Archive for the ‘Jewish American Heritage Month’ Category

Events Feb. 6, 2015

Cotuit Library:Cotuit Library is at 871 Main St. 508-428-8141; www.cotuitlibrary.org

Centerville Library: Feb. 23: It’s Movie Time – a free showing of “South Pacific,” 1 p.m.

Antiques!: The Hyannis Public Library’s 39th Weekend Antiques Show & Sale is schedule for Feb. 14 and 15, this year at the Barnstable Intermediate School, 895 Route 28, Hyannis. Show hours are 10 to 5 on Saturday and 11 to 4 on Sunday. Lunch and snacks are available both days. Adult admission is $6 or $5 with coupon, kids free (with adult). More info? 508-775-2280.

At Titcomb’s: Feb. 14: Bestselling author Mary Pat Kelly speaks and signs copies of her latest book, “Of Irish Blood,” 2 to 3 p.m. at Titcomb’s, 432 Route 6A, East Sandwich. 508-888-2331; www.titcombsbookshop.com

Winter Reading Series: Sturgis Library hosts a wintertime reading and discussion series, Shaking Two Nickels Together: A Literary Perspective on Impoverishment and Income Inequality, as a guest list of scholars examine the subject in its historical and socioeconomic context. Attend any or all lectures. Texts are available at the library: Next up: Feb. 24: A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, led by Anne Speyer; March 24: Selected Victorian poetry, led by Paula Krebs; April 28: Bread and Wine by Ignazio Silone, led by James Crowley. RSVP to 508-362-6636; made possible by a grant from Mass Humanities.

Help for kids who stutter: Several books and DVDs produced by the nonprofit Stuttering Foundation are available free to public libraries. Among these, a new DVD called Stuttering: For Kids By Kids, stars kids who are struggling with the disability themselves and are out to help others. Three libraries in Barnstable have this DVD on their shelves: Centerville Public Library; Cotuit Library; Hyannis Public Library.

Library perks: Hyannis Public Library continues to offer the Mango Languages online language-learning system to all CLAMS card holders in the villages, through a grant from the Kirkman Trust Fund awarded to Barnstable libraries. Valid CLAMS card holders may take advantage of reduced rate admissions to the New England Aquarium in Boston and to Heritage Museums & Gardens in Sandwich. Call the library for information. Hyannis Library is at 401 Main St. 508-775-2280, www.hyannislibrary.org

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About – National Hispanic Heritage Month

About National Hispanic Heritage Month

Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.

The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988, on the approval of Public Law 100-402.

The day of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16 and September18, respectively. Also, Columbus Day or Da de la Raza, which is October 12, falls within this 30 day period.

The Law Library of Congress has compiled guides to commemorative observations, including a comprehensive inventory of the Public Laws, Presidential Proclamations and congressional resolutions related to Hispanic American Heritage Month.

This Web portal is a collaborative project of the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

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Black History Month events in Rhode Island

THROUGH FRIDAY, FEB. 6

University of Rhode Islands 29th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Week Dismantling Segregation: Race, Poverty and Privilege, URI, Kingston campus. Events are free unless otherwise noted.

Feb. 2. Gallery talk: The Great Kings and Queens of Africa, 2 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Norman Barber, URI adjunct professor of Africana studies, leads a talk about this series of 30 paintings by 23 African-Americans. Film screening/discussion of Martin Luther King and the March on Washington, 4 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Produced by Robert Redford and narrated by Denzel Washington, the documentary describes the buildup to one of the peak moments of the civil rights movement. Facilitated by Bryna Wortman, URI associate theater professor, who attended the 1963 march.

Feb. 3. Film screening. Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North, 5 p.m., Swan Auditorium, Swan Hall. Directed/produced by Katrina Browne, the film tells the story of her ancestors, the DeWolfs of Bristol, the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history from 1769-1820. The Spirituality of Falun Gong, 6 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101), Co-sponsored by the Falun Dafa Association of Rhode Island.

Feb. 4. Unity luncheon and keynote address, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Memorial Union Ballroom. A communal sharing of food, song and reflection in celebration of the legacy of King and the application of the legacy at URI. The URI Chaplains Association presents the 11th annual Peacemaker Award honoring a student, student organization or a member of the URI academic community whose goals and activities express a commitment to the pursuit of peace and nonviolence. Keynote speaker is Katrina Browne, producer/director of Traces of the Trade and founder of the Tracing Center on Histories and Legacies of Slavery. Bias, Baggage and Beyond, seminar with Katrina Browne, 2 p.m., Multicultural Center, Computer Classroom (005). Exploration of the differences between intentional racism, unconscious racial bias, structural racism, white privilege and racial historical myths. Film screening/discussion: More Than a Dream, 5-7 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Screening and discussion led by Paul Bueno de Mesquita, director of the Center for Nonviolence and Peace Studies. The film follows Kings civil rights journey from when he reluctantly joined the bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala., through his rise as a world figure to his assassination in Memphis in 1968. Deep Listening The Path to the Beloved Community, 7 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Led by Joanne Friday, associate chaplain of the URI Chaplains Association, and Amy M. Olson, executive director of the Norman A. Fain Hillel Center. Interfaith celebration, 8 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Students and members of the campus diverse religious communities present readings, stories, songs and dances from their traditions.

