Archive for the ‘Jonathan Pollard’ Category

Jonathan Pollard: All-Around Terrible Person Daily Stormer

Steve Sailer iSteve April 4, 2014

Its testament to the power of insisting upon your version of The Narrative over and over that easily looked-up facts about the traitor Jonathan Pollard can simply be ignored.

For example, rather than being an ethno-patriotic altruist who gave Israel 3,600 cubic feet of secret American documents out of sheer idealism, Pollard is an all-around terrible person as countless incidents in his life attest. Always has been. From his Wikipedia article:

Pollard grew up with what he called a racial obligation to Israel,[15] and made his first trip to Israel in 1970, as part of a science program visiting the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot. While there, he was hospitalized after a fight with another student. One Weizmann scientist remembered Pollard as leaving behind a reputation of being an unstable troublemaker, the worst case of this kind in the history of the summer camp.[16]

After completing high school, Pollard attended Stanford University, where he completed a degree in political science in 1976.[14] While there, he is remembered by several of his acquaintances as boasting that he was a dual citizen of the United States and Israel and claiming to work for the Mossad and to have attained the rank of colonel in the Israel Defense Forces. None of these claims were true.[17][18][19]

Pollard was turned down for the CIA job after taking a polygraph test in which he admitted to prolific illegal drug usage between 1974 and 1978. The Navy asked for but was denied information from the CIA regarding Pollard, including the results of their pre-employment polygraph test showing Pollards excessive drug use.[23]

Two months after Pollard was hired, the technical director of NOSIC, Richard Haver, requested that he be terminated.[23] This came after a conversation with the new hire in which Pollard offered to start a back-channel operation with the South African intelligence service and lied about his fathers involvement with the CIA.[23] Instead of terminating Pollard, Havers boss reassigned him to a Navy human intelligence (HUMINT) operation, In the vetting process for this position, Pollard, it was later discovered, lied repeatedly: he denied illegal drug use, claimed his father had been a CIA operative, misrepresented his language abilities and his educational achievements, and claimed to have applied for a commission as officer in the Naval Reserve.[23]

While transferring to his new job at TF-168, Pollard again initiated a meeting with someone far up the chain of command, this time with Admiral Sumner Shapiro, Commander, Naval Intelligence Command (CNIC) about an idea he had for TF-168 and South Africa. (The TF-168 group had passed on his ideas.) After the meeting, Shapiro immediately ordered that Pollards security clearances be revoked and that he be reassigned to a non-sensitive position. According to The Washington Post, Shapiro dismissed Pollard as a kook, saying later, I wish the hell Id fired him.[24]

Because of the job transfer, Shapiros order to remove Pollards security clearances slipped through the cracks. However, Shapiros office followed up with a request to TF-168 that Pollards trustworthiness be investigated by the CIA. The CIA found Pollard to be a risk and recommended that he not be used in any intelligence collection operation. A subsequent polygraph test was inconclusive, although it did prompt Pollard to admit to making false statements to his superiors, prior drug use, and having unauthorized contacts with representatives of foreign governments.[25] The special agent administering the test felt that Pollard, who at times began shouting and shaking and making gagging sounds as if he were going to vomit, was feigning illness to invalidate the test, and recommended that he not be granted access to highly classified information.[25] Pollard was also required to be evaluated by a psychiatrist.[25]

Pollards clearance was reduced to Secret.[25] Pollard subsequently filed a grievance and threatened lawsuits to recover his SCI clearance, and subsequently began receiving excellent performance reviews.[26] In 1982, after the psychiatrist concluded Pollard had no mental illness, Pollards clearance was upgraded to SCI once again. In October 1984, after some reorganization of the Navys intelligence departments, Pollard applied for and was accepted into a position as an analyst for the Naval Intelligence Command.[citation needed]

Shortly after Pollard began working at NIC/TF-168, he met Aviem Sella, a combat veteran of the Israeli Air Force, at the time on leave from his position as a colonel to gain a masters degree in computer science as a graduate student at New York University. Pollard told Sella that he worked for U.S. naval intelligence, detailed to him specific incidents where U.S. intelligence was withholding information from Israel, and offered himself as a spy. Though Sella had wondered whether Pollard was part of an FBI sting operation to recruit an Israeli, he ended up believing him. Within a few days, in June 1984, Pollard started passing classified information to Sella and received, in exchange, $10,000 cash and a very expensive diamond and sapphire ring, which Pollard later used to propose marriage to his girlfriend Anne. He also agreed to receive $1,500 per month for further espionage.[28]

Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) investigator Ronald Olive has alleged that Pollard passed classified information to South Africa,[29] and attempted, through a third party, to sell classified information to Pakistan on multiple occasions.[30] Pollard also stole classified documents related to China on behalf of his wife, who used the information to advance her personal business-interests and kept them around the house, where investigating authorities discovered them when Pollards espionage activity came to light.[31][32][33]

During Pollards trial, the US governments memorandum in aid of sentencing challenged defendants claim that he was motivated by altruism rather than greed, asserting that Pollard had disclosed classified information in anticipation of financial gain in other instances:

The governments investigation has revealed that defendant provided to certain of his acquaintances U.S. classified documents which defendant obtained through U.S. Navy sources. The classified documents which defendant disclosed to two such acquaintances, both of whom are professional investment advisers, contained classified economic and political analyses which defendant believed would help his acquaintances render investment advice to their clients Defendant acknowledged that, although he was not paid for his unauthorized disclosures of classified information to the above-mentioned acquaintances, he hoped to be rewarded ultimately through business opportunities that these individuals could arrange for defendant when he eventually left his position with the U.S. Navy. In fact, defendant was involved in an ongoing business venture with two of these acquaintances at the time he provided the classified information to them[34]

During the course of the Pollard trial, Australian authorities reported the disclosure of classified American documents by Pollard to one of their own agents, a Royal Australian Navy officer who had been engaged in a personnel-exchange naval-liaison program between the U.S. and Australia.[35] The Australian officer, alarmed by Pollards repeated disclosure to him of data caveated No Foreign Access Allowed, reported the indiscretions to his chain of command, which in turn recalled him from his position in the U.S., fearing that the disclosures might be part of a CIA ruse.

Seymour Hersh reported in The New Yorker in 1999:

Had Pollards case gone to trial, one of the governments major witnesses would have been a journalist named Kurt Lohbeck, who had a checkered past. He had served seven months in prison after being convicted of passing a bad check in New Mexico in 1977, but by 1985 he was under contract to the CBS Evening News. Lohbeck, who now lives in Albuquerque (he received a full pardon from the governor of New Mexico two years ago), acknowledged in a telephone interview that he was prepared to testify, if necessary, about his involvement in Pollards unsuccessful efforts in 1985 to broker arms sales for the rebels in the Afghan war. At one meeting with a foreign diplomat, Lohbeck said, Pollard posed as a high-level C.I.A. operative. Lohbeck, who was then CBSs main battlefield correspondent in the Afghan war, told me that Pollard had provided him, and thus CBS, with a large number of classified American documents concerning the war. He also told me that Pollard had never discussed Israel with him or indicated any special feelings for the state. I never heard anything political from Jay, Lohbeck added, other than that he tried to portray himself as a Reaganite. Not a word about Israel. Jays sole interest was in making a lot of money.

Lohbeck went on to say that he had also been prepared to testify, if asked, about Pollards drug use. Jay used cocaine heavily, and had no compunction about doing it in public. Hed just lay it in lines on the table. In 1985, Lohbeck made similar statements, government officials said, to the F.B.I.

Pollard, told by me of Lohbecks assertions, sent a response from a jail cell in North Carolina: My relationship with Lohbeck is extremely complicated. I was never indicted for anything I did with him. Remember that.

Pollard reminds me vaguely of lobbyist-felonJack Abramoff, except Pollard was out of control on cocaine instead of steroids.

