Archive for the ‘Jewish’ Category

Gabrielle Sasson – Tablet Magazine

Gabrielle Sasson is entering seventh grade at Ramaz. Her family, in connection with her bat mitzvah, visited the Jewish communities of Addis Ababa and Gondar for ten days during early July. These are her impressions of the trip.

Two weeks ago, instead of starting summer camp together with my friends, I traveled to Ethiopia to visit its Jewish community. In important ways, the kids in Ethiopia felt deeply familiar to me. The children sing the same Jewish and Hebrew songs I learned in Jewish day school in New York. They recite the same tephilot. In fact, in many waystheir strong belief in God and their desire to make aliyahthey can seem even more deeply rooted in Judaism and the Jewish story.

Yet, the differences were starkand important. The Jews in Addis Ababa and Gondar live in shacks. Large families share two small mattresses, and one or two small blankets. Their clothing is full of holes. In honor of my bat mitzvah and my cousin Micahs bar mitzvah, our families made a small Kiddush after shul on Shabbat in Gondar. I was surprised by the excitement both adults and children felt when candy and soda was distributed. These are items my friends and I receive daily; we take them for granted. Here, kids do not have enough basic food to eat; many are malnourished.

When I visited the homes of the kids I played with in the synagogue compound, I was upset by the awful conditions. No child should have to live without running water, beds, blankets and toilets. We were so alike in so many ways yet I had so much and they had so little.

Poverty also prevents the kids from receiving medical treatment. We visited the medical clinic where Jewish childrenbut only those under fivehad recently begun to receive medical care. The doctor said that since the program began six weeks earlier he had saved 17 lives. What would happen to the children over five, the ones I had talked to and played with in the compound, the children who still had no access to medical care? The diseases the doctor talked abouttyphoid, typhus, malaria, intestinal parasitesdo not even exist in New York.

These differences are heartbreaking and angering, but there is one above all others that I think is impossible to explain: That these children are not allowed to even travel to Israel.

My family has a strong connection with Israel. We travel there frequently to visit family. If we wished to make aliyah, it would be easy; we would just get on a plane. When we asked the 1,100 community members present at Shabbat services how many had close family living in Israel, almost all the hands raised. And yet, Israel will not let these children make aliyah. To prepare for my trip, I read about the difficult decades-long struggle to bring the Ethiopian Jewish community to Israel. There are currently 140,000 Ethiopian Jews in Israel; for reasons I do not understand the government of Israel is reluctant to complete the aliyah by bringing the last 10,000 to the Jewish homeland. What makes these different from all other Jews around the world? We met orphans with no one to take care of themyoung childrenwho were not allowed to travel to Israel where their grandparents could take them in. So they live here, deprived of all of the resources that so many other Jews have, including the most important one: family.

I am only twelve years old. I do not understand why the Israeli government wont let Jewish children rejoin their families in Israel. I certainly do not understand why the American Jewish community, which has so much and helps Jews throughout the world, refuses to help them.

All my eyes still see is their dedication to Torah. My ears hear the prayers they offer to the God I pray to every day. And my heart still feels their pain, the pain that comes from realizing that almost no one in the Jewish world seems to care.

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A Jewish Slave In Rome – The Jewish Press – JewishPress.com

Photo Credit: Jewish Press

On Tisha BAv I always choose an appropriate book to read to keep my mind on the biggest tragedy ever to befall our people. Last year I read Chains by Leah Gebber a novel depicting the life of Jewish slaves in Rome during the time of the siege of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash.

When I realized it was dark outside and the fast must be over, I wandered into the kitchen, book still in hand, and continued to read as I broke my fast. I was more engrossed in the fate of Shulamit, Mariam and Chanan than in my food.

As Gebber writes in her preface, There is no such thing as writing a book. Only living a story.

For all of Tisha BAv I lived the life of a slave in Rome.

Gebber tells a magnificent story. She includes minute details which help place the reader on the shaking wooden platform as Shulamit and the other Jewish slaves have their mouths pried open and teeth examined to assess their value as slaves. A reader will feel as if she is standing in the hot stinking kitchen of a Roman aristocrat and watching the pig slave trying to best an enormous boar and get it on the spit; hear the whip slashing through the air before it cuts into the back of a slave being punished and feel her heart thumping as she sits in the stalls in the arena watching the gladiators, groomed for almost inevitable death, fighting for a few extra moments of life.

Until now my knowledge of life at this time was limited to the disturbing and horrifying commentaries I sometimes read on Megillas Eicha. But those are mostly about life in Eretz Yisrael in the time period leading up to Churban Bayis.

Until Id read Gebbers book I didnt even realize there were Jews who were captured or kidnapped by the Romans during the time leading up to the destruction of the Temple, as Shulamit was, and fettered and shipped off to the country which symbolized debauchery, depravity and decadence. Not only did she long for her physical freedom, she desperately missed her ability to connect with her Creator, as was shown by her mental torment when she realized that Pesach had come and gone and she had unwittingly eaten chametz. Her pain at feeling abandoned by G-d Who hadnt given her any sign of the approaching festival was greater than any physical pain from punishment that she experienced.

Even today many people have the custom not to walk under Tituss arch in Rome. This arch was constructed some years after Tituss triumphant entry into Rome as the conqueror of Judea who quelled the Great Jewish Revolt. Titus took many months to journey from Jerusalem to Rome so that he could show the world the Temple spoils he had plundered and the thousands of Jewish slaves he had taken. He traveled through Beirut, Syria, Antioch and Alexandria, and in each place held public games where Jewish slaves had to fight wild animals.

The arch clearly depicts what was taken from the Beis HaMikdash and is the reason that to this day it is assumed that the Menorah and other items plundered are somewhere in Rome.

Gebber admits that she knew very little about this period of time before she embarked on a six-month journey of research into the life of Jewish slaves in Rome. Before she wrote a word of her story, which was first serialized in a charedi weekly magazine, she immersed herself in the life and environment of both the Jews in Eretz Yisrael at the time and those in Rome. She also delved into the political background in Rome, as the fate of the Jews was dependent on Roman law.

The Romans, famed for their straight roads and warped minds, were a cruel and depraved people but, as Gebber comments, Rome was an incredibly law-abiding society even if the laws were corrupt. As the book progresses it becomes clear that this could work to the slaves advantage as a Roman wanting to rise in the echelons of power couldnt be thought to be flouting the law.

The books Gebber used for research were everywhere: in her bag, by her bedside, in different rooms and in the kitchen, so that at any time, wherever she was, she could pick one up and delve into a different aspect of her characters worlds.

Her research took her as far as the British Museum in London which has several rooms devoted to this historical period. Here she was able to actually see, among many other things, the kitchen utensils that the slaves would have used and the jewelry with which the wives of the Roman aristocrats adorned themselves, details of which are all woven into her story.

But she doesnt just give us insights into life in Rome. Gebber captures the mood and murderous in-fighting of the Jews in Eretz Yisrael during the crucial months leading up to the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash.

