Archive for the ‘Jewish Defense League’ Category

Redgrave turns director with documentary at Cannes – Rutland Herald – Rutland Herald

The Academy Award-winning actress Vanessa Redgrave makes her directing debut with Sea Sorrow, a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis. AP PHOTO

LONDON Vanessa Redgrave has spent six decades in front of the camera. Now her own past and current tragedies have encouraged her to get behind it.

The Academy Award-winning actress makes her directing debut with Sea Sorrow, a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at the Cannes Film Festival.

Ive identified all my life with refugees, said 80-yearold Redgrave, who was one of thousands of children evacuated from London during World War II to escape German bombs.

A mix of documentary and drama, Sea Sorrow includes Redgraves experiences alongside interviews with current-day migrants and their supporters, including Alf Dubs, a British politician who fled Nazi-occupied Europe as a child. Also in the mix is a scene from Shakespeares The Tempest a play about shipwrecked souls featuring Ralph Fiennes.

Redgrave says her son and film-producing partner Carlo Nero persuaded her to include autobiographical material.

I got worried, of course, by not wanting the film to be about me, she told The Associated Press in a recent interview at the production office she shares with Nero and a friendly poodle-Pomeranian mix named Zep. Its about the refugees.

But I do think that perhaps hopefully my telling the story, alongside Alf Dubs and the refugees, that some people will realize the thing we were all taught and which the government, (Winston) Churchills government, reminded people: It could happen to you.

Its a lesson many people in Europe and North America have forgotten as direct memories of war have faded. These days the news often carries stories of people making dangerous journeys by sea and land to flee war or seek a more prosperous life. Redgrave says such reports can be powerful, but often turn the migrants into a stream of images, not real people.

Once upon a time they were at university. Once upon a time she was a doctor, he was a teacher. Theyre real people, said Redgrave, who has been a UNICEF ambassador since 1990.

I think everybody, including myself, are in danger of losing our humanity, she added. We have to (do) what psychiatrists or psychologists call work on it.

Redgrave says she learned a huge amount about filmmaking in her first foray as director, but isnt sure she will do it again.

I just directed to tell this story, she said. Im not a filmmaker as such.

She shows no sign of retiring from acting, with projects lined up including a role in the Christoph Waltz-directed thriller Georgetown.

Redgrave is part of a British acting dynasty that includes her father, Michael Redgrave, her late siblings Lynne and Corin Redgrave and her daughters Natasha Richardson, who died in a ski accident in 2009, and Joely Richardson. Nero, her son, is a director and producer.

A six-time Oscar nominee, Redgrave won the supporting actress trophy in 1978 for playing an anti-Nazi activist in Julia, at a ceremony picketed by the Jewish Defense League because of Redgraves support for a Palestinian state. Her acceptance speech condemning Zionist hoodlums to a mix of boos and applause remains one of the most dramatic moments in Oscars history.

For years, Redgrave supported small left-wing groups such as the Workers Revolutionary Party and the Peace and Progress Party, and her political intensity hasnt faded. She is furious about Brexit, withering about Prime Minister Theresa Mays government and glum at the thought of a likely Conservative victory in Britains June 8 election.

You might think shed consider celebrity-obsessed Cannes a bit silly. But she is delighted to be returning to the festival, where she won a best-actress trophy in 1966 for Morgan A Suitable Case for Treatment. She won a second time in 1969 for Isadora.

Im thrilled to bits, she said. Still cant quite believe its true.

In spite of the lure of Venice and Toronto and other great (festivals), it remains the special one.

Redgrave has vivid memories of past visits to the French Riviera festival, including a 1967 trip with Michelangelo Antonionis Blow-Up. Photos of her on the beach in a striped mini-dress alongside the director and Italian actress Monica Vitti are the epitome of 1960s glamour.

I was considered to be a star then, she said.

She also recalled the camaraderie of walking up the festivals famous red-carpeted steps with Emma Thompson and her other co-stars from Howards End in 1992.

I remember very well Emma showing me her dress, and what did I think, Redgrave said. I thought it was very lovely, actually. I cant remember what I wore, but I remember what she wore.

Its going to be nice again, but whats really special is that our film having been accepted and welcomed by Cannes means that windows will open for the refugees all over the world, and especially in Europe.

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Redgrave turns director with documentary at Cannes – Rutland Herald – Rutland Herald

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May 28, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Islamophobe Needs Writing Gig – Dissident Voice

Jonathan Kays resignation from the Walrus for his role in promoting a prize for a writer who engages in cultural appropriation is a relief for the magazine. But, Canadas leading liberal magazine cant say they didnt know Kay was intolerant when they hired him to be editor-in-chief two years ago. Kay has repeatedly smeared Arabs and Muslims in the service of Israeli expansionism.

After protests against Benjamin Netanyahus planned speech at Concordia in 2002 Kay let loose about an Arabist rabble well-steeped in the specious propaganda of the Arab world that made the Montral university the centre of militant Arabism. Writing in the National Post, Kay added, it is only among the schools Arabs many of whom like [activist Laith] Marouf, are immigrants from Arab nations where free speech is non-existent and anti-Semitic filth is widespread that it is considered acceptable to shut your opponent up by force. (In fact, hundreds of white and other non-Arab leftists were part of the protests that led to the cancellation of Netanyahus speech.)

Kay supported George W. Bushs invasion of Iraq. In a 2002 column bemoaning the regions medieval hatreds he wrote that Israel can be trusted with nukes. But Iraq and its Muslim neighbours cannot.

During its 2006 war on Lebanon Kay claimed the media focused on Israeli killing because the world had become inured to watching Arab terrorists kill innocent Jews for two generations. He added a macho twist to his Israel apologetics. Hezbollah may wage war while hiding behind womens skirts and baby rattles, Kay wrote, but Israel stubbornly adheres to a more humane creed. Over 1,000 Lebanese, including 300 children under 13, were killed during the 34-day war while 165 Israelis, including 44 civilians, perished.

In a 2007 column Kay bemoaned how if you connect the dots between Canadas radicalized mosques and the terror threat you get accused of Islamophobia and two years later applauded Jason Kenney for smacking down the Canadian Arab Federation. The National Post editorial page editor wrote that CAFs support for the Palestinian cause made them a radicalized embarrassment to Canadian Arabs. (Imagine a columnist calling the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs a radicalized embarrassment to Canadian Jews for cheerleading Israels slaughter in Gaza.) In his column Kay claimed, that in an interview with his papers editorial board a year earlier, CAF representatives laid blame for virtually every problem the world faces on Israelincluding the alienation of Arab-Canadian children in Canadas public school system. Cue the image of a crazed CAF representative ranting about how Israel is directing Toronto school officials to diagnose Arab children with ADHD. I wasnt there but count me skeptical.

After Israel killed 1,400 Palestinians in Gaza in late 20082009 Kay wrote about the difference between Israel and the terror-worshiping cultures that besiege it. He described the Arabs sick spectacle, which he contrasted to Israel as a civilized culture that values human life. For Kay criticism of Israel killing 300 children simply reflected longstanding anti-Jewish prejudice. From the opening days of the Gazan campaign, wrote Kay, the blood-libels of massacre and genocide have flown thick and fast.

In 2010 Kay published a wildly Islamophobic screed, diseminated by the Jewish Defense League, titled Jonathan Kay on Muslim anti-Semitism: A hate reaching back 1,400 years. In it he wrote: The rhetoric and barbarism hurled against Israeli Jews after the Zionist project began were not new but simply the old, more diffuse rhetoric and barbarism being redirected, as by a lens, toward a particular pinprick on a map. . the continued vibrancy and economic success of Jewish civilization so close to Islams very heartland is precisely what has fed Muslim rage and jealousy for 14 centuries. Kay added that violence is encouraged and fetishized in such a lurid manner and [is] why so few Middle Eastern Muslims regard them [suicide terrorism and missile volleys] as a disgraceful or even regrettable part of their culture.

In a 2014 piece titled Ezra Levants trial echoes a time when Canadas radical Muslim activists were taken seriously he defended the Islamophobes slanderous attacks against Khurrum Awan. Found guilty of libeling Awan, Levant was ordered to pay him $80,000.

Claiming Gaza is home to more than a million Palestinians seething with anti-Semitic hatred, Kay repeatedly justified Israels 2014 attacks, which left 2,200 mostly civilians dead (6 Israeli civilians were killed). According to Kay, hundreds of Palestinian children died as unwilling martyrs to Hamas barbaric human-shield military strategy in which Hamas fighters hide behind skirts and baby strollers. For Kay the battle was waged between a nation seeking to live in peace and a terrorist group whose whole stated reason for existence is the extermination of the Jewish state and its inhabitants.

Kays appointment to head a purportedly liberal magazine says a great deal about the Canadian media landscape and broader political culture. Alongside his Walrus gig, Kay is regularly invited to address liberal Zionist organizations. In 2015 he spoke at an event organized by the progressive New Israel Fund and at a York Golda Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies panel titled Trudeau Good for the Jews? Last year Holy Blossom Temple in Toronto held a Kay vs. Kay debate, widely publicized by the Canadian Jewish News, on whether liberal Jews are trapped by their own ideology. Jonathan argued the progressive position and was countered by his hilariously right-wing mother, Barbara Kay, whose National Post column is largely devoted to stories of women oppressing men and the glory of Israel.

Jonathan Kay would probably deny any kinship with the Canadian Coalition of Concerned Citizens, Rise Canada, Soldiers of Odin and other openly Islamophobic/white supremacist groups. But, his Jewish/Western-supremacist outlook has led him to repeatedly denigrate Arabs and Muslims, which has contributed to the milieu that has seen the rise of these groups.

Why did the Walrus hire this guy?

Yves Engler is the author of A Propaganda System: How Canadas Government, Corporations, Media and Academia Sell War and Canada in Africa: 300 years of aid and exploitation. Read other articles by Yves.

This article was posted on Monday, May 15th, 2017 at 12:29am and is filed under Canada, Israel/Palestine, Lebanon, Media, Prejudice.

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Islamophobe Needs Writing Gig – Dissident Voice

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May 15, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Jewish Defense League Teams Up With Anti-Muslim Street Gang – Forward

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The militant Jewish Defense League is standing proudly with Canadian branch of Soldiers of Odin, an anti-immigrant patrol group with roots in Europe whose ranks include white nationalists.

