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Releasing Jonathan Pollard Backed by American Ex-Ambassadors to Israel

Lewis and Pickering Say Spy Has Served Enough Time By JTA

Published January 08, 2014.

wo former U.S. ambassadors to Israel who have opposed clemency for jailed spy-for-Israel Jonathan Pollard told an Israeli news website that they have changed their minds.

Samuel W. Lewis, who was ambassador to Israel between 1977 and 1985, the year Pollard was arrested; and Thomas Pickering, who served as ambassador from 1985, shortly before Pollard was arrested, to 1988, after which he became U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, told Israels Walla News website that they would support Pollards release, though for different reasons.

Pickering told Walla that he believes freeing Pollard would help U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to broker a peace deal between Israel and the Palestinians.

While he says he believes that Pollard is a traitor to the United States, and does not accept that Pollards life sentence to prison is disproportionate, Pickering said that I think that achieving an Israeli-Palestinian framework agreement is far more important than the continuation of Pollards incarceration.

Lewis does not believe there is a connection between the peace process and Pollard, and told Walla on Tuesday that Pollard should be freed on humanitarian grounds.

He betrayed us, and I am glad he sat in prison, but 28 years is time enough. Even if he may get out two years from now, I think there is something compelling about the appeal by more than 100 members of Knesset to (President) Obama to free him now, he told Walla.

Both former ambassadors are said to be close to Kerry. Pollard in the 29th year of a life sentence in a U.S. prison for spying for Israel.

Read more: http://www.jta.org/2014/01/08/news-opinion/united-states/report-former-u-s-envoys-to-israel-now-support-pollard-release#ixzz2poR34C1E

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Israeli lawmakers seek spy Jonathan Pollard’s release from U.S. prison – Middle East Times

Israeli lawmakers asked President Shimon Perez to push for the release of Jonathan Pollard, held in a U.S. prison for more than 28 years for spying for Israel.

However, U.S. officials said there was “no chance” President Barack Obama would be willing to free Pollard — convicted of passing classified information to Israel while working as a civilian intelligence analyst — as a carrot for release of Israeli-Arab prisoners, Israel Radio reported Wednesday.

Knesset members Nachman Shai and Ayelet Shaked, who have been lobbying for Pollard’s release, appealed to Peres to push the matter with U.S. officials.

The Jerusalem Post reported 106 lawmakers from coalition parties and the opposition, Jews and Arabs, submitted to Peres a letter addressed to Obama seeking Pollard’s release.

“The release of Jonathan Pollard is a national issue, all the MKs [members of the Knesset], including Arabs, agree on this,” Shaked said. “It’s the one issue that there is general consensus about.”

Peres has raised the issue of Pollard’s release with Obama and previous U.S. presidents, Israeli broadcaster Arutz Sheva said.

“It is an honor for me to bring before the President of the U.S. such a wide agreement in the Knesset,” Peres said after receiving the letter. “As president it is my clear duty to express such a wide consensus.”

Efi Lahav, head of the Council for Pollard, has visited Pollard and described the prisoner’s condition as serious, Arutz Sheva said.

“The hourglass is running out,” Lahav said. “Perhaps it has run out already.”

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Israeli lawmakers seek spy Jonathan Pollard’s release from U.S. prison – Middle East Times

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Kerry reportedly offered Israel the release of spy Jonathan Pollard – Middle East Times

An Israeli TV station said Secretary of State John Kerry suggested the United States may free Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard if Israel frees more Arab prisoners.

Citing sources it did not name, Channel 10 in Israel reported Kerry told Israeli leaders he had not yet consulted with President Barack Obama on the possibility of releasing Pollard, the Times of Israel said Friday.

Israeli Radio said Kerry offered only to investigate the possibility of Pollard’s release.

Pollard, 59, a former U.S. intelligence analyst, was sentenced to life in prison in 1987 and will be eligible for parole in 2015. Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and other leaders have called for his release, and Israel granted him citizenship in 1995.

Recent revelations of eavesdropping on Israeli officials by the U.S. National Security Agency have led to more pointed calls for Pollard’s freedom, the Times said.

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Kerry reportedly offered Israel the release of spy Jonathan Pollard – Middle East Times

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Children Pray for Jonathan Pollard – Video



Children Pray for Jonathan Pollard
http://www.israelnationalnews.com.

By: IsraelNationalTV

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Reports of U.S. spying on Israel boost calls to free Pollard

The disclosure in late December that American intelligence spied on former Israeli prime ministers has given new momentum to the effort to secure a pardon for convicted spy Jonathan Pollard.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and several leading Knesset members have called in recent days for Pollards release following reports that documents leaked by former defense contractor Edward Snowden showed U.S. intelligence had targeted the email addresses of Ehud Barak and Ehud Olmert.

