Archive for the ‘Jewish’ Category

JAY-Z Addresses Kanye Feud, Solange, Controversial Jewish Lyric in New Interview: Watch – Pitchfork

In a new interview following the release of 4:44, JAY-Z sat down with Rap Radar hosts Elliott Wilson and Brian B.Dot Miller to talk about his alleged beef with Kanye, the elevator incident with Solange, and criticism of his controversial lyric about Jewish people on The Story of O.J. In response to speculation that he was taking shots at Kanye on the opening track Kill Jay Z, Jay explains: Its not even about a Kanye diss. Its not a diss, Im talking to myself the whole time. He continues: Im not talking about Kanye when I say, You dropped out of school, you lost your principles, I’m talking about me! Watch part one of the interview below.

Jay admits, however, that he was upset from Kanyes comments during his on-stage rant at his abbreviated Saint Pablo tour stop in Sacramento. You got hurt, because this guy was talking about you on a stage, Jay said. But what really hurt me, you cant bring my kid or my wife into it… Weve gotten past bigger issues, but you brought my family into it, now its a problem with me.

Regarding the elevator incident with Solange, Jay says: Weve always had a great relationship… Weve had one disagreement. Before and after, weve been cool. He continues, Thats my sister. Not my sister-in-law, no, my sister. Period. In response to the question, What do you think when people say three great albums came out of this situation? Jay replied: I think we went into that elevator great artists. That doesnt surprise me.

Jay also responded to criticism that a line from the song The Story of O.J. fed into anti-Semitic stereotypes. He raps: You wanna know whats more important than throwin away money at a strip club? Credit/ You ever wonder why Jewish people own all the property in America? This how they did it. Following the LPs release in July, the Anti-Defamation League issued a statement: Such notions have lingered in society for decades, and we are concerned that this lyric could feed into preconceived notions about Jews and alleged Jewish control of the banks and finance.

When he was asked if he was surprised that the particular lyric was met with such resistance. Jay responded, Its hard for me to take that serious, because I exaggerated every black image in the world. He continued to explain that The Story of O.J. and its video addressed black stereotypes, and the lyric referring to Jewish people was exaggeration as well. Context is everything, he says. In the context of the song, Im trying say, you guys did it right!

He continues:

If even you, as the Jewish community, if you dont have a problem with the exaggerations of the guy eating watermelon and all the things that was happening If you dont have a problem with that, and thats the only line you pick out, then you are being a hypocrite. I cant address that in a real way. I gotta leave that where it is.

It was exaggeration. Of course I know Jewish people dont own all the property in the world. I mean, I own things! [laughs] It was an exaggeration, much like that racist cartoon.

Finally, Jay addressed the speculation that he was also dissing Future on Kill Jay Z, in which he raps: I dont even know what you woulda done, in the Future, other niggas playin football with your son. I really dont mean any malice, Jay says. Im not discrediting all step-pops in the world. It was a line to say, that could happen to me in my future. It just so happened that his name was Future, and then I just made a scheme out of it. He concludes: I wasnt trying to put Future down. We just made a song together, I dont have any problems with him.

This video interview follows JAY-Zs latest Footnotes video in which he discusses the importance of therapy. Previous videos include the Lupita Nyongo-starring video for JAY-Zs James Blake collaboration MaNyfaCedGod and the visual for Moonlight, which stars Jerrod Carmichael, Issa Rae, Tiffany Haddish, and more.

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JAY-Z Addresses Kanye Feud, Solange, Controversial Jewish Lyric in New Interview: Watch – Pitchfork

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From Charlottesville To Barcelona: The Jewish Response – HuffPost

“See, I give you today blessing and curse,” – Deuteronomy 11:26.

The horrific events of this past week – from Charlottesville to Barcelona – have brought these staggering words culled from this week’s Torah portion to the forefront of our consciousness.

First, we ought to recognize that goodness exists in our world. God’s blessings are given to us “today” and every day. Sometimes, they are found in the places we expect them least.

A woman once wrote a letter to the late Lubavitcher Rebbe complaining that her children are “rebellious” and “disrespectful.” The Rebbe, who was childless, responded movingly (among other gems of wisdom): “You complain about your children and their behaviors. But I ask you: do you know how many childless couples would give everything they have just to have children, as you do?” The Rebbe’s message was clear: Sometimes, all we need to do is open up our eyes and “see” the blessings of God that are given to us every day, and everywhere.

But God has also given our world its fair share of “curses.” In the past few days alone, we have witnessed some of these curses spewed by its most evil perpetrators, from the KKK to ISIS, from “white supremacists” to “jihadists.” Indeed, curses exist. And sadly and painfully, we must recognize them, and the evil that they spread, as a fait-tabli. For, too often, we rush to rationalize – or, at least, explain – why evil happens. “It’s not their fault,” someone told me the other day. “These bad people are brainwashed… and they live in dire circumstance; that’s all.” But if it isn’t ‘their fault’, then whose fault is it? And can that possibly justify their evil?

It is thus high time we stop offering excuses for these evil perpetrators. Evil is not a relative force; evil is absolute, and it must be treated as such. For if we cannot do so, with utmost clarity, how will we ever be able to stand up to it to ensure that good ultimately triumphs?

But beyond “seeing” and recognizing the evil curses of our world, we must also respond to them with unwavering action.

It is our hope that our world’s governments and leaders will do what they can to combat this horrific new wave of evil. But our response must be more personal. And whilst some choose to speak “out,” it would behoove us to, first and foremost, speak “in” and fill our minds, our hearts, and the walls of our homes, with words and actions of goodness.

We can “go out,” make noise and protest all sorts of forces, from political to philosophical. But it would better serve us and our world if we first “go in,” and with the silent music of love, educate our families, our friends, our neighbors, our communities, and even our influential “connections,” with the eternal values of our Torah and its commandments.

This is a quiet heroism – there are no flamboyant shows and loud shouts, no Facebook rants and dramatic gestures that capture attention. For it is not enough to focus on that which we are fighting against; we must also know that which we are fighting for. I am not so nave as to believe that good deeds alone will eradicate evil from the world. But we can, and ought to, shape the world – the world in which we live – by our actions.

In 1948, just three years following the Holocaust, Chaim Weizmann, the first president of the State of Israel broadcasted a famous call to Jews worldwide: “After Hitler murdered a third of the Jewish nation, it is the foremost duty of every Jew to be a ‘third more’ Jewish. Please, I beg every Jew in the world, be a ‘third more’ Jewish. Triple your prayers, triple your good deeds, and make up for the third of our nation that was so brutally decimated.”

Similarly, after witnessing such evil among us, we must do everything in our power to increase our deeds of goodness and holiness, from prayer to charity, from lighting Shabbat candles every Friday, to doing a stranger a favor, from Torah study to lending a helping hand, from eradicating gossip from our midst to infusing our social circles with words of kindness, and positive influence.

