Archive for the ‘Jewish Extremism’ Category

Jewish Extremism and Western Hypocrisy.

I’m fed up with the hypocrisy, it’s all around me, arggghhh. Anyway the dreadful attack in France of course shocked the majority of us, a terrible attack carried out by Islamist extremists. My question is, why were so many western citizens willing to support Islamist extremists in Libya and Syria? It’s simply not good enough to me that a sizable minority of people here in the west thought it was just fine to support groups with ultra conservative fundamentalist Islamic beliefs in Libya and Syria and laud them as being ”freedom fighters” while they now want to throw the baby out with the bath water over what happened in France.

In Libya and Syria the governments there were dealing with people of the Kouachi brothers’ mindset, though the difference was they weren’t just dealing with two of them, they were dealing with thousands of them (and they still are). Though people here in the west jumped on the biased western media bandwagon and started lauding these ultra conservative Islamist fellas in Libya and Syria as ”heroes” and ”freedom fighters”. I could see at the time that it was pathetic and wrong and that the ideals of these people were in opposition to our progressive ideals in several different ways.

What has the result been? Well Libya is now lawless in most parts, rebel groups that were lauded as ”freedom fighters” by westerners have been accused of crimes against humanity (by the UN) and ethnic cleansing which still goes on to this day. Leaders of the NTC in Libya turned a blind eye to the ethnic cleansing and I have evidence of that. There is no doubt that the situation of the majority of people in Libya today is worse than it was five years ago (a year before the civil war). Though so many westerners were only too happy to support the fueling of one side of that Civil War without caring about the consequences of that action. They were only too happy to get caught up in a biased media frenzy which labelled these extremists as being ”plucky rebels”. The facts are the majority of these rebel groups held a more regressive worldview than the Libyan regime that was in place at the time, that the majority of these rebels held views which were more at odds with our own than the Libyan regime of the time.

It was much the same case in Syria. Western governments, western media outlets and a sizable cohort of western citizens were only too happy to put their support behind ”rebels”. The majority of the rebels in Syria again were people who held fundamentalist Islamic beliefs (considered extreme by western standards). The majority of these rebels in Syria that were backed by many westerners want to create a more regressive Islamist based society than the largely secular state that is in place in Syria currently. Many westerners seem to have no problem in supporting Islamist extremists in the Middle East.

The regime of Gaddafi was far from perfect, the regime of Assad is far from perfect. Though are you seriously telling me these rebel folks in Libya have made Libya a better place? Are you seriously going to tell me that Libya is better off today than it was 5 years ago, that the majority of Libyans are better off now? The same goes for Syria, are you seriously going to tell me that the rebels in Syria, the majority which hold extreme fundamentalist Islamic beliefs would make Syria a better place for the majority of Syrians?

Too many westerners were willing to support people who held views completely opposed to their own progressive views here.

There seems to be a case in the west that Islamist extremism is alright so long as it’s consigned to the Middle East, that Islamist extremist fighters are ”plucky rebels” and ”freedom fighters” when they’re fighting against a regime. Islamist extremism needs to be opposed wherever it raises its head.

Islamist extremism should be opposed whether it raises its head in Libya, Syria, France or anywhere else.

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Jewish Extremism and Western Hypocrisy.

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January 17, 2015   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

On Rabin anniversary, warnings of a former extremist | The …

Yossi Klein Halevis first book, Memoirs of a Jewish Extremist, was initiallypublished on November 6, 1995 two days after the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin. An account of his youthful involvement in the violent activism fostered by Rabbi Meir Kahane in the Jewish Defense League at the turn of the 1970s, and his subsequent sobering up, it was commercially doomed by the appalling coincidence. Because of its title, a much-needed warningabout the terrible appeal of Jewish extremism and its horrific potential consequences was misperceived as a justification of such radicalism.

Klein Halevi recalls walking into a New York bookstore and being told by the owner, That book will never appear in my store. The author attempted to reason with him: I said to him, Its actually a book against Jewish extremism. And he said, I dont care what it is. That book, with that title, is not going to be in this store.’