Most school-age children can tell you that the second Beis HaMikdash was destroyed because of sinas chinam, baseless hatred, and in Chains we see how the Jewish zealots were determined that, whatever the cost, there should be no hope for the Jews who thought they could hang on a little longer and try to make peace with the Romans. The zealots wanted to ensure that their fellow Jews would have no choice but to take up weapons and fight. We smell the smoke as Mariam opens her windows and sees her storehouses go up in flames along with any possibility of surviving the siege and providing food for her fellow Jews. The arsonists were not the enemies from Rome, but rather fellow Jews who wanted to force their hand.

Gebber surprised me when she said, Josephus writes that Titus didnt want to destroy the Temple. It would have been an amazing prize for him to show off to his fellow countrymen. It was the most beautiful and important building in the world.

Jerusalem and Rome were like twin cities, probably the two most important cities in the world, but for very different reasons. They were two centers of culture, knowledge and scholarship. Jerusalem was the religious hub with thousands of Jewish pilgrims making aliyah leregel several times a year, but non-Jews also came from all over the world, including from Rome, to bring sacrifices in the Temple. Destroying the Temple would be a loss to many of Tituss own people as well.

Quoting Josephus, Gebber explained that Titus conferred with his counselors regarding the fate of the Beis Hamikdash which he referred to as a sacred building, one more remarkable than any other human work. Titus argued that it should not be destroyed because if preserved it would testify to the moderation of the Romans while if demolished it would be a perpetual sign of cruelty.

Gebbers villain, Chanan, personifies the similar but contradictory aspects of Jerusalem and Rome. A rich Jewish aristocrat and a Kohen with a physical deformity which prevented him from serving in the Beis HaMikdash, Chanan abandons his wife, home and responsibilities to his people, to try to find fame and fortune in Rome. But being at once admired and mistrusted, Chanan finds that it is not so simple to ingratiate himself to the Romans. To the non-Jews, a Jew remains a Jew whose loyalty can never be relied on and who can never be fully trusted or accepted. Chanans complex character undergoes twists and turns throughout the story as his plans and fortune ebb and flow very much the story of the Jew in galus today.

Since her youth, Tisha BAv has been a day of great meaning to Gebber, but today her children know how much the day has affected her. Although she rarely involves her children in her work, its not every day that literary research helps you understand so much more about our own history. Gebber said that last Tisha B Av she and her children sat together on the floor and she read to them some of passages from Josephus writings.

While studying European geography in school recently, Gebbers daughter wanted to make a cake in the shape of Romes Colosseum. After all, its a not-to-be-missed site for all tourists in Italy; its the largest amphitheater ever built and designated as one of the Wonders of the World. But her mother knew just what the Colosseum really represented. The building, although started by Vespasian, was finished by Titus, funded by spoils plundered from the Beis HaMikdash and built with the unpaid labor force of some of the tens of thousands of Jewish slaves forced into exile. It stands today as a reminder of all the horror and misery of Tisha BAv and the destruction of the Beis Hamikdash.

This was not the design that Gebber felt should be on a cake baked by a 21st century religious schoolgirl who lives in Jerusalem.

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Jewish Museum

Welcome to the Jewish Museum, a museum in New York City at the intersection of art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds. Whether you visit our home in the elegant Warburg mansion on Museum Mile, or engage with us online, there is something for everyone. Through our exhibitions, programs, and collection of nearly 30,000 works of art, ceremonial objects, and media, visitors can journey through 4,000 years of art and Jewish culture from around the world.

As an art museum representing the diversity of Jewish culture and identity, the Jewish Museum believes in free expression and an open society. We embrace multiple viewpoints regardless of race, gender, national origin, or religion, and we oppose discrimination in all its forms.

Our exhibitions and public programs provide platforms for cross-cultural dialogue, fostering empathy, mutual understanding, and respect. We champion the powerful roles art and artists can play in our communities, both inside and outside the Museums walls.

The Jewish Museum is dedicated to the enjoyment, understanding, and preservation of the artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people through its unparalleled collections and distinguished exhibitions. Learn More

The Jewish Museum was founded in 1904 in the library of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, where it was housed for more than four decades. Now located in the landmark Warburg mansion, this elegant former residence has been the home of the Museum since 1947Learn More

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In France, murder of a Jewish woman ignites debate over the word … – Washington Post

PARIS What happened to Sarah Halimi resembles the plot of a horror film.

In the early hours of April 4, the 65-year-old retired doctor and schoolteacher, an Orthodox Jew, was asleep in the modest apartment in northeastern Paris where she lived alone. Shortly after 4 a.m., a neighbor from the floor below, 27-year-old Kobili Traor, a Franco-Malian Muslim, is accused of having broken into her flat. Traor allegedly beat her to death and hurled her body off the balcony into the courtyard below.

In the days that followed, French authorities treated Halimis killing as an isolated incident. But Jewish leaders immediately protested, especially after other neighbors testified that they heard Traor scream Allahu akbar, Arabic for God is great, while allegedly attacking Halimi, who was the only Jew residing in the building, her family said. Ever since, the Halimi Affair has simmered on the margins of public discourse, boiling over last week when President Emmanuel Macron promised after months of saying nothing clarity on the death of Sarah Halimi.

In a country that has suffered a devastating slew of attacks in recent years, that clarity now means far more than the gruesome details of one particular case. At stake is a set of profound questions, as political as they are existential. What makes an act of violence a terrorist attack? And who decides what is terrorism and what is merely murder?

[Macron hosts Netanyahu, condemns anti-Zionism as anti-Semitism]

Strictly speaking, French law classifies as terrorism any grave act of violence whose individual or collective intent is to seriously disturb public order through intimidation or terror.

Legally, it is Frances chief public prosecutor for Paris who decides whether to launch a terrorism investigation. In the Halimi case, Franois Molins, who occupies that position, declined to consider it as terrorism and, initially, as an act of anti-Semitic violence.

The decision sent shock waves through the French Jewish community, Europes largest. For many, it evinces a political calculus that weighs certain attacks over others.

Its purely and simply ideological, said Gilles-William Goldnadel, an attorney for the Halimi family and a well-known conservative commentator for Frances Le Figaro newspaper. Of Traor, Goldnadel added: He had the profile of a radical Islamist, and yet somehow there is a resistance to call a spade a spade.

In general, the definition of the term radical Islamist remains a major debate in France.

In this case, neighbors testified that they heard Traor recite verses from the Koran in Halimis apartment. Then, in early June, Libration, a French newspaper, gained access to the police dossier on Traor, which suggested he had a record of petty crime and violent tendencies almost identical to those that have characterized the profiles of other terrorist suspects.

On a different level, other small-scale incidents even ones that experts see as comparably minor have instantly been classified as terrorism. In June, for instance, a man attacked police officers near Notre Dame cathedral in Paris with a hammer. Whereas Traor is believed to have yelled Allahu akbar, the assailant in this earlier case yelled, This is for Syria! In any case, the Notre Dame incident in which no one was killed was considered terrorism.

So was the killing of a police officer on the Champs Elyses on the eve of the French election in late April, as well as an attempted shooting at Pariss Orly Airport in March. But not the slaying of Sarah Halimi.

The office of Franois Molins did not return a request for comment.