Let us partner with God, and create new Divine blessings in our world, for all humanity, and for all future generations, to “see, today, and every day.

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From Charlottesville To Barcelona: The Jewish Response – HuffPost

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Barcelona Chief Rabbi Tells Jews After Attack: ‘Get Out, Go To Israel’ – Newsweek

The chief rabbi of Catalonia has told Jews that they should leave the Spanish regionand move to Israel because of fears of further radical Islamist attacks.

Rabbi Meir Bar-Hen, in an interview with the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, called Spain a “hub of Islamist terror for all of Europe.” His comments came after two vehicle-ramming attacks that left a total of 14 people dead on a famous Barcelona boulevardand ina seaside town south of the northern Spanish city. The Islamic State militant group (ISIS) claimed responsibility for the van attack in central Barcelona late Thursday that also injured more than 100 people.

“Jews are not here permanently,”he said. “I tell my congregants: Dont think were here for good. And I encourage them to buy property in Israel. This place is lost. Dont repeat the mistake of Algerian Jews, of Venezuelan Jews. Better [get out] early than late.” He was referring to two countries where Jewish populations have dwindled because of persecution.

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The Jewish community resumed their services on Friday in preparation for the Shabbat after the assaults a day earlier, despite a manhunt for the driver who fled the scene on the Las Ramblas avenue on foot.

Bar-Hen said that “radicial fringes” ofMuslim communities in northern Spain were the biggest threat to its Jewish communities. “Europe is lost,” he said, adding that when radical Islamists are “living among you…it’s very difficult to get rid of them. They only get stronger.”

People gather around tributes laid on Las Ramblas near the scene of yesterday’s terrorist attack, on August 18, 2017 in Barcelona, Spain. Carl Court/Getty

Jewish leaders across Europe have expressed concern about a rise of radical Islamist attacks, some that have directly targeted Jewish sites: “We are yet again witness to another terrorist attack in Europe perpetrated against innocent civilians,” saidMoshe Kantor, president of the European Jewish Congress.

“They are choosing to strike again at our zest for life and our basic freedoms with their cult of death. It is becoming increasingly difficult to prevent this abuse of regular vehicles as their chosen instrument of murder,” he added.

Recent attacks against Jewish targets in Europeinclude an ISIS sympathizer besieging a kosher supermarket in Paris in January 2015, a shooting at a synagogue in Copenhagen and a Jewish teacher who was stabbed by three men in the southern French city of Marseille, one who was wearing an ISIS t-shirt. In 2014, a gunman opened fire at the Jewish Museum of Belgium in Brussels, killing four people.

The European Jewish Congress estimates that around 15,000 Jews live in the Barcelona area, out of a total of 45,000 in Spain.

The country once served as a historicallysignificanthub for European Jews until the Spanish Inquisition forced hundreds of thousands of Sephardic Jews to leave. Under the Granada Edict, they were given the choice of departing the country, converting to Christianity or facing death.

Spain has tried to correct that centuries-old decision, passing a law that allows descendants of those who were expelled to reclaim theirSpanish nationality.

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Barcelona Chief Rabbi Tells Jews After Attack: ‘Get Out, Go To Israel’ – Newsweek

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2 of America’s most famous Jewish writers urge Jared and Ivanka … – Vox

Beloved Jewish novelists and married couple Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman are taking a stand against President Donald Trump in the wake of his response to last weekends white supremacist march in Charlottesville.

Jews will not replace us, the marchers chanted, some of them waving swastikas. They reportedly attacked counterprotesters by dousing them with pepper spray and lighter fluid and swinging lit torches at them. But Trump ultimately defended the marchers as people who were very quietly protesting and suggested that many sides were responsible for the violence. “What about the alt-left that came charging at the, as you say, the alt-right? he demanded.

Chabon and Waldman are having none of it. In an open letter published on Medium, addressed to our fellow Jews, in the United States, in Israel, and around the world, they declare that Trump has, at last, shown his true colors: He has allied himself with anti-Semitics and white supremacists.

The question is, they write, what are you going to do about it? If you dont feel, or cant show, any concern, pain or understanding for the persecution and demonization of others, at least show a little self-interest. At least show a little sechel. At the very least, show a little self-respect.

Jews still working for the Trump administration should resign, they write, and those who consider the Trump administration to be allies including the Israeli government should wise up.

But they reserve special instructions for the Jewish members of Trumps family, Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump:

To Jared Kushner: You have one minute to do whatever it takes to keep the history of your people from looking back on you as among its greatest traitors, and greatest fools; that minute is nearly past. To Ivanka Trump: Allow us to teach you an ancient and venerable phrase, long employed by Jewish parents and children to one another at such moments of family crisis: Ill sit shiva for you [the implication being, because youre dead to me]. Try it out on your father; see how it goes.

Chabon became a literary celebrity after the 1988 publication of his first novel, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, but perhaps his most beloved book is the literary comic book riff The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, which won the 2001 Pulitzer. Waldman, who was born in Israel, is a former lawyer who now writes mystery novels and essays about mothering.

Among all the bleak and violent truths that found confirmation or came slouching into view amid the torchlight of Charlottesville is this, Chabon and Waldman conclude: Any Jew, anywhere, who does not act to oppose President Donald Trump and his administration acts in favor of anti-Semitism; any Jew who does not condemn the President, directly and by name, for his racism, white supremacism, intolerance and Jew hatred, condones all of those things.

You can read the full letter here.

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Jewish Shark Tank’ helps entrepreneurs find success – News 12 Brooklyn

WILLIAMSBURG –

A former rabbi is helping entrepreneurs in Brooklyn find success through a web show he calls the Jewish version of ‘Shark Tank.’

A panel of investors sits on the set of Biz Tank and listens to entrepreneurs pitch their ideas, much like the popular hit ABC television show Shark Tank.

Joel Klein says Biz Tank has had 50 business pitches since it started.

They have seen everything from wine bottles covered in chocolate to a bib designed to keep babies safe.

One of the shows first contestants secured a $90,000 investment for his pet bed and supply company.

Klein says although about 70 percent of the contestants are Jewish, it is not a requirement for them to be.

He says about $6 million in deals have been invested.

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Jewish Shark Tank’ helps entrepreneurs find success – News 12 Brooklyn

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The Last Jewish Community Holding Out Against Zionism – Haaretz

skip – googletagmanagerskip – redirectProbability skip – adBlock detector skip – skip – Visual Revenue skip – skip – skip – logo schema for googleskip – infolinks- inread skip – skip – googletagmanagerskip – redirectProbability skip – AddBolcker Rabbi Mordechai Mintzberg at his home in the ultra-Orthodox neighborhood of Mea She’arim, Jerusalem. “Weve succeeded in getting through the past 200 years in the same fashion.” Emil Salman

The ultra-Orthodox group Edah Haredit does not believe in the State of Israel, Zionism or the Israeli army. One of its most prominent members, Rabbi Mordechai Mintzberg, says the group will never sell out, unlike the rest of the Haredi public

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Exhibit featuring Jewish contributions to North Dakota comes to Bonanzaville – Bismarck Tribune

WEST FARGO — As the rest of the country is grappling with how to understand racial divides after violence erupted at a neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Va. Aug. 12, Bonanzaville unveiled a new exhibit that celebrates the contributions and culture of Jewish families that helped shape North Dakota.