Israelis call for the release of convicted spy Jonathan Pollard during President Obamas visit to Jerusalem last March. photo/jta-getty images-uriel sinai

Secretary of State John Kerry reportedly said this week that Pollards release could be tied to a Palestinian prisoner release scheduled to take place before April, a condition of the current peace negotiations, but those reports have not been confirmed and sources say President Barack Obama has not agreed to such an arrangement.

Knesset speaker Yuli Edelstein accused the United States of hypocrisy for holding Pollard, who as a civilian Navy analyst spied on the United States for Israel, even as it spied on Israeli leaders. Transportation Minister Yisrael Katz said he wants the Israeli government to demand Pollards release and insist the United States cease its espionage operations in Israel, which were reported in early November. And opposition leader Isaac Herzog said Pollards punishment has long passed the limits of sensibility.

We hope that the conditions will be created that will enable us to bring Jonathan home, Netanyahu said Dec. 29 at the Israeli Cabinets weekly meeting. This is neither conditional on, nor related to, recent events, even though we have given our opinion on these developments.

When Pollards crimes first came to light in the mid-1980s, his activities seemed like a major act of betrayal given the close alliance between Israel and the United States. But the Snowden revelations show that spying by the United States and Israel has been a two-way affair.

Support for freeing Pollard represents a rare point of consensus in Israeli politics, with 100 Knesset members among the 120 signing a letter asking Obama to release Pollard, according to Shai. Eighty members signed a similar letter in 2012.

But Ronen Bergman, an expert on Israeli intelligence who is writing a history of Israels spy agencies, says Israeli pressure is unlikely to convince Obama to free Pollard in the short term.

Im quite positive that it wont happen tomorrow, because otherwise it will look as if the president of the United States accepts the claim that following the recent revelations from Edward Snowden, he should parole Jonathan Pollard, said Bergman. But once the Americans were caught with their hands in the cookie jar, it paints the Pollard issue in a different color.

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Jonathan Pollard – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jonathan Pollard

Jonathan Pollard, I.D. Photograph, U.S. Naval intelligence.

Jonathan Jay Pollard (born August 7, 1954) is an American criminal convicted of passing classified information to Israel while working as a civilian intelligence analyst.[1] He pleaded guilty and received a life sentence in 1987. Because his crime occurred prior to November 1, 1987, he is eligible for parole, and may be released on November 21, 2015.[2][3]

Israel granted Pollard citizenship in 1995, but denied until 1998 that it had bought classified information from him.[4] Israeli activist groups, as well as high-profile Israeli politicians, have lobbied for his release.[5] Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has voiced particularly strong support for Pollard, visiting the convicted spy in prison in 2002 while not in office.[6][7] His case was later linked to that of Ben-ami Kadish, another U.S. citizen who pleaded guilty to charges of passing classified information to Israel in the same period.[8][9]

The American government never charged Pollard with intent to injure the United States, and Pollard has expressed deep regrets for his actions committed by his strong love for Israel and the Jewish people.[10]

Jonathan Jay Pollard was born in Galveston, Texas, in 1954, to a Jewish family, the youngest of three siblings.[11] In 1961 his family moved to South Bend, Indiana, where his father, an award-winning microbiologist, taught at Notre Dame.[11]

Pollard was raised in a family where loyalties as a Jew and as an American were one, and was interested in fully becoming part of his country. At an early age Pollard became aware of the horrific toll the Holocaust had taken on his immediate family, and when he was about to become a Bar Mitzva he asked his parents to visit the death camps.[10]

Pollard grew up with what he called a “racial obligation” to Israel,[12] and made his first trip to Israel in 1970, as part of a science program visiting the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot. While there, he was hospitalized after a fight with another student. One Weizmann scientist remembered Pollard as leaving behind “a reputation of being an unstable troublemaker, the worst case of this kind in the history of the summer camp”.[13]

After completing high school, Pollard attended Stanford University, where he completed a degree in political science in 1976.[11] While there, he is remembered by several of his acquaintances as boasting that he was a dual citizen of the United States and Israel and claiming to work for the Mossad and to have attained the rank of colonel in the Israel Defense Forces. None of these claims were true.[14][15][16] Later, Pollard enrolled in several graduate schools, but never completed a postgraduate degree.[11]