Feb. 5. Discussion: Exploring the Confluence of Multiculturalism and Spirituality, 4 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Co-sponsored by Cross-Currents, a global network of people of faith and critical consciousness committed to connecting the wisdom of the heart and the life of the mind. Discussion: Nonviolence Principles in the Islamic Tradition, 5 p.m., Multicultural Center, Computer Classroom (005). Presentation applies an Islamic perspective on mercy, justice and beneficence for the purpose of establishing core principles of nonviolence. Discussion: Desegregation and the Black Radical Agenda, 5:30 p.m. Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Discussion explores ways in which people of African descent living in the United States and segregated socially, economically, educationally and politically, critically theorized an agenda for freedom.

Feb. 6. Compassion meditation workshop, noon, Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Workshop, led by Buddhist monk Thupten Tender, an instructor at the Center for Nonviolence and Peace Studies, explores the basis, rationale, common situations and health benefits for practicing compassion. URI Avi Schaefer Jewish/Muslim/Multicultural Shabbat (Sabbath) (fourth annual), 3-7 p.m. Norman M. Fain Hillel Center, Fraternity Circle. Jewish students, Muslim students and students of other faiths, ethnicities and cultural backgrounds are invited to prepare a meal together and share cultural and religious traditions. Free for students, $15 for others. Sign up at hannah_kaplan@my.uri.edu.

The Meeting, Ocean State Theatre Company, 1245 Jefferson Blvd., Warwick. 921-6800; oceanstatetheatre.org. Play depicts the imagined meeting of Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Feb. 1, 8, 15 at 2 p.m.; Feb. 5, 7, 14 at 2 and 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 6, 11, 13 at 7:30 p.m., $30; Friday-Saturday 7:30 p.m; Sunday 2 p.m. $34-$49.

Exhibit. Black Superheroes: From the Comic Book Universe to the College Campus, University of Rhode Island, Main Gallery, Fine Arts Center, 105 Upper College Rd., Kingston campus. uri.edu/maingallery. Monday-Saturday noon-4 p.m.

Black History Month exhibits, University of Rhode Island, Providence Feinstein Campus Gallery, 80 Washington St., Providence. 277-5206; uri.edu/prov/arts, uri.artsandculure@gmail.com. Free. Reception, panel, music and spoken word performance on Feb. 5, 5:30-7 p.m.

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Jewish American Heritage Month – The White House

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release

April 30, 2014

JEWISH AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH, 2014

– – – – – – –

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

For thousands of years, the Jewish people have sustained their identity and traditions, persevering in the face of persecution. Through generations of enslavement and years of wandering, through forced segregation and the horrors of the Holocaust, they have maintained their holy covenant and lived according to the Torah. Their pursuit of freedom brought multitudes to our shores, and today our country is the proud home to millions of Jewish Americans. This month, let us honor their tremendous contributions — as scientists and artists, as activists and entrepreneurs. And let all of us find inspiration in a story that speaks to the universal human experience, with all of its suffering and all of its salvation.

This history led many Jewish Americans to find common cause with the Civil Rights Movement. African Americans and Jewish Americans marched side-by-side in Selma and Montgomery. They boarded buses for Freedom Rides together, united in their support of liberty and human dignity. These causes remain just as urgent today. Jewish communities continue to confront anti-Semitism — both around the world and, as tragic events mere weeks ago in Kansas reminded us, here in the United States. Following in the footsteps of Jewish civil rights leaders, we must come together across all faiths, reject ignorance and intolerance, and root out hatred wherever it exists.

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James Terzian to Discuss Americans Heraldic Heritage in Talk to Genealogical Society

By Glenn Avolio for the Santa Barbara County Genealogical Society | Published on 01.30.2015 8:52 a.m.

The Santa Barbara County Genealogical Society will hold its monthly general meeting from 9:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 21 at First Presbyterian Church, 21 E. Constance St. in Santa Barbara.

James Terzian

This months featured speaker, James Terzian, will present “Americans Heraldic Heritage:Coats of Arms, Clan Crests, Illustrious Ancestry and Other Secrets We Genealogists Know.”

Most of us associate coats of arms with knights and nobility, clans and colonies the stuff of romance from ages of swords and chivalry. So it is. But heraldry is also very American.

From the first European voyages of discovery to the present day, heraldry has been actively used by military and civilian branches of government, by social, educational, religious and business organizations, and by families and individuals. It is part of the heritage of most who descend from Europeans, the bequest of ancestors of achievement, social position, political influence or affluence. And though few modern Americans understand heraldry, we see and use it everywhere.

In this months presentation, Terzian will explain American and European heraldry in a one-hour lecture and discussion. He will survey how heraldry works;how a person acquires and uses arms;how armorial ensigns on heirlooms, antiques, buildings, monuments and other artifacts can be “read”;and how these graphical representations of identity can be used to solve genealogical challenges and ancestral mysteries.

Terzian, is chairman of the Heraldry Foundation, director of the Miles Morgan Origins Project, secretary-treasurer of the Descendants of the Illegitimate Sons and Daughters of the Kings of Britain, and co-author of the currently authoritative treatise on American heraldic law. He has studied and consulted in heraldry and genealogy for over 40 years, and has represented the United States as a delegate to the International Congresses of Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences. He has also been honored by the Queen of the United Kingdom for his nonprofit activities.

Terzian is managing director of the Terzian International Group, a 27-year-old Silicon Valley firmthat advises clients on the development, launch and turn-around of technology, education and cultural organizations.

This promises to be a fascinating presentation.