Nineteen years later, Memoirs is now being re-released, with a new introduction that documents its strange history. Dismally, its author believes, it is actually more relevant today than it was even then, when an Israeli Jewish extremist had just gunned down the prime minister in cold blood. How so? Because, argues Halevi, Israel again finds itself embroiled in Jewish extremism, amid rising anti-democratic, violent tendencies among some of its youth, culminating earlier this summer in what he calls an unthinkable act: Jewskidnapping a 16-year-old Palestinian boy, Muhammed Abu Khdeir, and burning him alive. None of us would have believed before that happened that Jews any Jews would be capable of doing that, Halevi says. I dont believe that the Jews I knew in the JDL would have been capable of doing that.

I sat down last week with Halevi a senior fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, and the author of last years acclaimed Like Dreamers to talk about the impressionable youth whose story he recountsin Memoirs, and the anguished adult he has become. We began by discussingthe struggle for the release of Soviet Jewry, whose cause first inflamed him more than four decades ago, and the conversation moved on to the wider Jewish relationship with the rest of the world, and on through subsequent violent punctuations of the Jewish-Israeli narrative.

Yossi Klein Halevis re-released Memoirs

The interview is partly a confessional, as is the re-released Memoirs, since Klein Halevi acknowledges that Theres a link between the world I come from, the story that I tell in this book, from the Meir Kahane of Brooklyn in the late 1960s, to the Meir Kahane of Israel in the 70s and the 80s, and then to Baruch Goldstein in Hebron in 1994, to the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin in 1995, to the burning of this boy

We opened the door to self-righteous violence, he laments, the mentality that says, the whole world hates us and therefore there are no innocents in the world, there are no innocent passersby. Thats the ground from which all forms of terrorism emerge.

But it is, mainly, a cautionary tale again, as is the book a warning that it is imperative to deal with the extremist temptation and the release of moral restraint within parts of the Jewish community, which Halevi considers a threat to our soul as well as to our safety here in Israel.

When did you write Memoirs? In contrast to Like Dreamers, this wasnt a book you worked on for 11 years.

This was actually more like a 25-year book project. I started writing Memoirs in 1972, when I was 19, and I was very much in the world of Jewish militancy. I intended the book as a defense of the JDL and Meir Kahane. To my good fortune, I started taking notes. Many of the incidents and conversations that appear in the book from those years were not based on memory but on notes taken in live time.

Originally posted here:

On Rabin anniversary, warnings of a former extremist | The …

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January 13, 2015   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

Q&A with Yossi Klein Halevi: Jewish extremists endanger …

Yossi Klein Halevi. Photo by Ilir Bajraktari

In 1972, when Yossi Klein Halevi began writing a book that 23 years later would become his Memoirs of a Jewish Extremist, he was just 19 and allied with the extremist right wing of the Free Soviet Jewry movement.

As a follower of Rabbi Meir Kahane (assassinated in 1990) and a member of Kahanes Jewish Defense League (JDL), Halevi used his journalistic ability to clarify world events on behalf of the JDL. At the time, he still lived in his native New York City, so his role was to filter news about Israel and Jews through a prism largely shaped by the fear of another Holocaust, in which Jews and Israelis felt themselves unwelcome neighbors in a hostile gentile world.

The young Halevi likely never could have imagined that one day he would write a rebuke of Jewish extremism, saying it preaches ideas that are anathema to Judaism.

Halevis memoir was first published in 1995, almost to the day of the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin by the Jewish extremist Yigal Amir. Memoirs of a Jewish Extremist chronicles Halevis evolution from his teens into his late 20s. His other books, At the Entrance to the Garden of Eden and, most recently, the National Jewish Book award-winning Like Dreamers, have become known not for extremism, but rather for thoughtful moderation steeped in the authors love for Judaism and Israel.

The re-release of Memoirs in October could not have come at a more appropriate time, as a new brand of Palestinian terrorism of cars and knives shakes Israel, and vandalism, assaults and the murder of an Arab teen by three Jewish extremists all have made Jerusalem feel in recent months like a city waiting to explode into a war of neighbor versus neighbor.

On Nov. 29, extremist Jews lit a Jerusalem bilingual Jewish-Arab school on fire and spray-painted inciteful anti-Arab messages, including one that read, Kahane was right.