In a sane world, Israel and many of its American supporters would cite Pollards all-around awfulness as evidence that hes an anomaly, hes totally unrepresentative. They would downplay the arguments that he did it for Israel and play up the evidence that he was a cokehound with delusions of being an international man of mystery.

Instead, the opposite happens.

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Jonathan Pollard: All-Around Terrible Person Daily Stormer

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Jonathan Pollard SpyMuseum.com the #1 Resource for …

Born in 1954, the son of a microbiologist teaching at Notre Dame University in South Bend, Indiana. Was raised with a deep love for Israel instilled within him. Often vowed to migrate to Israel to live and to aid in fighting against the countrys enemies.

Was educated at Stanford University, graduating with a degree in Political Science in 1976 and enrolled in the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. While in school, Pollard often reveled in telling school mates of his adventures related to his fathers work with the CIA. He often created stories such as this, and even went so far as to enter fabricated information in an application for employment with the U.S. Government. After failing to complete finish his pursuits in graduate school, Pollard took a job with the U.S. Navy Intelligence, working as a research specialist in 1979.

In 1984, was assigned to serve as an analyst for the Naval Investigation Service, given special clearances and access to sensitive materials. Often shared some of this information with confidants and acquaintances.

Was recruited by Rafi Eitan, the head of the Bureau of Scientific Relations and was introduced to Israeli war hero Colonel Aviem Avi Sella, who was serving as an Israeli operative under the cover of being a graduate student at New York University. At a meeting in May 1984, Pollard offered to supply Israel with sensitive information in order to help Israel in strengthening its defense systems. He turned over information related to Iraqi chemical weaponry. Another Israeli agent, Yosef Yagur, was assigned as Pollards handler.

Pollard turned over thousands of documents to Yagur (he was able, because of his clearance, to simply check the documents out and take them home with him at night). In return, Pollard received $2,500 each month, as well as other gifts (including a diamond and sapphire engagement ring for his fiance, Anne Henderson).

Many of the secrets Pollard turned over were related to weaponry employed by Israels enemies, including Iraq. Pollard gathered most of his information by searching Defense Intelligence Agency databases and conducted searches up to three times each week. Often, he provided original documents to his Israeli contacts, allowing them to photocopy them over the weekend, after which they would return them in time for him to return to work on Monday morning.

Eventually, Pollards excessive research and requests for data alerted officials at NIS, including his supervisor, Jerry Agee. An investigation found that several highly sensitive documents that he requested were not within his workspace, and thus likely had been removed from the building. The FBI was alerted and began observing him.

On November 18, 1985, Pollard was stopped and questioned by the FBI and NIS security officials. In his possession were several top secret documents. He was questioned repeatedly over the course of the next few days and growing desperate, ran to the Israeli embassy for safety. Followed by FBI surveillance teams, the Pollards were confident that they would find sanctuary within the gates of the embassy, but instead were denied. Demanding political asylum, he was ordered by Israeli security to leaves the embassy grounds. The couple was soon thereafter arrested.

The fallout that Israel had engaged in espionage against the United States was immense. Public outcry and anger caused a backlash against Israel and jeopardized the countrys political and intelligence relationship with the United States. Israel tried to deflect the blame for the activity, claiming it to be a rouge operation.

Pollard cooperated with U.S. officials, but argued that he was not spying against the United States, but rather for Israel, to whom he had a greater allegiance. He also argued that much of his information was basically useless to the Israelis but the prosecutors demonstrated that some of the material was funneled by Soviet moles within the Israeli intelligence system and had compromised hundred of agents and friendlies in the Arab world.

Pollard pled guilty to espionage and was sentenced to life in prison. His wife was sentenced to two lesser crime and received a five year sentence, during which she complained vigorously about her treatment. She was released after three years and promptly divorced Pollard.

Pollard was considered a hero in Israel and many attempts were made to secure his release. Several Israeli officials made overtures towards the Bush and Clinton administrations but were denied.

After serving more than 30 years in a federal prison, Pollard was paroled on November 20, 2015. Under the terms of his parole he can not leave the United States without permission for five years and is subject to wearing an ankle bracelet monitor. His requests to move to Israel has been denied.

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Blitzer Opens Up in Ahavath Achim Situation Room – Atlanta Jewish Times

Speaking to a nearly full sanctuary at Ahavath Achim Synagogue,CNNanchor Wolf Blitzer said that he was happy to fulfill Stuart Eizenstats request that he deliver the annual Fran Eizenstat and Eizenstat Family Lecture.

As all of you know, theres been a very slow news cycle in Washington, Blitzer deadpanned.

Blitzers appearance Sunday, June11, came three days after former FBI Director James Comeys Senate testimony about his firing by President Donald Trump, the kind of high-profile event that the 69-year-old Blitzer has fronted often during his 27 years at CNN.

(Full disclosure: Iworked at CNN for many years.)

Eizenstat, an Atlanta native and former U.S. ambassador to the European Union who served in the administrations of Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, established the lecture series in 1987.

With both men seated on the bimah, Eizenstats questions allowed Blitzer to trace his life from his birth in postwar Germany to his front-row seat to history as a journalist.

Asked about the Trump administration, Blitzer threw up his hands, looked over the sanctuary for several seconds, then said: Its unique. It definitely is.

Blitzer rejected the suggestion that too much is being made of reported Russian interference in the 2016 election. At issue is a very important matter. The U.S. has to learn from what happened, from the Russian intervention in our democracy, in our election. Wed better make sure it doesnt happen again.

Wolf Blitzer defends CNN against accusations of being fake news. (Photo by Montoya Turner, Made You Look Photography)

On the subject of fake news, a frequent Trump barb, Blitzer praised CNNs fact-checking operation. We wont put it on the air until weve checked it out and we think its credible and reliable, he said. We are the first draft of history. Were journalists. We are to be as responsible, careful and precise as possible.

To answer the most-asked question, Blitzer said Wolf was the name of his maternal grandfather, who, like much of his mothers family, died in the Holocaust, as did Blitzers paternal grandparents.

Several months after he was born, Blitzer immigrated to Buffalo, N.Y., with his parents and older sister.

He received a bachelors in history from the State University of New York-Buffaloand, while pursuing his masters in international relations from Johns Hopkins University, also studied at Hebrew University ofJerusalem.

I was a news junkie even as a little boy growing up in Buffalo, Blitzer said. I loved the news, but it never dawned on me that I would go into the journalism profession.

When heannounced his career choice, his father replied, Journalist? Can you make a living doing that?

Blitzer started in the Tel Aviv bureau of the Reuters news agency.

As the Washington correspondent for The Jerusalem Postfrom 1973to 1990, Blitzer garnered his share of headlines.

At a news conference during Anwar Sadats April 1977 visit to Washington, Blitzer asked the Egyptian president if he might engender good will by promoting exchanges between Israelis and Egyptians.

He looked at me and he said, I am ready to do that. I have no hesitation to do that, but my people are not yet ready because of all of the wars and violence, Blitzer recalled.

After announcing in November 1977 that he would travel to Jerusalem and speak to the Knesset, Sadat said he began considering the move after a reporter, later identified as Blitzer, asked that question seven months earlier.

Blitzer made splashes with his jailhouse interviews in late 1986 and early 1987 of Jonathan Pollard, the U.S. Navy intelligence analyst who pleaded guilty in June 1986 to espionage and was in a Virginia prison awaiting sentencing by a federal judge.

It was an awful moment in U.S.-Israeli relations, Blitzer said. Pollard felt that the U.S. wasnt sharing critically important information with the Israelis, so he was going to do it and was paid for doing so.

When the Israeli censor would not permit Blitzers article to appear in the Israeli press, it was published by The Washington Postin February 1987.

Pollard was sentenced to life imprisonment in March 1987. He was released Nov. 20, 2015.