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Events Jan. 30, 2015

Cotuit Library:Jan. 30, Feb. 6: Designing Women fabric crafts group meets, 10 a.m.Feb. 2, 9: Dames & Their Games meets, 1:30 p.m.Feb. 3:Tech Class at Barnstable Senior Center on anti-virus and malware choices, 1:30 p.m.Feb. 7: Talk: “Pilgrim’s Progress” of amateur astronomy, 2 p.m. Feb. 11: Town Councilor Jessica Rapp Grassetti meets with constituents, 3 p.m. All at Cotuit Library, 871 Main St. 508-428-8141; www.cotuitlibrary.org

Centerville Library:Feb. 9: Local author Sherianna Boyle speaks on her latest book, “The Four Gifts of Anxiety: Transform Your Life,” 7 p.m. Learn the inner strengths that are hiding behind your stress and anxiety. The library is at 585 Main St. 508-790-6220. Also onFeb. 9: Jack Malcolm offers an Adult CPR/First Aid class,10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Participants receive an American Heart Association card, good for two years. $30, pre-registration required. Call 774-269-1940. OnFeb. 23: It’s Movie Time – a free showing of “South Pacific,” 1 p.m.

Brewster book discussion:Feb. 10: Brewster Ladies’ Library, 1822 Main St., will discuss “Bring Up the Bodies” by Hilary Mantel for its February reading selection, 1 p.m. in the library meeting room.

Antiques!: The Hyannis Public Library’s 39th Weekend Antiques Show & Sale is schedule forFeb. 14 and 15, this year at the Barnstable Intermediate School, 895 Route 28, Hyannis. Show hours are 10 to 5 on Saturday and 11 to 4 on Sunday. Lunch and snacks are available both days. Adult admission is $6 or $5 with coupon, kids free (with adult). More info? 508-775-2280.

At Titcomb’s:Feb. 14: Bestselling author Mary Pat Kelly speaks and signs copies of her latest book, “Of Irish Blood,” 2 to 3 p.m. at Titcomb’s, 432 Route 6A, East Sandwich. 508-888-2331; www.titcombsbookshop.com

Winter Reading Series: Sturgis Library hosts a wintertime reading and discussion series, Shaking Two Nickels Together: A Literary Perspective on Impoverishment and Income Inequality, as a guest list of scholars examine the subject in its historical and socioeconomic context. Attend any or all lectures. Texts are available at the library: Next up:Feb. 24:A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, led by Anne Speyer;March 24: Selected Victorian poetry, led by Paula Krebs;April 28: Bread and Wine by Ignazio Silone, led by James Crowley. RSVP to 508-362-6636; made possible by a grant from Mass Humanities.

Help for kids who stutter: Several books and DVDs produced by the nonprofit Stuttering Foundation are available free to public libraries. Among these, a new DVD called Stuttering: For Kids By Kids, stars kids who are struggling with the disability themselves and are out to help others. Three libraries in Barnstable have this DVD on their shelves: Centerville Public Library; Cotuit Library; Hyannis Public Library.

Library perks: Hyannis Public Library continues to offer the Mango Languages online language-learning system to all CLAMS card holders in the villages, through a grant from the Kirkman Trust Fund awarded to Barnstable libraries. Valid CLAMS card holders may take advantage of reduced rate admissions to the New England Aquarium in Boston and to Heritage Museums & Gardens in Sandwich. Call the library for information. Hyannis Library is at 401 Main St. 508-775-2280, www.hyannislibrary.org

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For Cuban Jews, improved ties to U.S. may not resolve central challenges

Adela Dworin has been president of Beth Shalom synagogue since 2006 and serves as the Cuban Jewish communitys government liaison. (Josh Tapper)/JTA

On a recent Friday night inside this citys Beth Shalom synagogue, Aliet Ashkenazi, 25, stood draped in a blue-and-white prayer shawl leading prayers in a mix of Spanish and near-perfect Hebrew.

It was the first time she had ever led services a feat considering she converted to Judaism seven years ago after discovering her father was Jewish.

The 300-seat sanctuary in the Cuban capital was near capacity, but the crowd filling the wooden pews was largely American, comprised of tour groups from New York and New Jersey. The next morning, with the Americans gone, the crowd had thinned. A handful of youths sat in the first few rows, leaving a gray-haired cohort of congregants in the back.

This is typically how things go for Cubas 1,500 or so Jews: Hordes of out-of-town guests arrive, bringing with them suitcases full of clothing and coveted medical supplies, and then theyre gone, leaving Cubas diminished Jewish community behind.

Amonth since the United States and Cuba announced renewed diplomatic relations after more than five decades of mutual recrimination and mistrust, it remains unclear how rapprochement will change things for Cubas Jewish community, which has shrunk tenfold since the end of the Cuban Revolution in 1959, when there were 15,000 Jews here.

If it will be better for Cuba, it will be better for Jews in Cuba as well, said Ida Gutzstat, executive director of the Bnai Brith Maimonides Lodge, a community center attached to the Sephardic synagogue in this citys Vedado neighborhood.

Amanda Amato, a 49-year-old secretary, sipping a plastic cup of Cristal beer at one of the lodges biannual parties, said, We have a difficult economic situation now, but its not for all time.

Already there has been some easing. Americans including the thousands of Jews who fled Cuba after the revolution now can send remittances of $2,000 every three months to Cubans, four times the previous limit.

While Cuban Jews endure the same depressed conditions as other Cubans, surviving on monthly food rations and salaries that rarely exceed $40 per month, the community as a whole is the recipient of largesse most Cubans can only dream of.