In a Nov. 19 interview with the Jewish Journal, one day after a brutal terrorist attack at a Har Nof synagogue just outside Jerusalem, where four Jews were murdered during morning prayers, Halevi described the feeling among Israelis as, Anything can happen at any moment.

What follows is an edited transcript of the interview:

Jewish Journal: There are some calls now to cede Arab parts of Jerusalem to the Palestinians so as to separate Jews and Muslims. Would that help ease tensions in the city?

Link:

Q&A with Yossi Klein Halevi: Jewish extremists endanger …

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December 16, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

Jewish Extremism – The WarningStar Intelligencer

Today, sadly, we buried my grandfather, Dr. Herman Miller.

As I wrote in my first post Game On my grandfather helped establish WarningStar Intelligence. Having lived 99 and half years, he brought a priceless infusion of knowledge, experience, and insight into this young company. Now, with his passing, his gentle spirit continues to inspire us.

At the gravesite, we stood and said the mourners Kaddish, the Jewish prayer that asserts belief in God despite our terrible loss.

Though my grandfather embraced his Jewish identity and was a lifelong supporter of Jewish and Israeli causes, he was no theist. As a trained physician and a man of science born in the early 20thcentury, he witnessed the horror of the Holocaust which, in addition to killing Six Million Jews, also murdered the faith of countless more who couldnt understand how their chosen god would allow such travesty.

Dr. Miller was quite critical of religiosity, especially within his own faith-community of Judaism. As many secular Jews do, my grandfather felt contempt for the radical Hasidic Jews in Israel who dressed in medieval garb, took welfare from the state while righteously condemning it at the same time. He was also critical of liberal Reform Judaism of which he was a part until he left, because of certain rabbis’ focus on money and membership dues.

Now, personally I happen to believe in a Creative Intelligence (no pun intended.) Ive had many great debates with my grandfather about theology and philosophy and was never able to convince him otherwise. But I suspect that my grandfather might concede defeat as he finds himself in a heavenly abode reunited with his lost loved ones. Of course, I could be wrong, but one can hope!

So as our family ritualistically recited the Kaddish prayers, I silently gazed at my grandfathers casket and couldnt help but think about Judaism and the problems within the religion that manifest in extreme forms today.

While my grandfather was being buried in America, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahutook an opportunityto condemn so-called price tag attacks carried out by religious Jewish extremists.

Price Tag Attacks are acts of vengeance carried out by radical religious – often youths – against a variety of targets: Arabs, Christians, Israeli security forces. They are attacks intended to exact a price for perceived or real offensives against the Jewish communities of the West Bank. Offensives could be anything from an actual terror attack against Jewish settlers to the Israeli government tearing down an illegal outpost.

In other words, price tag attacks are meant to serve as deterrents.

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Jewish Extremism – The WarningStar Intelligencer

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December 10, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

George Galloway on ‘Jewish extremism’ – Video



George Galloway on 'Jewish extremism'
On the latest Comment show, George Galloway talks 'Jewish extremism'.

By: PressTVUK

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George Galloway on ‘Jewish extremism’ – Video

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Press TV Viewer Slams George Galloway’s Stance on ‘Jewish Extremism’ – Video



Press TV Viewer Slams George Galloway's Stance on 'Jewish Extremism'
On the latest episode of Comment, George Galloway and a Press TV caller argue on 'Jewish extremism', Israel and Palestine.

By: PressTVUK

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Press TV Viewer Slams George Galloway’s Stance on ‘Jewish Extremism’ – Video

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Comment with George Galloway on ‘Jewish extremism’ and ISIL – Video



Comment with George Galloway on 'Jewish extremism' and ISIL
On this week's episode of Comment, George discusses the threat of ISIL and the effective fight against them and how Jewish extremism can be dealt with.

By: PressTVUK

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Comment with George Galloway on ‘Jewish extremism’ and ISIL – Video

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George Galloway: Jewish Extremism – Video



George Galloway: Jewish Extremism
George mentions his personal experience of Jewish Extremism Show: Comment source: http://www.presstv.com/live.html.

