Archive for the ‘Jewish Extremism’ Category

Jewish extremism – One News Page

Jewish settlers agree to leave Amona site in occupied West Bank Residents of a Jewish outpost in the occupied West Bank vote in favour of an evacuation proposal. BBC News 28 minutes ago – Front PageAlso reported by Seattle Times Jewish Grassroots Organizing in the Age of Trump When Barack Obama first ran for president, he was derided by those on the right for the work he did as a community organizer. They criticized him for going… Huffington Post 2 days ago – PoliticsAlso reported by Bangkok Post Minneapolis Jewish Community Defends Rep. Keith Ellison Against Anti-Semitism Allegations WASHINGTON Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) has faced a bipartisan barrage of attacks from groups and individuals accusing him of harboring ill will toward… Huffington Post 6 days ago – PoliticsAlso reported by Bangkok Post Muslim Civil Rights Group Honors Jewish Counterpart With Award The Council on American-Islamic Relations, a leading civil rights organization for American Muslims, is preparing to honor the advocacy group Jewish Voice for… Huffington Post 2 days ago – Politics Newly discovered photo suggests Jewish assassin used by Nazis to justify Kristallnacht survived World War Two Telegraph.co.uk 5 hours ago – Politics Netanyahu: Trump feels very warmly about the Jewish state His attitude, his support for Israel is clear. He feels very warmly about the Jewish state, about the Jewish people and about Jewish people. There is no… Jerusalem Post 1 week ago – Middle East Leumis Regional Head of Private Banking Joins Executive Board of The Executives of the Los Angeles Jewish Home LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Leumi announced today that Jonathan Graham, Regional Head of Private Banking, has joined the executive board of The Executives of… Business Wire 1 week ago – Press Releases

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December 18, 2016   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

Jewish religious terrorism – Wikipedia

Jewish religious terrorism is religious terrorism committed by extremists within Judaism motivated by religious rather than ethnic or nationalistic beliefs.[citation needed][1][2]

Some researchers on ethnic terrorism distinguish between ethnic terrorism and religious terrorism, but admit that the distinction between these forms of terrorism is often blurred in practice. Daniel Bymen, in his study on “The Logic of ethnic terrorism”, argues that Jews operate far more as an ethnic group than as a community motivated by and organized according to religious doctrine.[3] As good examples of Jewish terrorism based on ethnic, not religious grounds, or Zionist political violence, the author cites Jewish underground groups Irgun and Lehi, which operated against British law during the British Mandate of Palestine before the Israeli declaration of independence in 1948.[citation needed]

According to Mark Burgess, the 1st century Jewish political and religious movement called Zealotry was one of the first examples of the use of terrorism by Jews.[4] They sought to incite the people of Judaea Province to rebel against the Roman Empire and expel it from Israel by force of arms. The term Zealot, in Hebrew kanai, means one who is zealous on behalf of God.[5][6] The most extremist groups of Zealots were called Sicarii.[4] Sicarii used violent stealth tactics against Romans. Under their cloaks they concealed sicae, or small daggers, from which they received their name. At popular assemblies, particularly during the pilgrimage to the Temple Mount, they stabbed their enemies (Romans or Roman sympathizers, Herodians), lamenting ostentatiously after the deed to blend into the crowd to escape detection. In one account, given in the Talmud, Sicarii destroyed the city’s food supply so that the people would be forced to fight against the Roman siege instead of negotiating peace. Sicarii also raided Jewish habitations and killed fellow Jews whom they considered apostates and collaborators.

According to a study by the political scientist Noemi Gal-Or, after the creation of Israel, Jewish terrorism has been assessed in Israel as “far less significant” than Arab terrorism.[7] It lasted a few years during the 1950s and was directed at internal Israeli-Jewish targets, not at the Israeli Arab population.[7] There was then a long intermission until the 1980s, when the Jewish Underground was exposed.[7] However, some argue that in the modern era Jewish religious extremism has been greatly underestimated. The phenomena of price tag attacks began around 2008. These are hate crimes done by extremist settler Jewish Israelis usually involve the destruction of property or hateful graffiti, particularly targeting property associated with Arabs, Christians, secular Israelis, and Israeli soldiers. The name was derived from the words “Price tag” which may be scrawled on the site of the attack with the allegation that the attack was a “price” for settlements the government forced them to give up and revenge for Palestinian attacks on settlers.[8] They have been variously called terrorism, particularly when they result in death. Another modern phenomenon is “revenge” attacks, motivated by a desire for “revenge” against Palestinian terrorism. A particularly egregious example of this phenomenon was the Kidnapping and murder of Mohammed Abu Khdeir, in which a Palestinian teenager was burned to death by an Israeli man and two teenagers. Their declared motive was vengeance for the kidnapping and murder of three Israeli teenagers. In July 2015, two attacks suspected to be by religious Israeli Jews occurred a day apart, the first a stabbing attack at a Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade and the second a price-tag arson attack against a Palestinian house in Duma. Shortly after the two terror attacks, one of which killed an Israeli girl and another a Palestinian infant, Israel came under criticism, including from within its government and from the Jewish community in the U.S., for not doing enough to address the threat of terrorism by Jewish extremists. Those saying Israel should be more proactive in addressing Jewish extremism included the ADL and AJC.

It has been suggested[by whom?] that a similarity between Jewish religious terrorists and jihad networks in Western democracies is their alienation and isolation from the values of the majority, mainstream culture, which they view as an existential threat to their own community. Other similarities between these groups are that their ideology is not exclusively religious, as it attempts to achieve political, territorial and nationalistic goals as well, e.g., the disruption of the Camp David accords. However, the newer of these Jewish groups have tended to emphasize religious motives for their actions at the expense of secular ones. In the case of Jewish terrorism, most networks consist of religious Zionists and ultra-Orthodox Jews living in isolated, homogenous communities.[9]

The following groups have been considered religious terrorist organizations in Israel:

Shin Bet has complained that the Israeli government is too lenient in dealing with religious extremism of Jewish extremists who want the creation of a Jewish land based on halacha, Jewish religious laws. Says Haaretz:”The Shin Bet complained that the courts are too lenient, particularly in enforcement against those who violate restraining orders distancing them from the West Bank or restricting their movement. The Shin Bet supports the position of Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon, who has called for limited use of administrative detention against Jewish terrorists.” [47] Israeli agencies keeping tabs on the religious terrorist groups say they are “anarchist” and “anti-Zionist,” motivated to bring down the government of Israel and create a new Israeli “kingdom” that would operate according to halacha (Jewish law).[47] A week after the July 2015 attacks, administrative detention was approved for Jewish terror suspects.[8]

Several violent acts by Jews have been described as terrorism and attributed to religious motivations.The following are the most notable:[48]

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October 25, 2016   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

Kill All Pedophiles by John de Nugent

Please contact YouTube and get this video deleted, before someone uses www.ClipConverter.cc to download this video and upload it to all the video sharing web sites on the Internet.