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For Cuba Jews, Better Ties to U.S. May Not Be Cure-All

Even If Island Prospers, Community Still Faces Challenges

getty images

Published January 25, 2015.

Havana (JTA) On a recent Friday night inside this citys Beth Shalom synagogue, Aliet Ashkenazi, 25, stood draped in a blue-and-white prayer shawl leading prayers in a mix of Spanish and near-perfect Hebrew.

It was the first time she had ever led services a feat considering she converted to Judaism seven years ago after discovering her father was Jewish.

The 300-seat sanctuary in the Cuban capital was near capacity, but the crowd filling the wooden pews was largely American, comprised of tour groups from New York and New Jersey. The next morning, with the Americans gone, the crowd had thinned. A handful of youths sat in the first few rows, leaving a gray-haired cohort of congregants in the back.

This is typically how things go for Cubas 1,500 or so Jews: Hordes of out-of-town guests arrive, bringing with them suitcases full of clothing and coveted medical supplies, and then theyre gone, leaving Cubas diminished Jewish community behind.

A month since the United States and Cuba announced renewed diplomatic relations after more than five decades of mutual recrimination and mistrust, it remains unclear how rapprochement will change things for Cubas Jewish community, which has shrunk tenfold since the end of the Cuban Revolution in 1959, when there were 15,000 Jews here.

If it will be better for Cuba, it will be better for Jews in Cuba as well, said Ida Gutzstat, executive director of the Bnai Brith Maimonides Lodge, a community center attached to the Sephardic synagogue in this citys Vedado neighborhood.

Amanda Amato, a 49-year-old secretary, sipping a plastic cup of Cristal beer at one of the lodges biannual parties, said, We have a difficult economic situation now, but its not for all time.

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Obama's State of the Union Address and its Bearing on US/Iran Relations

By Kam Zarrabi

When it comes to Americas foreign policies, Its too bad that trying to do whats good for America is so often blocked by special interest groups and elected officials who owe their positions, hence their loyalties, to influence peddlers with different agendas. Watching the proceedings of January 21stSenate Foreign Relations Committee hearings on C-SPAN exemplified this tragic state of affairs. It was about the new opening to Cuba, and the progress being made toward a solution to the Iranian nuclear issues currently underway between the P5+1 group headed by the United States and the Iranian delegation.

Before getting into what troubled me most watching the proceedings, it would be helpful to highlight a few facts on the ground:

Now, let us look at what Americas honest concerns and interests might be in the Middle East, the Arabian Peninsula, and indeed the rest of the so-called Islamic world. One of those concerns cannot possibly be Irans nuclear ambitions. As I mentioned above, even a nuclear-armed Iran does not pose any danger of a potential offensive use of nuclear weapons. Yes, having a nuclear arsenal might work as a deterrent to discourage a nuclear attack upon Iran by Israel, but even that possibility is so remote that devoting the money and energy to develop that deterrent tool would be foolish at best. Israel could be literally wiped out of existence by non-nuclear means should it attempt to attack Iran with its atomic weapons. So, why would Iran even bother?

Americas true agenda is finding the most expedient and, at the same time, face-saving way to extricate itself from the current costly and counterproductive entanglements in the Middle East, without creating more breeding areas for terrorist cells that intend to jeopardize Americas legitimate interests. This is where the question pops up as to why the Assad regime in Syria was targeted by the United States in the first place, resulting in the destruction of a nation, hundreds of thousands of casualties, over two million refugees, and a battleground for competing terrorist gangs that led to the formation of the Daesh group. How was the Syrian regime a threat to the United States of America to have been targeted for regime-change? If it was an ally of Iran and a conduit between Iran and the Lebanese Hezbollah and, by extension, the Palestinian Hamas, it might have been a concern for Israel, not the United States; unless, of course, we consider Israels interests worth sacrificing American lives and fortune and the creation of more enemies for America.

Lets not kid ourselves that the concern for targeting the Assad regime was a purely humanitarian issue that required encouraging and financing opposition groups to bring down a tyrannical dictator in order to promote freedom and democracy – in spite of what Senators McCain and Graham say. The truth cannot be denied that American attempts to topple the Assad regime was simply to follow Israels demands and, at the same time, to support our compliant ally, the Saudi clan.

Now we are facing a horrible blowback. We found out the hard and embarrassing way that Assad was not a pushover as the likes of Senators McCain and Graham think. And thanks to Americas misguided interference, Daesh militants and sympathizers are pouring through the 900 mile border from Syria to Turkey and on to Western Europe and ultimately to North America.

The only armies with adequate military skills and equipment that can possibly eradicate the Daesh movement are the Syrian army, the Lebanese Hezbollah, and the Iranian forces. Iran has already been engaged in battling the Daesh terror groups in Iraq, although the media here tries not to mention its accomplishments or even its logistical coordination with the Americans for political reasons.

In Yemen, it is the Iran backed Houthis that are gaining more control and fighting both terrorist groups, Al-Qaeda and Daesh. Houthis, and the Yemeni government subsidized by the Saudis and Americans, are in the best position to eradicate both groups which are a threat to Americas regional interests, the Saudi regime, as well as to Iran, especially now that these terrorist camps have found new spawning environment in Afghanistan next door to Iran.