The difference, for some security analysts, is that these other cases were all defined by some discernible motivation of public disturbance, targeting as they did busy thoroughfares and transit hubs.

The simple fact that someone killed someone else because of confession or religion is not enough, said Jean-Charles Brisard, director of the French Center for the Analysis of Terrorism, a Paris-based think tank. It needs to have a certain degree of willingness to disrupt the French public order.

For Sarah Halimis family, however, that she was thrown off a balcony into a public space presented a dark spectacle meant to be seen and to pose a clear threat to other Jews. In an interview, Halimis brother, William Attal, 62, said that the familys principal objective was securing public recognition of the anti-Semitism that, in their eyes, killed their mother, sister and grandmother.

As Attal put it: I want you to understand that the fight of this family is that people recognize the Islamist, anti-Semitic nature of the assassin, who massacred and killed a Jewish woman, whom he knew was a Jew and whom he knew was alone.

In the French Jewish community, the Halimi Affair provides what many consider yet another example of the French state refusing to acknowledge the realities of contemporary anti-Semitism in France.

[Black Lives Matter movement comes to France. But will it translate?]

For many, this affair harks back to another Halimi Affair, from 2006, when Ilan Halimi, a 23-year-old cellphone salesman who had no relation to Sarah Halimi, was abducted and murdered by the Gang of Barbarians, a gang of immigrant criminals from the Paris suburbs. They had targeted their victim merely because he was Jewish, which French authorities initially refused to recognize.

These ostrich politics must stop, and our leaders must become aware of what is happening in the country, read a recent letter signed by 17 prominent French intellectuals in the aftermath of the latest Halimi Affair.

Its always the same story in France, journalist and public intellectual Bernard-Henri Lvy, another advocate of Halimi and her family, said in an interview. Anti-Semitism is not supposed to exist, especially among minority communities.

On the whole, the recent and widely publicized uptick in Jews leaving France for Israel has slowed, and the number of reported anti- Semitic acts decreased by nearly 59percent in 2016, according to the French Interior Ministry.

In general, the wave of terrorist violence that has struck this country in the past two years has not singled out Jews as targets. But scattered instances of anti-Semitic violence have continued to be reported, with victims often identifying their assailants as North African or West African.

France is also home to one of Europes largest Muslim populations, a group that is repeatedly criticized across the political spectrum, particularly by the staunchly anti-immigrant National Front. Anti-Muslim violence also has become a reality of modern French life. So as not to channel that rhetoric and to condone that violence, many elected officials are loath to accuse the entirety of a diverse and sprawling community of a blanket charge as severe as anti-Semitism, analysts say.

It comes from a very good, honorable place of not wanting to overgeneralize, but sometimes it can go too far, said Ethan Katz, the author of an acclaimed book on the history of Jewish-Muslim relations in France and a professor of history at the University of Cincinnati.

Whats a fair critique is that mainstream politicians have not figured out a genuine way to address, aside from security measures, the legitimate problem of anti- Semitism in France today including in certain areas of Frances Muslim population.

This, for her family and many others, is the tragedy of the Halimi Affair: the effacement of an anti-Semitism that remains a real threat, especially in tense urban areas. In the words of Goldnadel, the lawyer: Without naming it, there is no chance to escape this sickness.

Read more

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Regavim: Israeli Arabs Building Illegal Mega-Mansion on State Land – The Jewish Press – JewishPress.com

Photo Credit: Regavim

The Regavim movement on Sunday petitioned the Haifa District Court against the Misgav Regional Councils Local Planning and Building Committee following the construction of a huge illegal villa within the councils zone, branding it a new record for anarchy.

The Misgav Regional Council in the Galilee region in northern Israel is home to 22,000 Israelis, in 35 small towns, Kibbutzim and Moshavim, 29 of which are primarily Jewish, 6 Bedouin.

About six months ago, Regavim, which systematically monitors illegal construction and expropriation of state land, primarily in the Arab sector, noticed the construction of a huge five-level, two-part mansion built on state owned land.

In the past half-year, Regavim has sent repeated requests to the Misgav Local Committee demanding that it carry out supervision and enforcement activities against the illegal construction carried out under its jurisdiction. However, the requests were not answered.

As the lack of response persisted, Regavim petitioned the court through attorney Boaz Arazi, to instruct the local committee to use the enforcement tools available to it: issuing stop-work orders, filing indictments against offenders and demolishing the illegal building.

Even though the phenomenon of illegal construction has long become a state plague, this one is still a very special case, explained Yishai Hamo, director of operations for the Regavim movement in the northern district. This is a real castle, which was established with a bottomless disregard for the law, on land that belongs in part to the state.

Until now there has been leniency towards illegal construction established in the jurisdictional areas of the Arab communities, Hamo noted, but in this case, the area in question is outside the boundaries of the Araba community, and therefore there is no planning future or any possibility of legalizing.

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60 Headstones Toppled At Connecticut Jewish Cemetery – Forward

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Around 60 headstones were toppled at the Ateres Knesseth Israel Cemetery in Hartford, Conn., causing more than $10,000 in damages.

(JTA) Some 60 headstones were toppled in a Jewish cemetery in Hartford, Conn.

The damage at the Ateres Knesseth Israel Cemetery was discovered on Friday, when a relative of someone buried there visited the gravesite.

The woman who made the discovery told police that when she visited the cemetery on Monday, five days earlier, she had not seen any such damage, according to reports.

Most of the 60 gravestones reportedly can be reset on their bases, but at least two were shattered.

The cost to repair the damage is estimated at up to $10,000.

Hartford Police told the Hartford Courant newspaper that there is no evidence that the vandalism is a hate crime since no anti-Semitic graffiti was found at the scene. There were no security cameras in place at the cemetery.

It appears to be a random desecration, a cowardly act of vandalism, Howard Sovronsky, head of the Greater Hartford Jewish Federation, told the Courant.

Earlier this year, dozens of headstones were pushed over and vandalized at cemeteries in Philadelphia and St. Louis, among others.

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Mahwah engineer orders Jewish group to take down religious boundary – NorthJersey.com

A rise in heroin use in Bergen County, the Ramapough Lenape head to court and two new podcasts – all in “7 things to know in New Jersey this weekend.” Wochit

One of the white PVC pipes installed on a utility pole in Mahwah that officials say are prohibited because it is a sign.(Photo: Tom Nobile/NortJersey.com)

MAHWAHTownshipofficialsordereda New York Jewish community to cease building a religious boundary,known as an eruv,through Mahwahbecause the boundaryviolatestownshipzoningregulations, according to a letter sent by the township engineer.

Mike Kelly, the engineer, wrotethe white PVC pipe installed by the South Monsey EruvFund on utility poles thatmark the boundary perimeter constitute asign. Signs are prohibited ontrees, rocks or utility polesin the township.

Our elected responsibilities are to serve the public and enforce the laws of the Township of Mahwah,Mayor Bill Laforet said. “This sends a very strong message to those who choose to violate our sign ordinances.

In Jewish tradition, Orthodox Jews within an eruv can perform tasksoutside of their home that areotherwise forbidden on the Sabbath. Those tasks include pushing a stroller or carrying keys. Orange & Rockland Utilities, which owns the poles, granted approval to the Monsey group in March, according to a company spokesperson.