Blitzer said his first major story after joining CNN as military affairs correspondent May 8, 1990, was the most surprising.

In July 1990, as Iraqi troops massed along the Kuwaiti border, Blitzer and other journalists were told privately by the chief of naval operations and a senior CIA official that Iraqi ruler Saddam Hussein wanted to intimidate his smaller southern neighbor but would never invade another Arab country.

As he drove home about 10 p.m. Aug. 1, Blitzer was informed of a wire service report that Iraqi troops had crossed the border.

After learning how wrong that earlier assessment had been It was clearly a blunder on the part of the U.S. intelligence community Blitzer did a telephone report, then returned to the Pentagon, where he was back on television at midnight.

A highlight of Blitzers time as a White House correspondent from 1992to 1999 was an interview with Nelson Mandela, South Africas first post-apartheid president, during President Bill Clintons March 1998 trip.

Blitzer was amazed by Mandelas attitude, despite his 25 years of incarceration on Robben Island. He had no bitterness. He had no anger. A lot of people would have wanted to kill all those nasty apartheid guards who tormented and tortured him, but to build a new South Africa, Mandela told Blitzer, the efforts of all races would be needed. It was such a remarkable moment.

Blitzer, who today hosts both Wolfand The Situation Room,has anchored CNNs coverage of presidential elections since 2004.

Calling the 2008 president election for Barack Obama broughtBlitzer an unexpected celebrity, he said. In the weeks and months and years that followed wherever I go, usually older African-Americans would come up to me, and they would hug me, and they would kiss me, and they would start to cry, (saying)We never believed wed see an African-American president in our lifetime. We always thought it would be stolen at the last minute, they would do something. Until we heard it from you, we really didnt believe it was going to happen.

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Pollard’s appeal was rejected because of admiral’s ‘myth’ – Arutz Sheva

Last week’s rejection of Jonathan Pollard’s appeal to ease his difficult parole restrictions is largely due to a letter written by a US Navy admiral the contents of which have been called a “myth.”

An investigative report by the Hamodia newspaper shows that the letter, written in 1995, contains never-before raised grave accusations against Pollard. In fact, the parole commission itself noted last year that Pollard’s sole infraction was when he told a warden that G-d runs the world.

Still, this did not stop the court from writing in its rejection of Pollard’s appeal, “The fact that Pollard was never charged or disciplined for these [grave violations] did not strip the conduct of relevancy in the Commissions assessment… That is to say, even though the accusations had never before been attributed any importance indicating their worthlessness still and all, the Parole Commission was within its rights to take them into consideration when levying the harsh restrictions on Pollard.

Hamodia’s long-time Pollard investigator Avraham Weissman reports that the story began in 1995, when then-acting CIA director Admiral William O. Studeman wrote a letter to the Parole Commission. The stated goal of his letter was to convince the commission not to grant parole to Jonathan Pollard. He stated there that Pollard had actually written 14 letters to outside addressees that contained top-secret classified information. Studeman described the information in a few lines, and then wrote, ‘Mr. Pollards track record in prison can only be a harbinger of his anticipated security practices once released.’

A legal observer who has been following the Pollard case for many years told Hamodia that he was flabbergasted when he was first permitted to see the Studeman letter last year.

He told Weissman that Studeman’s letter is nothing more than a “myth,” and explained why: The sending of a single letter containing classified information would have sufficed to create a very serious blot on his prison record and very likely be grounds for new criminal charges against Pollard – let alone attempting to send 14 such letters. The government would have been delighted to find a reason to keep Pollard behind bars for many more years, yet for 20 years they never even insinuated that he had tried to do such a thing.”

Even in July of 2014,” he continued, “when they harshly rejected his plea for parole, they gave no indication that he had broken any rules in regard to the sending of letters. After July 7, 2015, the parole commission itself noted that his sole infraction was when he told a warden that ‘G-d runs the world.’

Why, then, did the court agree last week that the Parole Commission was not out of bounds in giving weight to Studeman’s letter? The court, in rejecting Pollard’s appeal, “explained” as follows (emphasis added):

The Commission did not abuse its discretion in according weight to a 1995 letter from the then-CIA director reporting that classified information had appeared in Pollards prison correspondence at least 14 times. The fact that Pollard was never charged or disciplined for these communications did not strip the conduct of relevancy in the Commissions assessment of whether to impose special conditions on Pollards parole.”

Hamodia further reports that after the Studeman letter was released, Pollards attorneys, who have high-level security clearance, asked to see the 14 letters supposedly written by Pollard. They were steadfastly refused.

The government must know that they had cleared hundreds of these same letters, the legal observer noted. Many of these letters are still out there, and were these letters released, the claim would be immediately debunked.”

However, he added, any objective observer wouldnt even need to see the letters to know this is all a myth. As Pollards lawyers have stated in court, by acknowledging in 2015 what his sole infraction in prison was, the Parole Commission itself repudiated the claim made by Studeman.”

On July 7, 2015, during Pollard’s 30th year in prison, he was finally granted parole. At the hearing, Gregg Maisal, chief of the National Security Section of the U.S. Attorneys office, confirmed that the government believed that there was no probability of Mr. Pollard re-offending.

His parole includes the following harsh restrictions: He must wear a GPS monitoring system that consists of a non-removable transmitter installed on his wrist, and a receiver that is plugged into an outlet in his Manhattan residence. Whenever he moves outside the range of the receiver, the transmitter acts as a GPS tracker and monitors his location. On Sabbath, he is effectively prevented from stepping outside his home, as that would cause the battery to drain, forbidden on the Sabbath according to Jewish Law. He also may not leave his home between 7:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m, and during the daytime, he may travel only in parts of Manhattan, and is even prohibited from visiting nearby Brooklyn. His computers are monitored and inspected, as would be those of any employer who chooses to hire him, which has prevented him from being able to gain employment.

In many ways,” the legal observer told Hamodia, “the sad saga of the Studeman letter – a document whose absurd contents have been disclaimed by the very commission that is now trying to use it as a weapon against Pollard – is emblematic of why Jonathans battle for justice has always been so uphill. The 14 letters it refers to have never undergone any sort of judicial review. Not only did the government refuse to show them to Pollards lawyers, but they declined to show it to any third party including Judge Forrest.”

“Even now,” he concluded, “after [Pollard] already served 30 long years in prison, in their zeal to make Pollards life as miserable as possible, they refuse to allow ideals like truth or justice to get in their way.

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MainOpEdsTrump should move Pollard to Jerusalem – Arutz Sheva

President Trump’s delay in moving the US Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem presents the President with a wonderful opportunity to commute Jonathan Pollard’s sentence – freeing Pollard to move from New York to Jerusalem.

Trump made his unequivocal Embassy pledge on 22 March 2016:

“We will move the American embassy to the eternal capital of the Jewish people, Jerusalem.”

A White House statement on 1 June put this brave face on Trump ‘s decision delaying the Embassy move:

“While President Donald J. Trump signed the waiver under the Jerusalem Embassy Act and delayed moving the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, no one should consider this step to be in any way a retreat from the President’s strong support for Israel and for the United States-Israel alliance. President Trump made this decision to maximize the chances of successfully negotiating a deal between Israel and the Palestinians, fulfilling his solemn obligation to defend America’s national security interests. But, as he has repeatedly stated his intention to move the embassy, the question is not if that move happens, but only when.”

Negotiations between Israel and the Palestinian Arabs have so far extended over a period of 23 years without any real success – so one can only wonder when the Embassy move is likely to occur.

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s response was quite philosophical:

“Though Israel is disappointed that the embassy will not move at this time, we appreciate today’s expression of President Trump’s friendship to Israel and his commitment to moving the embassy in the future,”

Trump’s friendship would be confirmed were he to commute Pollard’sharsh parole conditions to enable Pollard’s move to Jerusalem,

Pollard – an intelligence analyst with the US Government – received his life sentence for passing classified information to an American ally – Israel. No other American has received such a crushing sentence.