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Events Feb. 6, 2015

Cotuit Library:Cotuit Library is at 871 Main St. 508-428-8141; www.cotuitlibrary.org Centerville Library: Feb. 23: It’s Movie Time – a free showing of “South Pacific,” 1 p.m. Antiques!: The Hyannis Public Library’s 39th Weekend Antiques Show & Sale is schedule for Feb. 14 and 15, this year at the Barnstable Intermediate School, 895 Route 28, Hyannis. Show hours are 10 to 5 on Saturday and 11 to 4 on Sunday. Lunch and snacks are available both days. Adult admission is $6 or $5 with coupon, kids free (with adult). More info? 508-775-2280. At Titcomb’s: Feb. 14: Bestselling author Mary Pat Kelly speaks and signs copies of her latest book, “Of Irish Blood,” 2 to 3 p.m. at Titcomb’s, 432 Route 6A, East Sandwich. 508-888-2331; www.titcombsbookshop.com Winter Reading Series: Sturgis Library hosts a wintertime reading and discussion series, Shaking Two Nickels Together: A Literary Perspective on Impoverishment and Income Inequality, as a guest list of scholars examine the subject in its historical and socioeconomic context. Attend any or all lectures. Texts are available at the library: Next up: Feb. 24: A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, led by Anne Speyer; March 24: Selected Victorian poetry, led by Paula Krebs; April 28: Bread and Wine by Ignazio Silone, led by James Crowley. RSVP to 508-362-6636; made possible by a grant from Mass Humanities. Help for kids who stutter: Several books and DVDs produced by the nonprofit Stuttering Foundation are available free to public libraries. Among these, a new DVD called Stuttering: For Kids By Kids, stars kids who are struggling with the disability themselves and are out to help others. Three libraries in Barnstable have this DVD on their shelves: Centerville Public Library; Cotuit Library; Hyannis Public Library. Library perks: Hyannis Public Library continues to offer the Mango Languages online language-learning system to all CLAMS card holders in the villages, through a grant from the Kirkman Trust Fund awarded to Barnstable libraries. Valid CLAMS card holders may take advantage of reduced rate admissions to the New England Aquarium in Boston and to Heritage Museums & Gardens in Sandwich. Call the library for information. Hyannis Library is at 401 Main St. 508-775-2280, www.hyannislibrary.org ARTS

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About – National Hispanic Heritage Month

About National Hispanic Heritage Month Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15. It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988, on the approval of Public Law 100-402. The day of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16 and September18, respectively. Also, Columbus Day or Da de la Raza, which is October 12, falls within this 30 day period. The Law Library of Congress has compiled guides to commemorative observations, including a comprehensive inventory of the Public Laws, Presidential Proclamations and congressional resolutions related to Hispanic American Heritage Month. This Web portal is a collaborative project of the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and U.S. National Archives and Records Administration.

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Black History Month events in Rhode Island

THROUGH FRIDAY, FEB. 6 University of Rhode Islands 29th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Week Dismantling Segregation: Race, Poverty and Privilege, URI, Kingston campus. Events are free unless otherwise noted. Feb. 2. Gallery talk: The Great Kings and Queens of Africa, 2 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Norman Barber, URI adjunct professor of Africana studies, leads a talk about this series of 30 paintings by 23 African-Americans. Film screening/discussion of Martin Luther King and the March on Washington, 4 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Produced by Robert Redford and narrated by Denzel Washington, the documentary describes the buildup to one of the peak moments of the civil rights movement. Facilitated by Bryna Wortman, URI associate theater professor, who attended the 1963 march. Feb. 3. Film screening. Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North, 5 p.m., Swan Auditorium, Swan Hall. Directed/produced by Katrina Browne, the film tells the story of her ancestors, the DeWolfs of Bristol, the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history from 1769-1820. The Spirituality of Falun Gong, 6 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101), Co-sponsored by the Falun Dafa Association of Rhode Island. Feb. 4. Unity luncheon and keynote address, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Memorial Union Ballroom. A communal sharing of food, song and reflection in celebration of the legacy of King and the application of the legacy at URI. The URI Chaplains Association presents the 11th annual Peacemaker Award honoring a student, student organization or a member of the URI academic community whose goals and activities express a commitment to the pursuit of peace and nonviolence. Keynote speaker is Katrina Browne, producer/director of Traces of the Trade and founder of the Tracing Center on Histories and Legacies of Slavery. Bias, Baggage and Beyond, seminar with Katrina Browne, 2 p.m., Multicultural Center, Computer Classroom (005). Exploration of the differences between intentional racism, unconscious racial bias, structural racism, white privilege and racial historical myths. Film screening/discussion: More Than a Dream, 5-7 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Screening and discussion led by Paul Bueno de Mesquita, director of the Center for Nonviolence and Peace Studies. The film follows Kings civil rights journey from when he reluctantly joined the bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala., through his rise as a world figure to his assassination in Memphis in 1968. Deep Listening The Path to the Beloved Community, 7 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Led by Joanne Friday, associate chaplain of the URI Chaplains Association, and Amy M. Olson, executive director of the Norman A. Fain Hillel Center. Interfaith celebration, 8 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Students and members of the campus diverse religious communities present readings, stories, songs and dances from their traditions. Feb. 5. Discussion: Exploring the Confluence of Multiculturalism and Spirituality, 4 p.m., Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Co-sponsored by Cross-Currents, a global network of people of faith and critical consciousness committed to connecting the wisdom of the heart and the life of the mind. Discussion: Nonviolence Principles in the Islamic Tradition, 5 p.m., Multicultural Center, Computer Classroom (005). Presentation applies an Islamic perspective on mercy, justice and beneficence for the purpose of establishing core principles of nonviolence. Discussion: Desegregation and the Black Radical Agenda, 5:30 p.m. Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Discussion explores ways in which people of African descent living in the United States and segregated socially, economically, educationally and politically, critically theorized an agenda for freedom. Feb. 6. Compassion meditation workshop, noon, Multicultural Center, Hardge Forum (101). Workshop, led by Buddhist monk Thupten Tender, an instructor at the Center for Nonviolence and Peace Studies, explores the basis, rationale, common situations and health benefits for practicing compassion. URI Avi Schaefer Jewish/Muslim/Multicultural Shabbat (Sabbath) (fourth annual), 3-7 p.m. Norman M. Fain Hillel Center, Fraternity Circle. Jewish students, Muslim students and students of other faiths, ethnicities and cultural backgrounds are invited to prepare a meal together and share cultural and religious traditions. Free for students, $15 for others. Sign up at hannah_kaplan@my.uri.edu. The Meeting, Ocean State Theatre Company, 1245 Jefferson Blvd., Warwick. 921-6800; oceanstatetheatre.org. Play depicts the imagined meeting of Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Feb. 1, 8, 15 at 2 p.m.; Feb. 5, 7, 14 at 2 and 7:30 p.m.; Feb. 6, 11, 13 at 7:30 p.m., $30; Friday-Saturday 7:30 p.m; Sunday 2 p.m. $34-$49. Exhibit. Black Superheroes: From the Comic Book Universe to the College Campus, University of Rhode Island, Main Gallery, Fine Arts Center, 105 Upper College Rd., Kingston campus. uri.edu/maingallery. Monday-Saturday noon-4 p.m. Black History Month exhibits, University of Rhode Island, Providence Feinstein Campus Gallery, 80 Washington St., Providence. 277-5206; uri.edu/prov/arts, uri.artsandculure@gmail.com. Free. Reception, panel, music and spoken word performance on Feb. 5, 5:30-7 p.m.