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Representatives from the Monsey group could not be reached Friday.

Eruvsarelocatedin 22places throughoutNew Jersey, including Paramus and Tenafly, according toOrange andRockland.

The Tenafly eruv was the subject of a six-year legal battle between Tenafly borough government and the Tenafly Eruv Association. In 2000, the Tenafly Borough Council bannederuvs, but in 2006thecouncil agreed to pay the association’s legal expenses and the association wasgiventhe right to expanditsboundary.

Theeruvcrossing Mahwahis supposed to span about 26 miles. It wouldcrossthe New York border into Mahwah andcontinuethrough Upper Saddle River and Montvale,Laforetsaid.

Piping has been installed on utility poles in Mahwah on Saddle River Road, East Mahwah Road,AirmontAvenue,MasonicusRoad andSparrowbushRoad.

Township officialshaveset an Aug. 4 deadline to remove the eruv, according toKelly’sletter.

Email: nobile:@northjersey.com

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Jewish groups slam PA over Temple Mount violence – The Jerusalem Post

A Palestinian woman argues with an Israeli border policeman at the entrance to the compound known to Muslims as Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as Temple Mount, in Jerusalem’s Old City . (photo credit:AMMAR AWAD / REUTERS)

The World Jewish Congress called on the Palestinian Authority to take immediate action to curb incitement, following the bloody terror attack on Friday night which killed three Israelis eating dinner in their home in the Halamish settlement.

The World Jewish Congress unequivocally condemns the heinous and horrific attack in the settlement of Halamish tonight which took the lives of three innocent Israelis sitting down for Shabbat dinner,” the organization said in a statement. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families of the victims, and with Israelis and Jewish people around the world. We demand that the Palestinian Authority take immediate measures to crack down on the incitement that led to this attack and make every effort to prevent such an atrocity from happening again.

Anti-Defamation league CEO Jonathan Greenblatt said he was “heartbroken” by the attack, adding that “such heinous crimes are amoral and inexcusable in the name of any faith.”

Addressing the riots which erupted after metal detectors were placed at an entrance to the Temple Mount complex, Greenblatt said that “all should have access to holy sites but violent riots are not a reasonable response to security measures intended to prevent violence.” He also criticized PA President Mahmoud Abbas’s announcement that he was freezing all contacts with Israel until it removes the new security measures, saying: “at time of intense tensions when we need cooperation, leaders should work together, not cease all contact.”

Meanwhile, the Simon Wiesenthal Center directed its criticism at the the World Council of Churches, which demanded a return to the status quo on the Temple Mount.

“Rather than decry the desecration of both human life and a holy site by jihadi murderers, the World Council of Churches (WCC) joined the chorus of voices in the Muslim world up in arms because Israel has introduced metal detectors to increase security for Muslims, Christians, and Jews,” the center said.

The response by the WCC is perfectly consistent with the WCCs decades-long animus against the Jewish State, remarked Rabbi Abraham Cooper, the Associate Dean of the Center and its Director of Global Social Action. In the years prior to the 1967 war, Jordan administered Jerusalems holy sites, desecrated every synagogue in the Old City, and barred Jews entirely from the Western Wall. The WCC never, ever protested. Yet they are prepared today to work in the name of the status quo against the installation of metal detectors, delighting jihadist groups who dream of igniting regional or global war by suicide attacks launched from Al-Aqsa, he continued.

The installation of metal detectors is taken for granted at the Vatican, at government offices, at every airport around the globe, added Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein, the Wiesenthal Centers Director of Interfaith Affairs. They were first made necessary when Palestinians internationalized terrorism decades ago.

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ADL raps Jewish pro-BDS group over anti-Israel ‘radicalism’ – The Jerusalem Post

Anti-Defamation League National Director Jonathan Greenblatt . (photo credit:Courtesy)

NEW YORK – The Anti-Defamation league has released a report criticizing the left-wing group Jewish Voice for Peace for taking increasingly radical positions and employing questionable tactics in pursuit of its mission to diminish support for Israel in recent months.

Among its concerns regarding the controversial pro-BDS organization, the ADL mentioned JVPs recent expressions of support for convicted Palestinian terrorists such as Rasmea Odeh and Marwan Barghouti.

Odeh made headlines earlier this year when she was invited to speak at JVPs conference back in April. Despite much criticism from the Jewish community, the group defended her participation, describing her as a feminist leader and a deeply respected Palestinian organizer. Odeh was sentenced to life in prison by an Israeli military court for planting the explosives used in two 1969 Jerusalem bombings, which killed two students. She was later released as part of a prisoner exchange.

In its zeal to condemn Israel at every opportunity, JVP has celebrated figures who have been convicted of engaging in terrorism. the ADL wrote.

According to the ADL, the group has also recently ramped up efforts to break down longstanding programs that allow members of American and Israeli police and defense communities to train together and share best practices for fighting terrorism.

This refers to JVPs new campaign titled Deadly Exchange, calling for action against joint training programs between Israeli and American security forces.

According to the organization, the Anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant, and anti-Black policies escalating in the Trump era have their roots in longstanding US and Israel policy.

In these exchange programs, JVP claims, American law enforcement officials are inculcated with disrespect for minorities and violence by their Israeli counterparts.

A recent promotional video for the Deadly Exchange campaign also points fingers at US Jewish organizations, including the ADL, for running many of the joint programs.

In a statement to The Jerusalem Post, JVP reacted to the ADL report, saying that it appears that JVP’s Deadly Exchange campaign has hit a nerve.

The ADL’s law enforcement exchange programs promote the exchange of violent and discriminatory police practices between the U.S. and Israel, the group wrote. Why is a self-described liberal civil rights organization facilitating these exchanges?

Another accusation on the ADLs list referred to harassment of Jewish LGBT groups, mentioning an incident that took place during the Celebrate Israel Parade in New York in June where JVP members disrupted the LGBTQ contingent, cutting their microphones and blocking them from marching.

According to reports, JVP also supported the expulsion of the Jewish group, A Wider Bridge, from the Chicago Dyke March on the grounds that they carried rainbow flags which resembled Israeli flags, the ADL wrote. One of JVPs longtime tactics has been to allege that Israels proud record of support for LGBTQ rights is merely a way of directing attention away from its mistreatment of Palestinians.

In addition, the ADL stated that although JVP pays lip service to the importance of dialogue and discussion of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, in practice JVP members have shouted down and interrupted campus speeches by guests whom they consider too Zionist.

Jewish Voice for Peace did not provide an answer to these accusations, despite inquiries from The Jerusalem Post.

Israel has strengths and weaknesses, things to teach and things to learn, like any country in the world. It is perfectly legitimate to criticize Israeli policies, the ADL concluded. But JVPs single-minded desire to paint Israel as a source of racism and violence has led it far beyond legitimate criticism of Israel.