Pollard – released in 2015 after serving 30 years penal servitude – was placed on harsh parole conditions requiring him to wear an electronic tracking device, obey a curfew and allow his computers to be monitored. He must remain in the United States until November 2020.

Pollard’s appeal to relax his parole conditions was recently rejected.

Pollard’s treatment can be contrasted to that meted out to Bradley (now known as Chelsea) Manning – who leaked more than 700,000 documents to WikiLeaks in 2010 whilst serving as an intelligence analyst in Iraq,

Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison. President Obama’s precedent in freeing Manning whilst resisting similar overtures for Pollard’s release was reprehensible. President Obama commuted Mannings sentence in January – three days before vacating the White House – from 35 years to just over 7 years, the majority of which Manning had already served. Trump said Manning should never have been released from prison.

Manning was freed from federal custody on May 17th.

Israeli Prime Ministers from Yitzchak Rabin to Netanyahu had unsuccessfully lobbied successive Republican and Democratic Presidents for Pollard’s release and permission to resettle in Israel.

Pollard is recently reported to have remarked:

As much as Trump needs to be held to his promise to move the embassy, it is just as important that the prime minister keep his promise to bring an agent home”

President Obama’s precedent in freeing Manning whilst resisting similar overtures for Pollard’s release was reprehensible.

Commuting Pollard’s sentence at this particular moment in Trump’s presidency will help cement the blossoming post-Obama relationship between the United States and one of its staunchest allies – Israel.

Pollard’s move to Jerusalem as It celebrates the 50th anniversary of its liberation from 19 years of illegal occupation by Jordan would alleviate the disappointment of the Embassy not moving there.

That is what Trump-style dealmaking is all about.

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MainOpEdsTrump should move Pollard to Jerusalem – Arutz Sheva

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Jonathan Pollard Loses Appeal To Ease Parole Conditions – Forward

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Jonathan Pollard, the American convicted of spying for Israel, leaves a New York court house following his release from prison after 30 years on November 20, 2015.

(JTA) A federal appeals court has rejected the request by Jonathan Pollard, a convicted spy for Israel, to lift restrictive parole conditions.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan issued the judgment on Wednesday, a week after hearing arguments.

The parole terms issued upon Pollards release from a federal prison in November 2015 after serving 30 years of a life sentence require him to stay in his New York home from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m., to submit any computer he uses for inspection and to wear a GPS-monitoring device at all times. The device means that Pollard, who is Orthodox, is forced to violate Shabbat observance, his lawyer has said.

Pollard, 62, also must remain in the United States for five years, despite his desire to move to Israel.

Pollards attorney argued that the terms are overly severe because Pollard cannot remember the classified information he provided in 1984 and 1985 to Israeli officials and that he is not a flight risk, Reuters reported.

Pollard pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiracy to commit espionage in connection with providing Israeli contacts with hundreds of classified documents he had obtained as a civilian intelligence specialist for the U.S. Navy.

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Jonathan Pollard Loses Appeal To Ease Parole Conditions – Forward

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Jonathan Pollard loses appeal to ease parole conditions …

Jonathan Pollard, left, arrives at a federal courthouse in New York with his wife, Esther, to check in at a probation office just hours after he was released from prison, Nov. 20, 2015. (Ilana Gold/WCBS-TV via AP Images)

(JTA) A federal appeals court has rejected convicted spy for Israel Jonathan Pollards request to lift restrictive parole conditions.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan issued the judgment on Wednesday, a week after hearing arguments.

The parole terms issued upon Pollards release from a federal prison in November 2015 after serving 30 years of a life sentence require him to stay in his New York home from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.; to submit any computer he uses for inspection, and to wear a GPS-monitoring device at all times. The device means that Pollard, who is Orthodox, is forced to violate Shabbat observance, his lawyer has said.

Pollard, 62, also must remain in the United States for five years, despite his desire to move to Israel.

Pollards attorney argued that the terms are overly severe because Pollard cannot remember the classified information he provided in 1984 and 1985 to Israeli officials and that he is not a flight risk, Reuters reported.

Pollard pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiracy to commit espionage in connection with providing Israeli contacts with hundreds of classified documents he had obtained as a civilian intelligence specialist for the U.S. Navy.

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JONATHAN POLLARD (KIKE) LOSES BID TO RELAX US PAROLE …

A federal appeals court on Wednesday rejected a bid by Jonathan Pollard, the former US Navy intelligence officer who served 30 years in prison after being convicted of spying for Israel, to relax his parole conditions.

The US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan said the US Parole Commission acted within its discretion in requiring Pollard to wear an electronic tracking device, obey a curfew and allow his computers to be monitored.

Eliot Lauer, Pollards attorney, told The Jerusalem Post that he was disappointed in two respects. First the result. Second in that the court did not step out of the checklist and confront the commission on the manifest injustice of the onerous and unnecessary restrictions.

The Free Pollard campaign responded that the timing and substance of the Second Circuits denial of Pollards appeal to lift his parole restrictions reflect politics, not due process.

The courts decision was handed down with unprecedented speed obviously calculated to occur simultaneously with Presidents Trumps departure from Israel and with Yom Yerushalyim, the campaign said. Clearly the timing of this decision, which normally takes months but was delivered less than a week after oral arguments, was intended as a slap across Israels face.

Coming on the heels of the US presidents compromise of an Israeli intelligence operation and the consequent endangerment of the life of an Israeli agent, this unambiguous insult to Israel via the Second Circuit Court is revealing of the new US administrations continuing tolerance of an anti-Israel agenda by those elements in the American defense and intelligence communities hostile to the US-Israel special relationship, the statement continued.

This officially accepted belligerence will not be camouflaged by photo-ops and heart-warming speeches.

Unless and until Jonathan Pollard is allowed to come home to Israel, the US intelligence establishments warin- the-shadows against Israel will continue unabated, the campaign concluded.

Pollard pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiracy to commit espionage in connection with providing Israeli contacts with hundreds of classified documents.

His lawyers have said his parole conditions have prevented him from getting a job.

On Sunday, Pollard appealed to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to bring up the matter of his release during his meeting with US President Donald Trump on Monday.

Netanyahus spokesman declined to reveal whether or not he did.

Pollard made the comments during conversations he held with close friends over the weekend. His wife, Esther, recounted them to the Post.

As much as Trump needs to be held to his promise to move the embassy, it is just as important that the prime minister keep his promise to bring an agent home, Pollard reportedly said to the friends during the weekend.

Last week, Pollard appealed US District Judge Katherine Forrests decision to keep in place the parole conditions that were imposed when he was released from prison in November 2015, after serving 30 years of a life sentence for spying for Israel.

The conditions prevent Pollard from leaving his New York home after 7 p.m. and before 7 a.m., compel him to submit any computer he uses for inspection and require him to wear a GPS monitoring device that forces him to violate the Sabbath.

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May 25, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

Former Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard Loses Bid to Ease US Parole Restrictions – Algemeiner

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Jonathan and Esther Pollard. Photo: Justice for Jonathan Pollard.

JNS.org A federal appeals court rejected on Wednesday a bid by Jonathan Pollard the former US Navy intelligence analyst who was released from prison in November 2015 after serving a 30-year sentence on charges of spying for Israel to ease restrictions of his parole.

In its ruling, the US Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit in New York said the US Parole Commission acted within its discretion in setting Pollards curfew, internet restrictions and tracking devices.

Eliot Lauer, Pollards attorney, told The Jerusalem Post he was disappointed in two respects. First, the result. Second, in that the court did not step out of the checklist and confront the commission on the manifest injustice of the onerous and unnecessary restrictions.