The Anti-Defamation League says that Soldiers of Odin contains many open white supremacists, as well as other right-wing extremists.

But Meir Weinstein, the head of the Canadian branch of the JDL disputes this. He says the groups goals are aligned with those of the JDL and claims they have disowned the more racist elements within their parent organization in Finland.

They disowned racism and theyre against radical Islam, Weinstein told the Canadian Jewish News.

The Canadian Soldiers of Odin group is primarily focused on Muslim immigration. In a lengthy video on their Facebook page, one spokesman decried Muslims coming into Canada.

Theyre following the code of the Muslim Brotherhood to a tee, he said. Theyre infiltrating through refugees.

Bernie Farber, former chief executive officer of the Canadian Jewish Congress, called the JDLs alliance a shanda, Yiddish for disgrace.

Email Sam Kestenbaum at kestenbaum@forward.com and follow him on Twitter at @skestenbaum

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Jewish Defense League Teams Up With Anti-Muslim Street Gang – Forward

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May 13, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Ex-Member Of Jewish Terror Group Accuses Muslim Activist Of Terrorism – Carbonated.tv (blog)

New York State Assemblyman Dov Hikind, who labeled activist Linda Sarsour as an anti-Semite, was a high-ranking member of a right-wing terror organization.

Palestinian-American activist Linda Sarsour became a lightning rod for slanderous attacks and character assassination after the City University of New Yorks School of Public Health invited her to speak at its graduation ceremony.

There was nothing wrong with the invitation, seeing as the CUNY, just like other schools, regularly selects renowned activists and public figures to attend such events and Sarsour, who was the co-chair of the historic Womens March earlier this year, definitely fit the bill.

However, the controversy revolving around her selection began after New York State Assemblyman Dov Hikind wrote a contemptuous op-ed for the New York Daily News, where he not only called on the university to withdraw its invitation but also labeled Sarsour as an anti-Semite and an apologist for terrorism.

Freedom of speech, some say. I applaud freedom of speech. But giving this type of platform the honor of a commencement address, which every graduating student must attend to someone whos an apologist for terrorism is a far cry from freedom of speech, he wrote. Its incitement.

Hikinds derisive claims were based on a tweet that showed a little boy walking towards heavily armed riot police officers, with stones clutched in his tiny hands. Sarsour shared the image on Oct. 11, 2015, after Israeli forces reportedly killed 199 Palestinians in shootings and clashes.

Apart from the fact that Hikind, who represents Brooklyn in state assembly, maligned Sarsour on the basis of a single tweet, its just incredible that he had the audacity to call the activist, or anyone for that matter, an anti-Semite when he was once part of a right-wing terrorist organization himself.

As The Huffington Post revealed, Hikind was a high-ranking member of the Jewish Defense League in the early 1970s.

The Jewish Defense League (JDL) is a radical organization that preaches a violent form of anti-Arab, Jewish nationalism, stated the Southern Poverty Law Center. The group has orchestrated countless terrorist attacks in the U.S. and abroad, and has engaged in intense harassment of foreign diplomats, Muslims, Jewish scholars and community leaders, and officials.

JDL, founded in 1968 by the late Rabbi Meir Kahane, has been linked to several violent protests and break-ins, brutal assaults on Arabs, an alleged plot to hijack an Arab airliner, harassment campaigns and a number of bomb explosions among other things.

Kahane routinely referred to Arabs as dogs, demanded an ethnic cleansing of Arabs from Israel and the occupied territories, denounced any Jews who had sexual relations with an Arab, once attempted to lynch two Arab passersby and was charged for making a fire bomb.

Even Hikind himself was accused of tossing a smoke bomb into the Ugandan mission at the United Nations in New York back in 1976 a claim he did not deny. In fact, the list of alleged crimes the assemblyman has been accused of include calling for the assassination of pro-Palestinian Arab-Americans and plotting to bomb Arab targets across the U.S.

He was also believed to be a close friend of a man convicted of carrying out 20 bombings in New York and Washington, D.C, according to the New York Times.

Over 43 years ago, I was very proud to be part of the Jewish Defense League, Hikind told The Huffington Post. Looking back on my JDL days, Im proud of what we accomplished.

When asked about Kahane, Hikind had this to say:

When Rabbi Kahane decided to emigrate to Israel, I was no longer involved with his work. I remained in Brooklyn and had work of my own. Some people have suggested that I was Rabbi Kahanes right-hand man. If so, then I resent having not even been mentioned in his bestseller, ‘The Story of the Jewish Defense League.’ The truth is I continued to watch and admire Rabbi Kahane from afar. Did I agree with him on everything? Alas, I dont even agree with my own wife Shani on everything. Almost everything.

Kahane was assassinated in 1990 in New York.

Unfortunately, it doesnt seem as if Hikinds extremist and stereotypical views have evolved with time.

Case in point: Referring to Dr. Barat Ellman and Ellen Lippman, two rabbis who published an op-ed titled Linda Sarsour is a friend to Jews and called out Hikind for provoking a vicious smear campaign, the Democratic assembly member said:

How would Rabbi Kahane respond today hearing that two women rabbis attempted to kosher someone as transparently dangerous and anti-Semitic as Linda Sarsour? I warned you!

In 2013, Hikind also made headlines after he showed up to a Purim party with blackface and an Afro wig.

It was not meant to hurt anyone. And to those who were? Im sorry, he said later during a press conference. I understand peoples sensitivities, even though, like,hey, come on Purim. You know what Purim is? Its not a big deal. Nobody meant anything.

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Ex-Member Of Jewish Terror Group Accuses Muslim Activist Of Terrorism – Carbonated.tv (blog)

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May 13, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Jewish Defense League Allies with Alt-Right – Tikun Olam …

To some of you this may seem obvious. But to the rest of us, who still retain a sense of outrage, this still shocks. Obviously, the American Alt-Right is in triumphalist mode with its man in the White House. White supremacists are in hog heaven. You can almost picture Richard Spencer giving a sieg heil in the Oval Office (though that hasnt happenedyet).

But until now, there hasnt been a strong effort by the Alt-Right to link arms with its Jewish equivalent: the JDL and Israeli Hilltop Youth types. As I said, until now. Just as social media brings you the best of the new and innovative; it brings you the dregs of the dregs, the lowest of humanity. So I hereby bring you a new Facebook group uniting white supremacy with Jewish supremacy.

Doncha just love these rules?

No antisemitism, antiwhite* or antioriental sentiments allow. All other bigotry welcome.

Alas, the poor Irish have been expelled from the white race (somehow). But Italians are permitted on a case by case basis. Presumably, if youre a Northern League member youre OK. If youre an Italian Communist, youre scum.

As an aside, JDL Canada has been engaged in such initiatives. In Toronto, it makes common cause with the Sons of Odin, a white supremacist group with roots in the European neo-Nazi world. The two groups commonly protest against Canadian Muslims.

Underlying all this is the assumption that Jews are white. Ive always been uncomfortable by slotting Jews into the Caucasian demographic category. I dont feel white or think white. Id like to think that Jewish is a different category. Perhaps not Middle Eastern. But somewhere in between.

Whats oddest of all about this ideological miscegenation is that it turns hundreds of years of white supremacism and anti-Semitism on its head. Since well before the days of the Torquemadas auto da-fe, the Czars Protocols of the Elders of Zion and Hitlers Nuremberg Laws, Jews have been the bete noire of the fascist ruling class. What changed? How did we all of a sudden become a friend of these monsters? It makes me very uncomfortable. Id far rather David Duke hate me than love me.

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Jewish Defense League Allies with Alt-Right – Tikun Olam …

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This Politician Keeps Saying Linda Sarsour Supports Terror. But He … – HuffPost

NEW YORK Dozens of activists, including some city lawmakers, gathered Monday outside City Hall in Manhattan to show support for Linda Sarsour, the Muslim activist and Palestinian-American best known as an organizer of the massive Womens March on Washington.

The activists said Sarsour is the victim of a slanderous and Islamophobic smear campaign that started late last month, when the New York Daily News publisheda vicious op-edby Democratic New York state assemblyman Dov Hikind.

Hikind, who called on the City University of New York to rescind its invitation for Sarsour to deliver the commencement speech at its School of Public Health, argued that Sarsour is anti-Semitic, as well as an apologist for terror who has no lack of affection for dead Jews.

Sarsours supporters, many of whom are Jewish, refuted these claims in the strongest terms, accusing Hikind of conflating Sarsours criticism of Israel with anti-Semitism. They pointed to her interfaith work in the Jewish community and her long history of condemning terrorism.

Watch city council member Brad Lander, who is Jewish, defend Sarsour at Mondays rally:

Hikinds piece marked the beginning of a full-throated crusade against Sarsour, which was soon joined by members of Congress, conservative pundits and anti-Muslim hate sites. This has precipitated an online harassment campaign directed at Sarsour, who showed HuffPost multiple death threats she has received in recent weeks.

Meanwhile, Hikind is promoting a video in which he points to evidence he says proves Sarsour is a terror sympathizer. And on May 1, he tweeted: Social justice activist or terrorist advocate? @lsarsour has some questions to answer.

But if theres anyone who has questions to answer regarding terrorism, its Hikind.

The powerful,taxpayer-paid elected official who has represented Brooklyns Borough Park and its large Orthodox population in the state assembly since 1982 spent years as a leader of an actual terror group.

Starting in the early 1970s, Hikind was a high-ranking member of the Jewish Defense League, a group described in a 2001 FBI report as a right-wing terrorist group and a violent extremist Jewish organization.

The JDL has beenresponsible for a slew of bombings, shootings, assaults, break-ins, threats and acts of vandalism since its founding in 1968, including when Hikind was a member.

Because there has been little public accounting of Hikinds role in the organization, HuffPost sent the assemblyman a detailed list of questions this week about his relationship to the JDL. In response, Hikind gave HuffPost an exclusive statement a full copy of which can be read at the bottom of this article in which he states that he couldnt recall with greater fondness his time with the group.

Over 43 years ago, I was very proud to be part of the Jewish Defense League, Hikind wrote.

New York Daily News via Getty Images

Although Hikind claims his role in the JDL was non-violent, his statement did not address specific HuffPost questions regarding whether he once called for the assassination of pro-Palestinian Arab-Americans; whether he was a close friend of a man convicted of carrying out 20 bombings in New York and Washington, D.C.; or regarding why the FBI suspected him in plotting six bombings of Arab targets across the U.S.