Pollard’s future wife, Anne Henderson (born 1 May 1960) had moved to Washington DC in fall 1978 to live with her (recently divorced) father, Bernard Henderson. According to her father, in summer 1981 she moved into a house on Capitol Hill with two other women and, through a friend of one of her roommates, she first met Pollard. He later claimed to have fallen in love during their first meeting they were “an inseparable couple” by November 1981, and in June 1982, when her Capitol Hill lease expired, she moved into Pollard’s apartment in Arlington, VA.[17] In December 1982 the couple moved into downtown Washington DC, to a two-bedroom apartment at 1733 20th Street N.W., near Dupont Circle. They would remain there until their arrest in 1985, at which time they were paying $750 per month in rent.[18] They did not marry until August 9, 1985 more than year after Pollard began spying for Israel in a civil ceremony in Venice, Italy.[19]

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Jonathan Pollard – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Jonathan Pollard

Jonathan Pollard was a civilian American Naval intelligence analyst. In the mid 1980’s (circa 1983-1984), Pollard discovered that information vital to Israel’s security was being deliberately withheld by certain elements within the U.S. national security establishment. Israel was legally entitled to this vital security information according to a 1983 Memorandum of Understanding between the two countries. The information being withheld from Israel included Syrian, Iraqi, Libyan and Iranian nuclear, chemical, and biological warfare capabilities – being developed for use against Israel. It also included information on ballistic missile development by these countries and information on planned terrorist attacks against Israeli civilian targets. When Pollard discovered this suppression of information and asked his superiors about it, he was told to “mind his own business”, and that “Jews get nervous talking about poison gas; they don’t need to know.”

He also learned that the objective of cutting off the flow of information to Israel was to severely curtail Israel’s ability to act independently in defense of her own interests.

Furthermore, on May 11, 1998, Israel formally acknowledged Jonathan Pollard had been a bona fide Israeli agent. This fact wiped out any remaining doubt about Jonathan Pollard’s motives. Being an official agent is, by definition, the polar opposite of being a mercenary.

Prior to sentencing, then-Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger delivered a 46-page classified memorandum to the sentencing judge. Since then, neither Pollard nor any of his cleared attorneys have ever been allowed to access the memorandum to challenge the false charges it contains-a clear violation of Pollard’s constitutional rights.

The day before sentencing, Weinberger delivered a four-page supplemental memorandum to the sentencing judge. In it, he falsely accused Pollard of treason. Also in the supplemental memorandum, Weinberger advocated a life sentence in clear violation of Pollard’s plea agreement. The implication that follows from Weinberger’s false characterization of Pollard’s offense as “treason” is that the country Pollard served, Israel, is an enemy state.

The Court of Appeals, in a two-to-one decision, rejected the challenge, largely on procedural grounds.

The majority placed heavy emphasis on the failure to appeal from the life sentence in a timely manner, and on the resulting far heavier burden faced by Pollard in seeking to challenge the sentence via habeas corpus. [Note: “Habeas corpus” is a procedure by which an incarcerated person may bring a court challenge to the legality of his or her incarceration – often long after the underlying case has been concluded.]

In a dissenting opinion, Court of Appeals Judge Stephen Williams called the case “a fundamental miscarriage of justice,” and wrote that he would have ordered that Pollard’s sentence be vacated.

The CIA claim that another highly-placed spy in the U.S. had to exist in order to give Jonathan Pollard his highly specific tasking orders is a complete fabrication. To understand how Pollard was tasked by Israel to secure specific documents, see: Was there another U.S. spy tasking Pollard? – Mr. X’ Exposed.

The Israeli government recognized long ago that Jonathan’s sentence was unjust, that the documents he delivered to Israel did not remotely cause the damage that the prosecution claimed but never proved. As a result of this recognition, various Israeli administrations have negotiated, as a matter of basic fairness, to secure Jonathan’s release.

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Jonathan Pollard

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Jonathan Pollard | Jewish Virtual Library

Jonathan Pollard is a former U.S. Navy intelligence analyst who was convicted of spying for Israel. He is currently incarcerated in the United States.

– Arrest & Reaction – The Trial – Legal Appeals

In November 1985, the FBI arrested Pollard, a U.S. Navy intelligence analyst, on charges of selling classified material to Israel. Pollard was subsequently sentenced to life imprisonment. His wife, Anne, got five years in jail for assisting her husband.

Immediately upon Pollard’s arrest, Israel apologized and explained that the operation was unauthorized. “It is Israel’s policy to refrain from any intelligence activity related to the United States,” an official government statement declared, “in view of the close and special relationship of friendship” between two countries. Prime Minister Shimon Peres stated: “Spying on the United States stands in total contradiction to our policy.”1

The United States and Israel worked together to investigate the Pollard affair. The Israeli inquiry revealed that Pollard was not working for Israeli military intelligence or the Mossad. He was directed by a small, independent scientific intelligence unit. Pollard initiated the contact with the Israelis.