Since his release, Pollard has been barred from leaving his New York home between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. His parole conditions also forbid him from freely using the internet and speaking with the media. He is obliged to wear a GPS monitoring apparatus at all times and cannot leave the US.

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Former Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard Loses Bid to Ease US Parole Restrictions – Algemeiner

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May 25, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

Jonathan Pollard: All-Around Terrible Person Daily Stormer

Steve Sailer iSteve April 4, 2014 Its testament to the power of insisting upon your version of The Narrative over and over that easily looked-up facts about the traitor Jonathan Pollard can simply be ignored. For example, rather than being an ethno-patriotic altruist who gave Israel 3,600 cubic feet of secret American documents out of sheer idealism, Pollard is an all-around terrible person as countless incidents in his life attest. Always has been. From his Wikipedia article: Pollard grew up with what he called a racial obligation to Israel,[15] and made his first trip to Israel in 1970, as part of a science program visiting the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot. While there, he was hospitalized after a fight with another student. One Weizmann scientist remembered Pollard as leaving behind a reputation of being an unstable troublemaker, the worst case of this kind in the history of the summer camp.[16] After completing high school, Pollard attended Stanford University, where he completed a degree in political science in 1976.[14] While there, he is remembered by several of his acquaintances as boasting that he was a dual citizen of the United States and Israel and claiming to work for the Mossad and to have attained the rank of colonel in the Israel Defense Forces. None of these claims were true.[17][18][19] Pollard was turned down for the CIA job after taking a polygraph test in which he admitted to prolific illegal drug usage between 1974 and 1978. The Navy asked for but was denied information from the CIA regarding Pollard, including the results of their pre-employment polygraph test showing Pollards excessive drug use.[23] Two months after Pollard was hired, the technical director of NOSIC, Richard Haver, requested that he be terminated.[23] This came after a conversation with the new hire in which Pollard offered to start a back-channel operation with the South African intelligence service and lied about his fathers involvement with the CIA.[23] Instead of terminating Pollard, Havers boss reassigned him to a Navy human intelligence (HUMINT) operation, In the vetting process for this position, Pollard, it was later discovered, lied repeatedly: he denied illegal drug use, claimed his father had been a CIA operative, misrepresented his language abilities and his educational achievements, and claimed to have applied for a commission as officer in the Naval Reserve.[23] While transferring to his new job at TF-168, Pollard again initiated a meeting with someone far up the chain of command, this time with Admiral Sumner Shapiro, Commander, Naval Intelligence Command (CNIC) about an idea he had for TF-168 and South Africa. (The TF-168 group had passed on his ideas.) After the meeting, Shapiro immediately ordered that Pollards security clearances be revoked and that he be reassigned to a non-sensitive position. According to The Washington Post, Shapiro dismissed Pollard as a kook, saying later, I wish the hell Id fired him.[24] Because of the job transfer, Shapiros order to remove Pollards security clearances slipped through the cracks. However, Shapiros office followed up with a request to TF-168 that Pollards trustworthiness be investigated by the CIA. The CIA found Pollard to be a risk and recommended that he not be used in any intelligence collection operation. A subsequent polygraph test was inconclusive, although it did prompt Pollard to admit to making false statements to his superiors, prior drug use, and having unauthorized contacts with representatives of foreign governments.[25] The special agent administering the test felt that Pollard, who at times began shouting and shaking and making gagging sounds as if he were going to vomit, was feigning illness to invalidate the test, and recommended that he not be granted access to highly classified information.[25] Pollard was also required to be evaluated by a psychiatrist.[25] Pollards clearance was reduced to Secret.[25] Pollard subsequently filed a grievance and threatened lawsuits to recover his SCI clearance, and subsequently began receiving excellent performance reviews.[26] In 1982, after the psychiatrist concluded Pollard had no mental illness, Pollards clearance was upgraded to SCI once again. In October 1984, after some reorganization of the Navys intelligence departments, Pollard applied for and was accepted into a position as an analyst for the Naval Intelligence Command.[citation needed] Shortly after Pollard began working at NIC/TF-168, he met Aviem Sella, a combat veteran of the Israeli Air Force, at the time on leave from his position as a colonel to gain a masters degree in computer science as a graduate student at New York University. Pollard told Sella that he worked for U.S. naval intelligence, detailed to him specific incidents where U.S. intelligence was withholding information from Israel, and offered himself as a spy. Though Sella had wondered whether Pollard was part of an FBI sting operation to recruit an Israeli, he ended up believing him. Within a few days, in June 1984, Pollard started passing classified information to Sella and received, in exchange, $10,000 cash and a very expensive diamond and sapphire ring, which Pollard later used to propose marriage to his girlfriend Anne. He also agreed to receive $1,500 per month for further espionage.[28] Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) investigator Ronald Olive has alleged that Pollard passed classified information to South Africa,[29] and attempted, through a third party, to sell classified information to Pakistan on multiple occasions.[30] Pollard also stole classified documents related to China on behalf of his wife, who used the information to advance her personal business-interests and kept them around the house, where investigating authorities discovered them when Pollards espionage activity came to light.[31][32][33] During Pollards trial, the US governments memorandum in aid of sentencing challenged defendants claim that he was motivated by altruism rather than greed, asserting that Pollard had disclosed classified information in anticipation of financial gain in other instances: The governments investigation has revealed that defendant provided to certain of his acquaintances U.S. classified documents which defendant obtained through U.S. Navy sources. The classified documents which defendant disclosed to two such acquaintances, both of whom are professional investment advisers, contained classified economic and political analyses which defendant believed would help his acquaintances render investment advice to their clients Defendant acknowledged that, although he was not paid for his unauthorized disclosures of classified information to the above-mentioned acquaintances, he hoped to be rewarded ultimately through business opportunities that these individuals could arrange for defendant when he eventually left his position with the U.S. Navy. In fact, defendant was involved in an ongoing business venture with two of these acquaintances at the time he provided the classified information to them[34] During the course of the Pollard trial, Australian authorities reported the disclosure of classified American documents by Pollard to one of their own agents, a Royal Australian Navy officer who had been engaged in a personnel-exchange naval-liaison program between the U.S. and Australia.[35] The Australian officer, alarmed by Pollards repeated disclosure to him of data caveated No Foreign Access Allowed, reported the indiscretions to his chain of command, which in turn recalled him from his position in the U.S., fearing that the disclosures might be part of a CIA ruse. Seymour Hersh reported in The New Yorker in 1999: Had Pollards case gone to trial, one of the governments major witnesses would have been a journalist named Kurt Lohbeck, who had a checkered past. He had served seven months in prison after being convicted of passing a bad check in New Mexico in 1977, but by 1985 he was under contract to the CBS Evening News. Lohbeck, who now lives in Albuquerque (he received a full pardon from the governor of New Mexico two years ago), acknowledged in a telephone interview that he was prepared to testify, if necessary, about his involvement in Pollards unsuccessful efforts in 1985 to broker arms sales for the rebels in the Afghan war. At one meeting with a foreign diplomat, Lohbeck said, Pollard posed as a high-level C.I.A. operative. Lohbeck, who was then CBSs main battlefield correspondent in the Afghan war, told me that Pollard had provided him, and thus CBS, with a large number of classified American documents concerning the war. He also told me that Pollard had never discussed Israel with him or indicated any special feelings for the state. I never heard anything political from Jay, Lohbeck added, other than that he tried to portray himself as a Reaganite. Not a word about Israel. Jays sole interest was in making a lot of money. Lohbeck went on to say that he had also been prepared to testify, if asked, about Pollards drug use. Jay used cocaine heavily, and had no compunction about doing it in public. Hed just lay it in lines on the table. In 1985, Lohbeck made similar statements, government officials said, to the F.B.I. Pollard, told by me of Lohbecks assertions, sent a response from a jail cell in North Carolina: My relationship with Lohbeck is extremely complicated. I was never indicted for anything I did with him. Remember that. Pollard reminds me vaguely of lobbyist-felonJack Abramoff, except Pollard was out of control on cocaine instead of steroids. In a sane world, Israel and many of its American supporters would cite Pollards all-around awfulness as evidence that hes an anomaly, hes totally unrepresentative. They would downplay the arguments that he did it for Israel and play up the evidence that he was a cokehound with delusions of being an international man of mystery. Instead, the opposite happens.