He did not answer a question regarding whether he had knowledge of, or involvement in, other JDL plots that involved violence or were otherwise illegal. He also did not deny that in 1976 he tossed a smoke bomb into the Ugandan mission at the United Nations in New York, saying in his statement that he did a few pranks at the Ugandan mission, for which I was never charged.

JDLs founder, Rabbi Meir Kahane, consistently preached a radical form of Jewish nationalism which reflected racism, violence and political extremism, according to the Anti-Defamation League, a prominent Jewish organization that fights anti-Semitism.

Kahane publicly called Arabs dogs and was once part of a crowd in Israel that chantedKill the Arabs! and attempted to lynch two Arab passersby. He called for the ethnic cleansing of Arabs from Israel and the occupied territories and was convicted in the U.S. for making a bomb. He also formed the Kach political party in Israel, which was later deemed a violent terrorist organization by both Israel and the U.S.

Hikind speaks admiringly of Kahane in his statement. He said he was no longer involved with Kahane when the rabbi moved to Israel in the early 1970s, but noted that the truth is I continued to watch and admire Rabbi Kahane from afar.

Did I agree with him on everything? Hikind said. Alas, I dont even agree with my own wife Shani on everything. Almost everything.

Four days after the Daily News published Hikinds op-ed, the paper published another by Dr. Barat Ellman and Ellen Lippman, two rabbis whodefended Sarsour against all of the assemblymans allegations. They wrote that Hikinds sloppy attempt to demonize her reeks of anti-Muslim bias.

Hikind addressed the two rabbis toward the end of his statement to HuffPost, appearing to take umbrage thattwo women rabbis challenged him.

How would Rabbi Kahane respond today hearing that two women rabbis attempted to kosher someone as transparently dangerous and anti-Semitic as Linda Sarsour? I warned you! he wrote.

You can read Hikinds full statement to HuffPost below.

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Confessions of a Non-Violent Jewish Activist

by Dov Hikind

My recent objections to terrorist propagandist Linda Sarsour and her glorification of radical Islamic fanatics has caused some of her supporters to respond with the knee-jerked cry of, Kill the messenger! One can only hope their plea is figurative. Regardless, theyve called into question, and asked reporters to delve into, my own personal history. The Huffington Post has asked me for a statement regarding a time of my life that, to be quite frank, I couldnt recall with greater fondness.

Over 43 years ago, I was very proud to be part of the Jewish Defense League. Founded by Rabbi Meir Kahane of Brooklyn, the JDLs early exploits received a fair amount of attention. After all, the notion of Jews standing up for themselves was still rather novel to some who preferred when Jews didnt. I came late to the organization but was gratified to work on behalf of Soviet Jewry, Syrian Jewry, fighting anti-Semitism and helping the Jewish poor. These were the days of the Civil Rights movement and people everywhere were awakening to the necessity of getting involved.

During those years I was arrested on numerous occasions at the Soviet mission for chaining myself to their fence. We were bringing attention to urgent matters and demanding change through non-violent protest.

When Rabbi Kahane decided to emigrate to Israel, I was no longer involved with his work. I remained in Brooklyn and had work of my own. Some people have suggested that I was Rabbi Kahanes right-hand man. If so, then I resent having not even been mentioned in his best seller,The Story of the Jewish Defense League.

The truth is I continued to watch and admire Rabbi Kahane from afar. Did I agree with him on everything? Alas, I dont even agree with my own wife Shani on everything.Almosteverything.

Looking back on my JDL days, Im proud of what we accomplished. Countless Russians Jews are no longer trapped behind the Iron Curtain. Natan Sharansky, the celebrated refusenik who became a prominent leader in Israel, notes how vital our civil rights protests were on behalf of trapped and mistreated Russian Jews.

Another time attention was vital was when Ugandan leader Idi Amin had Israelis kidnapped and held hostage. Israel was successful in rescuing everyone except Dora Bloch, a 78-year-old grandmother who had been hospitalized. When Dora went missing, we needed to bring attention to her plight even if it meant bedeviling the people at the Ugandan mission with a few pranks for which I was never charged. The story grows in the re-telling (especially by my detractors), but when I recall how Dora was finally found after being burnt to death, one can hardly blame me for trying to free her.

After Rabbi Kahane was assassinated, murdered by one of the terrorists who would attempt to blow up the World Trade Center, I was invited to speak at his funeral. It was a very sad day. Everyone who knew Rabbi Kahane recognized that he was one of the most dedicated individuals when it came to standing up for his people. He was certainly the one man most responsible for helping to free Soviet Jews.

How would Rabbi Kahane respond today hearing that two women rabbis attempted to kosher someone as transparently dangerous and anti-Semitic as Linda Sarsour?

I warned you!

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This Politician Keeps Saying Linda Sarsour Supports Terror. But He … – HuffPost

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Vanessa Redgrave turns director with documentary at Cannes – New Jersey Herald

Posted: May. 10, 2017 8:00 am

LONDON (AP) Vanessa Redgrave has spent six decades in front of the camera. Now her own past and current tragedies have encouraged her to get behind it.

The Academy Award-winning actress makes her directing debut with “Sea Sorrow,” a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at this month’s Cannes Film Festival .

“I’ve identified all my life with refugees,” said 80-year-old Redgrave, who was one of thousands of children evacuated from London during World War II to escape German bombs.

A mix of documentary and drama, “Sea Sorrow” includes Redgrave’s experiences alongside interviews with current-day migrants and their supporters, including Alf Dubs, a British politician who fled Nazi-occupied Europe as a child. Also in the mix is a scene from Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” a play about shipwrecked souls featuring Ralph Fiennes.

Redgrave says her son and film-producing partner Carlo Nero persuaded her to include autobiographical material.

“I got worried, of course, by not wanting the film to be about me,” she told The Associated Press in a recent interview at the production office she shares with Nero and a friendly poodle-Pomeranian mix named Zep. “It’s about the refugees.

“But I do think that perhaps hopefully my telling the story alongside Alf Dubs and the refugees that some people will realize the thing we were all taught and which the government, (Winston) Churchill’s government, reminded people: It could happen to you.”

It’s a lesson many people in Europe and North America have forgotten as direct memories of war have faded. These days the news often carries stories of people making dangerous journeys by sea and land to flee war or seek a more prosperous life. Redgrave says such reports can be powerful, but often turn the migrants “into a stream of images, not real people.”

“Once upon a time they were at university. Once upon a time she was a doctor, he was a teacher. They’re real people,” said Redgrave, who has been a UNICEF ambassador since 1990.

“I think everybody, including myself, are in danger of losing our humanity,” she added. “We have to (do) what psychiatrists or psychologists call ‘work on it.'”

Redgrave says she learned a huge amount about filmmaking in her first foray as director, but isn’t sure she will do it again.

“I just directed to tell this story,” she said. “I’m not a filmmaker as such.”

She shows no sign of retiring from acting, with projects lined up including a role in Christoph Waltz-directed thriller “Georgetown.”

Redgrave is part of a British acting dynasty that includes her father Michael Redgrave, her late siblings Lynne and Corin Redgrave and her daughters Natasha Richardson, who died in a ski accident in 2009, and Joely Richardson. Nero, her son, is a director and producer.

A six-time Oscar nominee, Redgrave won the supporting actress trophy in 1978 for playing an anti-Nazi activist in “Julia,” at a ceremony picketed by the Jewish Defense League because of Redgrave’s support for a Palestinian state. Her acceptance speech condemning “Zionist hoodlums” to a mix of boos and applause remains one of the most dramatic moments in Oscars history.

For years, Redgrave supported small left-wing groups such as the Workers Revolutionary Party and the Peace and Progress Party, and her political intensity hasn’t faded. She is furious about Brexit, withering about Prime Minister Theresa May’s government and glum at the thought of a likely Conservative victory in Britain’s June 8 election.

You might think she’d consider celebrity-obsessed Cannes a bit silly. But she is delighted to be returning to the festival, where she won a best-actress trophy in 1966 for “Morgan – A Suitable Case for Treatment.” She won a second time in 1969 for “Isadora.”

“I’m thrilled to bits,” she said. “Still can’t quite believe it’s true.

“In spite of the lure of Venice and Toronto and other great (festivals), it remains the special one.”

Redgrave has vivid memories of past visits to the French Riviera festival, including a 1967 trip with Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Blow-Up.” Photos of her on the beach in a striped mini-dress alongside the director and Italian actress Monica Vitti are the epitome of 1960s glamour.

“I was considered to be a star then,” she said.

She also recalled the camaraderie of walking up the festival’s famous red-carpeted steps with Emma Thompson and her other co-stars from “Howards End” in 1992.

“I remember very well Emma showing me her dress, and what did I think,” Redgrave said. “I thought it was very lovely, actually. I can’t remember what I wore, but I remember what she wore.

“It’s going to be nice again, but what’s really special is that our film having been accepted and welcomed by Cannes means that windows will open for the refugees all over the world, and especially in Europe.”

___

Follow Jill Lawless on Twitter at http://Twitter.com/JillLawless

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Vanessa Redgrave turns director with documentary at Cannes – New Jersey Herald

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May 12, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Vanessa Redgrave turns director with documentary at Cannes – Daily Astorian

Vanessa Redgrave makes her directing debut with “Sea Sorrow,” a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at this month’s Cannes Film Festival

The Associated Press

FILE – In this Wednesday, May 3, 2017 file photo actress Vanessa Redgrave poses for a portrait photograph after being interviewed by Associated Press in London. The Academy Award-winning actress makes her directing debut with “Sea Sorrow,” a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at this month’s Cannes Film Festival. (Photo by Grant Pollard/Invision/AP, File)

The Associated Press

FILE – In this Wednesday, May 3, 2017 file photo actress Vanessa Redgrave poses for a portrait photograph after being interviewed by Associated Press in London. The Academy Award-winning actress makes her directing debut with “Sea Sorrow,” a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at this month’s Cannes Film Festival. (Photo by Grant Pollard/Invision/AP, File)

LONDON (AP) Vanessa Redgrave has spent six decades in front of the camera. Now her own past and current tragedies have encouraged her to get behind it.

The Academy Award-winning actress makes her directing debut with “Sea Sorrow,” a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at this month’s Cannes Film Festival .

“I’ve identified all my life with refugees,” said 80-year-old Redgrave, who was one of thousands of children evacuated from London during World War II to escape German bombs.