By: Realenlighten

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George Galloway: Jewish Extremism – Video

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November 16, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

George Galloway with an angry Jewish caller – Video



George Galloway with an angry Jewish caller
George made an a example of the current show's topic about “Jewish Extremism” Show: Comment source: http://www.presstv.com/live.html.

By: Realenlighten

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George Galloway with an angry Jewish caller – Video

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November 14, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

Jewish Extremism and Western Hypocrisy.

I’m fed up with the hypocrisy, it’s all around me, arggghhh. Anyway the dreadful attack in France of course shocked the majority of us, a terrible attack carried out by Islamist extremists. My question is, why were so many western citizens willing to support Islamist extremists in Libya and Syria? It’s simply not good enough to me that a sizable minority of people here in the west thought it was just fine to support groups with ultra conservative fundamentalist Islamic beliefs in Libya and Syria and laud them as being ”freedom fighters” while they now want to throw the baby out with the bath water over what happened in France. In Libya and Syria the governments there were dealing with people of the Kouachi brothers’ mindset, though the difference was they weren’t just dealing with two of them, they were dealing with thousands of them (and they still are). Though people here in the west jumped on the biased western media bandwagon and started lauding these ultra conservative Islamist fellas in Libya and Syria as ”heroes” and ”freedom fighters”. I could see at the time that it was pathetic and wrong and that the ideals of these people were in opposition to our progressive ideals in several different ways. What has the result been? Well Libya is now lawless in most parts, rebel groups that were lauded as ”freedom fighters” by westerners have been accused of crimes against humanity (by the UN) and ethnic cleansing which still goes on to this day. Leaders of the NTC in Libya turned a blind eye to the ethnic cleansing and I have evidence of that. There is no doubt that the situation of the majority of people in Libya today is worse than it was five years ago (a year before the civil war). Though so many westerners were only too happy to support the fueling of one side of that Civil War without caring about the consequences of that action. They were only too happy to get caught up in a biased media frenzy which labelled these extremists as being ”plucky rebels”. The facts are the majority of these rebel groups held a more regressive worldview than the Libyan regime that was in place at the time, that the majority of these rebels held views which were more at odds with our own than the Libyan regime of the time. It was much the same case in Syria. Western governments, western media outlets and a sizable cohort of western citizens were only too happy to put their support behind ”rebels”. The majority of the rebels in Syria again were people who held fundamentalist Islamic beliefs (considered extreme by western standards). The majority of these rebels in Syria that were backed by many westerners want to create a more regressive Islamist based society than the largely secular state that is in place in Syria currently. Many westerners seem to have no problem in supporting Islamist extremists in the Middle East. The regime of Gaddafi was far from perfect, the regime of Assad is far from perfect. Though are you seriously telling me these rebel folks in Libya have made Libya a better place? Are you seriously going to tell me that Libya is better off today than it was 5 years ago, that the majority of Libyans are better off now? The same goes for Syria, are you seriously going to tell me that the rebels in Syria, the majority which hold extreme fundamentalist Islamic beliefs would make Syria a better place for the majority of Syrians? Too many westerners were willing to support people who held views completely opposed to their own progressive views here. There seems to be a case in the west that Islamist extremism is alright so long as it’s consigned to the Middle East, that Islamist extremist fighters are ”plucky rebels” and ”freedom fighters” when they’re fighting against a regime. Islamist extremism needs to be opposed wherever it raises its head. Islamist extremism should be opposed whether it raises its head in Libya, Syria, France or anywhere else.

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January 17, 2015   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