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

Jonathan Pollard SpyMuseum.com the #1 Resource for …

Born in 1954, the son of a microbiologist teaching at Notre Dame University in South Bend, Indiana. Was raised with a deep love for Israel instilled within him. Often vowed to migrate to Israel to live and to aid in fighting against the countrys enemies. Was educated at Stanford University, graduating with a degree in Political Science in 1976 and enrolled in the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. While in school, Pollard often reveled in telling school mates of his adventures related to his fathers work with the CIA. He often created stories such as this, and even went so far as to enter fabricated information in an application for employment with the U.S. Government. After failing to complete finish his pursuits in graduate school, Pollard took a job with the U.S. Navy Intelligence, working as a research specialist in 1979. In 1984, was assigned to serve as an analyst for the Naval Investigation Service, given special clearances and access to sensitive materials. Often shared some of this information with confidants and acquaintances. Was recruited by Rafi Eitan, the head of the Bureau of Scientific Relations and was introduced to Israeli war hero Colonel Aviem Avi Sella, who was serving as an Israeli operative under the cover of being a graduate student at New York University. At a meeting in May 1984, Pollard offered to supply Israel with sensitive information in order to help Israel in strengthening its defense systems. He turned over information related to Iraqi chemical weaponry. Another Israeli agent, Yosef Yagur, was assigned as Pollards handler. Pollard turned over thousands of documents to Yagur (he was able, because of his clearance, to simply check the documents out and take them home with him at night). In return, Pollard received $2,500 each month, as well as other gifts (including a diamond and sapphire engagement ring for his fiance, Anne Henderson). Many of the secrets Pollard turned over were related to weaponry employed by Israels enemies, including Iraq. Pollard gathered most of his information by searching Defense Intelligence Agency databases and conducted searches up to three times each week. Often, he provided original documents to his Israeli contacts, allowing them to photocopy them over the weekend, after which they would return them in time for him to return to work on Monday morning. Eventually, Pollards excessive research and requests for data alerted officials at NIS, including his supervisor, Jerry Agee. An investigation found that several highly sensitive documents that he requested were not within his workspace, and thus likely had been removed from the building. The FBI was alerted and began observing him. On November 18, 1985, Pollard was stopped and questioned by the FBI and NIS security officials. In his possession were several top secret documents. He was questioned repeatedly over the course of the next few days and growing desperate, ran to the Israeli embassy for safety. Followed by FBI surveillance teams, the Pollards were confident that they would find sanctuary within the gates of the embassy, but instead were denied. Demanding political asylum, he was ordered by Israeli security to leaves the embassy grounds. The couple was soon thereafter arrested. The fallout that Israel had engaged in espionage against the United States was immense. Public outcry and anger caused a backlash against Israel and jeopardized the countrys political and intelligence relationship with the United States. Israel tried to deflect the blame for the activity, claiming it to be a rouge operation. Pollard cooperated with U.S. officials, but argued that he was not spying against the United States, but rather for Israel, to whom he had a greater allegiance. He also argued that much of his information was basically useless to the Israelis but the prosecutors demonstrated that some of the material was funneled by Soviet moles within the Israeli intelligence system and had compromised hundred of agents and friendlies in the Arab world. Pollard pled guilty to espionage and was sentenced to life in prison. His wife was sentenced to two lesser crime and received a five year sentence, during which she complained vigorously about her treatment. She was released after three years and promptly divorced Pollard. Pollard was considered a hero in Israel and many attempts were made to secure his release. Several Israeli officials made overtures towards the Bush and Clinton administrations but were denied. After serving more than 30 years in a federal prison, Pollard was paroled on November 20, 2015. Under the terms of his parole he can not leave the United States without permission for five years and is subject to wearing an ankle bracelet monitor. His requests to move to Israel has been denied.

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June 23, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

Blitzer Opens Up in Ahavath Achim Situation Room – Atlanta Jewish Times

Speaking to a nearly full sanctuary at Ahavath Achim Synagogue,CNNanchor Wolf Blitzer said that he was happy to fulfill Stuart Eizenstats request that he deliver the annual Fran Eizenstat and Eizenstat Family Lecture. As all of you know, theres been a very slow news cycle in Washington, Blitzer deadpanned. Blitzers appearance Sunday, June11, came three days after former FBI Director James Comeys Senate testimony about his firing by President Donald Trump, the kind of high-profile event that the 69-year-old Blitzer has fronted often during his 27 years at CNN. (Full disclosure: Iworked at CNN for many years.) Eizenstat, an Atlanta native and former U.S. ambassador to the European Union who served in the administrations of Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, established the lecture series in 1987. With both men seated on the bimah, Eizenstats questions allowed Blitzer to trace his life from his birth in postwar Germany to his front-row seat to history as a journalist. Asked about the Trump administration, Blitzer threw up his hands, looked over the sanctuary for several seconds, then said: Its unique. It definitely is. Blitzer rejected the suggestion that too much is being made of reported Russian interference in the 2016 election. At issue is a very important matter. The U.S. has to learn from what happened, from the Russian intervention in our democracy, in our election. Wed better make sure it doesnt happen again. Wolf Blitzer defends CNN against accusations of being fake news. (Photo by Montoya Turner, Made You Look Photography) On the subject of fake news, a frequent Trump barb, Blitzer praised CNNs fact-checking operation. We wont put it on the air until weve checked it out and we think its credible and reliable, he said. We are the first draft of history. Were journalists. We are to be as responsible, careful and precise as possible. To answer the most-asked question, Blitzer said Wolf was the name of his maternal grandfather, who, like much of his mothers family, died in the Holocaust, as did Blitzers paternal grandparents. Several months after he was born, Blitzer immigrated to Buffalo, N.Y., with his parents and older sister. He received a bachelors in history from the State University of New York-Buffaloand, while pursuing his masters in international relations from Johns Hopkins University, also studied at Hebrew University ofJerusalem. I was a news junkie even as a little boy growing up in Buffalo, Blitzer said. I loved the news, but it never dawned on me that I would go into the journalism profession. When heannounced his career choice, his father replied, Journalist? Can you make a living doing that? Blitzer started in the Tel Aviv bureau of the Reuters news agency. As the Washington correspondent for The Jerusalem Postfrom 1973to 1990, Blitzer garnered his share of headlines. At a news conference during Anwar Sadats April 1977 visit to Washington, Blitzer asked the Egyptian president if he might engender good will by promoting exchanges between Israelis and Egyptians. He looked at me and he said, I am ready to do that. I have no hesitation to do that, but my people are not yet ready because of all of the wars and violence, Blitzer recalled. After announcing in November 1977 that he would travel to Jerusalem and speak to the Knesset, Sadat said he began considering the move after a reporter, later identified as Blitzer, asked that question seven months earlier. Blitzer made splashes with his jailhouse interviews in late 1986 and early 1987 of Jonathan Pollard, the U.S. Navy intelligence analyst who pleaded guilty in June 1986 to espionage and was in a Virginia prison awaiting sentencing by a federal judge. It was an awful moment in U.S.-Israeli relations, Blitzer said. Pollard felt that the U.S. wasnt sharing critically important information with the Israelis, so he was going to do it and was paid for doing so. When the Israeli censor would not permit Blitzers article to appear in the Israeli press, it was published by The Washington Postin February 1987. Pollard was sentenced to life imprisonment in March 1987. He was released Nov. 20, 2015. Blitzer said his first major story after joining CNN as military affairs correspondent May 8, 1990, was the most surprising. In July 1990, as Iraqi troops massed along the Kuwaiti border, Blitzer and other journalists were told privately by the chief of naval operations and a senior CIA official that Iraqi ruler Saddam Hussein wanted to intimidate his smaller southern neighbor but would never invade another Arab country. As he drove home about 10 p.m. Aug. 1, Blitzer was informed of a wire service report that Iraqi troops had crossed the border. After learning how wrong that earlier assessment had been It was clearly a blunder on the part of the U.S. intelligence community Blitzer did a telephone report, then returned to the Pentagon, where he was back on television at midnight. A highlight of Blitzers time as a White House correspondent from 1992to 1999 was an interview with Nelson Mandela, South Africas first post-apartheid president, during President Bill Clintons March 1998 trip. Blitzer was amazed by Mandelas attitude, despite his 25 years of incarceration on Robben Island. He had no bitterness. He had no anger. A lot of people would have wanted to kill all those nasty apartheid guards who tormented and tortured him, but to build a new South Africa, Mandela told Blitzer, the efforts of all races would be needed. It was such a remarkable moment. Blitzer, who today hosts both Wolfand The Situation Room,has anchored CNNs coverage of presidential elections since 2004. Calling the 2008 president election for Barack Obama broughtBlitzer an unexpected celebrity, he said. In the weeks and months and years that followed wherever I go, usually older African-Americans would come up to me, and they would hug me, and they would kiss me, and they would start to cry, (saying)We never believed wed see an African-American president in our lifetime. We always thought it would be stolen at the last minute, they would do something. Until we heard it from you, we really didnt believe it was going to happen.