A mix of documentary and drama, “Sea Sorrow” includes Redgrave’s experiences alongside interviews with current-day migrants and their supporters, including Alf Dubs, a British politician who fled Nazi-occupied Europe as a child. Also in the mix is a scene from Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” a play about shipwrecked souls featuring Ralph Fiennes.

Redgrave says her son and film-producing partner Carlo Nero persuaded her to include autobiographical material.

“I got worried, of course, by not wanting the film to be about me,” she told The Associated Press in a recent interview at the production office she shares with Nero and a friendly poodle-Pomeranian mix named Zep. “It’s about the refugees.

“But I do think that perhaps hopefully my telling the story alongside Alf Dubs and the refugees that some people will realize the thing we were all taught and which the government, (Winston) Churchill’s government, reminded people: It could happen to you.”

It’s a lesson many people in Europe and North America have forgotten as direct memories of war have faded. These days the news often carries stories of people making dangerous journeys by sea and land to flee war or seek a more prosperous life. Redgrave says such reports can be powerful, but often turn the migrants “into a stream of images, not real people.”

“Once upon a time they were at university. Once upon a time she was a doctor, he was a teacher. They’re real people,” said Redgrave, who has been a UNICEF ambassador since 1990.

“I think everybody, including myself, are in danger of losing our humanity,” she added. “We have to (do) what psychiatrists or psychologists call ‘work on it.'”

Redgrave says she learned a huge amount about filmmaking in her first foray as director, but isn’t sure she will do it again.

“I just directed to tell this story,” she said. “I’m not a filmmaker as such.”

She shows no sign of retiring from acting, with projects lined up including a role in Christoph Waltz-directed thriller “Georgetown.”

Redgrave is part of a British acting dynasty that includes her father Michael Redgrave, her late siblings Lynne and Corin Redgrave and her daughters Natasha Richardson, who died in a ski accident in 2009, and Joely Richardson. Nero, her son, is a director and producer.

A six-time Oscar nominee, Redgrave won the supporting actress trophy in 1978 for playing an anti-Nazi activist in “Julia,” at a ceremony picketed by the Jewish Defense League because of Redgrave’s support for a Palestinian state. Her acceptance speech condemning “Zionist hoodlums” to a mix of boos and applause remains one of the most dramatic moments in Oscars history.

For years, Redgrave supported small left-wing groups such as the Workers Revolutionary Party and the Peace and Progress Party, and her political intensity hasn’t faded. She is furious about Brexit, withering about Prime Minister Theresa May’s government and glum at the thought of a likely Conservative victory in Britain’s June 8 election.

You might think she’d consider celebrity-obsessed Cannes a bit silly. But she is delighted to be returning to the festival, where she won a best-actress trophy in 1966 for “Morgan – A Suitable Case for Treatment.” She won a second time in 1969 for “Isadora.”

“I’m thrilled to bits,” she said. “Still can’t quite believe it’s true.

“In spite of the lure of Venice and Toronto and other great (festivals), it remains the special one.”

Redgrave has vivid memories of past visits to the French Riviera festival, including a 1967 trip with Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Blow-Up.” Photos of her on the beach in a striped mini-dress alongside the director and Italian actress Monica Vitti are the epitome of 1960s glamour.

“I was considered to be a star then,” she said.

She also recalled the camaraderie of walking up the festival’s famous red-carpeted steps with Emma Thompson and her other co-stars from “Howards End” in 1992.

“I remember very well Emma showing me her dress, and what did I think,” Redgrave said. “I thought it was very lovely, actually. I can’t remember what I wore, but I remember what she wore.

“It’s going to be nice again, but what’s really special is that our film having been accepted and welcomed by Cannes means that windows will open for the refugees all over the world, and especially in Europe.”

___

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Vanessa Redgrave turns director with documentary at Cannes – Daily Astorian

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May 10, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

How the Six-Day War changed American Jews – Cleveland Jewish News

NEW YORK On the morning of June 5, 1967, as Arab armies and Israel clashed following weeks of tension, Rabbi Irving Yitz Greenberg sat anxious amid his congregants at daily prayers fearful that the Jewish people would face extinction for the second time in 25 years.

One of the people said, Theyre going to wipe out Israel. Whats going to be? recalled Greenberg, then the spiritual leader of a synagogue in the Riverdale section of the Bronx.

I said, Theyre not going to wipe out Israel, and if they do, theres going to be a sign up: The shul is closed. Faith could not go on with an unmitigated catastrophe of that size happening again.

The fear felt by Greenberg pervaded the air in American Jewish communities that week. Two decades after the world learned the full extent of the Holocaust, Americans looked on from afar as Egypt and Syria threatened the young Jewish state.

Jonathan Sarna, then 12, remembers watching on TV as Israelis dug mass graves to prepare for potential slaughter. A teenage Yossi Klein Halevi remembers the broadcasts of mass rallies in Cairo calling for Israels death.

But many American Jews, haunted by their failure to act during the Holocaust, didnt just passively watch events unfold they decided to mobilize. They raised tens of millions of dollars. They held rallies. They lobbied President Lyndon Johnson.

Within days, however, the fear turned to relief. The relief turned to pride when Israel won the war in six days, tripling its territory and taking control of Judaisms holiest sites.

The Six-Day War, as it quickly became known, intensified American Jews love for Israel and imbued them with a new confidence to advocate for their interests at home and abroad. And the terror that consumed the community in the run-up to the war led to an increased emphasis on Holocaust remembrance.

The shift from terror to power experienced by the Jewish community in June 1967 set up Holocaust memory and support of Israel as the twin poles of American Jewish identity. At the same time, however, it sparked debates on territory, history, identity and occupation issues that continue to consume American Jews 50 years later.

There was an emotional trajectory that united Jewish people in a way I dont think weve ever seen since the revelation at Mount Sinai 3,500 years ago, said Klein Halevi, author of Like Dreamers, a chronicle of Israels Six-Day War generation. Growing up in Brooklyn, he recalled moving from existential dread to relief when we realized that Israel had taken the offensive.

American Jews poured their money into supporting the embattled state creating a precedent (and expectations) for Jewish philanthropy for decades to come, historians say. In the New York City area alone, the United Jewish Appeal raised more than $20 million during the week of the war, nearly $150 million in todays dollars.

Greenberg recalls a congregant taking out a second mortgage to donate $20,000 to Israel. In the New York suburb of Scarsdale, seven high school students raised $10,000 from their neighborhood on the wars second day.

The unbelievable amounts of money that were collected before and during the war, nobody had ever seen anything like it, said Sarna, a professor of Jewish history at Brandeis University. American Jews didnt want people to say we did nothing. There wasnt much they could do, but they knew they could give of their wealth.

Jews also took to the streets to support Israel. On June 8, the third day of the war, 50,000 Jews rallied outside the White House, already demanding that Israel be allowed to keep its battlefield gains. The day after the war, 20,000 Jews filled this citys Madison Square Garden to cheer the victory.

While Jews had protested en masse before, the war showed Jewish leaders how powerful demonstrations could be, said Jack Wertheimer, a Jewish history professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary. The victory also gave American Jews an increased assertiveness to advocate for their own interests. Israels victory energized the movement to free Soviet Jewry, which would go on to organize large rallies in Washington, D.C., and protests at Soviet consulates, missions and cultural events across the country.

Israel has been very good for American Jewish leaders, Wertheimer said. The emergence of Israel as a player on the international stage made it possible for American Jewish organizations to ratchet up their presence.

American Jews also became far more comfortable displaying their love for Israel, and Americans in general supported Israel in the war. Cold War calculations led the U.S.-Israel alliance to grow stronger, while among Jews, expressions of Israeli culture increased in America. The war led more American synagogues to adopt Israeli pronunciations of Hebrew, Wertheimer said, and to use Israeli melodies for prayers. Klein Halevi remembers his doctor decorating his waiting room with an enormous photo of Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Dayan.

It really intensified a sense of Israel being central, Sarna said. American Jews love moments when their Americanness and their Jewishness reinforce one another. Theres this sense that the Six-Day War is a victory for America and for the Jewish people.

Jews also began traveling more to Israel, which experienced a period of euphoria following the war. Immigration to the Jewish state rose steadily in the late 1960s and early 70s, and American Jews would later have a disproportionate presence in the settlement movement. While American Jews make up about 5 percent of Israelis overall, they comprise 15 percent of West Bank settlers, according to Oxford professor Sara Yael Hirschhorn, author of the recent book City on a Hilltop, about American Jews in the settlement movement.

There was just this spontaneous need on the part of Jews and the world to physically connect to Israel because of this feeling that we almost lost Israel, said Klein Halevi, who has written about channeling his own Jewish fears and pride into the militant Jewish Defense League a youthful flirtation with extremism he eventually left behind. An Israeli since 1982, he recalled the post-war euphoria spoken about in Israel, where there was this feeling that Jewish history is over, and we won.Certainly the wars were over. The Arabs would never be foolish enough to attack us again.

Even amid the celebration, cracks of discord began to appear. Jewish leaders bristled at criticism from liberal Americans who had allied with Jews on domestic policy fights like civil rights. Criticism of Israels military gains from some African-American leaders further weakened a once strong black-Jewish alliance that had begun fraying half a year earlier, when the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee expelled its white members.

In the liberal camp, theres a hostility directed at Israel following the war, Wertheimer said. American Jews looked upon these individuals as their allies, as their colleagues in some of the great battles. They could not begin to understand why, when it came to this matter, these allies turned on Israel.

Half a century after the victory, organized American Jewry wrestles with its legacy. Fundraisers and activists lament that there isnt the same kind of unifying cause around which Jews can rally. Committed activists are split among a right wing that feels God delivered into Jewish hands a land that can never again be divided, and a left wing that sees the warand the decisions made in its aftermath as the start of what has become Israels most intractable problem: control of millions of Arabs living on lands seized during the victory.

Five decades later, says Hirschhorn, the joy felt in 1967 has faded for many American Jews born long after the war. They dont remember the Six-Day War as a massacre averted or a near miraculous victory of David over Goliath. ForJews with memories of 1967, Hirschhorn said, feeling strong was an exhilarating experience.Now American Jews are still grappling withthe meaning of Jewish power.

The pride they felt in that moment has changed for our generation, who look at it in a different way and have seen the outcome of the war, said Hirschhorn, who was born well after the war. Now the question of our generation is, how do you manage Jewish power responsibly, whether thats in the State of Israel or outside of it?