On Rabin anniversary, warnings of a former extremist | The …

Yossi Klein Halevis first book, Memoirs of a Jewish Extremist, was initiallypublished on November 6, 1995 two days after the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin. An account of his youthful involvement in the violent activism fostered by Rabbi Meir Kahane in the Jewish Defense League at the turn of the 1970s, and his subsequent sobering up, it was commercially doomed by the appalling coincidence. Because of its title, a much-needed warningabout the terrible appeal of Jewish extremism and its horrific potential consequences was misperceived as a justification of such radicalism. Klein Halevi recalls walking into a New York bookstore and being told by the owner, That book will never appear in my store. The author attempted to reason with him: I said to him, Its actually a book against Jewish extremism. And he said, I dont care what it is. That book, with that title, is not going to be in this store.’ Nineteen years later, Memoirs is now being re-released, with a new introduction that documents its strange history. Dismally, its author believes, it is actually more relevant today than it was even then, when an Israeli Jewish extremist had just gunned down the prime minister in cold blood. How so? Because, argues Halevi, Israel again finds itself embroiled in Jewish extremism, amid rising anti-democratic, violent tendencies among some of its youth, culminating earlier this summer in what he calls an unthinkable act: Jewskidnapping a 16-year-old Palestinian boy, Muhammed Abu Khdeir, and burning him alive. None of us would have believed before that happened that Jews any Jews would be capable of doing that, Halevi says. I dont believe that the Jews I knew in the JDL would have been capable of doing that. I sat down last week with Halevi a senior fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, and the author of last years acclaimed Like Dreamers to talk about the impressionable youth whose story he recountsin Memoirs, and the anguished adult he has become. We began by discussingthe struggle for the release of Soviet Jewry, whose cause first inflamed him more than four decades ago, and the conversation moved on to the wider Jewish relationship with the rest of the world, and on through subsequent violent punctuations of the Jewish-Israeli narrative. Yossi Klein Halevis re-released Memoirs The interview is partly a confessional, as is the re-released Memoirs, since Klein Halevi acknowledges that Theres a link between the world I come from, the story that I tell in this book, from the Meir Kahane of Brooklyn in the late 1960s, to the Meir Kahane of Israel in the 70s and the 80s, and then to Baruch Goldstein in Hebron in 1994, to the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin in 1995, to the burning of this boy We opened the door to self-righteous violence, he laments, the mentality that says, the whole world hates us and therefore there are no innocents in the world, there are no innocent passersby. Thats the ground from which all forms of terrorism emerge. But it is, mainly, a cautionary tale again, as is the book a warning that it is imperative to deal with the extremist temptation and the release of moral restraint within parts of the Jewish community, which Halevi considers a threat to our soul as well as to our safety here in Israel. When did you write Memoirs? In contrast to Like Dreamers, this wasnt a book you worked on for 11 years. This was actually more like a 25-year book project. I started writing Memoirs in 1972, when I was 19, and I was very much in the world of Jewish militancy. I intended the book as a defense of the JDL and Meir Kahane. To my good fortune, I started taking notes. Many of the incidents and conversations that appear in the book from those years were not based on memory but on notes taken in live time.

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January 13, 2015   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

Q&A with Yossi Klein Halevi: Jewish extremists endanger …

Yossi Klein Halevi. Photo by Ilir Bajraktari In 1972, when Yossi Klein Halevi began writing a book that 23 years later would become his Memoirs of a Jewish Extremist, he was just 19 and allied with the extremist right wing of the Free Soviet Jewry movement. As a follower of Rabbi Meir Kahane (assassinated in 1990) and a member of Kahanes Jewish Defense League (JDL), Halevi used his journalistic ability to clarify world events on behalf of the JDL. At the time, he still lived in his native New York City, so his role was to filter news about Israel and Jews through a prism largely shaped by the fear of another Holocaust, in which Jews and Israelis felt themselves unwelcome neighbors in a hostile gentile world. The young Halevi likely never could have imagined that one day he would write a rebuke of Jewish extremism, saying it preaches ideas that are anathema to Judaism. Halevis memoir was first published in 1995, almost to the day of the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin by the Jewish extremist Yigal Amir. Memoirs of a Jewish Extremist chronicles Halevis evolution from his teens into his late 20s. His other books, At the Entrance to the Garden of Eden and, most recently, the National Jewish Book award-winning Like Dreamers, have become known not for extremism, but rather for thoughtful moderation steeped in the authors love for Judaism and Israel. The re-release of Memoirs in October could not have come at a more appropriate time, as a new brand of Palestinian terrorism of cars and knives shakes Israel, and vandalism, assaults and the murder of an Arab teen by three Jewish extremists all have made Jerusalem feel in recent months like a city waiting to explode into a war of neighbor versus neighbor. On Nov. 29, extremist Jews lit a Jerusalem bilingual Jewish-Arab school on fire and spray-painted inciteful anti-Arab messages, including one that read, Kahane was right. In a Nov. 19 interview with the Jewish Journal, one day after a brutal terrorist attack at a Har Nof synagogue just outside Jerusalem, where four Jews were murdered during morning prayers, Halevi described the feeling among Israelis as, Anything can happen at any moment. What follows is an edited transcript of the interview: Jewish Journal: There are some calls now to cede Arab parts of Jerusalem to the Palestinians so as to separate Jews and Muslims. Would that help ease tensions in the city?