The yearlong exhibit, titled The North Dakota Jewish Experience: Shvitzing It Out on the Prairie, explores the history and lives of Jewish homesteaders.

The idea for the showcase was sparked after a May 21 rededication of the Jewish Homesteaders Cemetery in Ashley, which contains the graves of about 28 pioneer Jewish farmers. The rededication was followed by the July 4 placement of a plaque honoring Jewish settlers in the Dakota Territory next to South Pleasant Church at Bonanzaville.

Those events really sparked a lot of interest throughout the community, said Bonanzaville Executive Director Brenda Warren. We decided to educate our community and our visitors on what great contributions the Jewish immigrants made to North Dakota and our country.

Bonanzavilles exhibit, which includes a timeline of Jewish and artifacts of Jewish culture donated by area families, opened to a reception attended by nearly 100 people on Tuesday.

The story of North Dakota is a proud saga of hard work and dedication to the community, said Rabbi Yonah Grossman, who founded the Chabad Jewish Center in Fargo.

After the U.S. Homestead Act of 1862, flocks of immigrants made their way west and into the Dakota Territory, and thousands of Jewish settlers made their home in the upper Great Plains.

At one time, North Dakota had the fourth largest number of homesteaders working plats of land, said Steve Hunegs, executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas.

At least 800 Jewish individuals filed for land between 1880 and 1916, usually settling in clusters around the state. The first Jewish settlement in North Dakota was in 1882 when about 11 families settled near Devils Lake, according to the Bonanzaville exhibit.

Millions of Jewish families were fleeing the Russian empires persecution during that time, including Rabbi Benjamin Papermaster, who arrived in Fargo in 1891 from Kovno, Lithuania.

Papermaster settled in Grand Forks and organized a collection of Russian and German Jewish families into a congregation, serving as the rabbi of the Grand Forks Jewish community until 1934. As a circuit rabbi, he traveled across the area to circumcise babies, and officiate weddings, funerals and other events.

In 1896, the Temple Beth El synagogue was chartered in Fargo. It remains one of only two active synagogues left in North Dakota, along with B’nai Israel Congregation in Grand Forks.

Many settlers farmed or landed in towns created around the railroad lines and operated general stores.

Over the years, many Jewish individuals made great impacts on Fargo and its economy. Myron Bright was a judge on the 8th District Circuit Court of Appeals from 1968 until his death in 2016. The longest-serving Fargo mayor was Herschel Lashkowitz, who stood at the citys helm from 1954 to 1974. In 1968, Harold Doroshow and his wife opened North Dakotas first McDonalds in Fargo.

Many Jewish families left the area after staying the necessary five years to acquire a full land title under the Homestead Act. North Dakotas Jewish population is now about 400, which is fewer than any other state except South Dakota, according to Robin Doroshow, executive director of the Jewish Historical Society of the Upper Midwest.

Fargo Mayor Tim Mahoney said the exhibit will help bring an understanding of different cultures to this area at a time when it is most needed.

We have to kill the hate, Mahoney said. We all have to love one another, we have to love all of the cultures and the more we show these things about them, the more we can understand.

The exhibit will remain open until August 2018 and could become a permanent display, Warren said.

Bonanzaville is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday through Aug. 31.

The exhibit was created at the Bonanzaville pavilion with the Jewish Historical Society of the Upper Midwest, the Chabad Jewish Center of North Dakota, and the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas. It was designed by Curator Typhanie Schaffer and North Dakota State University professor Angela Smith.

Readers can reach Forum reporter Wendy Reuer at (701) 241-5530

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For Jewish Americans, echoes of the Holocaust and anger over … – Los Angeles Times

Dina Chernick had just arrived for breakfast Thursday at a Jewish deli in the Pico-Robertson neighborhood, but she already had a bad case of indigestion. She could thank President Trump for that.

Heres this guy and hes talking about uniting the country and then he makes these terribly divisive statements, said Chernick, an attorney in West Los Angeles who likened Trump to a salesman peddling snake-oil instead of soothing balm.

Even at a distance, Chernick said, it was horrifying to see anti-Semitic, white nationalist demonstrators marching through the streets of Charlottesville, Va., their hard faces illuminated by blazing torch light. It makes me terribly sad, she said.

From a political standpoint, the criticism was hardly surprising. The overwhelming majority of Jewish Americans, like Chernick, voted for Hillary Clinton.

But even some Trump supporters and Jewish Republicans have condemned the presidents spread-the-blame response and statement that there were some very fine people mixed among the white supremacists and neo-Nazis who brought violence to the idyllic college town.

There are no good Nazis and no good members of the [Ku Klux] Klan, the Republican Jewish Coalition said in a statement.

We join with our political and religious brethren in calling upon President Trump to provide greater moral clarity in rejecting racism, bigotry, and antisemitism, the statement said.

Trump has weathered a difficult relationship with the American Jewish community. While professing fierce loyalty to Israel, a touchstone for many Jews, he has given offense on more than one occasion.

Noah Bierman and David Lauter

At a presidential forum in 2015, he summoned a familiar canard by boasting of his wealth and telling his audience of Jewish donors, Im a negotiator like you folks.

Seven months later, he tweeted a graphic critical of Hillary Clinton that featured a pile of cash and a six-pointed star resembling the Jewish Star of David. Soon after he took office, the White House issued a statement marking International Holocaust Remembrance Day that made no mention of the 6 million Jews who perished.

Some have been discomfited by the presence of Trump advisor Stephen K. Bannon, who ran the Breitbart website giving a platform to white nationalists. Bannon is now installed as chief political strategist in the White House.

But for many Jews, the violence in Charlottesville on Saturday and Trumps vacillating response were of a whole other order.

No one, whether Republican, independent or a Democrat wants to see the Klan or Nazis parading down the streets of the United States, as if theyre taking over, said Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder and dean of Los Angeles Simon Wiesenthal Center, named after the famed Nazi hunter, and its Museum of Tolerance.

No one could ever compare neo-Nazis, the Klan and white supremacists to demonstrators that are demonstrating against them, said Hier, who delivered one of several prayers at Trumps inauguration. To equate the two sides, he went on, is preposterous.

The leading organization of Orthodox rabbis also weighed in with a statement condemning the presidents comparing white supremacist marchers to counter-demonstrators in Charlottesville.

There is no moral comparison, said Rabbi Elazar Muskin, president of the Rabbinical Council of America. Failure to unequivocally reject hatred and bias is a failing of moral leadership and fans the flames of intolerance and chauvinism.