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How the Six-Day War changed American Jews – Cleveland Jewish News

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May 9, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Redgrave turns director with documentary at Cannes – Rutland Herald – Rutland Herald

The Academy Award-winning actress Vanessa Redgrave makes her directing debut with Sea Sorrow, a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis. AP PHOTO LONDON Vanessa Redgrave has spent six decades in front of the camera. Now her own past and current tragedies have encouraged her to get behind it. The Academy Award-winning actress makes her directing debut with Sea Sorrow, a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. Ive identified all my life with refugees, said 80-yearold Redgrave, who was one of thousands of children evacuated from London during World War II to escape German bombs. A mix of documentary and drama, Sea Sorrow includes Redgraves experiences alongside interviews with current-day migrants and their supporters, including Alf Dubs, a British politician who fled Nazi-occupied Europe as a child. Also in the mix is a scene from Shakespeares The Tempest a play about shipwrecked souls featuring Ralph Fiennes. Redgrave says her son and film-producing partner Carlo Nero persuaded her to include autobiographical material. I got worried, of course, by not wanting the film to be about me, she told The Associated Press in a recent interview at the production office she shares with Nero and a friendly poodle-Pomeranian mix named Zep. Its about the refugees. But I do think that perhaps hopefully my telling the story, alongside Alf Dubs and the refugees, that some people will realize the thing we were all taught and which the government, (Winston) Churchills government, reminded people: It could happen to you. Its a lesson many people in Europe and North America have forgotten as direct memories of war have faded. These days the news often carries stories of people making dangerous journeys by sea and land to flee war or seek a more prosperous life. Redgrave says such reports can be powerful, but often turn the migrants into a stream of images, not real people. Once upon a time they were at university. Once upon a time she was a doctor, he was a teacher. Theyre real people, said Redgrave, who has been a UNICEF ambassador since 1990. I think everybody, including myself, are in danger of losing our humanity, she added. We have to (do) what psychiatrists or psychologists call work on it. Redgrave says she learned a huge amount about filmmaking in her first foray as director, but isnt sure she will do it again. I just directed to tell this story, she said. Im not a filmmaker as such. She shows no sign of retiring from acting, with projects lined up including a role in the Christoph Waltz-directed thriller Georgetown. Redgrave is part of a British acting dynasty that includes her father, Michael Redgrave, her late siblings Lynne and Corin Redgrave and her daughters Natasha Richardson, who died in a ski accident in 2009, and Joely Richardson. Nero, her son, is a director and producer. A six-time Oscar nominee, Redgrave won the supporting actress trophy in 1978 for playing an anti-Nazi activist in Julia, at a ceremony picketed by the Jewish Defense League because of Redgraves support for a Palestinian state. Her acceptance speech condemning Zionist hoodlums to a mix of boos and applause remains one of the most dramatic moments in Oscars history. For years, Redgrave supported small left-wing groups such as the Workers Revolutionary Party and the Peace and Progress Party, and her political intensity hasnt faded. She is furious about Brexit, withering about Prime Minister Theresa Mays government and glum at the thought of a likely Conservative victory in Britains June 8 election. You might think shed consider celebrity-obsessed Cannes a bit silly. But she is delighted to be returning to the festival, where she won a best-actress trophy in 1966 for Morgan A Suitable Case for Treatment. She won a second time in 1969 for Isadora. Im thrilled to bits, she said. Still cant quite believe its true. In spite of the lure of Venice and Toronto and other great (festivals), it remains the special one. Redgrave has vivid memories of past visits to the French Riviera festival, including a 1967 trip with Michelangelo Antonionis Blow-Up. Photos of her on the beach in a striped mini-dress alongside the director and Italian actress Monica Vitti are the epitome of 1960s glamour. I was considered to be a star then, she said. She also recalled the camaraderie of walking up the festivals famous red-carpeted steps with Emma Thompson and her other co-stars from Howards End in 1992. I remember very well Emma showing me her dress, and what did I think, Redgrave said. I thought it was very lovely, actually. I cant remember what I wore, but I remember what she wore. Its going to be nice again, but whats really special is that our film having been accepted and welcomed by Cannes means that windows will open for the refugees all over the world, and especially in Europe.

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May 28, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Islamophobe Needs Writing Gig – Dissident Voice

Jonathan Kays resignation from the Walrus for his role in promoting a prize for a writer who engages in cultural appropriation is a relief for the magazine. But, Canadas leading liberal magazine cant say they didnt know Kay was intolerant when they hired him to be editor-in-chief two years ago. Kay has repeatedly smeared Arabs and Muslims in the service of Israeli expansionism. After protests against Benjamin Netanyahus planned speech at Concordia in 2002 Kay let loose about an Arabist rabble well-steeped in the specious propaganda of the Arab world that made the Montral university the centre of militant Arabism. Writing in the National Post, Kay added, it is only among the schools Arabs many of whom like [activist Laith] Marouf, are immigrants from Arab nations where free speech is non-existent and anti-Semitic filth is widespread that it is considered acceptable to shut your opponent up by force. (In fact, hundreds of white and other non-Arab leftists were part of the protests that led to the cancellation of Netanyahus speech.) Kay supported George W. Bushs invasion of Iraq. In a 2002 column bemoaning the regions medieval hatreds he wrote that Israel can be trusted with nukes. But Iraq and its Muslim neighbours cannot. During its 2006 war on Lebanon Kay claimed the media focused on Israeli killing because the world had become inured to watching Arab terrorists kill innocent Jews for two generations. He added a macho twist to his Israel apologetics. Hezbollah may wage war while hiding behind womens skirts and baby rattles, Kay wrote, but Israel stubbornly adheres to a more humane creed. Over 1,000 Lebanese, including 300 children under 13, were killed during the 34-day war while 165 Israelis, including 44 civilians, perished. In a 2007 column Kay bemoaned how if you connect the dots between Canadas radicalized mosques and the terror threat you get accused of Islamophobia and two years later applauded Jason Kenney for smacking down the Canadian Arab Federation. The National Post editorial page editor wrote that CAFs support for the Palestinian cause made them a radicalized embarrassment to Canadian Arabs. (Imagine a columnist calling the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs a radicalized embarrassment to Canadian Jews for cheerleading Israels slaughter in Gaza.) In his column Kay claimed, that in an interview with his papers editorial board a year earlier, CAF representatives laid blame for virtually every problem the world faces on Israelincluding the alienation of Arab-Canadian children in Canadas public school system. Cue the image of a crazed CAF representative ranting about how Israel is directing Toronto school officials to diagnose Arab children with ADHD. I wasnt there but count me skeptical. After Israel killed 1,400 Palestinians in Gaza in late 20082009 Kay wrote about the difference between Israel and the terror-worshiping cultures that besiege it. He described the Arabs sick spectacle, which he contrasted to Israel as a civilized culture that values human life. For Kay criticism of Israel killing 300 children simply reflected longstanding anti-Jewish prejudice. From the opening days of the Gazan campaign, wrote Kay, the blood-libels of massacre and genocide have flown thick and fast. In 2010 Kay published a wildly Islamophobic screed, diseminated by the Jewish Defense League, titled Jonathan Kay on Muslim anti-Semitism: A hate reaching back 1,400 years. In it he wrote: The rhetoric and barbarism hurled against Israeli Jews after the Zionist project began were not new but simply the old, more diffuse rhetoric and barbarism being redirected, as by a lens, toward a particular pinprick on a map. . the continued vibrancy and economic success of Jewish civilization so close to Islams very heartland is precisely what has fed Muslim rage and jealousy for 14 centuries. Kay added that violence is encouraged and fetishized in such a lurid manner and [is] why so few Middle Eastern Muslims regard them [suicide terrorism and missile volleys] as a disgraceful or even regrettable part of their culture. In a 2014 piece titled Ezra Levants trial echoes a time when Canadas radical Muslim activists were taken seriously he defended the Islamophobes slanderous attacks against Khurrum Awan. Found guilty of libeling Awan, Levant was ordered to pay him $80,000. Claiming Gaza is home to more than a million Palestinians seething with anti-Semitic hatred, Kay repeatedly justified Israels 2014 attacks, which left 2,200 mostly civilians dead (6 Israeli civilians were killed). According to Kay, hundreds of Palestinian children died as unwilling martyrs to Hamas barbaric human-shield military strategy in which Hamas fighters hide behind skirts and baby strollers. For Kay the battle was waged between a nation seeking to live in peace and a terrorist group whose whole stated reason for existence is the extermination of the Jewish state and its inhabitants. Kays appointment to head a purportedly liberal magazine says a great deal about the Canadian media landscape and broader political culture. Alongside his Walrus gig, Kay is regularly invited to address liberal Zionist organizations. In 2015 he spoke at an event organized by the progressive New Israel Fund and at a York Golda Koschitzky Centre for Jewish Studies panel titled Trudeau Good for the Jews? Last year Holy Blossom Temple in Toronto held a Kay vs. Kay debate, widely publicized by the Canadian Jewish News, on whether liberal Jews are trapped by their own ideology. Jonathan argued the progressive position and was countered by his hilariously right-wing mother, Barbara Kay, whose National Post column is largely devoted to stories of women oppressing men and the glory of Israel. Jonathan Kay would probably deny any kinship with the Canadian Coalition of Concerned Citizens, Rise Canada, Soldiers of Odin and other openly Islamophobic/white supremacist groups. But, his Jewish/Western-supremacist outlook has led him to repeatedly denigrate Arabs and Muslims, which has contributed to the milieu that has seen the rise of these groups. Why did the Walrus hire this guy? Yves Engler is the author of A Propaganda System: How Canadas Government, Corporations, Media and Academia Sell War and Canada in Africa: 300 years of aid and exploitation. Read other articles by Yves. This article was posted on Monday, May 15th, 2017 at 12:29am and is filed under Canada, Israel/Palestine, Lebanon, Media, Prejudice.