A subcommittee of the Knesset’s Defense and Foreign Affairs Committee on Intelligence and Security Services concluded: “Beyond all doubt…the operational echelons (namely: the Scientific Liaison Unit headed by Rafael Eitan) decided to recruit and handle Pollard without any check or consultation with the political echelon or receiving its direct or indirect approval.” The Knesset committee took the government to task for not properly supervising the scientific unit.

As promised to the U.S. government, the spy unit that directed Pollard was disbanded, his handlers punished and the stolen documents returned.2 The last point was crucial to the U.S. Department of Justice’s case against Pollard.

Pollard denied spying against the United States. He said he provided only information he believed was vital to Israeli security and was being withheld by the Pentagon. This included data on Soviet arms shipments to Syria, Iraqi and Syrian chemical weapons, the Pakistani atomic bomb project and Libyan air defense systems.3 Because the information he took is classified, we can’t verify if this is true.

In 2006, Rafael Eitan said, It is likely that we could have gotten the same information without him. He also said, however, that Pollard provided information of such high quality and accuracy, so good and so important to the countrys security that my desire, my appetite to get more and more material overcame me. He added taht the information might have made a difference had Israel been involved in another war. Eitan also maintained that Pollard never exposed any American agents and that another spy, Aldrich Ames, tried to blame Pollard to divert suspicion from his activities.3a

The agent in charge of counterintelligence for the Naval Investigative Service who caught Pollard has said that he was involved in illegal activities to help countries besides Israel. Ron Olive wrote that Pollard confessed that before he spied for Israel, he passed classified information to South Africa, his civilian financial advisers and a member of the Australian Royal Navy. He also admitted passing documents to Pakistan in the hopes it would take him on as a spy. Olive quotes Pollard during a debriefing after he pleaded guilty saying, If I could see it, and touch it, you can assume I got it….My only limitation was what I couldn’t carry. Olive said Pollard stole 360 cubic feet of classified secrets and confessed to stealing classifed information two to three times a day, three to four days a week.3b

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Jonathan Pollard | Jewish Virtual Library

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The Jonathan Jay Pollard Spy Case — A Bullied Boy — Crime …

Jonathan Jay Pollard was born on August 7, 1954 in Galveston, Texas. His father, Dr. Morris Pollard, was a microbiologist. His mother, Molly Pollard, was a homemaker. He was the youngest of three children. Harvey was the oldest and Carol was the middle sister. The family soon began calling their youngest son by his middle name.

When Jay was very young, the family moved to South Bend, Indiana so his father could take a position at Notre Dame University. Dr. Morris Pollard would later recall that he experienced not a whiff of anti-Semitism at the Roman Catholic institution. Rather, he and his family were always made to feel welcome.

Neither Galveston, Texas nor South Bend, Indiana boasted large Jewish communities but the Pollards were deeply involved with the Jewish groups in their areas. The family made a special effort to instill a powerful sense of Jewish identity in their children. The parents were devoted to the cause of Israel and impressed their love for the Jewish homeland upon their youngsters. The Pollard children learned about the Holocaust at a young age and grew up knowing that the Nazis had slaughtered some 70 of the family’s European relatives.

The Pollards were affluent and lived comfortably in a ranch-style home in a little cul de sac. Jay was close to both parents, especially his mother. He was also, to some degree, “parented” by his older brother and sister. He was a precocious youngster upon whom his whole family doted. Musically talented, he learned to play the cello and became quite accomplished at it.

School was a different story. He made excellent grades but outside his family, young Jay was disliked by other children. He was frequently picked on. On a daily basis, Jay was teased and taunted and often physically assaulted by his fellow students. Why? There are several possible reasons. The boy was short for his age. He also wore glasses. Children can be notoriously cruel to “shrimps” and “four-eyes.” Additionally, Jay was obviously bright and envy of a smart kid or “teacher’s pet” often sparks school-age persecution.

Yearbook photo of Jonathan Pollard

Finally, the boy was Jewish in an area that had few Jews. Jay blamed this factor exclusively for his being the target of so many taunts. This solidified his interest in, and love for, Israel, the country where Jews could be “normal.”

In 1967, when Jay was 13, several Arab countries attacked Israel. The teenager was devastated. It seemed impossible that the little country could hold out against so many enemies. “They’re going to kill Israel!” he sobbed to his mother. “I’ll never get to see Israel.” Molly assured him that Israel would survive.

When Jay woke up the next morning, he found out that what would become famous as the Six-Day War was over and Israel had won. The lad was overjoyed. “Then I’ll get to see Israel!” he shouted.