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February 1, 2015   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

Jewish American Heritage Month – The White House

The White House Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release April 30, 2014 JEWISH AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH, 2014 – – – – – – – BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION For thousands of years, the Jewish people have sustained their identity and traditions, persevering in the face of persecution. Through generations of enslavement and years of wandering, through forced segregation and the horrors of the Holocaust, they have maintained their holy covenant and lived according to the Torah. Their pursuit of freedom brought multitudes to our shores, and today our country is the proud home to millions of Jewish Americans. This month, let us honor their tremendous contributions — as scientists and artists, as activists and entrepreneurs. And let all of us find inspiration in a story that speaks to the universal human experience, with all of its suffering and all of its salvation. This history led many Jewish Americans to find common cause with the Civil Rights Movement. African Americans and Jewish Americans marched side-by-side in Selma and Montgomery. They boarded buses for Freedom Rides together, united in their support of liberty and human dignity. These causes remain just as urgent today. Jewish communities continue to confront anti-Semitism — both around the world and, as tragic events mere weeks ago in Kansas reminded us, here in the United States. Following in the footsteps of Jewish civil rights leaders, we must come together across all faiths, reject ignorance and intolerance, and root out hatred wherever it exists.

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January 30, 2015   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

James Terzian to Discuss Americans Heraldic Heritage in Talk to Genealogical Society

By Glenn Avolio for the Santa Barbara County Genealogical Society | Published on 01.30.2015 8:52 a.m. The Santa Barbara County Genealogical Society will hold its monthly general meeting from 9:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 21 at First Presbyterian Church, 21 E. Constance St. in Santa Barbara. James Terzian This months featured speaker, James Terzian, will present “Americans Heraldic Heritage:Coats of Arms, Clan Crests, Illustrious Ancestry and Other Secrets We Genealogists Know.” Most of us associate coats of arms with knights and nobility, clans and colonies the stuff of romance from ages of swords and chivalry. So it is. But heraldry is also very American. From the first European voyages of discovery to the present day, heraldry has been actively used by military and civilian branches of government, by social, educational, religious and business organizations, and by families and individuals. It is part of the heritage of most who descend from Europeans, the bequest of ancestors of achievement, social position, political influence or affluence. And though few modern Americans understand heraldry, we see and use it everywhere. In this months presentation, Terzian will explain American and European heraldry in a one-hour lecture and discussion. He will survey how heraldry works;how a person acquires and uses arms;how armorial ensigns on heirlooms, antiques, buildings, monuments and other artifacts can be “read”;and how these graphical representations of identity can be used to solve genealogical challenges and ancestral mysteries. Terzian, is chairman of the Heraldry Foundation, director of the Miles Morgan Origins Project, secretary-treasurer of the Descendants of the Illegitimate Sons and Daughters of the Kings of Britain, and co-author of the currently authoritative treatise on American heraldic law. He has studied and consulted in heraldry and genealogy for over 40 years, and has represented the United States as a delegate to the International Congresses of Genealogical and Heraldic Sciences. He has also been honored by the Queen of the United Kingdom for his nonprofit activities. Terzian is managing director of the Terzian International Group, a 27-year-old Silicon Valley firmthat advises clients on the development, launch and turn-around of technology, education and cultural organizations. This promises to be a fascinating presentation.