The statement, issued Wednesday, was the second by the organization and was aimed directly at the president, a contrast with an initial response that more generally criticized violence and bigotry in Charlottesville without mentioning Trump.

Rabbi Mark Dratch, the groups executive vice president, said the council was moved to offer its more pointed statement after the president fell back Tuesday on his position that both sides shared blame for the violence around the white nationalist rally.

We feel that, really, instead of putting an end to the criticism and the troubles that his statements were causing, it further fanned them, Dratch said.

The statement was particularly notable given Trumps support among Orthodox Jews, who, unlike more secular Jews, supported the president in large numbers. (Jews constitute about 3% of the electorate.)

In a personal slap, the rabbi who oversaw the conversion of Trumps daughter Ivanka to Judaism issued an open letter to Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun, a Modern Orthodox synagogue on New York’s Upper East Side, in which he castigated the president for his remarks.

We are appalled by this resurgence of bigotry and anti-Semitism, and the renewed vigor of the neo-Nazis, KKK and alt-right, read the letter, published by New York Magazine and signed by Haskel Lookstein as well as rabbis Chaim Steinmetz and Elie Weinstock.

While we avoid politics, we are deeply troubled by the moral equivalency and equivocation President Trump has offered in response to this act of violence, the letter said.

Ivanka Trump converted to Judaism ahead of her 2009 wedding to Jared Kushner, a White House advisor and Orthodox Jew, who was denigrated by some of the anti-Semitic demonstrators in Virginia.

Neither Kushner nor Ivanka Trump have publicly addressed the presidents vacillating comments on the violent confrontations in Charlottesville. Trumps daughter did issue a tweet on Sunday stating, There should be no place in society for racism, white supremacy and neo-nazis.

The president has his Jewish defenders, among them Alice Feinstein, a retired midwife who now works as a hospice nurse in Los Angeles. He said all the bad guys are bad guys, Feinstein said, pausing over a bowl of hot-and-sour soup at Shanghai Diamond Garden in Pico-Robertson.

He has no connection to David Duke, Feinstein continued, referring to the former Ku Klux Klan leader, no connection to white supremacy, no connection to the KKK. He is not an anti-Semite. Capital letters. He is not an anti-Semite.

The fallout from last weekends protests in Charlottesville, which has roiled the country for days, also whipped up controversy in Israel, where Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was condemned for his hesitancy addressing the anti-Semitic display in Virginia and staying silent in response to Trumps comments blaming both sides.

Netanyahu, a strong Trump ally, waited three days before issuing a tepid condemnation. Outraged by expressions of anti-Semitism, neo-Nazism and racism. Everyone should oppose this hatred, he tweeted Tuesday in English.

He issued no such statement in Hebrew, the states official language and the first language of most Israelis.

A number of opposition politicians, commentators and even some members of Netanyahus own governing coalition urged the prime minister to take a tougher stance, even if it meant antagonizing Trump.

In an op-ed published in the left-leaning newspaper Haaretz, Stav Shafir of the opposition Labor Party wrote, Even after U.S. President Donald Trumps historic comments on Tuesday, where the president of the United States uttered statements that should never be said, Netanyahu stayed silent and shamed the Israeli people as a whole.

The front page of the daily Yediot Ahronot, which has been critical of Netanyahu, was covered with a picture of Trump and the single word SHAME. Maariv, a paper on the center-right, led with the headline, Presidential Embrace for Extreme Right.

Late Thursday, in an apparent attempt to mitigate the damage for Netanyahu, Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman said on Israeli radio that it is unbearable to see Nazi symbols in the greatest democracy on Earth, the United States but the U.S. doesnt need our advice on how to handle this.

Special correspondent Noga Tarnopolsky in Jerusalem contributed to this report.

mark.barabak@latimes.com

@markzbarabak

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Jewish Republicans reject Trump’s take on Charlottesville violence – Politico

President Donald Trump addresses the 2016 American Israel Public Affairs Committee in Washington, D.C. Following the president’s remarks on violence in Charlottesville, AIPAC urged officials to “reject moral equivalence.” | Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Jewish Republicans rejected Donald Trumps comments in response to violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, but it doesnt appear the president is facing further consequences from the small but vital GOP constituency over what they saw as a failure to adequately denounce crowds that shouted anti-Semitic chants and hoisted Nazi flags last weekend.

The Republican Jewish Coalition in a statement called for Trump to show greater leadership after he seemed Tuesday to equate neo-Nazi and Ku Klux Klan demonstrators with those protesting them. Matt Brooks, executive director of the RJC, would not say whether members plan any further steps to warn the president.

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“People are scared and frightened and disgusted by the events of Charlottesville,” Brooks told POLITICO on Thursday. “It’s incredible in this time and place in our American history that we’re dealing with the scourge of vile neo-Nazis and white supremacists. It’s just intolerable.”

Brooks also would not disclose any conversations with Republican megadonor Sheldon Adelson, who sits on the RJC’s board but has not personally weighed in.

Still, some Republican strategists are nervous about turning off a group that regularly votes, raises money and donates to candidates. Trumps daughter Ivanka and her family are Jewish, as are several of the presidents top aides. But his statement that there were very fine people amid those protesting the planned removal of a Confederate statue who chanted, among other things, Jews will not replace us shocked supporters and critics alike.

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“Getting this right is life and death for the Republican Party. You can’t have a Republican Party that people believe is a racist party,” said Rick Tyler, a Trump critic and former communications director for Sen. Ted Cruz, who aggressively courted Republican Jews in his own 2016 presidential bid. “The Republican Jewish community provides a lot of support for the Republican Party, particularly financial support.”

The RJC which asked Trump to provide greater moral clarity in rejecting racism, bigotry, and antisemitism was more direct than the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, which issued a statement Thursday urging all elected officials to reject moral equivalence between those who promote hate and those who oppose it.

But AIPACs statement was nonetheless a striking rebuke given the groups past praise of Trumps hawkish stance on Israel and as-yet-unfulfilled vow to move the U.S. Embassy there from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

Tennessee Rep. David Kustoff, one of two Jewish Republicans in Congress, called on “White Supremacists, the KKK, neo-Nazis and all groups that preach hate” to be “explicitly condemned.” The other, Rep. Lee Zeldin of New York, followed Trump in placing blame on both sides for violence that culminated in the death of a woman after a car plowed into a crowd of counter-protesters.

But Zeldin added: “These two sides are not equal. They are different.”

Nonpartisan Jewish groups, like the Anti-Defamation League, have been more direct in criticizing Trump’s rhetoric.

It’s not the first time Trump has angered the American Jewish community. Many were baffled and offended when his White House put out a statement on Holocaust Remembrance Day that made no mention of the Jews who were killed.

Fred Zeidman, a member of the RJC board of directors and a former George W. Bush appointee to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, praised his group’s leadership for taking a stand after the Charlottesville violence.

“We know the issues that evolve from remaining silent, and we can’t remain silent,” he told POLITICO on Thursday. “We know what happens when we remain silent.”

