg. Magnolia Pictures 92641828 The family takes a road trip and Greg schemes to become famous as a new cast takes over for the fourth installment based on Jeff Kinney’s comic youth novels. With Jason Ian Drucker, Charlie Wright, Owen Asztalos, Tom Everett Scott, Alicia Silverstone. Written by Kinney and director David Bowers. 20th Century Fox 92595368 An 18-year-old woman, confined to her house in a protected environment because of an illness, forms an attachment to the boy next door and yearns to experience the outside world. With Amandla Stenberg, Nick Robinson, Ana De La Reguera, Anika Noni Rose. Written by J. Mills Goodloe, based on the book by Nicola Yoon. Directed by Stella Meghie. Warner Bros./ MGM Directors Sebastian Junger and Nick Quested map the regions turmoil in this documentary. National Geographic Verit documentary follows three White Helmets volunteer first responders who rush in to some of the most dangerous areas in Syria. Directed by Firas Fayyad, Steen Johannessen. Grasshopper Film The suicide of a young artist brings together his girlfriend and mother as they confront their grief. With Janet McTeer, Alia Shawkat, Rhys Wakefield, Nancy Kwan, Emily Rios, Alfred Molina. Written by Amber Tamblyn, Ed Dougherty, based on the novel by Janet Fitch. Directed by Amber Tamblyn. Imagination Worldwide The nuptials are set, but an Orthodox woman has only one month to find a groom. With Noa Koler, Amos Tamam, Oz Zehavi. Written and directed by Rama Burshtein. In Hebrew with English subtitles. (1:50) NR. Roadside Attractions Also: Devil’s Domain Horror film with Michael Madsen. Cleopatra Entertainment Fight for Space Documentary. Gravitas Ventures If You’re Not in the Obit, Eat Breakfast Documentary. With Carl Reiner. HBO Documentary Films The Last Shaman Documentary. Abramorama 7 Witches Horror. Indican Pictures Solaris (1972) and Stalker (1979) Re-release of Andrei Tarkovsky films Janus Films The Survivalist Post-apocalyptic thriller. IFC Midnight May 26 A renowned and uncompromising artist struggles against authoritarianism in post-World War II Communist Poland in director Andrzej Wajdas final film. With Boguslaw Linda. Written by Andrzej Mularczyk. Film Movement 92080757 Dwayne Johnson steps into the formidable flip flops of David Hasselhoff as lifeguard Mitch Buchanan in this adaptation of the 1990s TV series. With Zac Efron, Priyanka Chopra, Alexandra Daddario, Jon Bass, Kelly Rohrbach, Ilfenesh Hadera. Written by Damian Shannon & Mark Swift, story by Jay Scherick & David Ronn and Thomas Lennon & Robert Ben Garant, based on the series created by Michael Berk & Douglas Schwartz and Gregory J. Bonann. Directed by Seth Gordon. Paramount Pictures The 30-year trek of the Grateful Dead as their organic approach to touring and getting the word out turned them into one of the most successful and popular live acts in rock n roll is chronicled in this documentary. Featuring Jerry Garcia, Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann, Phil Lesh, Bob Weir. Directed by Amir Bar-Lev. Amazon Studios Cate Blanchett plays multiple roles in a series of vignettes inspired by artist manifestos. Written and directed by Julian Rosefeldt. FilmRise 92708471 Captain Jack is down-on-his-luck and his survival depends on an alliance with an attractive astronomer and a Royal Navy sailor. With Johnny Depp, Javier Bardem, Brenton Thwaites, Kaya Scodelario, Kevin R. McNally, Golshifteh Farahani, David Wenham, Stephen Graham and Geoffrey Rush. Written by Jeff Nathanson, story by Nathanson and Terry Rossio. Directed by Joachim Rnning and Espen Sandberg. Walt Disney Pictures Bryan Cranston stars as a successful but overwhelmed businessman whose disappearance is not what it appears. With Jennifer Garner, Jason O’Mara, Beverly D’Angelo, Ian Anthony Dale, Pippa Bennett-Warner, Isaac Leyva, Victoria Bruno, Ellery Sprayberry, Tracey Walter. Written and directed by Robin Swicord. IFC Films A four-star U.S. general is charged with ending the country’s involvement in Afghanistan. With Brad Pitt, Ben Kingsley, Tilda Swinton, Topher Grace, Anthony Michael Hall, Will Poulter, Keith Stanfield. Written and directed by David Michod, based on the book The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of Americas War in Afghanistan by Michael Hastings. Netflix Also: Berlin Syndrome Psychological thriller. Vertical Entertainment Black Butterfly Thriller with Antonio Banderas, Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Piper Perabo. Lionsgate Premiere Drone Thriller. Screen Media Films Legion of Brothers Documentary. Gravitas Ventures Spirit Game: Pride of a Nation Sports documentary. XLrator Media May TBD Also: Aida’s Secrets Documentary. Music Box Films Bugs Documentary. Kino Lorber NISE: The Heart of Madness Brazilian drama. Outsider Pictures / Strand Releasing The Penguin Counters Documentary. First Run Features June 2 Director Errol Morris profiles portrait photographer Elsa Dorfman through her work with the Polaroid Land 20×24 camera and her Cambridge, Mass., studio, where she captured families, Beat poets, rock stars and Harvard standouts. Neon A young couple attempt to work their marital woes out by starting a band and turning their fights into songs. With Adam Pally, Fred Armisen, Susie Essman, Hannah Simone, Ravi Patel, Jorma Taccone, Jesse Williams, Brooklyn Decker, Jaime Chung, Chris DElia, Colin Hanks. Written and directed by Zoe Lister-Jones. IFC Films Animated adaptation of the hit illustrated book series by Dav Pilkey about a pair of wildly imaginative boys and their creation of a not-so-bright superhero. Voices by Kevin Hart, Ed Helms, Thomas Middleditch, Nick Kroll, Jordan Peele, Kristen Schaal. Written by Nicholas Stoller. Directed by David Soren. 