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April 26, 2016   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, Alan Dershowitz, Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Jewish, Anti-Semitism, Anti-Semitism News, B'nai B'rith, Hate Crime Hoax, Hate Speech, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Jewish Lobby, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, John de Nugent, Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Jewish religious terrorism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jewish religious terrorism is a type of religious terrorism committed by extremists within Judaism motivated by religious rather than ethnic or nationalistic beliefs.[1][2]

Some researchers on ethnic terrorism distinguish between ethnic terrorism and religious terrorism, but admit that the distinction between these forms of terrorism is often blurred in practice. Daniel Bymen, in his study on “The Logic of ethnic terrorism”, argues that Jews operate far more as an ethnic group than as a community motivated by and organized according to religious doctrine. As good examples of Jewish terrorism based on ethnic, not religious grounds, or Zionist political violence, the author cites Jewish underground groups Irgun and Lehi, which operated against British law during the British Mandate of Palestine before the Israeli declaration of independence in 1948.[3][4]

According to Mark Burgess, the 1st century Jewish political and religious movement called Zealotry was one of the first examples of the use of terrorism by Jews.[5] They sought to incite the people of Judaea Province to rebel against the Roman Empire and expel it from Israel by force of arms. The term Zealot, in Hebrew kanai, means one who is zealous on behalf of God.[6][7] The most extremist groups of Zealots were called Sicarii.[5] Sicarii used violent stealth tactics against Romans. Under their cloaks they concealed sicae, or small daggers, from which they received their name. At popular assemblies, particularly during the pilgrimage to the Temple Mount, they stabbed their enemies (Romans or Roman sympathizers, Herodians), lamenting ostentatiously after the deed to blend into the crowd to escape detection. In one account, given in the Talmud, Sicarii destroyed the city’s food supply so that the people would be forced to fight against the Roman siege instead of negotiating peace. Sicarii also raided Jewish habitations and killed fellow Jews whom they considered apostates and collaborators.

According to a study by the political scientist Noemi Gal-Or, after the creation of Israel, Jewish terrorism has been assessed in Israel as “far less significant” than Arab terrorism.[8] It lasted a few years during the 1950s and was directed at internal Israeli-Jewish targets, not at the Israeli Arab population.[8] There was then a long intermission until the 1980s, when the Jewish Underground was exposed.[8] However, some argue that in the modern era Jewish religious extremism has been greatly underestimated. The phenomena of price tag attacks began around 2008. These are hate crimes done by extremist Jewish Israelis and usually involve the destruction of property or hateful graffiti, particularly targeting property associated with Arabs, Christians, secular Israelis, and Israeli soldiers. The name was derived from the words “Price tag” which may be scrawled on the site of the attack with the allegation that the attack was a “price” for settlements the government forced them to give up and revenge for Palestinian attacks on settlers.[9] They have been variously called terrorism, particularly when they result in death. Another modern phenomenon is “revenge” attacks, motivated by a desire for “revenge” against Palestinian terrorism. A particularly egregious example of this phenomenon was the Kidnapping and murder of Mohammed Abu Khdeir, in which a Palestinian teenager was burned to death by a Israeli man and two teenagers. Their declared motive was vengeance for the kidnapping and murder of three Israeli teenagers by a Hamas-affiliated cell. In July 2015, two attacks suspected to be by religious Israeli Jews occurred a day apart, the first a stabbing attack at a Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade and the second a price-tag arson attack against a Palestinian house in Duma. Shortly after the two terror attacks, one of which killed an Israeli girl and another a Palestinian infant, Israel came under criticism, including from within its government and from the Jewish community in the U.S., for not doing enough to address the threat of terrorism by Jewish extremists. Those saying Israel should be more proactive in addressing Jewish extremism included the ADL and AJC.

It has been suggested[by whom?] that a similarity between Jewish religious terrorists and jihad networks in Western democracies is their alienation and isolation from the values of the majority, mainstream culture, which they view as an existential threat to their own community. Other similarities between these groups are that their ideology is not exclusively religious, as it attempts to achieve political, territorial and nationalistic goals as well, e.g. the disruption of the Camp David accords. However, the newer of these Jewish groups have tended to emphasize religious motives for their actions at the expense of secular ones. In the case of Jewish terrorism most networks consist of religious Zionists and ultra-orthodox Jews living in isolated, homogenous communities.[10]

The following groups have been considered religious terrorist organizations in Israel:

Shin Bet has complained that the Israeli government is too lenient in dealing with religious extremism of Jewish extremists who want the creation of a Jewish land based on halacha, Jewish religious laws. Says Haaretz:”The Shin Bet complained that the courts are too lenient, particularly in enforcement against those who violate restraining orders distancing them from the West Bank or restricting their movement. The Shin Bet supports the position of Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon, who has called for limited use of administrative detention against Jewish terrorists.” [47] Israeli agencies keeping tabs on the religious terrorist groups say they are “anarchist” and “anti-Zionist,” motivated to bring down the government of Israel and create a new Israeli “kingdom” that would operate according to halacha (Jewish law).[47] A week after the July 2015 attacks, administrative detention was approved for Jewish terror suspects.[9]

Several violent acts by Jews have been described as terrorism and attributed to religious motivations,.[48]

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Jewish religious terrorism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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August 7, 2015   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

Q&A: A look at the history of Jewish extremism in Israel …

JERUSALEM The arrest of a well-known Jewish extremist marks Israel’s first concrete step in its new “zero tolerance” approach toward what the government describes as Jewish terrorism. A recent pair of attacks brought into the open long-standing fears about a radicalized and ultraconservative fringe that had been operating below the radar but now appears to be intensifying its violence.

Israel’s Shin Bet security service says 23-year-old Meir Ettinger, grandson of the late ultranationalist Rabbi Meir Kahane, was arrested for “involvement in an extremist Jewish organization” that was seeking to bring about religious “redemption” through attacks on Christian sites and Palestinian property.

With its focus primarily on preventing Palestinian terrorism, Israeli authorities now pledge to direct more resources toward domestic assailants who have been allowed to operate with relative impunity. The threat is nothing new, but authorities indicate they can no longer overlook the violence.

Last Wednesday, the Shin Bet singled out Ettinger when it announced it had cracked the June arson attack on the Church of the Multiplication of the Loaves and Fish, a prominent Catholic church near the Sea of Galilee. It accused Ettinger of heading a movement of young settler activists who were responsible for the torching and a number of other hate crimes. Two of them were indicted for burning the church.