Thirteen was also the age for Jay’s Bar Mitzvah, the ceremony that traditionally marks a Jewish boy’s ascent to manhood. A boy gives a speech at his Bar Mitzvah and Jay took the subject of his speech from Isaiah and the message that Israel will be a leader among nations. The rabbi at their synagogue was not a Zionist and discouraged young Jay from speaking on that theme.

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Releasing Jonathan Pollard Backed by American Ex-Ambassadors to Israel

Lewis and Pickering Say Spy Has Served Enough Time By JTA Published January 08, 2014. wo former U.S. ambassadors to Israel who have opposed clemency for jailed spy-for-Israel Jonathan Pollard told an Israeli news website that they have changed their minds. Samuel W. Lewis, who was ambassador to Israel between 1977 and 1985, the year Pollard was arrested; and Thomas Pickering, who served as ambassador from 1985, shortly before Pollard was arrested, to 1988, after which he became U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, told Israels Walla News website that they would support Pollards release, though for different reasons. Pickering told Walla that he believes freeing Pollard would help U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to broker a peace deal between Israel and the Palestinians. While he says he believes that Pollard is a traitor to the United States, and does not accept that Pollards life sentence to prison is disproportionate, Pickering said that I think that achieving an Israeli-Palestinian framework agreement is far more important than the continuation of Pollards incarceration. Lewis does not believe there is a connection between the peace process and Pollard, and told Walla on Tuesday that Pollard should be freed on humanitarian grounds. He betrayed us, and I am glad he sat in prison, but 28 years is time enough. Even if he may get out two years from now, I think there is something compelling about the appeal by more than 100 members of Knesset to (President) Obama to free him now, he told Walla. Both former ambassadors are said to be close to Kerry. Pollard in the 29th year of a life sentence in a U.S. prison for spying for Israel. Read more: http://www.jta.org/2014/01/08/news-opinion/united-states/report-former-u-s-envoys-to-israel-now-support-pollard-release#ixzz2poR34C1E

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Israeli lawmakers seek spy Jonathan Pollard’s release from U.S. prison – Middle East Times

Israeli lawmakers asked President Shimon Perez to push for the release of Jonathan Pollard, held in a U.S. prison for more than 28 years for spying for Israel. However, U.S. officials said there was “no chance” President Barack Obama would be willing to free Pollard — convicted of passing classified information to Israel while working as a civilian intelligence analyst — as a carrot for release of Israeli-Arab prisoners, Israel Radio reported Wednesday. Knesset members Nachman Shai and Ayelet Shaked, who have been lobbying for Pollard’s release, appealed to Peres to push the matter with U.S. officials. The Jerusalem Post reported 106 lawmakers from coalition parties and the opposition, Jews and Arabs, submitted to Peres a letter addressed to Obama seeking Pollard’s release. “The release of Jonathan Pollard is a national issue, all the MKs [members of the Knesset], including Arabs, agree on this,” Shaked said. “It’s the one issue that there is general consensus about.” Peres has raised the issue of Pollard’s release with Obama and previous U.S. presidents, Israeli broadcaster Arutz Sheva said. “It is an honor for me to bring before the President of the U.S. such a wide agreement in the Knesset,” Peres said after receiving the letter. “As president it is my clear duty to express such a wide consensus.” Efi Lahav, head of the Council for Pollard, has visited Pollard and described the prisoner’s condition as serious, Arutz Sheva said. “The hourglass is running out,” Lahav said. “Perhaps it has run out already.”

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Kerry reportedly offered Israel the release of spy Jonathan Pollard – Middle East Times

An Israeli TV station said Secretary of State John Kerry suggested the United States may free Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard if Israel frees more Arab prisoners. Citing sources it did not name, Channel 10 in Israel reported Kerry told Israeli leaders he had not yet consulted with President Barack Obama on the possibility of releasing Pollard, the Times of Israel said Friday. Israeli Radio said Kerry offered only to investigate the possibility of Pollard’s release. Pollard, 59, a former U.S. intelligence analyst, was sentenced to life in prison in 1987 and will be eligible for parole in 2015. Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and other leaders have called for his release, and Israel granted him citizenship in 1995. Recent revelations of eavesdropping on Israeli officials by the U.S. National Security Agency have led to more pointed calls for Pollard’s freedom, the Times said.