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December 16, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

Jewish Extremism – The WarningStar Intelligencer

Today, sadly, we buried my grandfather, Dr. Herman Miller. As I wrote in my first post Game On my grandfather helped establish WarningStar Intelligence. Having lived 99 and half years, he brought a priceless infusion of knowledge, experience, and insight into this young company. Now, with his passing, his gentle spirit continues to inspire us. At the gravesite, we stood and said the mourners Kaddish, the Jewish prayer that asserts belief in God despite our terrible loss. Though my grandfather embraced his Jewish identity and was a lifelong supporter of Jewish and Israeli causes, he was no theist. As a trained physician and a man of science born in the early 20thcentury, he witnessed the horror of the Holocaust which, in addition to killing Six Million Jews, also murdered the faith of countless more who couldnt understand how their chosen god would allow such travesty. Dr. Miller was quite critical of religiosity, especially within his own faith-community of Judaism. As many secular Jews do, my grandfather felt contempt for the radical Hasidic Jews in Israel who dressed in medieval garb, took welfare from the state while righteously condemning it at the same time. He was also critical of liberal Reform Judaism of which he was a part until he left, because of certain rabbis’ focus on money and membership dues. Now, personally I happen to believe in a Creative Intelligence (no pun intended.) Ive had many great debates with my grandfather about theology and philosophy and was never able to convince him otherwise. But I suspect that my grandfather might concede defeat as he finds himself in a heavenly abode reunited with his lost loved ones. Of course, I could be wrong, but one can hope! So as our family ritualistically recited the Kaddish prayers, I silently gazed at my grandfathers casket and couldnt help but think about Judaism and the problems within the religion that manifest in extreme forms today. While my grandfather was being buried in America, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahutook an opportunityto condemn so-called price tag attacks carried out by religious Jewish extremists. Price Tag Attacks are acts of vengeance carried out by radical religious – often youths – against a variety of targets: Arabs, Christians, Israeli security forces. They are attacks intended to exact a price for perceived or real offensives against the Jewish communities of the West Bank. Offensives could be anything from an actual terror attack against Jewish settlers to the Israeli government tearing down an illegal outpost. In other words, price tag attacks are meant to serve as deterrents.

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December 10, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

George Galloway on ‘Jewish extremism’ – Video




George Galloway on'Jewish extremism' On the latest Comment show, George Galloway talks'Jewish extremism'. By: PressTVUK

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November 19, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

Press TV Viewer Slams George Galloway’s Stance on ‘Jewish Extremism’ – Video




Press TV Viewer Slams George Galloway's Stance on'Jewish Extremism' On the latest episode of Comment, George Galloway and a Press TV caller argue on'Jewish extremism', Israel and Palestine. By: PressTVUK

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November 17, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

Comment with George Galloway on ‘Jewish extremism’ and ISIL – Video




Comment with George Galloway on'Jewish extremism' and ISIL On this week's episode of Comment, George discusses the threat of ISIL and the effective fight against them and how Jewish extremism can be dealt with. By: PressTVUK

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November 17, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

George Galloway: Jewish Extremism – Video




George Galloway: Jewish Extremism George mentions his personal experience of Jewish Extremism Show: Comment source: http://www.presstv.com/live.html. By: Realenlighten

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November 16, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed

George Galloway with an angry Jewish caller – Video




George Galloway with an angry Jewish caller George made an a example of the current show's topic about “Jewish Extremism” Show: Comment source: http://www.presstv.com/live.html. By: Realenlighten

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November 14, 2014   Posted in: Jewish Extremism  Comments Closed


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