The next day, an anti-gay ultra-Orthodox extremist stabbed six revelers at Jerusalem’s gay pride parade, killing one of them a 16-year-old Jewish girl. Then, on Friday morning, suspected Jewish assailants set fire to a West Bank home, burning a Palestinian toddler to death and seriously wounding his parents and 4-year-old brother.

Israel has responded with outrage. President Reuven Rivlin visited the Arab victims in a hospital and expressed his shame over those who “have lost their humanity.” Extremists have since threatened him and posted images of him in Nazi garb and a Hitler-like mustache, invoking memories of the kind of incitement that preceded the 1995 assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin.

No one knows for sure who exactly was behind Friday’s arson but because of the target and Hebrew graffiti found on the charred home, suspicion immediately fell on Jewish settler extremists. So-called “price tag” attacks have been used by Jewish settlers for years to avenge Palestinian attacks and official Israeli steps they see as favoring the Palestinians.

The suspects generally belong to a group known as the “hilltop youth,” radicalized Jewish teen squatters on unauthorized settlement encampments on West Bank hilltops. Members of the group have been behind a series of vandalism attacks against Palestinian homes, agriculture and livestock, as well as mosques, churches and even Israeli schools and military bases.

The attacks have been condemned by the entire political spectrum as well as the mainstream settler leadership. Jewish assailants traditionally have drawn their inspiration from a small group of zealous settler rabbis. But Shlomo Fischer, senior fellow at the Jewish People Policy Institute and an expert on radical Jewish extremism, said these new-age messianic attackers “conceive of themselves as having a sort of charismatic-prophetic authority and what authorizes these extreme actions is ‘the voice of God’ within them.”

It’s not entirely clear. Initially seen as a pressure tactic on the government to cease making concessions to Palestinians and support settler expansion, the movement has now taken on more of a religious bent, going so far as to call for a revolution that alters the nature of Israel.

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Q&A: A look at the history of Jewish extremism in Israel …

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TERRORSCOPE: 1.1 Introduction to Jewish Extremism …

This chapter forms the introduction to terrorism perpetrated in the name of Judaism, the oldest of the Abrahamic faiths. It will address the theological aims and justifications for violence provided by two key strands of Jewish extremism, Millennialism and Zionism, and will oppose Bymens theory that, Jews operate far more as an ethnic group than as a community motivated by and organized according to religious doctrine. It suggests that religion in fact provides a strong Jewish identity, and certainly plays a central role in Jewish extremist ideology.

The relationship between Judaism and terrorist violence is complex, and the two are not understood as being instantly compatible. However, the Old Testament is replete with depictions of a vengeful and aggressive God The Lord is a warrior (Ex 15:3) and reveals an ancient mandate for a state of conflict between Jews and any foreign occupiers of Eretz Yisrael. Despite this, there have been far fewer Jewish terrorist groups and attacks than there have been Christian or Islamic. Jewish terrorism is largely domestic to Israel and the surrounding Arab countries, although there have been examples of militant activity in the United States, usually perpetrated by the Jewish Defence League (JDL), who attack groups and individuals deemed to be anti-Semitic or opposed to the State of Israel.

The three key goals of Jewish terrorism are: the creation of a theocratic state; to hasten redemption; and to retain the Holy Lands from the Arabs. They are all steeped in theology and provide the basis for modern-day extremist rhetoric. Jewish extremists tend to belong to one of the two main schools of theological understanding Millennialism and Zionism. Millennialism is presented as a purely theological creed, comprised of apocalyptic visions and rooted in the Jewish tradition. Zionism is also anchored in religious history, but is usually defined as a political concept. However, radical Jewish groups have persistently claimed the principles of Zionism to be religious rather than nationalist in nature. Both Millennialism and Zionism produce terrorist groups who claim to be acting in accordance with Gods wishes, and cite faith as their primary motivation.

The Plot to blow up the Dome of the Rock, the Cave of Patriarchs massacre, and the 1995 assassination of President Yitzhak Rabin, provide three of the most notorious examples of religiously motivated Jewish terrorism. This article will assess the legitimacy of these claims and whether Jewish terrorism truly has a theological core, or if nationalism and politics eclipse faith.

MILLENNIALISM

Adherents to Jewish millennial theology believe that humans should not passively wait for Redemption, but must attempt to activate the process themselves through dramatic action. This understanding has provided the religious impetus behind several devastating terrorist acts: In 1984 authorities uncovered a plot to blow up the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem by a group of Jewish extremists from the ultranationalist Gush Emunim settler movement. The Dome of the Rock, located on Temple Mount, has huge theological significance for both Jews and Muslims as it was constructed on the site of the Second Jewish Templeand also established as the location of the Isra and Miraj,the night journey taken by the prophet Muhammad in CE 621. The group held millennial beliefs and were ardent followers of Kahane, but the destruction was not designed as an act of retaliation or resentment, but to generate the resurrection of the Jewish Third Temple and enable the Messiahs return:

ZIONISM

Religious Zionism

Religious Zionists are Orthodox Jews who adhere to a blend of the Jewish faith and Zionist principles, and have formed a branch of the Zionistmovement that uses Old Testament theology to justify efforts to build a Jewish theocratic statein Eretz Yisrael. Imbued with the religious ideology of Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook (the first Chief Rabbi of Palestine) and his son Rabbi Zevi Judah, religious Zionists believe that the Bible unquestioningly shows God giving the Holy Lands to the Jews, and they are thus the legitimate governors of the land of Israel.

Kook proposed that Zionism is:

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Leo Frank is Interrogated by Atlanta Police On Monday morning, April 28, 1913 in the presence of his powerful lawyers Luther Zeigler Rosser and Herbert Haas.

The Monday morning, April 28, 1913 interrogation of Leo Frank at Atlanta’s Stationhouse that became State’s Exhibit B at his trial (question and answer portion published in Atlanta Constitution, August 2nd, 1913). Both the Leo Frank defense and Leo Frank prosecution ratified it as being accurate. Pay special attention to the time Leo Frank says Mary Phagan arrived at his second-floor window-front business office.

Q. What is your position with the company?
A. I am general superintendent and director of the company.

Q: How long have you held that position?
A: In Atlanta I have held that position since August 10th, 1908, My place of business is at 37-41 South Forsyth Street.

Q: About how many employees have you there?
A: About 107* in that plant?

Q: Male or female?
A: Mixed. I guess there are a few more girls than boys.

Q: On Saturday, April 26, I will get you to state if that was a holiday with your company?
A: Yes, sir, it was a holiday. The factory was shut down.