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Gabrielle Sasson – Tablet Magazine

Gabrielle Sasson is entering seventh grade at Ramaz. Her family, in connection with her bat mitzvah, visited the Jewish communities of Addis Ababa and Gondar for ten days during early July. These are her impressions of the trip. Two weeks ago, instead of starting summer camp together with my friends, I traveled to Ethiopia to visit its Jewish community. In important ways, the kids in Ethiopia felt deeply familiar to me. The children sing the same Jewish and Hebrew songs I learned in Jewish day school in New York. They recite the same tephilot. In fact, in many waystheir strong belief in God and their desire to make aliyahthey can seem even more deeply rooted in Judaism and the Jewish story. Yet, the differences were starkand important. The Jews in Addis Ababa and Gondar live in shacks. Large families share two small mattresses, and one or two small blankets. Their clothing is full of holes. In honor of my bat mitzvah and my cousin Micahs bar mitzvah, our families made a small Kiddush after shul on Shabbat in Gondar. I was surprised by the excitement both adults and children felt when candy and soda was distributed. These are items my friends and I receive daily; we take them for granted. Here, kids do not have enough basic food to eat; many are malnourished. When I visited the homes of the kids I played with in the synagogue compound, I was upset by the awful conditions. No child should have to live without running water, beds, blankets and toilets. We were so alike in so many ways yet I had so much and they had so little. Poverty also prevents the kids from receiving medical treatment. We visited the medical clinic where Jewish childrenbut only those under fivehad recently begun to receive medical care. The doctor said that since the program began six weeks earlier he had saved 17 lives. What would happen to the children over five, the ones I had talked to and played with in the compound, the children who still had no access to medical care? The diseases the doctor talked abouttyphoid, typhus, malaria, intestinal parasitesdo not even exist in New York. These differences are heartbreaking and angering, but there is one above all others that I think is impossible to explain: That these children are not allowed to even travel to Israel. My family has a strong connection with Israel. We travel there frequently to visit family. If we wished to make aliyah, it would be easy; we would just get on a plane. When we asked the 1,100 community members present at Shabbat services how many had close family living in Israel, almost all the hands raised. And yet, Israel will not let these children make aliyah. To prepare for my trip, I read about the difficult decades-long struggle to bring the Ethiopian Jewish community to Israel. There are currently 140,000 Ethiopian Jews in Israel; for reasons I do not understand the government of Israel is reluctant to complete the aliyah by bringing the last 10,000 to the Jewish homeland. What makes these different from all other Jews around the world? We met orphans with no one to take care of themyoung childrenwho were not allowed to travel to Israel where their grandparents could take them in. So they live here, deprived of all of the resources that so many other Jews have, including the most important one: family. I am only twelve years old. I do not understand why the Israeli government wont let Jewish children rejoin their families in Israel. I certainly do not understand why the American Jewish community, which has so much and helps Jews throughout the world, refuses to help them. All my eyes still see is their dedication to Torah. My ears hear the prayers they offer to the God I pray to every day. And my heart still feels their pain, the pain that comes from realizing that almost no one in the Jewish world seems to care.

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July 24, 2017   Posted in: Jewish  Comments Closed

A Jewish Slave In Rome – The Jewish Press – JewishPress.com

Photo Credit: Jewish Press On Tisha BAv I always choose an appropriate book to read to keep my mind on the biggest tragedy ever to befall our people. Last year I read Chains by Leah Gebber a novel depicting the life of Jewish slaves in Rome during the time of the siege of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash. When I realized it was dark outside and the fast must be over, I wandered into the kitchen, book still in hand, and continued to read as I broke my fast. I was more engrossed in the fate of Shulamit, Mariam and Chanan than in my food. As Gebber writes in her preface, There is no such thing as writing a book. Only living a story. For all of Tisha BAv I lived the life of a slave in Rome. Gebber tells a magnificent story. She includes minute details which help place the reader on the shaking wooden platform as Shulamit and the other Jewish slaves have their mouths pried open and teeth examined to assess their value as slaves. A reader will feel as if she is standing in the hot stinking kitchen of a Roman aristocrat and watching the pig slave trying to best an enormous boar and get it on the spit; hear the whip slashing through the air before it cuts into the back of a slave being punished and feel her heart thumping as she sits in the stalls in the arena watching the gladiators, groomed for almost inevitable death, fighting for a few extra moments of life. Until now my knowledge of life at this time was limited to the disturbing and horrifying commentaries I sometimes read on Megillas Eicha. But those are mostly about life in Eretz Yisrael in the time period leading up to Churban Bayis. Until Id read Gebbers book I didnt even realize there were Jews who were captured or kidnapped by the Romans during the time leading up to the destruction of the Temple, as Shulamit was, and fettered and shipped off to the country which symbolized debauchery, depravity and decadence. Not only did she long for her physical freedom, she desperately missed her ability to connect with her Creator, as was shown by her mental torment when she realized that Pesach had come and gone and she had unwittingly eaten chametz. Her pain at feeling abandoned by G-d Who hadnt given her any sign of the approaching festival was greater than any physical pain from punishment that she experienced. Even today many people have the custom not to walk under Tituss arch in Rome. This arch was constructed some years after Tituss triumphant entry into Rome as the conqueror of Judea who quelled the Great Jewish Revolt. Titus took many months to journey from Jerusalem to Rome so that he could show the world the Temple spoils he had plundered and the thousands of Jewish slaves he had taken. He traveled through Beirut, Syria, Antioch and Alexandria, and in each place held public games where Jewish slaves had to fight wild animals. The arch clearly depicts what was taken from the Beis HaMikdash and is the reason that to this day it is assumed that the Menorah and other items plundered are somewhere in Rome. Gebber admits that she knew very little about this period of time before she embarked on a six-month journey of research into the life of Jewish slaves in Rome. Before she wrote a word of her story, which was first serialized in a charedi weekly magazine, she immersed herself in the life and environment of both the Jews in Eretz Yisrael at the time and those in Rome. She also delved into the political background in Rome, as the fate of the Jews was dependent on Roman law. The Romans, famed for their straight roads and warped minds, were a cruel and depraved people but, as Gebber comments, Rome was an incredibly law-abiding society even if the laws were corrupt. As the book progresses it becomes clear that this could work to the slaves advantage as a Roman wanting to rise in the echelons of power couldnt be thought to be flouting the law. The books Gebber used for research were everywhere: in her bag, by her bedside, in different rooms and in the kitchen, so that at any time, wherever she was, she could pick one up and delve into a different aspect of her characters worlds. Her research took her as far as the British Museum in London which has several rooms devoted to this historical period. Here she was able to actually see, among many other things, the kitchen utensils that the slaves would have used and the jewelry with which the wives of the Roman aristocrats adorned themselves, details of which are all woven into her story. But she doesnt just give us insights into life in Rome. Gebber captures the mood and murderous in-fighting of the Jews in Eretz Yisrael during the crucial months leading up to the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash. Most school-age children can tell you that the second Beis HaMikdash was destroyed because of sinas chinam, baseless hatred, and in Chains we see how the Jewish zealots were determined that, whatever the cost, there should be no hope for the Jews who thought they could hang on a little longer and try to make peace with the Romans. The zealots wanted to ensure that their fellow Jews would have no choice but to take up weapons and fight. We smell the smoke as Mariam opens her windows and sees her storehouses go up in flames along with any possibility of surviving the siege and providing food for her fellow Jews. The arsonists were not the enemies from Rome, but rather fellow Jews who wanted to force their hand. Gebber surprised me when she said, Josephus writes that Titus didnt want to destroy the Temple. It would have been an amazing prize for him to show off to his fellow countrymen. It was the most beautiful and important building in the world. Jerusalem and Rome were like twin cities, probably the two most important cities in the world, but for very different reasons. They were two centers of culture, knowledge and scholarship. Jerusalem was the religious hub with thousands of Jewish pilgrims making aliyah leregel several times a year, but non-Jews also came from all over the world, including from Rome, to bring sacrifices in the Temple. Destroying the Temple would be a loss to many of Tituss own people as well. Quoting Josephus, Gebber explained that Titus conferred with his counselors regarding the fate of the Beis Hamikdash which he referred to as a sacred building, one more remarkable than any other human work. Titus argued that it should not be destroyed because if preserved it would testify to the moderation of the Romans while if demolished it would be a perpetual sign of cruelty. Gebbers villain, Chanan, personifies the similar but contradictory aspects of Jerusalem and Rome. A rich Jewish aristocrat and a Kohen with a physical deformity which prevented him from serving in the Beis HaMikdash, Chanan abandons his wife, home and responsibilities to his people, to try to find fame and fortune in Rome. But being at once admired and mistrusted, Chanan finds that it is not so simple to ingratiate himself to the Romans. To the non-Jews, a Jew remains a Jew whose loyalty can never be relied on and who can never be fully trusted or accepted. Chanans complex character undergoes twists and turns throughout the story as his plans and fortune ebb and flow very much the story of the Jew in galus today. Since her youth, Tisha BAv has been a day of great meaning to Gebber, but today her children know how much the day has affected her. Although she rarely involves her children in her work, its not every day that literary research helps you understand so much more about our own history. Gebber said that last Tisha B Av she and her children sat together on the floor and she read to them some of passages from Josephus writings. While studying European geography in school recently, Gebbers daughter wanted to make a cake in the shape of Romes Colosseum. After all, its a not-to-be-missed site for all tourists in Italy; its the largest amphitheater ever built and designated as one of the Wonders of the World. But her mother knew just what the Colosseum really represented. The building, although started by Vespasian, was finished by Titus, funded by spoils plundered from the Beis HaMikdash and built with the unpaid labor force of some of the tens of thousands of Jewish slaves forced into exile. It stands today as a reminder of all the horror and misery of Tisha BAv and the destruction of the Beis Hamikdash. This was not the design that Gebber felt should be on a cake baked by a 21st century religious schoolgirl who lives in Jerusalem.