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June 17, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

Pollard’s appeal was rejected because of admiral’s ‘myth’ – Arutz Sheva

Last week’s rejection of Jonathan Pollard’s appeal to ease his difficult parole restrictions is largely due to a letter written by a US Navy admiral the contents of which have been called a “myth.” An investigative report by the Hamodia newspaper shows that the letter, written in 1995, contains never-before raised grave accusations against Pollard. In fact, the parole commission itself noted last year that Pollard’s sole infraction was when he told a warden that G-d runs the world. Still, this did not stop the court from writing in its rejection of Pollard’s appeal, “The fact that Pollard was never charged or disciplined for these [grave violations] did not strip the conduct of relevancy in the Commissions assessment… That is to say, even though the accusations had never before been attributed any importance indicating their worthlessness still and all, the Parole Commission was within its rights to take them into consideration when levying the harsh restrictions on Pollard. Hamodia’s long-time Pollard investigator Avraham Weissman reports that the story began in 1995, when then-acting CIA director Admiral William O. Studeman wrote a letter to the Parole Commission. The stated goal of his letter was to convince the commission not to grant parole to Jonathan Pollard. He stated there that Pollard had actually written 14 letters to outside addressees that contained top-secret classified information. Studeman described the information in a few lines, and then wrote, ‘Mr. Pollards track record in prison can only be a harbinger of his anticipated security practices once released.’ A legal observer who has been following the Pollard case for many years told Hamodia that he was flabbergasted when he was first permitted to see the Studeman letter last year. He told Weissman that Studeman’s letter is nothing more than a “myth,” and explained why: The sending of a single letter containing classified information would have sufficed to create a very serious blot on his prison record and very likely be grounds for new criminal charges against Pollard – let alone attempting to send 14 such letters. The government would have been delighted to find a reason to keep Pollard behind bars for many more years, yet for 20 years they never even insinuated that he had tried to do such a thing.” Even in July of 2014,” he continued, “when they harshly rejected his plea for parole, they gave no indication that he had broken any rules in regard to the sending of letters. After July 7, 2015, the parole commission itself noted that his sole infraction was when he told a warden that ‘G-d runs the world.’ Why, then, did the court agree last week that the Parole Commission was not out of bounds in giving weight to Studeman’s letter? The court, in rejecting Pollard’s appeal, “explained” as follows (emphasis added): The Commission did not abuse its discretion in according weight to a 1995 letter from the then-CIA director reporting that classified information had appeared in Pollards prison correspondence at least 14 times. The fact that Pollard was never charged or disciplined for these communications did not strip the conduct of relevancy in the Commissions assessment of whether to impose special conditions on Pollards parole.” Hamodia further reports that after the Studeman letter was released, Pollards attorneys, who have high-level security clearance, asked to see the 14 letters supposedly written by Pollard. They were steadfastly refused. The government must know that they had cleared hundreds of these same letters, the legal observer noted. Many of these letters are still out there, and were these letters released, the claim would be immediately debunked.” However, he added, any objective observer wouldnt even need to see the letters to know this is all a myth. As Pollards lawyers have stated in court, by acknowledging in 2015 what his sole infraction in prison was, the Parole Commission itself repudiated the claim made by Studeman.” On July 7, 2015, during Pollard’s 30th year in prison, he was finally granted parole. At the hearing, Gregg Maisal, chief of the National Security Section of the U.S. Attorneys office, confirmed that the government believed that there was no probability of Mr. Pollard re-offending. His parole includes the following harsh restrictions: He must wear a GPS monitoring system that consists of a non-removable transmitter installed on his wrist, and a receiver that is plugged into an outlet in his Manhattan residence. Whenever he moves outside the range of the receiver, the transmitter acts as a GPS tracker and monitors his location. On Sabbath, he is effectively prevented from stepping outside his home, as that would cause the battery to drain, forbidden on the Sabbath according to Jewish Law. He also may not leave his home between 7:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m, and during the daytime, he may travel only in parts of Manhattan, and is even prohibited from visiting nearby Brooklyn. His computers are monitored and inspected, as would be those of any employer who chooses to hire him, which has prevented him from being able to gain employment. In many ways,” the legal observer told Hamodia, “the sad saga of the Studeman letter – a document whose absurd contents have been disclaimed by the very commission that is now trying to use it as a weapon against Pollard – is emblematic of why Jonathans battle for justice has always been so uphill. The 14 letters it refers to have never undergone any sort of judicial review. Not only did the government refuse to show them to Pollards lawyers, but they declined to show it to any third party including Judge Forrest.” “Even now,” he concluded, “after [Pollard] already served 30 long years in prison, in their zeal to make Pollards life as miserable as possible, they refuse to allow ideals like truth or justice to get in their way.

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June 6, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