Several People in Building.

Q: Who was in that building during the day?
A: Well, there were several people who come in during the morning?

Q: Was anyone in the office with you up, to noon?
A: Yes, sir, the office boy [Alonzo Mann] and a stenographer.

Q: What time did they leave?
A: About 12 or a little after.

Q: Have you a day watchman there?
A: Yes, Sir.

Q: Was he on duty at 12 o’clock?
A: No, sir, he left shortly before.

Q: Who came in after the stenographer and the office boy left?
A: This little girl. Mary Phagan, but at the time I didn’t know that was her name. She came in between 12:05 and 12:10, maybe 12:07, to get her pay envelope, her salary.

Frank Pays Mary Phagan:

Q: You paid her?
A: Yes, sir, and she went out of the office.

Q: What office was you in at that time?
A: In the inner office at my desk, the furtherest office to the left from the main office.

Q: Could you see the direction she went in when she left?
A: My impression was she just walked away I didn’t pay any particular attention.

Q: Do you keep the door locked downstairs?
A: I didn’t that morning, because the mail was coming in. I locked it at 1:10 p.m. when I went to dinner.

Q: Was anyone else in that building?
A: Yes, sir, Arthur White and Harry Denham, They were working on machinery, doing repair work, working on the top floor of the building, which is the fourth floor, toward the rear, or about the middle of the building, but a little more to the rear.

Q: What kind of work were they doing?
A: They were tightening up the belts; they are not machinists, one is a foreman in one department and the other is an assistant in another, and Denham was just assisting White, and Mrs. White, the wife of Arthur White, was also in the building. She left about 1 o’clock. I went up there and told them I was going to dinner, and they had to get out and they said they had not finished, and I said, “how long will it take?” and they said until some time in the afternoon, and then I said, “Mrs. White, you will have to go, for I am going to lock these boys in here. ”

Door was Locked:

Q: Can anyone from the inside open those doors?
A: They can open the outside door, but not the inside door, which I locked.

Q: In going in the outside door, is there any way by which anyone could go in the basement from the front?
A: Yes sir, through the trap door.

Q: They would not necessarily have to go up the steps?
A: No, sir, they couldn’t get up there if I was out.

Q: You locked the outer door?
A: Yes, sir, and I locked the inner door.

Q: What time did you get back?
A: At 3 o’clock, maybe two or three minutes before, and I went to the office and took off my coat and then went upstairs to tell those boys I was back, and I couldn’t find them at first, they were back in the dipping room, in the rear, and I said, Are you ready? and they said, We are just read, and I said, all right, ring out when you go down, to let me know when you go out, and they rang out, and Arthur White come in the office and said, Mr. Frank, loan me $2, and I said, What’s the matter? We just paid off, and he said, My wife robbed me, and I gave him $2 and he walked away, and the two of them walked out.

Newt Lee Arrives.

Q: And you locked the doors behind them?
A: I locked the outer door, when I am in there, there is no need of locking the inner door. There was only one person I was looking for to come in, and that was the nightwatchman.

Q: What time did he get there?
A: I saw him twenty minutes to 4 [3:40 p.m]

Q: Had you previously arranged for him to get there?
A: Yes, sir. On Friday night I told him, after he got his money, I gave him the keys and said you had better come around early tomorrow, because I may go to the ball game, and he came early because of that fact. I told him to be there by 4 o’clock and he came 20 minutes to 4. I figured I would leave about 1, and would not come back, but it was so cold I didn’t want to risk catching cold, and I came back to the factory as I usually do. He came in, and he said, Yes, sir, and he had a bag of bananas with him, and he offered me a banana. I didn’t see them, but he offered me one, and I guess he had them. We have told him, once he gets in that building never to go out. I told him he could go out, he got there so early, and I was going to be there. He came back about four minutes to 6, the reason I know that, I was putting the clock slips in, an the clock was right in front of me. I said, I will be reading in a minute, and he went downstairs and I came to the office and put on my coat and hat, and followed him and went out.

Saw Newt and Gantt Talking

Q: Did you see anybody with him as you went out?
A: Yes, sir; talking to him was J.M. Gantt – a man I had fired about two weeks previous.

Q: Did you have any talk with Gantt?
A: Newt told me he wanted to go up to get a pair of shoes he left while he was working there, and Gantt said to me, Newt don’t want me to go up, and he said you can go with me, Mr. Frank, and I said, that’s all right, go with him Newt and I went on home and I got home about 6:25 p.m.

Q: Is there anything else that happened that afternoon?
A: No, sir, that’s all I know.

Q: You don’t know what time Gantt came down after he went up?
A: Oh, no, I saw him go in and I locked the door after him, but I didn’t try them.

Q: Did you ask Newt?
A: Yes, sir, I telephoned him. I tried to telephone him when I got home. He punches the clock at half hour intervals, and the clock and the phone is in the office and didn’t get an answer, and at 7 o’clock I called him and asked him if Gantt got his shoes, and he said yes, he got them and I said is everything all right, and he said yes, and the next thing I know they called me at 7:30 a.m. the next morning.

Did Lee Let People In?

Q: Do you know whether your watchman at any time has been in the habit of letting people in there any time?
A: No, sir.

Q: did you ever have any trouble with any watchman about such as that?
A: No, sir.

Q: Do you know whether any of your employees go there at night?
A: Yes sir, Gantt did when he was working there, he had a key and sometimes he would have some work left over. I never have seen him go but until I go out, I go out and come back, but he has come back before I left, but that is part of his duty.

Q: Did you take a bath yesterday or Saturday night?
A: Yes, sir. Saturday night at home.

Q: Did you change your clothes?
A: Yes sir.

Q: The clothes that you changed are at home?
A: Yes sir, and this is the suit of clothes I was wearing Saturday. After I left the shop I went to Jacobs Pharmacy and bought a box of candy for my wife and got home about 6:25.