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July 24, 2017   Posted in: Jewish  Comments Closed

Jewish Museum

Welcome to the Jewish Museum, a museum in New York City at the intersection of art and Jewish culture for people of all backgrounds. Whether you visit our home in the elegant Warburg mansion on Museum Mile, or engage with us online, there is something for everyone. Through our exhibitions, programs, and collection of nearly 30,000 works of art, ceremonial objects, and media, visitors can journey through 4,000 years of art and Jewish culture from around the world. As an art museum representing the diversity of Jewish culture and identity, the Jewish Museum believes in free expression and an open society. We embrace multiple viewpoints regardless of race, gender, national origin, or religion, and we oppose discrimination in all its forms. Our exhibitions and public programs provide platforms for cross-cultural dialogue, fostering empathy, mutual understanding, and respect. We champion the powerful roles art and artists can play in our communities, both inside and outside the Museums walls. The Jewish Museum is dedicated to the enjoyment, understanding, and preservation of the artistic and cultural heritage of the Jewish people through its unparalleled collections and distinguished exhibitions. Learn More The Jewish Museum was founded in 1904 in the library of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, where it was housed for more than four decades. Now located in the landmark Warburg mansion, this elegant former residence has been the home of the Museum since 1947Learn More

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In France, murder of a Jewish woman ignites debate over the word … – Washington Post