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JAY-Z Addresses Kanye Feud, Solange, Controversial Jewish Lyric in New Interview: Watch – Pitchfork

In a new interview following the release of 4:44, JAY-Z sat down with Rap Radar hosts Elliott Wilson and Brian B.Dot Miller to talk about his alleged beef with Kanye, the elevator incident with Solange, and criticism of his controversial lyric about Jewish people on The Story of O.J. In response to speculation that he was taking shots at Kanye on the opening track Kill Jay Z, Jay explains: Its not even about a Kanye diss. Its not a diss, Im talking to myself the whole time. He continues: Im not talking about Kanye when I say, You dropped out of school, you lost your principles, I’m talking about me! Watch part one of the interview below. Jay admits, however, that he was upset from Kanyes comments during his on-stage rant at his abbreviated Saint Pablo tour stop in Sacramento. You got hurt, because this guy was talking about you on a stage, Jay said. But what really hurt me, you cant bring my kid or my wife into it… Weve gotten past bigger issues, but you brought my family into it, now its a problem with me. Regarding the elevator incident with Solange, Jay says: Weve always had a great relationship… Weve had one disagreement. Before and after, weve been cool. He continues, Thats my sister. Not my sister-in-law, no, my sister. Period. In response to the question, What do you think when people say three great albums came out of this situation? Jay replied: I think we went into that elevator great artists. That doesnt surprise me. Jay also responded to criticism that a line from the song The Story of O.J. fed into anti-Semitic stereotypes. He raps: You wanna know whats more important than throwin away money at a strip club? Credit/ You ever wonder why Jewish people own all the property in America? This how they did it. Following the LPs release in July, the Anti-Defamation League issued a statement: Such notions have lingered in society for decades, and we are concerned that this lyric could feed into preconceived notions about Jews and alleged Jewish control of the banks and finance. When he was asked if he was surprised that the particular lyric was met with such resistance. Jay responded, Its hard for me to take that serious, because I exaggerated every black image in the world. He continued to explain that The Story of O.J. and its video addressed black stereotypes, and the lyric referring to Jewish people was exaggeration as well. Context is everything, he says. In the context of the song, Im trying say, you guys did it right! He continues: If even you, as the Jewish community, if you dont have a problem with the exaggerations of the guy eating watermelon and all the things that was happening If you dont have a problem with that, and thats the only line you pick out, then you are being a hypocrite. I cant address that in a real way. I gotta leave that where it is. It was exaggeration. Of course I know Jewish people dont own all the property in the world. I mean, I own things! [laughs] It was an exaggeration, much like that racist cartoon. Finally, Jay addressed the speculation that he was also dissing Future on Kill Jay Z, in which he raps: I dont even know what you woulda done, in the Future, other niggas playin football with your son. I really dont mean any malice, Jay says. Im not discrediting all step-pops in the world. It was a line to say, that could happen to me in my future. It just so happened that his name was Future, and then I just made a scheme out of it. He concludes: I wasnt trying to put Future down. We just made a song together, I dont have any problems with him. This video interview follows JAY-Zs latest Footnotes video in which he discusses the importance of therapy. Previous videos include the Lupita Nyongo-starring video for JAY-Zs James Blake collaboration MaNyfaCedGod and the visual for Moonlight, which stars Jerrod Carmichael, Issa Rae, Tiffany Haddish, and more.

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August 18, 2017   Posted in: Jewish  Comments Closed

From Charlottesville To Barcelona: The Jewish Response – HuffPost

“See, I give you today blessing and curse,” – Deuteronomy 11:26. The horrific events of this past week – from Charlottesville to Barcelona – have brought these staggering words culled from this week’s Torah portion to the forefront of our consciousness. First, we ought to recognize that goodness exists in our world. God’s blessings are given to us “today” and every day. Sometimes, they are found in the places we expect them least. A woman once wrote a letter to the late Lubavitcher Rebbe complaining that her children are “rebellious” and “disrespectful.” The Rebbe, who was childless, responded movingly (among other gems of wisdom): “You complain about your children and their behaviors. But I ask you: do you know how many childless couples would give everything they have just to have children, as you do?” The Rebbe’s message was clear: Sometimes, all we need to do is open up our eyes and “see” the blessings of God that are given to us every day, and everywhere. But God has also given our world its fair share of “curses.” In the past few days alone, we have witnessed some of these curses spewed by its most evil perpetrators, from the KKK to ISIS, from “white supremacists” to “jihadists.” Indeed, curses exist. And sadly and painfully, we must recognize them, and the evil that they spread, as a fait-tabli. For, too often, we rush to rationalize – or, at least, explain – why evil happens. “It’s not their fault,” someone told me the other day. “These bad people are brainwashed… and they live in dire circumstance; that’s all.” But if it isn’t ‘their fault’, then whose fault is it? And can that possibly justify their evil? It is thus high time we stop offering excuses for these evil perpetrators. Evil is not a relative force; evil is absolute, and it must be treated as such. For if we cannot do so, with utmost clarity, how will we ever be able to stand up to it to ensure that good ultimately triumphs? But beyond “seeing” and recognizing the evil curses of our world, we must also respond to them with unwavering action. It is our hope that our world’s governments and leaders will do what they can to combat this horrific new wave of evil. But our response must be more personal. And whilst some choose to speak “out,” it would behoove us to, first and foremost, speak “in” and fill our minds, our hearts, and the walls of our homes, with words and actions of goodness. We can “go out,” make noise and protest all sorts of forces, from political to philosophical. But it would better serve us and our world if we first “go in,” and with the silent music of love, educate our families, our friends, our neighbors, our communities, and even our influential “connections,” with the eternal values of our Torah and its commandments. This is a quiet heroism – there are no flamboyant shows and loud shouts, no Facebook rants and dramatic gestures that capture attention. For it is not enough to focus on that which we are fighting against; we must also know that which we are fighting for. I am not so nave as to believe that good deeds alone will eradicate evil from the world. But we can, and ought to, shape the world – the world in which we live – by our actions. In 1948, just three years following the Holocaust, Chaim Weizmann, the first president of the State of Israel broadcasted a famous call to Jews worldwide: “After Hitler murdered a third of the Jewish nation, it is the foremost duty of every Jew to be a ‘third more’ Jewish. Please, I beg every Jew in the world, be a ‘third more’ Jewish. Triple your prayers, triple your good deeds, and make up for the third of our nation that was so brutally decimated.” Similarly, after witnessing such evil among us, we must do everything in our power to increase our deeds of goodness and holiness, from prayer to charity, from lighting Shabbat candles every Friday, to doing a stranger a favor, from Torah study to lending a helping hand, from eradicating gossip from our midst to infusing our social circles with words of kindness, and positive influence. Let us partner with God, and create new Divine blessings in our world, for all humanity, and for all future generations, to “see, today, and every day. The Morning Email Wake up to the day’s most important news.