Required Reading:

100 Years Ago Today: The Trial of Leo Frank Begins
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/07/100-years-ago-today-the-trial-of-leo-frank-begins/

Leo Frank Trial Week One
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/08/the-leo-frank-trial-week-one/

Leo Frank Trial Week Two
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/08/the-leo-frank-trial-week-two/

One Hundred Years Ago Leo Frank Mounts the Witness Stand
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/08/100-years-ago-today-leo-frank-takes-the-stand

Leo Frank Trial Week Three
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/08/the-leo-frank-trial-week-three/

Leo Frank Trial Week Four
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/09/the-leo-frank-trial-week-four/

Leo Frank Trial Closing Arguments (Frank Hooper for Prosecution, Luther Rosser and Reuben Arnold for Defense)
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/10/the-leo-frank-trial-closing-arguments-of-hooper-arnold-and-rosser/

One Hundred Reasons Leo Frank is Guilty of Murdering Mary Phagan (Published April 26, 2013)
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/04/100-reasons-proving-leo-frank-is-guilty/

Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith: One Hundred Years of Racist Jewish Hate, October 1913 – 2013
http://theamericanmercury.org/2013/10/adl-100-years-of-hate/

Professor Emeritus of Judaic Studies: Leonard Dinnerstein’s Pseudo-history About the Leo Frank Case
http://theamericanmercury.org/2012/10/the-leo-frank-case-a-pseudo-history/

Review of Journalist-Author Steve Oney’s book ‘The Dead Shall Rise’: Who Really Solved the Mary Phagan Murder Case?
http://theamericanmercury.org/2012/10/who-really-solved-the-mary-phagan-murder-case/

Did Leo Frank Confess to the Murder of Mary Phagan?
http://theamericanmercury.org/2012/09/did-leo-frank-confess/

Atlanta Constitution Newspaper (1913 – 1915):
http://archive.org/details/LeoFrankCaseInTheAtlantaConstitutionNewspaper1913To1915

Atlanta Georgian Newspaper (April – August, 1913):
http://archive.org/details/AtlantaGeorgianNewspaperAprilToAugust1913

Atlanta Journal Newspaper (April – August, 1913):
http://archive.org/details/AtlantaJournalApril281913toAugust311913

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April 28, 2015   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, Anti-Defamation League, Ashkenazi, B'nai B'rith, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish Lobby, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, Leo Frank, Race Relations, Racism News, Southern Poverty Law Center, SPLC  Comments Closed

Arab Joint List can help contain Jewish extremism

Its role in Knesset voting can improve the basic rights of the Palestinians of the 1948 areas

Ramallah: After the Arab Joint List retained third place in the Israeli elections, political analysts and officials in the West Bank have argued that the list has a role to play in restraining the Jewish extremism directed against the Palestinian public in the West Bank.

Yes they can play a role, even limited. It is time for the Palestinians of the 1948 areas and their parliamentary representatives to play a part in the reigning in Jewish fundamentalism that is totally directed against West Bankers, said Ghassan Al Khatib, a political analyst and former speaker for the Palestinian government. The Palestinian parliamentarians should use their weight to confront the Israeli right wing, particularly with regard to Israeli colonial activities beyond the Green Line.

Although we know in advance that the capabilities of the Joint List is limited in affecting the entire Palestinian cause and influencing Israelis policies (because the Likud does not need the list to form a government) the Palestinians still have hope in the list, he told Gulf News.

The Likud and Netanyahu have their own alliances which will facilitate the way to form the new government, he said. The Joint List will have tremendous political weight and can play a serious role in the opposition. It could even negotiate the formation of an Israeli government with the other Zionist camp if given the chance.

Khatib said that given that the Joint List will have a role in the Knesset voting it can improve the basic rights of the Palestinians of the 1948 areas.

Tayseer Khalid, a member of the Executive Committee of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), said the Palestinian public is confident about the Palestinians of the 1948, since they are a core component of the Palestinian nationalistic movement. Palestinians of the 1948 areas have actively participated in all the confrontations and battles which Palestinians have waged in support of the creation of an independent Palestinian state on the 1967 borderlines. Occupied East Jerusalem is to be the capital of that state, he told Gulf News. We are confident that the Joint List parliament representatives will spare no effort in defending the civil, political and democratic rights of the Palestinians of the 1948 areas to secure our people there real equality with the Israelis.

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Arab Joint List can help contain Jewish extremism

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The Ugly Truth | Zionism, Jewish extremism and a few other …

Is V15 a Conduit for American Funds to Benjamin Netanyahus Opponents? Israeli Lobby Raises Questions on Both Sides of Pond ed noteonce again, it is important in our approach as Gentiles dealing withthis thing known as the Jewish question that we come to understand the various nuances associated with how this machinery works. As evidenced bythis piece appearing inthe Forwardconsidered by many to be the vanguard as far as discussions surrounding the Jewish issue is concernedwhat we clearly have here is a picture of the turf-war taking place at present within the organized Jewish community and what its implications may be for the rest of us who are simply trying to live and breath on Gods green earth.

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The Ugly Truth | Zionism, Jewish extremism and a few other …

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Jewish extremism – One News Page

Jewish settlers agree to leave Amona site in occupied West Bank Residents of a Jewish outpost in the occupied West Bank vote in favour of an evacuation proposal. BBC News 28 minutes ago – Front PageAlso reported by Seattle Times Jewish Grassroots Organizing in the Age of Trump When Barack Obama first ran for president, he was derided by those on the right for the work he did as a community organizer. They criticized him for going… Huffington Post 2 days ago – PoliticsAlso reported by Bangkok Post Minneapolis Jewish Community Defends Rep. Keith Ellison Against Anti-Semitism Allegations WASHINGTON Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) has faced a bipartisan barrage of attacks from groups and individuals accusing him of harboring ill will toward… Huffington Post 6 days ago – PoliticsAlso reported by Bangkok Post Muslim Civil Rights Group Honors Jewish Counterpart With Award The Council on American-Islamic Relations, a leading civil rights organization for American Muslims, is preparing to honor the advocacy group Jewish Voice for… Huffington Post 2 days ago – Politics Newly discovered photo suggests Jewish assassin used by Nazis to justify Kristallnacht survived World War Two Telegraph.co.uk 5 hours ago – Politics Netanyahu: Trump feels very warmly about the Jewish state His attitude, his support for Israel is clear. He feels very warmly about the Jewish state, about the Jewish people and about Jewish people. There is no… Jerusalem Post 1 week ago – Middle East Leumis Regional Head of Private Banking Joins Executive Board of The Executives of the Los Angeles Jewish Home LOS ANGELES–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Leumi announced today that Jonathan Graham, Regional Head of Private Banking, has joined the executive board of The Executives of… Business Wire 1 week ago – Press Releases

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Jewish religious terrorism – Wikipedia