PARIS What happened to Sarah Halimi resembles the plot of a horror film. In the early hours of April 4, the 65-year-old retired doctor and schoolteacher, an Orthodox Jew, was asleep in the modest apartment in northeastern Paris where she lived alone. Shortly after 4 a.m., a neighbor from the floor below, 27-year-old Kobili Traor, a Franco-Malian Muslim, is accused of having broken into her flat. Traor allegedly beat her to death and hurled her body off the balcony into the courtyard below. In the days that followed, French authorities treated Halimis killing as an isolated incident. But Jewish leaders immediately protested, especially after other neighbors testified that they heard Traor scream Allahu akbar, Arabic for God is great, while allegedly attacking Halimi, who was the only Jew residing in the building, her family said. Ever since, the Halimi Affair has simmered on the margins of public discourse, boiling over last week when President Emmanuel Macron promised after months of saying nothing clarity on the death of Sarah Halimi. In a country that has suffered a devastating slew of attacks in recent years, that clarity now means far more than the gruesome details of one particular case. At stake is a set of profound questions, as political as they are existential. What makes an act of violence a terrorist attack? And who decides what is terrorism and what is merely murder? [Macron hosts Netanyahu, condemns anti-Zionism as anti-Semitism] Strictly speaking, French law classifies as terrorism any grave act of violence whose individual or collective intent is to seriously disturb public order through intimidation or terror. Legally, it is Frances chief public prosecutor for Paris who decides whether to launch a terrorism investigation. In the Halimi case, Franois Molins, who occupies that position, declined to consider it as terrorism and, initially, as an act of anti-Semitic violence. The decision sent shock waves through the French Jewish community, Europes largest. For many, it evinces a political calculus that weighs certain attacks over others. Its purely and simply ideological, said Gilles-William Goldnadel, an attorney for the Halimi family and a well-known conservative commentator for Frances Le Figaro newspaper. Of Traor, Goldnadel added: He had the profile of a radical Islamist, and yet somehow there is a resistance to call a spade a spade. In general, the definition of the term radical Islamist remains a major debate in France. In this case, neighbors testified that they heard Traor recite verses from the Koran in Halimis apartment. Then, in early June, Libration, a French newspaper, gained access to the police dossier on Traor, which suggested he had a record of petty crime and violent tendencies almost identical to those that have characterized the profiles of other terrorist suspects. On a different level, other small-scale incidents even ones that experts see as comparably minor have instantly been classified as terrorism. In June, for instance, a man attacked police officers near Notre Dame cathedral in Paris with a hammer. Whereas Traor is believed to have yelled Allahu akbar, the assailant in this earlier case yelled, This is for Syria! In any case, the Notre Dame incident in which no one was killed was considered terrorism. So was the killing of a police officer on the Champs Elyses on the eve of the French election in late April, as well as an attempted shooting at Pariss Orly Airport in March. But not the slaying of Sarah Halimi. The office of Franois Molins did not return a request for comment. The difference, for some security analysts, is that these other cases were all defined by some discernible motivation of public disturbance, targeting as they did busy thoroughfares and transit hubs. The simple fact that someone killed someone else because of confession or religion is not enough, said Jean-Charles Brisard, director of the French Center for the Analysis of Terrorism, a Paris-based think tank. It needs to have a certain degree of willingness to disrupt the French public order. For Sarah Halimis family, however, that she was thrown off a balcony into a public space presented a dark spectacle meant to be seen and to pose a clear threat to other Jews. In an interview, Halimis brother, William Attal, 62, said that the familys principal objective was securing public recognition of the anti-Semitism that, in their eyes, killed their mother, sister and grandmother. As Attal put it: I want you to understand that the fight of this family is that people recognize the Islamist, anti-Semitic nature of the assassin, who massacred and killed a Jewish woman, whom he knew was a Jew and whom he knew was alone. In the French Jewish community, the Halimi Affair provides what many consider yet another example of the French state refusing to acknowledge the realities of contemporary anti-Semitism in France. [Black Lives Matter movement comes to France. But will it translate?] For many, this affair harks back to another Halimi Affair, from 2006, when Ilan Halimi, a 23-year-old cellphone salesman who had no relation to Sarah Halimi, was abducted and murdered by the Gang of Barbarians, a gang of immigrant criminals from the Paris suburbs. They had targeted their victim merely because he was Jewish, which French authorities initially refused to recognize. These ostrich politics must stop, and our leaders must become aware of what is happening in the country, read a recent letter signed by 17 prominent French intellectuals in the aftermath of the latest Halimi Affair. Its always the same story in France, journalist and public intellectual Bernard-Henri Lvy, another advocate of Halimi and her family, said in an interview. Anti-Semitism is not supposed to exist, especially among minority communities. On the whole, the recent and widely publicized uptick in Jews leaving France for Israel has slowed, and the number of reported anti- Semitic acts decreased by nearly 59percent in 2016, according to the French Interior Ministry. In general, the wave of terrorist violence that has struck this country in the past two years has not singled out Jews as targets. But scattered instances of anti-Semitic violence have continued to be reported, with victims often identifying their assailants as North African or West African. France is also home to one of Europes largest Muslim populations, a group that is repeatedly criticized across the political spectrum, particularly by the staunchly anti-immigrant National Front. Anti-Muslim violence also has become a reality of modern French life. So as not to channel that rhetoric and to condone that violence, many elected officials are loath to accuse the entirety of a diverse and sprawling community of a blanket charge as severe as anti-Semitism, analysts say. It comes from a very good, honorable place of not wanting to overgeneralize, but sometimes it can go too far, said Ethan Katz, the author of an acclaimed book on the history of Jewish-Muslim relations in France and a professor of history at the University of Cincinnati. Whats a fair critique is that mainstream politicians have not figured out a genuine way to address, aside from security measures, the legitimate problem of anti- Semitism in France today including in certain areas of Frances Muslim population. This, for her family and many others, is the tragedy of the Halimi Affair: the effacement of an anti-Semitism that remains a real threat, especially in tense urban areas. In the words of Goldnadel, the lawyer: Without naming it, there is no chance to escape this sickness. Read more Thank you, dear Donald: Why Macron invited Trump to France Trump and Macron, once cast as adversaries, show they have much in common Two deaths in Europe point to the rebirth of E.U. optimism Todays coverage from Post correspondents around the world Like Washington Post World on Facebook and stay updated on foreign news

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Regavim: Israeli Arabs Building Illegal Mega-Mansion on State Land – The Jewish Press – JewishPress.com

Photo Credit: Regavim The Regavim movement on Sunday petitioned the Haifa District Court against the Misgav Regional Councils Local Planning and Building Committee following the construction of a huge illegal villa within the councils zone, branding it a new record for anarchy. The Misgav Regional Council in the Galilee region in northern Israel is home to 22,000 Israelis, in 35 small towns, Kibbutzim and Moshavim, 29 of which are primarily Jewish, 6 Bedouin. About six months ago, Regavim, which systematically monitors illegal construction and expropriation of state land, primarily in the Arab sector, noticed the construction of a huge five-level, two-part mansion built on state owned land. In the past half-year, Regavim has sent repeated requests to the Misgav Local Committee demanding that it carry out supervision and enforcement activities against the illegal construction carried out under its jurisdiction. However, the requests were not answered. As the lack of response persisted, Regavim petitioned the court through attorney Boaz Arazi, to instruct the local committee to use the enforcement tools available to it: issuing stop-work orders, filing indictments against offenders and demolishing the illegal building. Even though the phenomenon of illegal construction has long become a state plague, this one is still a very special case, explained Yishai Hamo, director of operations for the Regavim movement in the northern district. This is a real castle, which was established with a bottomless disregard for the law, on land that belongs in part to the state. Until now there has been leniency towards illegal construction established in the jurisdictional areas of the Arab communities, Hamo noted, but in this case, the area in question is outside the boundaries of the Araba community, and therefore there is no planning future or any possibility of legalizing.

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60 Headstones Toppled At Connecticut Jewish Cemetery – Forward

Twitter Around 60 headstones were toppled at the Ateres Knesseth Israel Cemetery in Hartford, Conn., causing more than $10,000 in damages. (JTA) Some 60 headstones were toppled in a Jewish cemetery in Hartford, Conn. The damage at the Ateres Knesseth Israel Cemetery was discovered on Friday, when a relative of someone buried there visited the gravesite. The woman who made the discovery told police that when she visited the cemetery on Monday, five days earlier, she had not seen any such damage, according to reports. Most of the 60 gravestones reportedly can be reset on their bases, but at least two were shattered. The cost to repair the damage is estimated at up to $10,000. Hartford Police told the Hartford Courant newspaper that there is no evidence that the vandalism is a hate crime since no anti-Semitic graffiti was found at the scene. There were no security cameras in place at the cemetery. It appears to be a random desecration, a cowardly act of vandalism, Howard Sovronsky, head of the Greater Hartford Jewish Federation, told the Courant. Earlier this year, dozens of headstones were pushed over and vandalized at cemeteries in Philadelphia and St. Louis, among others.

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Mahwah engineer orders Jewish group to take down religious boundary – NorthJersey.com