20th Century Fox / DreamWorks Animation Brian Cox stars as the British prime minister in the tense days leading up to the D-Day invasion. With Miranda Richardson, John Slattery, Julian Wadham, James Purefoy, Ella Purnell, Richard Durden. Written by Alex von Tunzelmann. Directed by Jonathan Teplitzky. Cohen Media Group Demetri Martin writes, directs and stars with Kevin Kline as a father-and-son dealing with grief and attendant life changes. With Gillian Jacobs. CBS Films During WWII, a German soldier is sent to occupied Holland to monitor espionage surrounding the exiled Kaiser Wilhelm II. With Christopher Plummer, Jai Courtney, Lily James. Written by Simon Burke, based on a novel by Alan Judd. Directed by David Leveaux. A24 A love triangle emerges in the drag queen bars of Tokyo in this restoration of writer-director Toshio Matsumoto’s 1969 drama. With Pt, Osamu Ogasawara, Yoshimi J. Cinelicious Pictures A Newcastle carpenter with a heart condition battles government bureaucracy after he is denied benefits and aids a struggling single mom with two children. Winner of the Palme dOr at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival. With Dave Johns, Hayley Squires. Written by Paul Laverty. Directed by Ken Loach. Sundance Selects A pre-World War I Cambridge man battles his homosexual urges in this 1987 adaptation of the E.M. Forster novel by producer Ismail Merchant and director James Ivory. With James Wilby, Hugh Grant, Rupert Graves, Ben Kingsley, Phoebe Nicholls. Written by Kit Hesketh-Harvey and Ivory. Cohen Media Group The art worlds enfant terrible is followed from his early years through a recent Guggenheim retrospective. Directed by Maura Axelrod. Bond / 360 Two sisters in 1977 Jerusalem probe their stern father’s unspoken experiences in World War II Poland. With Nelly Tagar, Joy Rieger, Doron Tavory and Evgenia Dodina. Written and directed by Avi Nesher. Samuel Goldwyn Films In 1930s Sweden, an indigenous teenage girl feels the sting of racism and vows to escape. With Lene Cecilia Sparrok, Mia Erika Sparrok, Maj-Doris Rimpi. Written and directed by Amanda Kernell. Synergetic Distribution 91831565 The Amazonian princess gets her own movie and leaves her island paradise to fight a war to end all wars. With Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Robin Wright, Danny Huston, David Thewlis, Connie Nielsen, Elena Anaya, Ewen Bremner, Lucy Davis, Lisa Loven Kongsli, Eugene Brave Rock, Sad Taghmaoui. Written by Allan Heinberg, story by Zack Snyder & Allan Heinberg and Jason Fuchs, based on characters from DC. Wonder Woman created by William Moulton Marston. Directed by Patty Jenkins. Warner Bros. Also: All About the Money Action comedy with Eddie Griffin. Gravitas Ventures Dark Signal Horror. XLrator Media Handsome Devil Drama. Breaking Glass Pictures Vincent-n-Roxxy Romantic drama with Emile Hirsh, Zo Kravitz, Zoey Deutch. Vertical Entertainment Documentary on the Chinese immigrant Sung family, owners of the only U.S. bank to face criminal charges stemming from the 2008 financial crisis. Directed by Steve James. PBS Films A writer deals with the death of her wife, a deep desire to become a mother and falls into a love triangle with her two best friends. With Laura Heisler, Bryan Dechart, Annie Potts, Raoul Bhaneja, Anna Fitzwater. Written by Gretchen M. Michelfeld. Directed by Heather de Michele. First Run Features Writer Mike White and director Miguel Arteta reteam for a satire about a dinner party where a successful immigrant health practitioner butts heads with a smug billionaire. With Salma Hayek, John Lithgow, Chlo Sevigny, Connie Britton, David Warshofsky, Amy Landecker, Jay Duplass, John Early. Roadside Attractions A washed-up western actor changes his priorities after a cancer diagnosis. With Sam Elliott, Laura Prepon, Krysten Ritter, Nick Offerman, Katharine Ross. Written by Brett Haley, Marc Basch. Directed by Haley. The Orchard Adult brother and sister twins confront their lack of emotional development when they date the same man. With Lucas Neff, Artemis Pebdani, Angela Trimbur. Written by Kristin Archibald and Doug Archibald. Directed by Doug Archibald. Magnolia Pictures Writer-director Trey Edward Shults follows “Krisha” with a dystopian horror story about a man and his family under siege. With Joel Edgerton, Riley Keough, Christopher Abbott, Carmen Ejogo and Kelvin Harrison Jr. A24 92803777

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April 21, 2017   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed


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