Jewish religious terrorism is religious terrorism committed by extremists within Judaism motivated by religious rather than ethnic or nationalistic beliefs.[citation needed][1][2] Some researchers on ethnic terrorism distinguish between ethnic terrorism and religious terrorism, but admit that the distinction between these forms of terrorism is often blurred in practice. Daniel Bymen, in his study on “The Logic of ethnic terrorism”, argues that Jews operate far more as an ethnic group than as a community motivated by and organized according to religious doctrine.[3] As good examples of Jewish terrorism based on ethnic, not religious grounds, or Zionist political violence, the author cites Jewish underground groups Irgun and Lehi, which operated against British law during the British Mandate of Palestine before the Israeli declaration of independence in 1948.[citation needed] According to Mark Burgess, the 1st century Jewish political and religious movement called Zealotry was one of the first examples of the use of terrorism by Jews.[4] They sought to incite the people of Judaea Province to rebel against the Roman Empire and expel it from Israel by force of arms. The term Zealot, in Hebrew kanai, means one who is zealous on behalf of God.[5][6] The most extremist groups of Zealots were called Sicarii.[4] Sicarii used violent stealth tactics against Romans. Under their cloaks they concealed sicae, or small daggers, from which they received their name. At popular assemblies, particularly during the pilgrimage to the Temple Mount, they stabbed their enemies (Romans or Roman sympathizers, Herodians), lamenting ostentatiously after the deed to blend into the crowd to escape detection. In one account, given in the Talmud, Sicarii destroyed the city’s food supply so that the people would be forced to fight against the Roman siege instead of negotiating peace. Sicarii also raided Jewish habitations and killed fellow Jews whom they considered apostates and collaborators. According to a study by the political scientist Noemi Gal-Or, after the creation of Israel, Jewish terrorism has been assessed in Israel as “far less significant” than Arab terrorism.[7] It lasted a few years during the 1950s and was directed at internal Israeli-Jewish targets, not at the Israeli Arab population.[7] There was then a long intermission until the 1980s, when the Jewish Underground was exposed.[7] However, some argue that in the modern era Jewish religious extremism has been greatly underestimated. The phenomena of price tag attacks began around 2008. These are hate crimes done by extremist settler Jewish Israelis usually involve the destruction of property or hateful graffiti, particularly targeting property associated with Arabs, Christians, secular Israelis, and Israeli soldiers. The name was derived from the words “Price tag” which may be scrawled on the site of the attack with the allegation that the attack was a “price” for settlements the government forced them to give up and revenge for Palestinian attacks on settlers.[8] They have been variously called terrorism, particularly when they result in death. Another modern phenomenon is “revenge” attacks, motivated by a desire for “revenge” against Palestinian terrorism. A particularly egregious example of this phenomenon was the Kidnapping and murder of Mohammed Abu Khdeir, in which a Palestinian teenager was burned to death by an Israeli man and two teenagers. Their declared motive was vengeance for the kidnapping and murder of three Israeli teenagers. In July 2015, two attacks suspected to be by religious Israeli Jews occurred a day apart, the first a stabbing attack at a Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade and the second a price-tag arson attack against a Palestinian house in Duma. Shortly after the two terror attacks, one of which killed an Israeli girl and another a Palestinian infant, Israel came under criticism, including from within its government and from the Jewish community in the U.S., for not doing enough to address the threat of terrorism by Jewish extremists. Those saying Israel should be more proactive in addressing Jewish extremism included the ADL and AJC. It has been suggested[by whom?] that a similarity between Jewish religious terrorists and jihad networks in Western democracies is their alienation and isolation from the values of the majority, mainstream culture, which they view as an existential threat to their own community. Other similarities between these groups are that their ideology is not exclusively religious, as it attempts to achieve political, territorial and nationalistic goals as well, e.g., the disruption of the Camp David accords. However, the newer of these Jewish groups have tended to emphasize religious motives for their actions at the expense of secular ones. In the case of Jewish terrorism, most networks consist of religious Zionists and ultra-Orthodox Jews living in isolated, homogenous communities.[9] The following groups have been considered religious terrorist organizations in Israel: Shin Bet has complained that the Israeli government is too lenient in dealing with religious extremism of Jewish extremists who want the creation of a Jewish land based on halacha, Jewish religious laws. Says Haaretz:”The Shin Bet complained that the courts are too lenient, particularly in enforcement against those who violate restraining orders distancing them from the West Bank or restricting their movement. The Shin Bet supports the position of Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon, who has called for limited use of administrative detention against Jewish terrorists.” [47] Israeli agencies keeping tabs on the religious terrorist groups say they are “anarchist” and “anti-Zionist,” motivated to bring down the government of Israel and create a new Israeli “kingdom” that would operate according to halacha (Jewish law).[47] A week after the July 2015 attacks, administrative detention was approved for Jewish terror suspects.[8] Several violent acts by Jews have been described as terrorism and attributed to religious motivations.The following are the most notable:[48]

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Kill All Pedophiles by John de Nugent

Please contact YouTube and get this video deleted, before someone uses www.ClipConverter.cc to download this video and upload it to all the video sharing web sites on the Internet.