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Children Pray for Jonathan Pollard – Video




Children Pray for Jonathan Pollard http://www.israelnationalnews.com. By: IsraelNationalTV

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Reports of U.S. spying on Israel boost calls to free Pollard

The disclosure in late December that American intelligence spied on former Israeli prime ministers has given new momentum to the effort to secure a pardon for convicted spy Jonathan Pollard. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and several leading Knesset members have called in recent days for Pollards release following reports that documents leaked by former defense contractor Edward Snowden showed U.S. intelligence had targeted the email addresses of Ehud Barak and Ehud Olmert. Israelis call for the release of convicted spy Jonathan Pollard during President Obamas visit to Jerusalem last March. photo/jta-getty images-uriel sinai Secretary of State John Kerry reportedly said this week that Pollards release could be tied to a Palestinian prisoner release scheduled to take place before April, a condition of the current peace negotiations, but those reports have not been confirmed and sources say President Barack Obama has not agreed to such an arrangement. Knesset speaker Yuli Edelstein accused the United States of hypocrisy for holding Pollard, who as a civilian Navy analyst spied on the United States for Israel, even as it spied on Israeli leaders. Transportation Minister Yisrael Katz said he wants the Israeli government to demand Pollards release and insist the United States cease its espionage operations in Israel, which were reported in early November. And opposition leader Isaac Herzog said Pollards punishment has long passed the limits of sensibility. We hope that the conditions will be created that will enable us to bring Jonathan home, Netanyahu said Dec. 29 at the Israeli Cabinets weekly meeting. This is neither conditional on, nor related to, recent events, even though we have given our opinion on these developments. When Pollards crimes first came to light in the mid-1980s, his activities seemed like a major act of betrayal given the close alliance between Israel and the United States. But the Snowden revelations show that spying by the United States and Israel has been a two-way affair. Support for freeing Pollard represents a rare point of consensus in Israeli politics, with 100 Knesset members among the 120 signing a letter asking Obama to release Pollard, according to Shai. Eighty members signed a similar letter in 2012. But Ronen Bergman, an expert on Israeli intelligence who is writing a history of Israels spy agencies, says Israeli pressure is unlikely to convince Obama to free Pollard in the short term. Im quite positive that it wont happen tomorrow, because otherwise it will look as if the president of the United States accepts the claim that following the recent revelations from Edward Snowden, he should parole Jonathan Pollard, said Bergman. But once the Americans were caught with their hands in the cookie jar, it paints the Pollard issue in a different color.

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Jonathan Pollard – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jonathan Pollard Jonathan Pollard, I.D. Photograph, U.S. Naval intelligence. Jonathan Jay Pollard (born August 7, 1954) is an American criminal convicted of passing classified information to Israel while working as a civilian intelligence analyst.[1] He pleaded guilty and received a life sentence in 1987. Because his crime occurred prior to November 1, 1987, he is eligible for parole, and may be released on November 21, 2015.[2][3] Israel granted Pollard citizenship in 1995, but denied until 1998 that it had bought classified information from him.[4] Israeli activist groups, as well as high-profile Israeli politicians, have lobbied for his release.[5] Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has voiced particularly strong support for Pollard, visiting the convicted spy in prison in 2002 while not in office.[6][7] His case was later linked to that of Ben-ami Kadish, another U.S. citizen who pleaded guilty to charges of passing classified information to Israel in the same period.[8][9] The American government never charged Pollard with intent to injure the United States, and Pollard has expressed deep regrets for his actions committed by his strong love for Israel and the Jewish people.[10] Jonathan Jay Pollard was born in Galveston, Texas, in 1954, to a Jewish family, the youngest of three siblings.[11] In 1961 his family moved to South Bend, Indiana, where his father, an award-winning microbiologist, taught at Notre Dame.[11] Pollard was raised in a family where loyalties as a Jew and as an American were one, and was interested in fully becoming part of his country. At an early age Pollard became aware of the horrific toll the Holocaust had taken on his immediate family, and when he was about to become a Bar Mitzva he asked his parents to visit the death camps.[10] Pollard grew up with what he called a “racial obligation” to Israel,[12] and made his first trip to Israel in 1970, as part of a science program visiting the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot. While there, he was hospitalized after a fight with another student. One Weizmann scientist remembered Pollard as leaving behind “a reputation of being an unstable troublemaker, the worst case of this kind in the history of the summer camp”.[13] After completing high school, Pollard attended Stanford University, where he completed a degree in political science in 1976.[11] While there, he is remembered by several of his acquaintances as boasting that he was a dual citizen of the United States and Israel and claiming to work for the Mossad and to have attained the rank of colonel in the Israel Defense Forces. None of these claims were true.[14][15][16] Later, Pollard enrolled in several graduate schools, but never completed a postgraduate degree.[11] Pollard’s future wife, Anne Henderson (born 1 May 1960) had moved to Washington DC in fall 1978 to live with her (recently divorced) father, Bernard Henderson. According to her father, in summer 1981 she moved into a house on Capitol Hill with two other women and, through a friend of one of her roommates, she first met Pollard. He later claimed to have fallen in love during their first meeting they were “an inseparable couple” by November 1981, and in June 1982, when her Capitol Hill lease expired, she moved into Pollard’s apartment in Arlington, VA.[17] In December 1982 the couple moved into downtown Washington DC, to a two-bedroom apartment at 1733 20th Street N.W., near Dupont Circle. They would remain there until their arrest in 1985, at which time they were paying $750 per month in rent.[18] They did not marry until August 9, 1985 more than year after Pollard began spying for Israel in a civil ceremony in Venice, Italy.[19]