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May 15, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Jewish Defense League Teams Up With Anti-Muslim Street Gang – Forward

Facebook The militant Jewish Defense League is standing proudly with Canadian branch of Soldiers of Odin, an anti-immigrant patrol group with roots in Europe whose ranks include white nationalists. The Anti-Defamation League says that Soldiers of Odin contains many open white supremacists, as well as other right-wing extremists. But Meir Weinstein, the head of the Canadian branch of the JDL disputes this. He says the groups goals are aligned with those of the JDL and claims they have disowned the more racist elements within their parent organization in Finland. They disowned racism and theyre against radical Islam, Weinstein told the Canadian Jewish News. The Canadian Soldiers of Odin group is primarily focused on Muslim immigration. In a lengthy video on their Facebook page, one spokesman decried Muslims coming into Canada. Theyre following the code of the Muslim Brotherhood to a tee, he said. Theyre infiltrating through refugees. Bernie Farber, former chief executive officer of the Canadian Jewish Congress, called the JDLs alliance a shanda, Yiddish for disgrace. Email Sam Kestenbaum at kestenbaum@forward.com and follow him on Twitter at @skestenbaum

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May 13, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Ex-Member Of Jewish Terror Group Accuses Muslim Activist Of Terrorism – Carbonated.tv (blog)

New York State Assemblyman Dov Hikind, who labeled activist Linda Sarsour as an anti-Semite, was a high-ranking member of a right-wing terror organization. Palestinian-American activist Linda Sarsour became a lightning rod for slanderous attacks and character assassination after the City University of New Yorks School of Public Health invited her to speak at its graduation ceremony. There was nothing wrong with the invitation, seeing as the CUNY, just like other schools, regularly selects renowned activists and public figures to attend such events and Sarsour, who was the co-chair of the historic Womens March earlier this year, definitely fit the bill. However, the controversy revolving around her selection began after New York State Assemblyman Dov Hikind wrote a contemptuous op-ed for the New York Daily News, where he not only called on the university to withdraw its invitation but also labeled Sarsour as an anti-Semite and an apologist for terrorism. Freedom of speech, some say. I applaud freedom of speech. But giving this type of platform the honor of a commencement address, which every graduating student must attend to someone whos an apologist for terrorism is a far cry from freedom of speech, he wrote. Its incitement. Hikinds derisive claims were based on a tweet that showed a little boy walking towards heavily armed riot police officers, with stones clutched in his tiny hands. Sarsour shared the image on Oct. 11, 2015, after Israeli forces reportedly killed 199 Palestinians in shootings and clashes. Apart from the fact that Hikind, who represents Brooklyn in state assembly, maligned Sarsour on the basis of a single tweet, its just incredible that he had the audacity to call the activist, or anyone for that matter, an anti-Semite when he was once part of a right-wing terrorist organization himself. As The Huffington Post revealed, Hikind was a high-ranking member of the Jewish Defense League in the early 1970s. The Jewish Defense League (JDL) is a radical organization that preaches a violent form of anti-Arab, Jewish nationalism, stated the Southern Poverty Law Center. The group has orchestrated countless terrorist attacks in the U.S. and abroad, and has engaged in intense harassment of foreign diplomats, Muslims, Jewish scholars and community leaders, and officials. JDL, founded in 1968 by the late Rabbi Meir Kahane, has been linked to several violent protests and break-ins, brutal assaults on Arabs, an alleged plot to hijack an Arab airliner, harassment campaigns and a number of bomb explosions among other things. Kahane routinely referred to Arabs as dogs, demanded an ethnic cleansing of Arabs from Israel and the occupied territories, denounced any Jews who had sexual relations with an Arab, once attempted to lynch two Arab passersby and was charged for making a fire bomb. Even Hikind himself was accused of tossing a smoke bomb into the Ugandan mission at the United Nations in New York back in 1976 a claim he did not deny. In fact, the list of alleged crimes the assemblyman has been accused of include calling for the assassination of pro-Palestinian Arab-Americans and plotting to bomb Arab targets across the U.S. He was also believed to be a close friend of a man convicted of carrying out 20 bombings in New York and Washington, D.C, according to the New York Times. Over 43 years ago, I was very proud to be part of the Jewish Defense League, Hikind told The Huffington Post. Looking back on my JDL days, Im proud of what we accomplished. When asked about Kahane, Hikind had this to say: When Rabbi Kahane decided to emigrate to Israel, I was no longer involved with his work. I remained in Brooklyn and had work of my own. Some people have suggested that I was Rabbi Kahanes right-hand man. If so, then I resent having not even been mentioned in his bestseller, ‘The Story of the Jewish Defense League.’ The truth is I continued to watch and admire Rabbi Kahane from afar. Did I agree with him on everything? Alas, I dont even agree with my own wife Shani on everything. Almost everything. Kahane was assassinated in 1990 in New York. Unfortunately, it doesnt seem as if Hikinds extremist and stereotypical views have evolved with time. Case in point: Referring to Dr. Barat Ellman and Ellen Lippman, two rabbis who published an op-ed titled Linda Sarsour is a friend to Jews and called out Hikind for provoking a vicious smear campaign, the Democratic assembly member said: How would Rabbi Kahane respond today hearing that two women rabbis attempted to kosher someone as transparently dangerous and anti-Semitic as Linda Sarsour? I warned you! In 2013, Hikind also made headlines after he showed up to a Purim party with blackface and an Afro wig. It was not meant to hurt anyone. And to those who were? Im sorry, he said later during a press conference. I understand peoples sensitivities, even though, like,hey, come on Purim. You know what Purim is? Its not a big deal. Nobody meant anything.

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Jewish Defense League Allies with Alt-Right – Tikun Olam …

To some of you this may seem obvious. But to the rest of us, who still retain a sense of outrage, this still shocks. Obviously, the American Alt-Right is in triumphalist mode with its man in the White House. White supremacists are in hog heaven. You can almost picture Richard Spencer giving a sieg heil in the Oval Office (though that hasnt happenedyet). But until now, there hasnt been a strong effort by the Alt-Right to link arms with its Jewish equivalent: the JDL and Israeli Hilltop Youth types. As I said, until now. Just as social media brings you the best of the new and innovative; it brings you the dregs of the dregs, the lowest of humanity. So I hereby bring you a new Facebook group uniting white supremacy with Jewish supremacy. Doncha just love these rules? No antisemitism, antiwhite* or antioriental sentiments allow. All other bigotry welcome. Alas, the poor Irish have been expelled from the white race (somehow). But Italians are permitted on a case by case basis. Presumably, if youre a Northern League member youre OK. If youre an Italian Communist, youre scum. As an aside, JDL Canada has been engaged in such initiatives. In Toronto, it makes common cause with the Sons of Odin, a white supremacist group with roots in the European neo-Nazi world. The two groups commonly protest against Canadian Muslims. Underlying all this is the assumption that Jews are white. Ive always been uncomfortable by slotting Jews into the Caucasian demographic category. I dont feel white or think white. Id like to think that Jewish is a different category. Perhaps not Middle Eastern. But somewhere in between. Whats oddest of all about this ideological miscegenation is that it turns hundreds of years of white supremacism and anti-Semitism on its head. Since well before the days of the Torquemadas auto da-fe, the Czars Protocols of the Elders of Zion and Hitlers Nuremberg Laws, Jews have been the bete noire of the fascist ruling class. What changed? How did we all of a sudden become a friend of these monsters? It makes me very uncomfortable. Id far rather David Duke hate me than love me.

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This Politician Keeps Saying Linda Sarsour Supports Terror. But He … – HuffPost