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Barcelona Chief Rabbi Tells Jews After Attack: ‘Get Out, Go To Israel’ – Newsweek

The chief rabbi of Catalonia has told Jews that they should leave the Spanish regionand move to Israel because of fears of further radical Islamist attacks. Rabbi Meir Bar-Hen, in an interview with the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, called Spain a “hub of Islamist terror for all of Europe.” His comments came after two vehicle-ramming attacks that left a total of 14 people dead on a famous Barcelona boulevardand ina seaside town south of the northern Spanish city. The Islamic State militant group (ISIS) claimed responsibility for the van attack in central Barcelona late Thursday that also injured more than 100 people. “Jews are not here permanently,”he said. “I tell my congregants: Dont think were here for good. And I encourage them to buy property in Israel. This place is lost. Dont repeat the mistake of Algerian Jews, of Venezuelan Jews. Better [get out] early than late.” He was referring to two countries where Jewish populations have dwindled because of persecution. Keep up with this story and more by subscribing now The Jewish community resumed their services on Friday in preparation for the Shabbat after the assaults a day earlier, despite a manhunt for the driver who fled the scene on the Las Ramblas avenue on foot. Bar-Hen said that “radicial fringes” ofMuslim communities in northern Spain were the biggest threat to its Jewish communities. “Europe is lost,” he said, adding that when radical Islamists are “living among you…it’s very difficult to get rid of them. They only get stronger.” People gather around tributes laid on Las Ramblas near the scene of yesterday’s terrorist attack, on August 18, 2017 in Barcelona, Spain. Carl Court/Getty Jewish leaders across Europe have expressed concern about a rise of radical Islamist attacks, some that have directly targeted Jewish sites: “We are yet again witness to another terrorist attack in Europe perpetrated against innocent civilians,” saidMoshe Kantor, president of the European Jewish Congress. “They are choosing to strike again at our zest for life and our basic freedoms with their cult of death. It is becoming increasingly difficult to prevent this abuse of regular vehicles as their chosen instrument of murder,” he added. Recent attacks against Jewish targets in Europeinclude an ISIS sympathizer besieging a kosher supermarket in Paris in January 2015, a shooting at a synagogue in Copenhagen and a Jewish teacher who was stabbed by three men in the southern French city of Marseille, one who was wearing an ISIS t-shirt. In 2014, a gunman opened fire at the Jewish Museum of Belgium in Brussels, killing four people. The European Jewish Congress estimates that around 15,000 Jews live in the Barcelona area, out of a total of 45,000 in Spain. The country once served as a historicallysignificanthub for European Jews until the Spanish Inquisition forced hundreds of thousands of Sephardic Jews to leave. Under the Granada Edict, they were given the choice of departing the country, converting to Christianity or facing death. Spain has tried to correct that centuries-old decision, passing a law that allows descendants of those who were expelled to reclaim theirSpanish nationality.

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2 of America’s most famous Jewish writers urge Jared and Ivanka … – Vox

Beloved Jewish novelists and married couple Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman are taking a stand against President Donald Trump in the wake of his response to last weekends white supremacist march in Charlottesville. Jews will not replace us, the marchers chanted, some of them waving swastikas. They reportedly attacked counterprotesters by dousing them with pepper spray and lighter fluid and swinging lit torches at them. But Trump ultimately defended the marchers as people who were very quietly protesting and suggested that many sides were responsible for the violence. “What about the alt-left that came charging at the, as you say, the alt-right? he demanded. Chabon and Waldman are having none of it. In an open letter published on Medium, addressed to our fellow Jews, in the United States, in Israel, and around the world, they declare that Trump has, at last, shown his true colors: He has allied himself with anti-Semitics and white supremacists. The question is, they write, what are you going to do about it? If you dont feel, or cant show, any concern, pain or understanding for the persecution and demonization of others, at least show a little self-interest. At least show a little sechel. At the very least, show a little self-respect. Jews still working for the Trump administration should resign, they write, and those who consider the Trump administration to be allies including the Israeli government should wise up. But they reserve special instructions for the Jewish members of Trumps family, Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump: To Jared Kushner: You have one minute to do whatever it takes to keep the history of your people from looking back on you as among its greatest traitors, and greatest fools; that minute is nearly past. To Ivanka Trump: Allow us to teach you an ancient and venerable phrase, long employed by Jewish parents and children to one another at such moments of family crisis: Ill sit shiva for you [the implication being, because youre dead to me]. Try it out on your father; see how it goes. Chabon became a literary celebrity after the 1988 publication of his first novel, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, but perhaps his most beloved book is the literary comic book riff The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, which won the 2001 Pulitzer. Waldman, who was born in Israel, is a former lawyer who now writes mystery novels and essays about mothering. Among all the bleak and violent truths that found confirmation or came slouching into view amid the torchlight of Charlottesville is this, Chabon and Waldman conclude: Any Jew, anywhere, who does not act to oppose President Donald Trump and his administration acts in favor of anti-Semitism; any Jew who does not condemn the President, directly and by name, for his racism, white supremacism, intolerance and Jew hatred, condones all of those things. You can read the full letter here.

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Jewish Shark Tank’ helps entrepreneurs find success – News 12 Brooklyn

WILLIAMSBURG – A former rabbi is helping entrepreneurs in Brooklyn find success through a web show he calls the Jewish version of ‘Shark Tank.’ A panel of investors sits on the set of Biz Tank and listens to entrepreneurs pitch their ideas, much like the popular hit ABC television show Shark Tank. Joel Klein says Biz Tank has had 50 business pitches since it started. They have seen everything from wine bottles covered in chocolate to a bib designed to keep babies safe. One of the shows first contestants secured a $90,000 investment for his pet bed and supply company. Klein says although about 70 percent of the contestants are Jewish, it is not a requirement for them to be. He says about $6 million in deals have been invested.

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The Last Jewish Community Holding Out Against Zionism – Haaretz

skip – googletagmanagerskip – redirectProbability skip – adBlock detector skip – skip – Visual Revenue skip – skip – skip – logo schema for googleskip – infolinks- inread skip – skip – googletagmanagerskip – redirectProbability skip – AddBolcker Rabbi Mordechai Mintzberg at his home in the ultra-Orthodox neighborhood of Mea She’arim, Jerusalem. “Weve succeeded in getting through the past 200 years in the same fashion.” Emil Salman The ultra-Orthodox group Edah Haredit does not believe in the State of Israel, Zionism or the Israeli army. One of its most prominent members, Rabbi Mordechai Mintzberg, says the group will never sell out, unlike the rest of the Haredi public

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Exhibit featuring Jewish contributions to North Dakota comes to Bonanzaville – Bismarck Tribune