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Jonathan Pollard

Jonathan Pollard was a civilian American Naval intelligence analyst. In the mid 1980’s (circa 1983-1984), Pollard discovered that information vital to Israel’s security was being deliberately withheld by certain elements within the U.S. national security establishment. Israel was legally entitled to this vital security information according to a 1983 Memorandum of Understanding between the two countries. The information being withheld from Israel included Syrian, Iraqi, Libyan and Iranian nuclear, chemical, and biological warfare capabilities – being developed for use against Israel. It also included information on ballistic missile development by these countries and information on planned terrorist attacks against Israeli civilian targets. When Pollard discovered this suppression of information and asked his superiors about it, he was told to “mind his own business”, and that “Jews get nervous talking about poison gas; they don’t need to know.” He also learned that the objective of cutting off the flow of information to Israel was to severely curtail Israel’s ability to act independently in defense of her own interests. Furthermore, on May 11, 1998, Israel formally acknowledged Jonathan Pollard had been a bona fide Israeli agent. This fact wiped out any remaining doubt about Jonathan Pollard’s motives. Being an official agent is, by definition, the polar opposite of being a mercenary. Prior to sentencing, then-Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger delivered a 46-page classified memorandum to the sentencing judge. Since then, neither Pollard nor any of his cleared attorneys have ever been allowed to access the memorandum to challenge the false charges it contains-a clear violation of Pollard’s constitutional rights. The day before sentencing, Weinberger delivered a four-page supplemental memorandum to the sentencing judge. In it, he falsely accused Pollard of treason. Also in the supplemental memorandum, Weinberger advocated a life sentence in clear violation of Pollard’s plea agreement. The implication that follows from Weinberger’s false characterization of Pollard’s offense as “treason” is that the country Pollard served, Israel, is an enemy state. The Court of Appeals, in a two-to-one decision, rejected the challenge, largely on procedural grounds. The majority placed heavy emphasis on the failure to appeal from the life sentence in a timely manner, and on the resulting far heavier burden faced by Pollard in seeking to challenge the sentence via habeas corpus. [Note: “Habeas corpus” is a procedure by which an incarcerated person may bring a court challenge to the legality of his or her incarceration – often long after the underlying case has been concluded.] In a dissenting opinion, Court of Appeals Judge Stephen Williams called the case “a fundamental miscarriage of justice,” and wrote that he would have ordered that Pollard’s sentence be vacated. The CIA claim that another highly-placed spy in the U.S. had to exist in order to give Jonathan Pollard his highly specific tasking orders is a complete fabrication. To understand how Pollard was tasked by Israel to secure specific documents, see: Was there another U.S. spy tasking Pollard? – Mr. X’ Exposed. The Israeli government recognized long ago that Jonathan’s sentence was unjust, that the documents he delivered to Israel did not remotely cause the damage that the prosecution claimed but never proved. As a result of this recognition, various Israeli administrations have negotiated, as a matter of basic fairness, to secure Jonathan’s release.

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Jonathan Pollard | Jewish Virtual Library