NEW YORK Dozens of activists, including some city lawmakers, gathered Monday outside City Hall in Manhattan to show support for Linda Sarsour, the Muslim activist and Palestinian-American best known as an organizer of the massive Womens March on Washington. The activists said Sarsour is the victim of a slanderous and Islamophobic smear campaign that started late last month, when the New York Daily News publisheda vicious op-edby Democratic New York state assemblyman Dov Hikind. Hikind, who called on the City University of New York to rescind its invitation for Sarsour to deliver the commencement speech at its School of Public Health, argued that Sarsour is anti-Semitic, as well as an apologist for terror who has no lack of affection for dead Jews. Sarsours supporters, many of whom are Jewish, refuted these claims in the strongest terms, accusing Hikind of conflating Sarsours criticism of Israel with anti-Semitism. They pointed to her interfaith work in the Jewish community and her long history of condemning terrorism. Watch city council member Brad Lander, who is Jewish, defend Sarsour at Mondays rally: Hikinds piece marked the beginning of a full-throated crusade against Sarsour, which was soon joined by members of Congress, conservative pundits and anti-Muslim hate sites. This has precipitated an online harassment campaign directed at Sarsour, who showed HuffPost multiple death threats she has received in recent weeks. Meanwhile, Hikind is promoting a video in which he points to evidence he says proves Sarsour is a terror sympathizer. And on May 1, he tweeted: Social justice activist or terrorist advocate? @lsarsour has some questions to answer. But if theres anyone who has questions to answer regarding terrorism, its Hikind. The powerful,taxpayer-paid elected official who has represented Brooklyns Borough Park and its large Orthodox population in the state assembly since 1982 spent years as a leader of an actual terror group. Starting in the early 1970s, Hikind was a high-ranking member of the Jewish Defense League, a group described in a 2001 FBI report as a right-wing terrorist group and a violent extremist Jewish organization. The JDL has beenresponsible for a slew of bombings, shootings, assaults, break-ins, threats and acts of vandalism since its founding in 1968, including when Hikind was a member. Because there has been little public accounting of Hikinds role in the organization, HuffPost sent the assemblyman a detailed list of questions this week about his relationship to the JDL. In response, Hikind gave HuffPost an exclusive statement a full copy of which can be read at the bottom of this article in which he states that he couldnt recall with greater fondness his time with the group. Over 43 years ago, I was very proud to be part of the Jewish Defense League, Hikind wrote. New York Daily News via Getty Images Although Hikind claims his role in the JDL was non-violent, his statement did not address specific HuffPost questions regarding whether he once called for the assassination of pro-Palestinian Arab-Americans; whether he was a close friend of a man convicted of carrying out 20 bombings in New York and Washington, D.C.; or regarding why the FBI suspected him in plotting six bombings of Arab targets across the U.S. He did not answer a question regarding whether he had knowledge of, or involvement in, other JDL plots that involved violence or were otherwise illegal. He also did not deny that in 1976 he tossed a smoke bomb into the Ugandan mission at the United Nations in New York, saying in his statement that he did a few pranks at the Ugandan mission, for which I was never charged. JDLs founder, Rabbi Meir Kahane, consistently preached a radical form of Jewish nationalism which reflected racism, violence and political extremism, according to the Anti-Defamation League, a prominent Jewish organization that fights anti-Semitism. Kahane publicly called Arabs dogs and was once part of a crowd in Israel that chantedKill the Arabs! and attempted to lynch two Arab passersby. He called for the ethnic cleansing of Arabs from Israel and the occupied territories and was convicted in the U.S. for making a bomb. He also formed the Kach political party in Israel, which was later deemed a violent terrorist organization by both Israel and the U.S. Hikind speaks admiringly of Kahane in his statement. He said he was no longer involved with Kahane when the rabbi moved to Israel in the early 1970s, but noted that the truth is I continued to watch and admire Rabbi Kahane from afar. Did I agree with him on everything? Hikind said. Alas, I dont even agree with my own wife Shani on everything. Almost everything. Four days after the Daily News published Hikinds op-ed, the paper published another by Dr. Barat Ellman and Ellen Lippman, two rabbis whodefended Sarsour against all of the assemblymans allegations. They wrote that Hikinds sloppy attempt to demonize her reeks of anti-Muslim bias. Hikind addressed the two rabbis toward the end of his statement to HuffPost, appearing to take umbrage thattwo women rabbis challenged him. How would Rabbi Kahane respond today hearing that two women rabbis attempted to kosher someone as transparently dangerous and anti-Semitic as Linda Sarsour? I warned you! he wrote. You can read Hikinds full statement to HuffPost below. Facebook Confessions of a Non-Violent Jewish Activist by Dov Hikind My recent objections to terrorist propagandist Linda Sarsour and her glorification of radical Islamic fanatics has caused some of her supporters to respond with the knee-jerked cry of, Kill the messenger! One can only hope their plea is figurative. Regardless, theyve called into question, and asked reporters to delve into, my own personal history. The Huffington Post has asked me for a statement regarding a time of my life that, to be quite frank, I couldnt recall with greater fondness. Over 43 years ago, I was very proud to be part of the Jewish Defense League. Founded by Rabbi Meir Kahane of Brooklyn, the JDLs early exploits received a fair amount of attention. After all, the notion of Jews standing up for themselves was still rather novel to some who preferred when Jews didnt. I came late to the organization but was gratified to work on behalf of Soviet Jewry, Syrian Jewry, fighting anti-Semitism and helping the Jewish poor. These were the days of the Civil Rights movement and people everywhere were awakening to the necessity of getting involved. During those years I was arrested on numerous occasions at the Soviet mission for chaining myself to their fence. We were bringing attention to urgent matters and demanding change through non-violent protest. When Rabbi Kahane decided to emigrate to Israel, I was no longer involved with his work. I remained in Brooklyn and had work of my own. Some people have suggested that I was Rabbi Kahanes right-hand man. If so, then I resent having not even been mentioned in his best seller,The Story of the Jewish Defense League. The truth is I continued to watch and admire Rabbi Kahane from afar. Did I agree with him on everything? Alas, I dont even agree with my own wife Shani on everything.Almosteverything. Looking back on my JDL days, Im proud of what we accomplished. Countless Russians Jews are no longer trapped behind the Iron Curtain. Natan Sharansky, the celebrated refusenik who became a prominent leader in Israel, notes how vital our civil rights protests were on behalf of trapped and mistreated Russian Jews. Another time attention was vital was when Ugandan leader Idi Amin had Israelis kidnapped and held hostage. Israel was successful in rescuing everyone except Dora Bloch, a 78-year-old grandmother who had been hospitalized. When Dora went missing, we needed to bring attention to her plight even if it meant bedeviling the people at the Ugandan mission with a few pranks for which I was never charged. The story grows in the re-telling (especially by my detractors), but when I recall how Dora was finally found after being burnt to death, one can hardly blame me for trying to free her. After Rabbi Kahane was assassinated, murdered by one of the terrorists who would attempt to blow up the World Trade Center, I was invited to speak at his funeral. It was a very sad day. Everyone who knew Rabbi Kahane recognized that he was one of the most dedicated individuals when it came to standing up for his people. He was certainly the one man most responsible for helping to free Soviet Jews. How would Rabbi Kahane respond today hearing that two women rabbis attempted to kosher someone as transparently dangerous and anti-Semitic as Linda Sarsour? I warned you! America does not do a good job of tracking incidents of hate and bias. We need your help to create a database of such incidents across the country, so we all know whats going on. Tell us your story. Sign up for the HuffPost Must Reads newsletter. Each Sunday, we will bring you the best original reporting, long form writing and breaking news from The Huffington Post and around the web, plus behind-the-scenes looks at how its all made. Click here to sign up!

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May 12, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Vanessa Redgrave turns director with documentary at Cannes – New Jersey Herald

Posted: May. 10, 2017 8:00 am LONDON (AP) Vanessa Redgrave has spent six decades in front of the camera. Now her own past and current tragedies have encouraged her to get behind it. The Academy Award-winning actress makes her directing debut with “Sea Sorrow,” a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at this month’s Cannes Film Festival . “I’ve identified all my life with refugees,” said 80-year-old Redgrave, who was one of thousands of children evacuated from London during World War II to escape German bombs. A mix of documentary and drama, “Sea Sorrow” includes Redgrave’s experiences alongside interviews with current-day migrants and their supporters, including Alf Dubs, a British politician who fled Nazi-occupied Europe as a child. Also in the mix is a scene from Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” a play about shipwrecked souls featuring Ralph Fiennes. Redgrave says her son and film-producing partner Carlo Nero persuaded her to include autobiographical material. “I got worried, of course, by not wanting the film to be about me,” she told The Associated Press in a recent interview at the production office she shares with Nero and a friendly poodle-Pomeranian mix named Zep. “It’s about the refugees. “But I do think that perhaps hopefully my telling the story alongside Alf Dubs and the refugees that some people will realize the thing we were all taught and which the government, (Winston) Churchill’s government, reminded people: It could happen to you.” It’s a lesson many people in Europe and North America have forgotten as direct memories of war have faded. These days the news often carries stories of people making dangerous journeys by sea and land to flee war or seek a more prosperous life. Redgrave says such reports can be powerful, but often turn the migrants “into a stream of images, not real people.” “Once upon a time they were at university. Once upon a time she was a doctor, he was a teacher. They’re real people,” said Redgrave, who has been a UNICEF ambassador since 1990. “I think everybody, including myself, are in danger of losing our humanity,” she added. “We have to (do) what psychiatrists or psychologists call ‘work on it.'” Redgrave says she learned a huge amount about filmmaking in her first foray as director, but isn’t sure she will do it again. “I just directed to tell this story,” she said. “I’m not a filmmaker as such.” She shows no sign of retiring from acting, with projects lined up including a role in Christoph Waltz-directed thriller “Georgetown.” Redgrave is part of a British acting dynasty that includes her father Michael Redgrave, her late siblings Lynne and Corin Redgrave and her daughters Natasha Richardson, who died in a ski accident in 2009, and Joely Richardson. Nero, her son, is a director and producer. A six-time Oscar nominee, Redgrave won the supporting actress trophy in 1978 for playing an anti-Nazi activist in “Julia,” at a ceremony picketed by the Jewish Defense League because of Redgrave’s support for a Palestinian state. Her acceptance speech condemning “Zionist hoodlums” to a mix of boos and applause remains one of the most dramatic moments in Oscars history. For years, Redgrave supported small left-wing groups such as the Workers Revolutionary Party and the Peace and Progress Party, and her political intensity hasn’t faded. She is furious about Brexit, withering about Prime Minister Theresa May’s government and glum at the thought of a likely Conservative victory in Britain’s June 8 election. You might think she’d consider celebrity-obsessed Cannes a bit silly. But she is delighted to be returning to the festival, where she won a best-actress trophy in 1966 for “Morgan – A Suitable Case for Treatment.” She won a second time in 1969 for “Isadora.” “I’m thrilled to bits,” she said. “Still can’t quite believe it’s true. “In spite of the lure of Venice and Toronto and other great (festivals), it remains the special one.” Redgrave has vivid memories of past visits to the French Riviera festival, including a 1967 trip with Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Blow-Up.” Photos of her on the beach in a striped mini-dress alongside the director and Italian actress Monica Vitti are the epitome of 1960s glamour. “I was considered to be a star then,” she said. She also recalled the camaraderie of walking up the festival’s famous red-carpeted steps with Emma Thompson and her other co-stars from “Howards End” in 1992. “I remember very well Emma showing me her dress, and what did I think,” Redgrave said. “I thought it was very lovely, actually. I can’t remember what I wore, but I remember what she wore. “It’s going to be nice again, but what’s really special is that our film having been accepted and welcomed by Cannes means that windows will open for the refugees all over the world, and especially in Europe.” ___ Follow Jill Lawless on Twitter at http://Twitter.com/JillLawless

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May 12, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