WEST FARGO — As the rest of the country is grappling with how to understand racial divides after violence erupted at a neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville, Va. Aug. 12, Bonanzaville unveiled a new exhibit that celebrates the contributions and culture of Jewish families that helped shape North Dakota. The yearlong exhibit, titled The North Dakota Jewish Experience: Shvitzing It Out on the Prairie, explores the history and lives of Jewish homesteaders. The idea for the showcase was sparked after a May 21 rededication of the Jewish Homesteaders Cemetery in Ashley, which contains the graves of about 28 pioneer Jewish farmers. The rededication was followed by the July 4 placement of a plaque honoring Jewish settlers in the Dakota Territory next to South Pleasant Church at Bonanzaville. Those events really sparked a lot of interest throughout the community, said Bonanzaville Executive Director Brenda Warren. We decided to educate our community and our visitors on what great contributions the Jewish immigrants made to North Dakota and our country. Bonanzavilles exhibit, which includes a timeline of Jewish and artifacts of Jewish culture donated by area families, opened to a reception attended by nearly 100 people on Tuesday. The story of North Dakota is a proud saga of hard work and dedication to the community, said Rabbi Yonah Grossman, who founded the Chabad Jewish Center in Fargo. After the U.S. Homestead Act of 1862, flocks of immigrants made their way west and into the Dakota Territory, and thousands of Jewish settlers made their home in the upper Great Plains. At one time, North Dakota had the fourth largest number of homesteaders working plats of land, said Steve Hunegs, executive director of the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas. At least 800 Jewish individuals filed for land between 1880 and 1916, usually settling in clusters around the state. The first Jewish settlement in North Dakota was in 1882 when about 11 families settled near Devils Lake, according to the Bonanzaville exhibit. Millions of Jewish families were fleeing the Russian empires persecution during that time, including Rabbi Benjamin Papermaster, who arrived in Fargo in 1891 from Kovno, Lithuania. Papermaster settled in Grand Forks and organized a collection of Russian and German Jewish families into a congregation, serving as the rabbi of the Grand Forks Jewish community until 1934. As a circuit rabbi, he traveled across the area to circumcise babies, and officiate weddings, funerals and other events. In 1896, the Temple Beth El synagogue was chartered in Fargo. It remains one of only two active synagogues left in North Dakota, along with B’nai Israel Congregation in Grand Forks. Many settlers farmed or landed in towns created around the railroad lines and operated general stores. Over the years, many Jewish individuals made great impacts on Fargo and its economy. Myron Bright was a judge on the 8th District Circuit Court of Appeals from 1968 until his death in 2016. The longest-serving Fargo mayor was Herschel Lashkowitz, who stood at the citys helm from 1954 to 1974. In 1968, Harold Doroshow and his wife opened North Dakotas first McDonalds in Fargo. Many Jewish families left the area after staying the necessary five years to acquire a full land title under the Homestead Act. North Dakotas Jewish population is now about 400, which is fewer than any other state except South Dakota, according to Robin Doroshow, executive director of the Jewish Historical Society of the Upper Midwest. Fargo Mayor Tim Mahoney said the exhibit will help bring an understanding of different cultures to this area at a time when it is most needed. We have to kill the hate, Mahoney said. We all have to love one another, we have to love all of the cultures and the more we show these things about them, the more we can understand. The exhibit will remain open until August 2018 and could become a permanent display, Warren said. Bonanzaville is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday through Aug. 31. The exhibit was created at the Bonanzaville pavilion with the Jewish Historical Society of the Upper Midwest, the Chabad Jewish Center of North Dakota, and the Jewish Community Relations Council of Minnesota and the Dakotas. It was designed by Curator Typhanie Schaffer and North Dakota State University professor Angela Smith. Readers can reach Forum reporter Wendy Reuer at (701) 241-5530

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For Jewish Americans, echoes of the Holocaust and anger over … – Los Angeles Times