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April 26, 2016   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, Alan Dershowitz, Anti-Defamation League, Anti-Jewish, Anti-Semitism, Anti-Semitism News, B'nai B'rith, Hate Crime Hoax, Hate Speech, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish History, Jewish Lobby, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, John de Nugent, Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Jewish religious terrorism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jewish religious terrorism is a type of religious terrorism committed by extremists within Judaism motivated by religious rather than ethnic or nationalistic beliefs.[1][2] Some researchers on ethnic terrorism distinguish between ethnic terrorism and religious terrorism, but admit that the distinction between these forms of terrorism is often blurred in practice. Daniel Bymen, in his study on “The Logic of ethnic terrorism”, argues that Jews operate far more as an ethnic group than as a community motivated by and organized according to religious doctrine. As good examples of Jewish terrorism based on ethnic, not religious grounds, or Zionist political violence, the author cites Jewish underground groups Irgun and Lehi, which operated against British law during the British Mandate of Palestine before the Israeli declaration of independence in 1948.[3][4] According to Mark Burgess, the 1st century Jewish political and religious movement called Zealotry was one of the first examples of the use of terrorism by Jews.[5] They sought to incite the people of Judaea Province to rebel against the Roman Empire and expel it from Israel by force of arms. The term Zealot, in Hebrew kanai, means one who is zealous on behalf of God.[6][7] The most extremist groups of Zealots were called Sicarii.[5] Sicarii used violent stealth tactics against Romans. Under their cloaks they concealed sicae, or small daggers, from which they received their name. At popular assemblies, particularly during the pilgrimage to the Temple Mount, they stabbed their enemies (Romans or Roman sympathizers, Herodians), lamenting ostentatiously after the deed to blend into the crowd to escape detection. In one account, given in the Talmud, Sicarii destroyed the city’s food supply so that the people would be forced to fight against the Roman siege instead of negotiating peace. Sicarii also raided Jewish habitations and killed fellow Jews whom they considered apostates and collaborators. According to a study by the political scientist Noemi Gal-Or, after the creation of Israel, Jewish terrorism has been assessed in Israel as “far less significant” than Arab terrorism.[8] It lasted a few years during the 1950s and was directed at internal Israeli-Jewish targets, not at the Israeli Arab population.[8] There was then a long intermission until the 1980s, when the Jewish Underground was exposed.[8] However, some argue that in the modern era Jewish religious extremism has been greatly underestimated. The phenomena of price tag attacks began around 2008. These are hate crimes done by extremist Jewish Israelis and usually involve the destruction of property or hateful graffiti, particularly targeting property associated with Arabs, Christians, secular Israelis, and Israeli soldiers. The name was derived from the words “Price tag” which may be scrawled on the site of the attack with the allegation that the attack was a “price” for settlements the government forced them to give up and revenge for Palestinian attacks on settlers.[9] They have been variously called terrorism, particularly when they result in death. Another modern phenomenon is “revenge” attacks, motivated by a desire for “revenge” against Palestinian terrorism. A particularly egregious example of this phenomenon was the Kidnapping and murder of Mohammed Abu Khdeir, in which a Palestinian teenager was burned to death by a Israeli man and two teenagers. Their declared motive was vengeance for the kidnapping and murder of three Israeli teenagers by a Hamas-affiliated cell. In July 2015, two attacks suspected to be by religious Israeli Jews occurred a day apart, the first a stabbing attack at a Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade and the second a price-tag arson attack against a Palestinian house in Duma. Shortly after the two terror attacks, one of which killed an Israeli girl and another a Palestinian infant, Israel came under criticism, including from within its government and from the Jewish community in the U.S., for not doing enough to address the threat of terrorism by Jewish extremists. Those saying Israel should be more proactive in addressing Jewish extremism included the ADL and AJC. It has been suggested[by whom?] that a similarity between Jewish religious terrorists and jihad networks in Western democracies is their alienation and isolation from the values of the majority, mainstream culture, which they view as an existential threat to their own community. Other similarities between these groups are that their ideology is not exclusively religious, as it attempts to achieve political, territorial and nationalistic goals as well, e.g. the disruption of the Camp David accords. However, the newer of these Jewish groups have tended to emphasize religious motives for their actions at the expense of secular ones. In the case of Jewish terrorism most networks consist of religious Zionists and ultra-orthodox Jews living in isolated, homogenous communities.[10] The following groups have been considered religious terrorist organizations in Israel: Shin Bet has complained that the Israeli government is too lenient in dealing with religious extremism of Jewish extremists who want the creation of a Jewish land based on halacha, Jewish religious laws. Says Haaretz:”The Shin Bet complained that the courts are too lenient, particularly in enforcement against those who violate restraining orders distancing them from the West Bank or restricting their movement. The Shin Bet supports the position of Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon, who has called for limited use of administrative detention against Jewish terrorists.” [47] Israeli agencies keeping tabs on the religious terrorist groups say they are “anarchist” and “anti-Zionist,” motivated to bring down the government of Israel and create a new Israeli “kingdom” that would operate according to halacha (Jewish law).[47] A week after the July 2015 attacks, administrative detention was approved for Jewish terror suspects.[9] Several violent acts by Jews have been described as terrorism and attributed to religious motivations,.[48]

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Q&A: A look at the history of Jewish extremism in Israel …

JERUSALEM The arrest of a well-known Jewish extremist marks Israel’s first concrete step in its new “zero tolerance” approach toward what the government describes as Jewish terrorism. A recent pair of attacks brought into the open long-standing fears about a radicalized and ultraconservative fringe that had been operating below the radar but now appears to be intensifying its violence. Israel’s Shin Bet security service says 23-year-old Meir Ettinger, grandson of the late ultranationalist Rabbi Meir Kahane, was arrested for “involvement in an extremist Jewish organization” that was seeking to bring about religious “redemption” through attacks on Christian sites and Palestinian property. With its focus primarily on preventing Palestinian terrorism, Israeli authorities now pledge to direct more resources toward domestic assailants who have been allowed to operate with relative impunity. The threat is nothing new, but authorities indicate they can no longer overlook the violence. Last Wednesday, the Shin Bet singled out Ettinger when it announced it had cracked the June arson attack on the Church of the Multiplication of the Loaves and Fish, a prominent Catholic church near the Sea of Galilee. It accused Ettinger of heading a movement of young settler activists who were responsible for the torching and a number of other hate crimes. Two of them were indicted for burning the church. The next day, an anti-gay ultra-Orthodox extremist stabbed six revelers at Jerusalem’s gay pride parade, killing one of them a 16-year-old Jewish girl. Then, on Friday morning, suspected Jewish assailants set fire to a West Bank home, burning a Palestinian toddler to death and seriously wounding his parents and 4-year-old brother. Israel has responded with outrage. President Reuven Rivlin visited the Arab victims in a hospital and expressed his shame over those who “have lost their humanity.” Extremists have since threatened him and posted images of him in Nazi garb and a Hitler-like mustache, invoking memories of the kind of incitement that preceded the 1995 assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. No one knows for sure who exactly was behind Friday’s arson but because of the target and Hebrew graffiti found on the charred home, suspicion immediately fell on Jewish settler extremists. So-called “price tag” attacks have been used by Jewish settlers for years to avenge Palestinian attacks and official Israeli steps they see as favoring the Palestinians. The suspects generally belong to a group known as the “hilltop youth,” radicalized Jewish teen squatters on unauthorized settlement encampments on West Bank hilltops. Members of the group have been behind a series of vandalism attacks against Palestinian homes, agriculture and livestock, as well as mosques, churches and even Israeli schools and military bases. The attacks have been condemned by the entire political spectrum as well as the mainstream settler leadership. Jewish assailants traditionally have drawn their inspiration from a small group of zealous settler rabbis. But Shlomo Fischer, senior fellow at the Jewish People Policy Institute and an expert on radical Jewish extremism, said these new-age messianic attackers “conceive of themselves as having a sort of charismatic-prophetic authority and what authorizes these extreme actions is ‘the voice of God’ within them.” It’s not entirely clear. Initially seen as a pressure tactic on the government to cease making concessions to Palestinians and support settler expansion, the movement has now taken on more of a religious bent, going so far as to call for a revolution that alters the nature of Israel.