A rise in heroin use in Bergen County, the Ramapough Lenape head to court and two new podcasts – all in “7 things to know in New Jersey this weekend.” Wochit One of the white PVC pipes installed on a utility pole in Mahwah that officials say are prohibited because it is a sign.(Photo: Tom Nobile/NortJersey.com) MAHWAHTownshipofficialsordereda New York Jewish community to cease building a religious boundary,known as an eruv,through Mahwahbecause the boundaryviolatestownshipzoningregulations, according to a letter sent by the township engineer. Mike Kelly, the engineer, wrotethe white PVC pipe installed by the South Monsey EruvFund on utility poles thatmark the boundary perimeter constitute asign. Signs are prohibited ontrees, rocks or utility polesin the township. Our elected responsibilities are to serve the public and enforce the laws of the Township of Mahwah,Mayor Bill Laforet said. “This sends a very strong message to those who choose to violate our sign ordinances. In Jewish tradition, Orthodox Jews within an eruv can perform tasksoutside of their home that areotherwise forbidden on the Sabbath. Those tasks include pushing a stroller or carrying keys. Orange & Rockland Utilities, which owns the poles, granted approval to the Monsey group in March, according to a company spokesperson. Ramapoughs demanding dismissal of tepee summonses Voluntary dues are becoming popular among synagogues around the country Mahwah man in child sex case ordered released from jail Representatives from the Monsey group could not be reached Friday. Eruvsarelocatedin 22places throughoutNew Jersey, including Paramus and Tenafly, according toOrange andRockland. The Tenafly eruv was the subject of a six-year legal battle between Tenafly borough government and the Tenafly Eruv Association. In 2000, the Tenafly Borough Council bannederuvs, but in 2006thecouncil agreed to pay the association’s legal expenses and the association wasgiventhe right to expanditsboundary. Theeruvcrossing Mahwahis supposed to span about 26 miles. It wouldcrossthe New York border into Mahwah andcontinuethrough Upper Saddle River and Montvale,Laforetsaid. Piping has been installed on utility poles in Mahwah on Saddle River Road, East Mahwah Road,AirmontAvenue,MasonicusRoad andSparrowbushRoad. Township officialshaveset an Aug. 4 deadline to remove the eruv, according toKelly’sletter. Email: nobile:@northjersey.com Read or Share this story: https://njersy.co/2vKwGSo

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Jewish groups slam PA over Temple Mount violence – The Jerusalem Post

A Palestinian woman argues with an Israeli border policeman at the entrance to the compound known to Muslims as Noble Sanctuary and to Jews as Temple Mount, in Jerusalem’s Old City . (photo credit:AMMAR AWAD / REUTERS) The World Jewish Congress called on the Palestinian Authority to take immediate action to curb incitement, following the bloody terror attack on Friday night which killed three Israelis eating dinner in their home in the Halamish settlement. The World Jewish Congress unequivocally condemns the heinous and horrific attack in the settlement of Halamish tonight which took the lives of three innocent Israelis sitting down for Shabbat dinner,” the organization said in a statement. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families of the victims, and with Israelis and Jewish people around the world. We demand that the Palestinian Authority take immediate measures to crack down on the incitement that led to this attack and make every effort to prevent such an atrocity from happening again. Anti-Defamation league CEO Jonathan Greenblatt said he was “heartbroken” by the attack, adding that “such heinous crimes are amoral and inexcusable in the name of any faith.” Addressing the riots which erupted after metal detectors were placed at an entrance to the Temple Mount complex, Greenblatt said that “all should have access to holy sites but violent riots are not a reasonable response to security measures intended to prevent violence.” He also criticized PA President Mahmoud Abbas’s announcement that he was freezing all contacts with Israel until it removes the new security measures, saying: “at time of intense tensions when we need cooperation, leaders should work together, not cease all contact.” Meanwhile, the Simon Wiesenthal Center directed its criticism at the the World Council of Churches, which demanded a return to the status quo on the Temple Mount. “Rather than decry the desecration of both human life and a holy site by jihadi murderers, the World Council of Churches (WCC) joined the chorus of voices in the Muslim world up in arms because Israel has introduced metal detectors to increase security for Muslims, Christians, and Jews,” the center said. The response by the WCC is perfectly consistent with the WCCs decades-long animus against the Jewish State, remarked Rabbi Abraham Cooper, the Associate Dean of the Center and its Director of Global Social Action. In the years prior to the 1967 war, Jordan administered Jerusalems holy sites, desecrated every synagogue in the Old City, and barred Jews entirely from the Western Wall. The WCC never, ever protested. Yet they are prepared today to work in the name of the status quo against the installation of metal detectors, delighting jihadist groups who dream of igniting regional or global war by suicide attacks launched from Al-Aqsa, he continued. The installation of metal detectors is taken for granted at the Vatican, at government offices, at every airport around the globe, added Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein, the Wiesenthal Centers Director of Interfaith Affairs. They were first made necessary when Palestinians internationalized terrorism decades ago. Share on facebook

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ADL raps Jewish pro-BDS group over anti-Israel ‘radicalism’ – The Jerusalem Post

Anti-Defamation League National Director Jonathan Greenblatt . (photo credit:Courtesy) NEW YORK – The Anti-Defamation league has released a report criticizing the left-wing group Jewish Voice for Peace for taking increasingly radical positions and employing questionable tactics in pursuit of its mission to diminish support for Israel in recent months. Among its concerns regarding the controversial pro-BDS organization, the ADL mentioned JVPs recent expressions of support for convicted Palestinian terrorists such as Rasmea Odeh and Marwan Barghouti. Odeh made headlines earlier this year when she was invited to speak at JVPs conference back in April. Despite much criticism from the Jewish community, the group defended her participation, describing her as a feminist leader and a deeply respected Palestinian organizer. Odeh was sentenced to life in prison by an Israeli military court for planting the explosives used in two 1969 Jerusalem bombings, which killed two students. She was later released as part of a prisoner exchange. In its zeal to condemn Israel at every opportunity, JVP has celebrated figures who have been convicted of engaging in terrorism. the ADL wrote. According to the ADL, the group has also recently ramped up efforts to break down longstanding programs that allow members of American and Israeli police and defense communities to train together and share best practices for fighting terrorism. This refers to JVPs new campaign titled Deadly Exchange, calling for action against joint training programs between Israeli and American security forces. According to the organization, the Anti-Muslim, anti-immigrant, and anti-Black policies escalating in the Trump era have their roots in longstanding US and Israel policy. In these exchange programs, JVP claims, American law enforcement officials are inculcated with disrespect for minorities and violence by their Israeli counterparts. A recent promotional video for the Deadly Exchange campaign also points fingers at US Jewish organizations, including the ADL, for running many of the joint programs. In a statement to The Jerusalem Post, JVP reacted to the ADL report, saying that it appears that JVP’s Deadly Exchange campaign has hit a nerve. The ADL’s law enforcement exchange programs promote the exchange of violent and discriminatory police practices between the U.S. and Israel, the group wrote. Why is a self-described liberal civil rights organization facilitating these exchanges? Another accusation on the ADLs list referred to harassment of Jewish LGBT groups, mentioning an incident that took place during the Celebrate Israel Parade in New York in June where JVP members disrupted the LGBTQ contingent, cutting their microphones and blocking them from marching. According to reports, JVP also supported the expulsion of the Jewish group, A Wider Bridge, from the Chicago Dyke March on the grounds that they carried rainbow flags which resembled Israeli flags, the ADL wrote. One of JVPs longtime tactics has been to allege that Israels proud record of support for LGBTQ rights is merely a way of directing attention away from its mistreatment of Palestinians. In addition, the ADL stated that although JVP pays lip service to the importance of dialogue and discussion of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, in practice JVP members have shouted down and interrupted campus speeches by guests whom they consider too Zionist. Jewish Voice for Peace did not provide an answer to these accusations, despite inquiries from The Jerusalem Post. Israel has strengths and weaknesses, things to teach and things to learn, like any country in the world. It is perfectly legitimate to criticize Israeli policies, the ADL concluded. But JVPs single-minded desire to paint Israel as a source of racism and violence has led it far beyond legitimate criticism of Israel. Share on facebook

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