Jonathan Pollard is a former U.S. Navy intelligence analyst who was convicted of spying for Israel. He is currently incarcerated in the United States. – Arrest & Reaction – The Trial – Legal Appeals In November 1985, the FBI arrested Pollard, a U.S. Navy intelligence analyst, on charges of selling classified material to Israel. Pollard was subsequently sentenced to life imprisonment. His wife, Anne, got five years in jail for assisting her husband. Immediately upon Pollard’s arrest, Israel apologized and explained that the operation was unauthorized. “It is Israel’s policy to refrain from any intelligence activity related to the United States,” an official government statement declared, “in view of the close and special relationship of friendship” between two countries. Prime Minister Shimon Peres stated: “Spying on the United States stands in total contradiction to our policy.”1 The United States and Israel worked together to investigate the Pollard affair. The Israeli inquiry revealed that Pollard was not working for Israeli military intelligence or the Mossad. He was directed by a small, independent scientific intelligence unit. Pollard initiated the contact with the Israelis. A subcommittee of the Knesset’s Defense and Foreign Affairs Committee on Intelligence and Security Services concluded: “Beyond all doubt…the operational echelons (namely: the Scientific Liaison Unit headed by Rafael Eitan) decided to recruit and handle Pollard without any check or consultation with the political echelon or receiving its direct or indirect approval.” The Knesset committee took the government to task for not properly supervising the scientific unit. As promised to the U.S. government, the spy unit that directed Pollard was disbanded, his handlers punished and the stolen documents returned.2 The last point was crucial to the U.S. Department of Justice’s case against Pollard. Pollard denied spying against the United States. He said he provided only information he believed was vital to Israeli security and was being withheld by the Pentagon. This included data on Soviet arms shipments to Syria, Iraqi and Syrian chemical weapons, the Pakistani atomic bomb project and Libyan air defense systems.3 Because the information he took is classified, we can’t verify if this is true. In 2006, Rafael Eitan said, It is likely that we could have gotten the same information without him. He also said, however, that Pollard provided information of such high quality and accuracy, so good and so important to the countrys security that my desire, my appetite to get more and more material overcame me. He added taht the information might have made a difference had Israel been involved in another war. Eitan also maintained that Pollard never exposed any American agents and that another spy, Aldrich Ames, tried to blame Pollard to divert suspicion from his activities.3a The agent in charge of counterintelligence for the Naval Investigative Service who caught Pollard has said that he was involved in illegal activities to help countries besides Israel. Ron Olive wrote that Pollard confessed that before he spied for Israel, he passed classified information to South Africa, his civilian financial advisers and a member of the Australian Royal Navy. He also admitted passing documents to Pakistan in the hopes it would take him on as a spy. Olive quotes Pollard during a debriefing after he pleaded guilty saying, If I could see it, and touch it, you can assume I got it….My only limitation was what I couldn’t carry. Olive said Pollard stole 360 cubic feet of classified secrets and confessed to stealing classifed information two to three times a day, three to four days a week.3b

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The Jonathan Jay Pollard Spy Case — A Bullied Boy — Crime …

Jonathan Jay Pollard was born on August 7, 1954 in Galveston, Texas. His father, Dr. Morris Pollard, was a microbiologist. His mother, Molly Pollard, was a homemaker. He was the youngest of three children. Harvey was the oldest and Carol was the middle sister. The family soon began calling their youngest son by his middle name. When Jay was very young, the family moved to South Bend, Indiana so his father could take a position at Notre Dame University. Dr. Morris Pollard would later recall that he experienced not a whiff of anti-Semitism at the Roman Catholic institution. Rather, he and his family were always made to feel welcome. Neither Galveston, Texas nor South Bend, Indiana boasted large Jewish communities but the Pollards were deeply involved with the Jewish groups in their areas. The family made a special effort to instill a powerful sense of Jewish identity in their children. The parents were devoted to the cause of Israel and impressed their love for the Jewish homeland upon their youngsters. The Pollard children learned about the Holocaust at a young age and grew up knowing that the Nazis had slaughtered some 70 of the family’s European relatives. The Pollards were affluent and lived comfortably in a ranch-style home in a little cul de sac. Jay was close to both parents, especially his mother. He was also, to some degree, “parented” by his older brother and sister. He was a precocious youngster upon whom his whole family doted. Musically talented, he learned to play the cello and became quite accomplished at it. School was a different story. He made excellent grades but outside his family, young Jay was disliked by other children. He was frequently picked on. On a daily basis, Jay was teased and taunted and often physically assaulted by his fellow students. Why? There are several possible reasons. The boy was short for his age. He also wore glasses. Children can be notoriously cruel to “shrimps” and “four-eyes.” Additionally, Jay was obviously bright and envy of a smart kid or “teacher’s pet” often sparks school-age persecution. Yearbook photo of Jonathan Pollard Finally, the boy was Jewish in an area that had few Jews. Jay blamed this factor exclusively for his being the target of so many taunts. This solidified his interest in, and love for, Israel, the country where Jews could be “normal.” In 1967, when Jay was 13, several Arab countries attacked Israel. The teenager was devastated. It seemed impossible that the little country could hold out against so many enemies. “They’re going to kill Israel!” he sobbed to his mother. “I’ll never get to see Israel.” Molly assured him that Israel would survive. When Jay woke up the next morning, he found out that what would become famous as the Six-Day War was over and Israel had won. The lad was overjoyed. “Then I’ll get to see Israel!” he shouted. Thirteen was also the age for Jay’s Bar Mitzvah, the ceremony that traditionally marks a Jewish boy’s ascent to manhood. A boy gives a speech at his Bar Mitzvah and Jay took the subject of his speech from Isaiah and the message that Israel will be a leader among nations. The rabbi at their synagogue was not a Zionist and discouraged young Jay from speaking on that theme.

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