Dina Chernick had just arrived for breakfast Thursday at a Jewish deli in the Pico-Robertson neighborhood, but she already had a bad case of indigestion. She could thank President Trump for that. Heres this guy and hes talking about uniting the country and then he makes these terribly divisive statements, said Chernick, an attorney in West Los Angeles who likened Trump to a salesman peddling snake-oil instead of soothing balm. Even at a distance, Chernick said, it was horrifying to see anti-Semitic, white nationalist demonstrators marching through the streets of Charlottesville, Va., their hard faces illuminated by blazing torch light. It makes me terribly sad, she said. From a political standpoint, the criticism was hardly surprising. The overwhelming majority of Jewish Americans, like Chernick, voted for Hillary Clinton. But even some Trump supporters and Jewish Republicans have condemned the presidents spread-the-blame response and statement that there were some very fine people mixed among the white supremacists and neo-Nazis who brought violence to the idyllic college town. There are no good Nazis and no good members of the [Ku Klux] Klan, the Republican Jewish Coalition said in a statement. We join with our political and religious brethren in calling upon President Trump to provide greater moral clarity in rejecting racism, bigotry, and antisemitism, the statement said. Trump has weathered a difficult relationship with the American Jewish community. While professing fierce loyalty to Israel, a touchstone for many Jews, he has given offense on more than one occasion. Noah Bierman and David Lauter At a presidential forum in 2015, he summoned a familiar canard by boasting of his wealth and telling his audience of Jewish donors, Im a negotiator like you folks. Seven months later, he tweeted a graphic critical of Hillary Clinton that featured a pile of cash and a six-pointed star resembling the Jewish Star of David. Soon after he took office, the White House issued a statement marking International Holocaust Remembrance Day that made no mention of the 6 million Jews who perished. Some have been discomfited by the presence of Trump advisor Stephen K. Bannon, who ran the Breitbart website giving a platform to white nationalists. Bannon is now installed as chief political strategist in the White House. But for many Jews, the violence in Charlottesville on Saturday and Trumps vacillating response were of a whole other order. No one, whether Republican, independent or a Democrat wants to see the Klan or Nazis parading down the streets of the United States, as if theyre taking over, said Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder and dean of Los Angeles Simon Wiesenthal Center, named after the famed Nazi hunter, and its Museum of Tolerance. No one could ever compare neo-Nazis, the Klan and white supremacists to demonstrators that are demonstrating against them, said Hier, who delivered one of several prayers at Trumps inauguration. To equate the two sides, he went on, is preposterous. The leading organization of Orthodox rabbis also weighed in with a statement condemning the presidents comparing white supremacist marchers to counter-demonstrators in Charlottesville. There is no moral comparison, said Rabbi Elazar Muskin, president of the Rabbinical Council of America. Failure to unequivocally reject hatred and bias is a failing of moral leadership and fans the flames of intolerance and chauvinism. The statement, issued Wednesday, was the second by the organization and was aimed directly at the president, a contrast with an initial response that more generally criticized violence and bigotry in Charlottesville without mentioning Trump. Rabbi Mark Dratch, the groups executive vice president, said the council was moved to offer its more pointed statement after the president fell back Tuesday on his position that both sides shared blame for the violence around the white nationalist rally. We feel that, really, instead of putting an end to the criticism and the troubles that his statements were causing, it further fanned them, Dratch said. The statement was particularly notable given Trumps support among Orthodox Jews, who, unlike more secular Jews, supported the president in large numbers. (Jews constitute about 3% of the electorate.) In a personal slap, the rabbi who oversaw the conversion of Trumps daughter Ivanka to Judaism issued an open letter to Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun, a Modern Orthodox synagogue on New York’s Upper East Side, in which he castigated the president for his remarks. We are appalled by this resurgence of bigotry and anti-Semitism, and the renewed vigor of the neo-Nazis, KKK and alt-right, read the letter, published by New York Magazine and signed by Haskel Lookstein as well as rabbis Chaim Steinmetz and Elie Weinstock. While we avoid politics, we are deeply troubled by the moral equivalency and equivocation President Trump has offered in response to this act of violence, the letter said. Ivanka Trump converted to Judaism ahead of her 2009 wedding to Jared Kushner, a White House advisor and Orthodox Jew, who was denigrated by some of the anti-Semitic demonstrators in Virginia. Neither Kushner nor Ivanka Trump have publicly addressed the presidents vacillating comments on the violent confrontations in Charlottesville. Trumps daughter did issue a tweet on Sunday stating, There should be no place in society for racism, white supremacy and neo-nazis. The president has his Jewish defenders, among them Alice Feinstein, a retired midwife who now works as a hospice nurse in Los Angeles. He said all the bad guys are bad guys, Feinstein said, pausing over a bowl of hot-and-sour soup at Shanghai Diamond Garden in Pico-Robertson. He has no connection to David Duke, Feinstein continued, referring to the former Ku Klux Klan leader, no connection to white supremacy, no connection to the KKK. He is not an anti-Semite. Capital letters. He is not an anti-Semite. The fallout from last weekends protests in Charlottesville, which has roiled the country for days, also whipped up controversy in Israel, where Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was condemned for his hesitancy addressing the anti-Semitic display in Virginia and staying silent in response to Trumps comments blaming both sides. Netanyahu, a strong Trump ally, waited three days before issuing a tepid condemnation. Outraged by expressions of anti-Semitism, neo-Nazism and racism. Everyone should oppose this hatred, he tweeted Tuesday in English. He issued no such statement in Hebrew, the states official language and the first language of most Israelis. A number of opposition politicians, commentators and even some members of Netanyahus own governing coalition urged the prime minister to take a tougher stance, even if it meant antagonizing Trump. In an op-ed published in the left-leaning newspaper Haaretz, Stav Shafir of the opposition Labor Party wrote, Even after U.S. President Donald Trumps historic comments on Tuesday, where the president of the United States uttered statements that should never be said, Netanyahu stayed silent and shamed the Israeli people as a whole. The front page of the daily Yediot Ahronot, which has been critical of Netanyahu, was covered with a picture of Trump and the single word SHAME. Maariv, a paper on the center-right, led with the headline, Presidential Embrace for Extreme Right. Late Thursday, in an apparent attempt to mitigate the damage for Netanyahu, Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman said on Israeli radio that it is unbearable to see Nazi symbols in the greatest democracy on Earth, the United States but the U.S. doesnt need our advice on how to handle this. Special correspondent Noga Tarnopolsky in Jerusalem contributed to this report. mark.barabak@latimes.com @markzbarabak ALSO ‘Art of the Deal’ writer predicts that Trump will resign by the end of the year Defending Confederate memorials, Trump equates Gens. Lee and Jackson with Presidents Washington and Jefferson Trump repeats claim about a general executing Muslim prisoners. Historians doubt it ever happened

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Jewish Republicans reject Trump’s take on Charlottesville violence – Politico

President Donald Trump addresses the 2016 American Israel Public Affairs Committee in Washington, D.C. Following the president’s remarks on violence in Charlottesville, AIPAC urged officials to “reject moral equivalence.” | Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images Jewish Republicans rejected Donald Trumps comments in response to violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, but it doesnt appear the president is facing further consequences from the small but vital GOP constituency over what they saw as a failure to adequately denounce crowds that shouted anti-Semitic chants and hoisted Nazi flags last weekend. The Republican Jewish Coalition in a statement called for Trump to show greater leadership after he seemed Tuesday to equate neo-Nazi and Ku Klux Klan demonstrators with those protesting them. Matt Brooks, executive director of the RJC, would not say whether members plan any further steps to warn the president. Story Continued Below “People are scared and frightened and disgusted by the events of Charlottesville,” Brooks told POLITICO on Thursday. “It’s incredible in this time and place in our American history that we’re dealing with the scourge of vile neo-Nazis and white supremacists. It’s just intolerable.” Brooks also would not disclose any conversations with Republican megadonor Sheldon Adelson, who sits on the RJC’s board but has not personally weighed in. Still, some Republican strategists are nervous about turning off a group that regularly votes, raises money and donates to candidates. Trumps daughter Ivanka and her family are Jewish, as are several of the presidents top aides. But his statement that there were very fine people amid those protesting the planned removal of a Confederate statue who chanted, among other things, Jews will not replace us shocked supporters and critics alike. Sign up for our must-read newsletter on what’s driving the afternoon in Washington. By signing up you agree to receive email newsletters or alerts from POLITICO. You can unsubscribe at any time. “Getting this right is life and death for the Republican Party. You can’t have a Republican Party that people believe is a racist party,” said Rick Tyler, a Trump critic and former communications director for Sen. Ted Cruz, who aggressively courted Republican Jews in his own 2016 presidential bid. “The Republican Jewish community provides a lot of support for the Republican Party, particularly financial support.” The RJC which asked Trump to provide greater moral clarity in rejecting racism, bigotry, and antisemitism was more direct than the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, which issued a statement Thursday urging all elected officials to reject moral equivalence between those who promote hate and those who oppose it. But AIPACs statement was nonetheless a striking rebuke given the groups past praise of Trumps hawkish stance on Israel and as-yet-unfulfilled vow to move the U.S. Embassy there from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Tennessee Rep. David Kustoff, one of two Jewish Republicans in Congress, called on “White Supremacists, the KKK, neo-Nazis and all groups that preach hate” to be “explicitly condemned.” The other, Rep. Lee Zeldin of New York, followed Trump in placing blame on both sides for violence that culminated in the death of a woman after a car plowed into a crowd of counter-protesters. But Zeldin added: “These two sides are not equal. They are different.” Nonpartisan Jewish groups, like the Anti-Defamation League, have been more direct in criticizing Trump’s rhetoric. It’s not the first time Trump has angered the American Jewish community. Many were baffled and offended when his White House put out a statement on Holocaust Remembrance Day that made no mention of the Jews who were killed. Fred Zeidman, a member of the RJC board of directors and a former George W. Bush appointee to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council, praised his group’s leadership for taking a stand after the Charlottesville violence. “We know the issues that evolve from remaining silent, and we can’t remain silent,” he told POLITICO on Thursday. “We know what happens when we remain silent.” Missing out on the latest scoops? Sign up for POLITICO Playbook and get the latest news, every morning in your inbox.

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