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January 30, 2015   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

Events Jan. 30, 2015

Cotuit Library:Jan. 30, Feb. 6: Designing Women fabric crafts group meets, 10 a.m.Feb. 2, 9: Dames & Their Games meets, 1:30 p.m.Feb. 3:Tech Class at Barnstable Senior Center on anti-virus and malware choices, 1:30 p.m.Feb. 7: Talk: “Pilgrim’s Progress” of amateur astronomy, 2 p.m. Feb. 11: Town Councilor Jessica Rapp Grassetti meets with constituents, 3 p.m. All at Cotuit Library, 871 Main St. 508-428-8141; www.cotuitlibrary.org Centerville Library:Feb. 9: Local author Sherianna Boyle speaks on her latest book, “The Four Gifts of Anxiety: Transform Your Life,” 7 p.m. Learn the inner strengths that are hiding behind your stress and anxiety. The library is at 585 Main St. 508-790-6220. Also onFeb. 9: Jack Malcolm offers an Adult CPR/First Aid class,10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Participants receive an American Heart Association card, good for two years. $30, pre-registration required. Call 774-269-1940. OnFeb. 23: It’s Movie Time – a free showing of “South Pacific,” 1 p.m. Brewster book discussion:Feb. 10: Brewster Ladies’ Library, 1822 Main St., will discuss “Bring Up the Bodies” by Hilary Mantel for its February reading selection, 1 p.m. in the library meeting room. Antiques!: The Hyannis Public Library’s 39th Weekend Antiques Show & Sale is schedule forFeb. 14 and 15, this year at the Barnstable Intermediate School, 895 Route 28, Hyannis. Show hours are 10 to 5 on Saturday and 11 to 4 on Sunday. Lunch and snacks are available both days. Adult admission is $6 or $5 with coupon, kids free (with adult). More info? 508-775-2280. At Titcomb’s:Feb. 14: Bestselling author Mary Pat Kelly speaks and signs copies of her latest book, “Of Irish Blood,” 2 to 3 p.m. at Titcomb’s, 432 Route 6A, East Sandwich. 508-888-2331; www.titcombsbookshop.com Winter Reading Series: Sturgis Library hosts a wintertime reading and discussion series, Shaking Two Nickels Together: A Literary Perspective on Impoverishment and Income Inequality, as a guest list of scholars examine the subject in its historical and socioeconomic context. Attend any or all lectures. Texts are available at the library: Next up:Feb. 24:A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens, led by Anne Speyer;March 24: Selected Victorian poetry, led by Paula Krebs;April 28: Bread and Wine by Ignazio Silone, led by James Crowley. RSVP to 508-362-6636; made possible by a grant from Mass Humanities. Help for kids who stutter: Several books and DVDs produced by the nonprofit Stuttering Foundation are available free to public libraries. Among these, a new DVD called Stuttering: For Kids By Kids, stars kids who are struggling with the disability themselves and are out to help others. Three libraries in Barnstable have this DVD on their shelves: Centerville Public Library; Cotuit Library; Hyannis Public Library. Library perks: Hyannis Public Library continues to offer the Mango Languages online language-learning system to all CLAMS card holders in the villages, through a grant from the Kirkman Trust Fund awarded to Barnstable libraries. Valid CLAMS card holders may take advantage of reduced rate admissions to the New England Aquarium in Boston and to Heritage Museums & Gardens in Sandwich. Call the library for information. Hyannis Library is at 401 Main St. 508-775-2280, www.hyannislibrary.org ARTS BARNSTABLE

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January 29, 2015   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

For Cuban Jews, improved ties to U.S. may not resolve central challenges

Adela Dworin has been president of Beth Shalom synagogue since 2006 and serves as the Cuban Jewish communitys government liaison. (Josh Tapper)/JTA On a recent Friday night inside this citys Beth Shalom synagogue, Aliet Ashkenazi, 25, stood draped in a blue-and-white prayer shawl leading prayers in a mix of Spanish and near-perfect Hebrew. It was the first time she had ever led services a feat considering she converted to Judaism seven years ago after discovering her father was Jewish. The 300-seat sanctuary in the Cuban capital was near capacity, but the crowd filling the wooden pews was largely American, comprised of tour groups from New York and New Jersey. The next morning, with the Americans gone, the crowd had thinned. A handful of youths sat in the first few rows, leaving a gray-haired cohort of congregants in the back. This is typically how things go for Cubas 1,500 or so Jews: Hordes of out-of-town guests arrive, bringing with them suitcases full of clothing and coveted medical supplies, and then theyre gone, leaving Cubas diminished Jewish community behind. Amonth since the United States and Cuba announced renewed diplomatic relations after more than five decades of mutual recrimination and mistrust, it remains unclear how rapprochement will change things for Cubas Jewish community, which has shrunk tenfold since the end of the Cuban Revolution in 1959, when there were 15,000 Jews here. If it will be better for Cuba, it will be better for Jews in Cuba as well, said Ida Gutzstat, executive director of the Bnai Brith Maimonides Lodge, a community center attached to the Sephardic synagogue in this citys Vedado neighborhood. Amanda Amato, a 49-year-old secretary, sipping a plastic cup of Cristal beer at one of the lodges biannual parties, said, We have a difficult economic situation now, but its not for all time. Already there has been some easing. Americans including the thousands of Jews who fled Cuba after the revolution now can send remittances of $2,000 every three months to Cubans, four times the previous limit. While Cuban Jews endure the same depressed conditions as other Cubans, surviving on monthly food rations and salaries that rarely exceed $40 per month, the community as a whole is the recipient of largesse most Cubans can only dream of.