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TERRORSCOPE: 1.1 Introduction to Jewish Extremism …

This chapter forms the introduction to terrorism perpetrated in the name of Judaism, the oldest of the Abrahamic faiths. It will address the theological aims and justifications for violence provided by two key strands of Jewish extremism, Millennialism and Zionism, and will oppose Bymens theory that, Jews operate far more as an ethnic group than as a community motivated by and organized according to religious doctrine. It suggests that religion in fact provides a strong Jewish identity, and certainly plays a central role in Jewish extremist ideology. The relationship between Judaism and terrorist violence is complex, and the two are not understood as being instantly compatible. However, the Old Testament is replete with depictions of a vengeful and aggressive God The Lord is a warrior (Ex 15:3) and reveals an ancient mandate for a state of conflict between Jews and any foreign occupiers of Eretz Yisrael. Despite this, there have been far fewer Jewish terrorist groups and attacks than there have been Christian or Islamic. Jewish terrorism is largely domestic to Israel and the surrounding Arab countries, although there have been examples of militant activity in the United States, usually perpetrated by the Jewish Defence League (JDL), who attack groups and individuals deemed to be anti-Semitic or opposed to the State of Israel. The three key goals of Jewish terrorism are: the creation of a theocratic state; to hasten redemption; and to retain the Holy Lands from the Arabs. They are all steeped in theology and provide the basis for modern-day extremist rhetoric. Jewish extremists tend to belong to one of the two main schools of theological understanding Millennialism and Zionism. Millennialism is presented as a purely theological creed, comprised of apocalyptic visions and rooted in the Jewish tradition. Zionism is also anchored in religious history, but is usually defined as a political concept. However, radical Jewish groups have persistently claimed the principles of Zionism to be religious rather than nationalist in nature. Both Millennialism and Zionism produce terrorist groups who claim to be acting in accordance with Gods wishes, and cite faith as their primary motivation. The Plot to blow up the Dome of the Rock, the Cave of Patriarchs massacre, and the 1995 assassination of President Yitzhak Rabin, provide three of the most notorious examples of religiously motivated Jewish terrorism. This article will assess the legitimacy of these claims and whether Jewish terrorism truly has a theological core, or if nationalism and politics eclipse faith. MILLENNIALISM Adherents to Jewish millennial theology believe that humans should not passively wait for Redemption, but must attempt to activate the process themselves through dramatic action. This understanding has provided the religious impetus behind several devastating terrorist acts: In 1984 authorities uncovered a plot to blow up the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem by a group of Jewish extremists from the ultranationalist Gush Emunim settler movement. The Dome of the Rock, located on Temple Mount, has huge theological significance for both Jews and Muslims as it was constructed on the site of the Second Jewish Templeand also established as the location of the Isra and Miraj,the night journey taken by the prophet Muhammad in CE 621. The group held millennial beliefs and were ardent followers of Kahane, but the destruction was not designed as an act of retaliation or resentment, but to generate the resurrection of the Jewish Third Temple and enable the Messiahs return: ZIONISM Religious Zionism Religious Zionists are Orthodox Jews who adhere to a blend of the Jewish faith and Zionist principles, and have formed a branch of the Zionistmovement that uses Old Testament theology to justify efforts to build a Jewish theocratic statein Eretz Yisrael. Imbued with the religious ideology of Rabbi Abraham Isaac Kook (the first Chief Rabbi of Palestine) and his son Rabbi Zevi Judah, religious Zionists believe that the Bible unquestioningly shows God giving the Holy Lands to the Jews, and they are thus the legitimate governors of the land of Israel. Kook proposed that Zionism is:

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Leo Frank is Interrogated by Atlanta Police On Monday morning, April 28, 1913 in the presence of his powerful lawyers Luther Zeigler Rosser and Herbert Haas.

The Monday morning, April 28, 1913 interrogation of Leo Frank at Atlanta’s Stationhouse that became State’s Exhibit B at his trial (question and answer portion published in Atlanta Constitution, August 2nd, 1913). Both the Leo Frank defense and Leo Frank prosecution ratified it as being accurate. Pay special attention to the time Leo Frank says […]

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April 28, 2015   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, Anti-Defamation League, Ashkenazi, B'nai B'rith, Jewish American Heritage Month, Jewish Extremism, Jewish Heritage, Jewish Lobby, Jewish Racism, Jewish Supremacism, Jews, Leo Frank, Race Relations, Racism News, Southern Poverty Law Center, SPLC  Comments Closed

Arab Joint List can help contain Jewish extremism

Its role in Knesset voting can improve the basic rights of the Palestinians of the 1948 areas Ramallah: After the Arab Joint List retained third place in the Israeli elections, political analysts and officials in the West Bank have argued that the list has a role to play in restraining the Jewish extremism directed against the Palestinian public in the West Bank. Yes they can play a role, even limited. It is time for the Palestinians of the 1948 areas and their parliamentary representatives to play a part in the reigning in Jewish fundamentalism that is totally directed against West Bankers, said Ghassan Al Khatib, a political analyst and former speaker for the Palestinian government. The Palestinian parliamentarians should use their weight to confront the Israeli right wing, particularly with regard to Israeli colonial activities beyond the Green Line. Although we know in advance that the capabilities of the Joint List is limited in affecting the entire Palestinian cause and influencing Israelis policies (because the Likud does not need the list to form a government) the Palestinians still have hope in the list, he told Gulf News. The Likud and Netanyahu have their own alliances which will facilitate the way to form the new government, he said. The Joint List will have tremendous political weight and can play a serious role in the opposition. It could even negotiate the formation of an Israeli government with the other Zionist camp if given the chance. Khatib said that given that the Joint List will have a role in the Knesset voting it can improve the basic rights of the Palestinians of the 1948 areas. Tayseer Khalid, a member of the Executive Committee of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), said the Palestinian public is confident about the Palestinians of the 1948, since they are a core component of the Palestinian nationalistic movement. Palestinians of the 1948 areas have actively participated in all the confrontations and battles which Palestinians have waged in support of the creation of an independent Palestinian state on the 1967 borderlines. Occupied East Jerusalem is to be the capital of that state, he told Gulf News. We are confident that the Joint List parliament representatives will spare no effort in defending the civil, political and democratic rights of the Palestinians of the 1948 areas to secure our people there real equality with the Israelis.

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March 19, 2015   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

The Ugly Truth | Zionism, Jewish extremism and a few other …

Is V15 a Conduit for American Funds to Benjamin Netanyahus Opponents? Israeli Lobby Raises Questions on Both Sides of Pond ed noteonce again, it is important in our approach as Gentiles dealing withthis thing known as the Jewish question that we come to understand the various nuances associated with how this machinery works. As evidenced bythis piece appearing inthe Forwardconsidered by many to be the vanguard as far as discussions surrounding the Jewish issue is concernedwhat we clearly have here is a picture of the turf-war taking place at present within the organized Jewish community and what its implications may be for the rest of us who are simply trying to live and breath on Gods green earth. Read the rest of this entry Read the rest of this entry Read the rest of this entry Read the rest of this entry Read the rest of this entry

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February 6, 2015   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed


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