Vanessa Redgrave turns director with documentary at Cannes – Daily Astorian

Vanessa Redgrave makes her directing debut with “Sea Sorrow,” a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at this month’s Cannes Film Festival The Associated Press FILE – In this Wednesday, May 3, 2017 file photo actress Vanessa Redgrave poses for a portrait photograph after being interviewed by Associated Press in London. The Academy Award-winning actress makes her directing debut with “Sea Sorrow,” a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at this month’s Cannes Film Festival. (Photo by Grant Pollard/Invision/AP, File) The Associated Press FILE – In this Wednesday, May 3, 2017 file photo actress Vanessa Redgrave poses for a portrait photograph after being interviewed by Associated Press in London. The Academy Award-winning actress makes her directing debut with “Sea Sorrow,” a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at this month’s Cannes Film Festival. (Photo by Grant Pollard/Invision/AP, File) LONDON (AP) Vanessa Redgrave has spent six decades in front of the camera. Now her own past and current tragedies have encouraged her to get behind it. The Academy Award-winning actress makes her directing debut with “Sea Sorrow,” a highly personal documentary about the migrant crisis that is set to premiere at this month’s Cannes Film Festival . “I’ve identified all my life with refugees,” said 80-year-old Redgrave, who was one of thousands of children evacuated from London during World War II to escape German bombs. A mix of documentary and drama, “Sea Sorrow” includes Redgrave’s experiences alongside interviews with current-day migrants and their supporters, including Alf Dubs, a British politician who fled Nazi-occupied Europe as a child. Also in the mix is a scene from Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” a play about shipwrecked souls featuring Ralph Fiennes. Redgrave says her son and film-producing partner Carlo Nero persuaded her to include autobiographical material. “I got worried, of course, by not wanting the film to be about me,” she told The Associated Press in a recent interview at the production office she shares with Nero and a friendly poodle-Pomeranian mix named Zep. “It’s about the refugees. “But I do think that perhaps hopefully my telling the story alongside Alf Dubs and the refugees that some people will realize the thing we were all taught and which the government, (Winston) Churchill’s government, reminded people: It could happen to you.” It’s a lesson many people in Europe and North America have forgotten as direct memories of war have faded. These days the news often carries stories of people making dangerous journeys by sea and land to flee war or seek a more prosperous life. Redgrave says such reports can be powerful, but often turn the migrants “into a stream of images, not real people.” “Once upon a time they were at university. Once upon a time she was a doctor, he was a teacher. They’re real people,” said Redgrave, who has been a UNICEF ambassador since 1990. “I think everybody, including myself, are in danger of losing our humanity,” she added. “We have to (do) what psychiatrists or psychologists call ‘work on it.'” Redgrave says she learned a huge amount about filmmaking in her first foray as director, but isn’t sure she will do it again. “I just directed to tell this story,” she said. “I’m not a filmmaker as such.” She shows no sign of retiring from acting, with projects lined up including a role in Christoph Waltz-directed thriller “Georgetown.” Redgrave is part of a British acting dynasty that includes her father Michael Redgrave, her late siblings Lynne and Corin Redgrave and her daughters Natasha Richardson, who died in a ski accident in 2009, and Joely Richardson. Nero, her son, is a director and producer. A six-time Oscar nominee, Redgrave won the supporting actress trophy in 1978 for playing an anti-Nazi activist in “Julia,” at a ceremony picketed by the Jewish Defense League because of Redgrave’s support for a Palestinian state. Her acceptance speech condemning “Zionist hoodlums” to a mix of boos and applause remains one of the most dramatic moments in Oscars history. For years, Redgrave supported small left-wing groups such as the Workers Revolutionary Party and the Peace and Progress Party, and her political intensity hasn’t faded. She is furious about Brexit, withering about Prime Minister Theresa May’s government and glum at the thought of a likely Conservative victory in Britain’s June 8 election. You might think she’d consider celebrity-obsessed Cannes a bit silly. But she is delighted to be returning to the festival, where she won a best-actress trophy in 1966 for “Morgan – A Suitable Case for Treatment.” She won a second time in 1969 for “Isadora.” “I’m thrilled to bits,” she said. “Still can’t quite believe it’s true. “In spite of the lure of Venice and Toronto and other great (festivals), it remains the special one.” Redgrave has vivid memories of past visits to the French Riviera festival, including a 1967 trip with Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Blow-Up.” Photos of her on the beach in a striped mini-dress alongside the director and Italian actress Monica Vitti are the epitome of 1960s glamour. “I was considered to be a star then,” she said. She also recalled the camaraderie of walking up the festival’s famous red-carpeted steps with Emma Thompson and her other co-stars from “Howards End” in 1992. “I remember very well Emma showing me her dress, and what did I think,” Redgrave said. “I thought it was very lovely, actually. I can’t remember what I wore, but I remember what she wore. “It’s going to be nice again, but what’s really special is that our film having been accepted and welcomed by Cannes means that windows will open for the refugees all over the world, and especially in Europe.” ___ Follow Jill Lawless on Twitter at http://Twitter.com/JillLawless Stay on topic – This helps keep the thread focused on the discussion at hand. If you would like to discuss another topic, look for a relevant article. Share with Us – We’d love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article, and smart, constructive criticism. Be Civil – It’s OK to have a difference in opinion but there’s no need to be a jerk. We reserve the right to delete any comments that we feel are spammy, off-topic, or reckless to the community. Be proactive – Use the ‘Flag as Inappropriate’ link at the upper right corner of each comment to let us know of abusive posts.

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May 10, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed

How the Six-Day War changed American Jews – Cleveland Jewish News

NEW YORK On the morning of June 5, 1967, as Arab armies and Israel clashed following weeks of tension, Rabbi Irving Yitz Greenberg sat anxious amid his congregants at daily prayers fearful that the Jewish people would face extinction for the second time in 25 years. One of the people said, Theyre going to wipe out Israel. Whats going to be? recalled Greenberg, then the spiritual leader of a synagogue in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. I said, Theyre not going to wipe out Israel, and if they do, theres going to be a sign up: The shul is closed. Faith could not go on with an unmitigated catastrophe of that size happening again. The fear felt by Greenberg pervaded the air in American Jewish communities that week. Two decades after the world learned the full extent of the Holocaust, Americans looked on from afar as Egypt and Syria threatened the young Jewish state. Jonathan Sarna, then 12, remembers watching on TV as Israelis dug mass graves to prepare for potential slaughter. A teenage Yossi Klein Halevi remembers the broadcasts of mass rallies in Cairo calling for Israels death. But many American Jews, haunted by their failure to act during the Holocaust, didnt just passively watch events unfold they decided to mobilize. They raised tens of millions of dollars. They held rallies. They lobbied President Lyndon Johnson. Within days, however, the fear turned to relief. The relief turned to pride when Israel won the war in six days, tripling its territory and taking control of Judaisms holiest sites. The Six-Day War, as it quickly became known, intensified American Jews love for Israel and imbued them with a new confidence to advocate for their interests at home and abroad. And the terror that consumed the community in the run-up to the war led to an increased emphasis on Holocaust remembrance. The shift from terror to power experienced by the Jewish community in June 1967 set up Holocaust memory and support of Israel as the twin poles of American Jewish identity. At the same time, however, it sparked debates on territory, history, identity and occupation issues that continue to consume American Jews 50 years later. There was an emotional trajectory that united Jewish people in a way I dont think weve ever seen since the revelation at Mount Sinai 3,500 years ago, said Klein Halevi, author of Like Dreamers, a chronicle of Israels Six-Day War generation. Growing up in Brooklyn, he recalled moving from existential dread to relief when we realized that Israel had taken the offensive. American Jews poured their money into supporting the embattled state creating a precedent (and expectations) for Jewish philanthropy for decades to come, historians say. In the New York City area alone, the United Jewish Appeal raised more than $20 million during the week of the war, nearly $150 million in todays dollars. Greenberg recalls a congregant taking out a second mortgage to donate $20,000 to Israel. In the New York suburb of Scarsdale, seven high school students raised $10,000 from their neighborhood on the wars second day. The unbelievable amounts of money that were collected before and during the war, nobody had ever seen anything like it, said Sarna, a professor of Jewish history at Brandeis University. American Jews didnt want people to say we did nothing. There wasnt much they could do, but they knew they could give of their wealth. Jews also took to the streets to support Israel. On June 8, the third day of the war, 50,000 Jews rallied outside the White House, already demanding that Israel be allowed to keep its battlefield gains. The day after the war, 20,000 Jews filled this citys Madison Square Garden to cheer the victory. While Jews had protested en masse before, the war showed Jewish leaders how powerful demonstrations could be, said Jack Wertheimer, a Jewish history professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary. The victory also gave American Jews an increased assertiveness to advocate for their own interests. Israels victory energized the movement to free Soviet Jewry, which would go on to organize large rallies in Washington, D.C., and protests at Soviet consulates, missions and cultural events across the country. Israel has been very good for American Jewish leaders, Wertheimer said. The emergence of Israel as a player on the international stage made it possible for American Jewish organizations to ratchet up their presence. American Jews also became far more comfortable displaying their love for Israel, and Americans in general supported Israel in the war. Cold War calculations led the U.S.-Israel alliance to grow stronger, while among Jews, expressions of Israeli culture increased in America. The war led more American synagogues to adopt Israeli pronunciations of Hebrew, Wertheimer said, and to use Israeli melodies for prayers. Klein Halevi remembers his doctor decorating his waiting room with an enormous photo of Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Dayan. It really intensified a sense of Israel being central, Sarna said. American Jews love moments when their Americanness and their Jewishness reinforce one another. Theres this sense that the Six-Day War is a victory for America and for the Jewish people. Jews also began traveling more to Israel, which experienced a period of euphoria following the war. Immigration to the Jewish state rose steadily in the late 1960s and early 70s, and American Jews would later have a disproportionate presence in the settlement movement. While American Jews make up about 5 percent of Israelis overall, they comprise 15 percent of West Bank settlers, according to Oxford professor Sara Yael Hirschhorn, author of the recent book City on a Hilltop, about American Jews in the settlement movement. There was just this spontaneous need on the part of Jews and the world to physically connect to Israel because of this feeling that we almost lost Israel, said Klein Halevi, who has written about channeling his own Jewish fears and pride into the militant Jewish Defense League a youthful flirtation with extremism he eventually left behind. An Israeli since 1982, he recalled the post-war euphoria spoken about in Israel, where there was this feeling that Jewish history is over, and we won.Certainly the wars were over. The Arabs would never be foolish enough to attack us again. Even amid the celebration, cracks of discord began to appear. Jewish leaders bristled at criticism from liberal Americans who had allied with Jews on domestic policy fights like civil rights. Criticism of Israels military gains from some African-American leaders further weakened a once strong black-Jewish alliance that had begun fraying half a year earlier, when the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee expelled its white members. In the liberal camp, theres a hostility directed at Israel following the war, Wertheimer said. American Jews looked upon these individuals as their allies, as their colleagues in some of the great battles. They could not begin to understand why, when it came to this matter, these allies turned on Israel. Half a century after the victory, organized American Jewry wrestles with its legacy. Fundraisers and activists lament that there isnt the same kind of unifying cause around which Jews can rally. Committed activists are split among a right wing that feels God delivered into Jewish hands a land that can never again be divided, and a left wing that sees the warand the decisions made in its aftermath as the start of what has become Israels most intractable problem: control of millions of Arabs living on lands seized during the victory. Five decades later, says Hirschhorn, the joy felt in 1967 has faded for many American Jews born long after the war. They dont remember the Six-Day War as a massacre averted or a near miraculous victory of David over Goliath. ForJews with memories of 1967, Hirschhorn said, feeling strong was an exhilarating experience.Now American Jews are still grappling withthe meaning of Jewish power. The pride they felt in that moment has changed for our generation, who look at it in a different way and have seen the outcome of the war, said Hirschhorn, who was born well after the war. Now the question of our generation is, how do you manage Jewish power responsibly, whether thats in the State of Israel or outside of it?

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May 9, 2017   Posted in: Jewish Defense League  Comments Closed


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