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January 27, 2015   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

For Cuba Jews, Better Ties to U.S. May Not Be Cure-All

Even If Island Prospers, Community Still Faces Challenges getty images Published January 25, 2015. Havana (JTA) On a recent Friday night inside this citys Beth Shalom synagogue, Aliet Ashkenazi, 25, stood draped in a blue-and-white prayer shawl leading prayers in a mix of Spanish and near-perfect Hebrew. It was the first time she had ever led services a feat considering she converted to Judaism seven years ago after discovering her father was Jewish. The 300-seat sanctuary in the Cuban capital was near capacity, but the crowd filling the wooden pews was largely American, comprised of tour groups from New York and New Jersey. The next morning, with the Americans gone, the crowd had thinned. A handful of youths sat in the first few rows, leaving a gray-haired cohort of congregants in the back. This is typically how things go for Cubas 1,500 or so Jews: Hordes of out-of-town guests arrive, bringing with them suitcases full of clothing and coveted medical supplies, and then theyre gone, leaving Cubas diminished Jewish community behind. A month since the United States and Cuba announced renewed diplomatic relations after more than five decades of mutual recrimination and mistrust, it remains unclear how rapprochement will change things for Cubas Jewish community, which has shrunk tenfold since the end of the Cuban Revolution in 1959, when there were 15,000 Jews here. If it will be better for Cuba, it will be better for Jews in Cuba as well, said Ida Gutzstat, executive director of the Bnai Brith Maimonides Lodge, a community center attached to the Sephardic synagogue in this citys Vedado neighborhood. Amanda Amato, a 49-year-old secretary, sipping a plastic cup of Cristal beer at one of the lodges biannual parties, said, We have a difficult economic situation now, but its not for all time.

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January 26, 2015   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed

Obama's State of the Union Address and its Bearing on US/Iran Relations

By Kam Zarrabi When it comes to Americas foreign policies, Its too bad that trying to do whats good for America is so often blocked by special interest groups and elected officials who owe their positions, hence their loyalties, to influence peddlers with different agendas. Watching the proceedings of January 21stSenate Foreign Relations Committee hearings on C-SPAN exemplified this tragic state of affairs. It was about the new opening to Cuba, and the progress being made toward a solution to the Iranian nuclear issues currently underway between the P5+1 group headed by the United States and the Iranian delegation. Before getting into what troubled me most watching the proceedings, it would be helpful to highlight a few facts on the ground: Now, let us look at what Americas honest concerns and interests might be in the Middle East, the Arabian Peninsula, and indeed the rest of the so-called Islamic world. One of those concerns cannot possibly be Irans nuclear ambitions. As I mentioned above, even a nuclear-armed Iran does not pose any danger of a potential offensive use of nuclear weapons. Yes, having a nuclear arsenal might work as a deterrent to discourage a nuclear attack upon Iran by Israel, but even that possibility is so remote that devoting the money and energy to develop that deterrent tool would be foolish at best. Israel could be literally wiped out of existence by non-nuclear means should it attempt to attack Iran with its atomic weapons. So, why would Iran even bother? Americas true agenda is finding the most expedient and, at the same time, face-saving way to extricate itself from the current costly and counterproductive entanglements in the Middle East, without creating more breeding areas for terrorist cells that intend to jeopardize Americas legitimate interests. This is where the question pops up as to why the Assad regime in Syria was targeted by the United States in the first place, resulting in the destruction of a nation, hundreds of thousands of casualties, over two million refugees, and a battleground for competing terrorist gangs that led to the formation of the Daesh group. How was the Syrian regime a threat to the United States of America to have been targeted for regime-change? If it was an ally of Iran and a conduit between Iran and the Lebanese Hezbollah and, by extension, the Palestinian Hamas, it might have been a concern for Israel, not the United States; unless, of course, we consider Israels interests worth sacrificing American lives and fortune and the creation of more enemies for America. Lets not kid ourselves that the concern for targeting the Assad regime was a purely humanitarian issue that required encouraging and financing opposition groups to bring down a tyrannical dictator in order to promote freedom and democracy – in spite of what Senators McCain and Graham say. The truth cannot be denied that American attempts to topple the Assad regime was simply to follow Israels demands and, at the same time, to support our compliant ally, the Saudi clan. Now we are facing a horrible blowback. We found out the hard and embarrassing way that Assad was not a pushover as the likes of Senators McCain and Graham think. And thanks to Americas misguided interference, Daesh militants and sympathizers are pouring through the 900 mile border from Syria to Turkey and on to Western Europe and ultimately to North America. The only armies with adequate military skills and equipment that can possibly eradicate the Daesh movement are the Syrian army, the Lebanese Hezbollah, and the Iranian forces. Iran has already been engaged in battling the Daesh terror groups in Iraq, although the media here tries not to mention its accomplishments or even its logistical coordination with the Americans for political reasons. In Yemen, it is the Iran backed Houthis that are gaining more control and fighting both terrorist groups, Al-Qaeda and Daesh. Houthis, and the Yemeni government subsidized by the Saudis and Americans, are in the best position to eradicate both groups which are a threat to Americas regional interests, the Saudi regime, as well as to Iran, especially now that these terrorist camps have found new spawning environment in Afghanistan next door to Iran.

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January 24, 2015   Posted in: Jewish American Heritage Month  Comments Closed


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