MainOpEdsTrump should move Pollard to Jerusalem – Arutz Sheva

President Trump’s delay in moving the US Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem presents the President with a wonderful opportunity to commute Jonathan Pollard’s sentence – freeing Pollard to move from New York to Jerusalem. Trump made his unequivocal Embassy pledge on 22 March 2016: “We will move the American embassy to the eternal capital of the Jewish people, Jerusalem.” A White House statement on 1 June put this brave face on Trump ‘s decision delaying the Embassy move: “While President Donald J. Trump signed the waiver under the Jerusalem Embassy Act and delayed moving the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, no one should consider this step to be in any way a retreat from the President’s strong support for Israel and for the United States-Israel alliance. President Trump made this decision to maximize the chances of successfully negotiating a deal between Israel and the Palestinians, fulfilling his solemn obligation to defend America’s national security interests. But, as he has repeatedly stated his intention to move the embassy, the question is not if that move happens, but only when.” Negotiations between Israel and the Palestinian Arabs have so far extended over a period of 23 years without any real success – so one can only wonder when the Embassy move is likely to occur. Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s response was quite philosophical: “Though Israel is disappointed that the embassy will not move at this time, we appreciate today’s expression of President Trump’s friendship to Israel and his commitment to moving the embassy in the future,” Trump’s friendship would be confirmed were he to commute Pollard’sharsh parole conditions to enable Pollard’s move to Jerusalem, Pollard – an intelligence analyst with the US Government – received his life sentence for passing classified information to an American ally – Israel. No other American has received such a crushing sentence. Pollard – released in 2015 after serving 30 years penal servitude – was placed on harsh parole conditions requiring him to wear an electronic tracking device, obey a curfew and allow his computers to be monitored. He must remain in the United States until November 2020. Pollard’s appeal to relax his parole conditions was recently rejected. Pollard’s treatment can be contrasted to that meted out to Bradley (now known as Chelsea) Manning – who leaked more than 700,000 documents to WikiLeaks in 2010 whilst serving as an intelligence analyst in Iraq, Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison. President Obama’s precedent in freeing Manning whilst resisting similar overtures for Pollard’s release was reprehensible. President Obama commuted Mannings sentence in January – three days before vacating the White House – from 35 years to just over 7 years, the majority of which Manning had already served. Trump said Manning should never have been released from prison. Manning was freed from federal custody on May 17th. Israeli Prime Ministers from Yitzchak Rabin to Netanyahu had unsuccessfully lobbied successive Republican and Democratic Presidents for Pollard’s release and permission to resettle in Israel. Pollard is recently reported to have remarked: As much as Trump needs to be held to his promise to move the embassy, it is just as important that the prime minister keep his promise to bring an agent home” President Obama’s precedent in freeing Manning whilst resisting similar overtures for Pollard’s release was reprehensible. Commuting Pollard’s sentence at this particular moment in Trump’s presidency will help cement the blossoming post-Obama relationship between the United States and one of its staunchest allies – Israel. Pollard’s move to Jerusalem as It celebrates the 50th anniversary of its liberation from 19 years of illegal occupation by Jordan would alleviate the disappointment of the Embassy not moving there. That is what Trump-style dealmaking is all about.

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June 6, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

Jonathan Pollard Loses Appeal To Ease Parole Conditions – Forward

Getty Jonathan Pollard, the American convicted of spying for Israel, leaves a New York court house following his release from prison after 30 years on November 20, 2015. (JTA) A federal appeals court has rejected the request by Jonathan Pollard, a convicted spy for Israel, to lift restrictive parole conditions. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan issued the judgment on Wednesday, a week after hearing arguments. The parole terms issued upon Pollards release from a federal prison in November 2015 after serving 30 years of a life sentence require him to stay in his New York home from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m., to submit any computer he uses for inspection and to wear a GPS-monitoring device at all times. The device means that Pollard, who is Orthodox, is forced to violate Shabbat observance, his lawyer has said. Pollard, 62, also must remain in the United States for five years, despite his desire to move to Israel. Pollards attorney argued that the terms are overly severe because Pollard cannot remember the classified information he provided in 1984 and 1985 to Israeli officials and that he is not a flight risk, Reuters reported. Pollard pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiracy to commit espionage in connection with providing Israeli contacts with hundreds of classified documents he had obtained as a civilian intelligence specialist for the U.S. Navy.

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May 28, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

Jonathan Pollard loses appeal to ease parole conditions …

Jonathan Pollard, left, arrives at a federal courthouse in New York with his wife, Esther, to check in at a probation office just hours after he was released from prison, Nov. 20, 2015. (Ilana Gold/WCBS-TV via AP Images) (JTA) A federal appeals court has rejected convicted spy for Israel Jonathan Pollards request to lift restrictive parole conditions. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan issued the judgment on Wednesday, a week after hearing arguments. The parole terms issued upon Pollards release from a federal prison in November 2015 after serving 30 years of a life sentence require him to stay in his New York home from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.; to submit any computer he uses for inspection, and to wear a GPS-monitoring device at all times. The device means that Pollard, who is Orthodox, is forced to violate Shabbat observance, his lawyer has said. Pollard, 62, also must remain in the United States for five years, despite his desire to move to Israel. Pollards attorney argued that the terms are overly severe because Pollard cannot remember the classified information he provided in 1984 and 1985 to Israeli officials and that he is not a flight risk, Reuters reported. Pollard pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiracy to commit espionage in connection with providing Israeli contacts with hundreds of classified documents he had obtained as a civilian intelligence specialist for the U.S. Navy.

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May 25, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

JONATHAN POLLARD (KIKE) LOSES BID TO RELAX US PAROLE …

A federal appeals court on Wednesday rejected a bid by Jonathan Pollard, the former US Navy intelligence officer who served 30 years in prison after being convicted of spying for Israel, to relax his parole conditions. The US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan said the US Parole Commission acted within its discretion in requiring Pollard to wear an electronic tracking device, obey a curfew and allow his computers to be monitored. Eliot Lauer, Pollards attorney, told The Jerusalem Post that he was disappointed in two respects. First the result. Second in that the court did not step out of the checklist and confront the commission on the manifest injustice of the onerous and unnecessary restrictions. The Free Pollard campaign responded that the timing and substance of the Second Circuits denial of Pollards appeal to lift his parole restrictions reflect politics, not due process. The courts decision was handed down with unprecedented speed obviously calculated to occur simultaneously with Presidents Trumps departure from Israel and with Yom Yerushalyim, the campaign said. Clearly the timing of this decision, which normally takes months but was delivered less than a week after oral arguments, was intended as a slap across Israels face. Coming on the heels of the US presidents compromise of an Israeli intelligence operation and the consequent endangerment of the life of an Israeli agent, this unambiguous insult to Israel via the Second Circuit Court is revealing of the new US administrations continuing tolerance of an anti-Israel agenda by those elements in the American defense and intelligence communities hostile to the US-Israel special relationship, the statement continued. This officially accepted belligerence will not be camouflaged by photo-ops and heart-warming speeches. Unless and until Jonathan Pollard is allowed to come home to Israel, the US intelligence establishments warin- the-shadows against Israel will continue unabated, the campaign concluded. Pollard pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiracy to commit espionage in connection with providing Israeli contacts with hundreds of classified documents. His lawyers have said his parole conditions have prevented him from getting a job. On Sunday, Pollard appealed to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to bring up the matter of his release during his meeting with US President Donald Trump on Monday. Netanyahus spokesman declined to reveal whether or not he did. Pollard made the comments during conversations he held with close friends over the weekend. His wife, Esther, recounted them to the Post. As much as Trump needs to be held to his promise to move the embassy, it is just as important that the prime minister keep his promise to bring an agent home, Pollard reportedly said to the friends during the weekend. Last week, Pollard appealed US District Judge Katherine Forrests decision to keep in place the parole conditions that were imposed when he was released from prison in November 2015, after serving 30 years of a life sentence for spying for Israel. The conditions prevent Pollard from leaving his New York home after 7 p.m. and before 7 a.m., compel him to submit any computer he uses for inspection and require him to wear a GPS monitoring device that forces him to violate the Sabbath. Like Loading…

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May 25, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

Former Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard Loses Bid to Ease US Parole Restrictions – Algemeiner

Email a copy of “Former Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard Loses Bid to Ease US Parole Restrictions” to a friend Jonathan and Esther Pollard. Photo: Justice for Jonathan Pollard. JNS.org A federal appeals court rejected on Wednesday a bid by Jonathan Pollard the former US Navy intelligence analyst who was released from prison in November 2015 after serving a 30-year sentence on charges of spying for Israel to ease restrictions of his parole. In its ruling, the US Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit in New York said the US Parole Commission acted within its discretion in setting Pollards curfew, internet restrictions and tracking devices. Eliot Lauer, Pollards attorney, told The Jerusalem Post he was disappointed in two respects. First, the result. Second, in that the court did not step out of the checklist and confront the commission on the manifest injustice of the onerous and unnecessary restrictions. Since his release, Pollard has been barred from leaving his New York home between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. His parole conditions also forbid him from freely using the internet and speaking with the media. He is obliged to wear a GPS monitoring apparatus at all times and cannot leave the US.

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May 25, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed


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