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Jonathan Pollard loses appeal to ease parole conditions …

Jonathan Pollard, left, arrives at a federal courthouse in New York with his wife, Esther, to check in at a probation office just hours after he was released from prison, Nov. 20, 2015. (Ilana Gold/WCBS-TV via AP Images)

(JTA) A federal appeals court has rejected convicted spy for Israel Jonathan Pollards request to lift restrictive parole conditions.

The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan issued the judgment on Wednesday, a week after hearing arguments.

The parole terms issued upon Pollards release from a federal prison in November 2015 after serving 30 years of a life sentence require him to stay in his New York home from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.; to submit any computer he uses for inspection, and to wear a GPS-monitoring device at all times. The device means that Pollard, who is Orthodox, is forced to violate Shabbat observance, his lawyer has said.

Pollard, 62, also must remain in the United States for five years, despite his desire to move to Israel.

Pollards attorney argued that the terms are overly severe because Pollard cannot remember the classified information he provided in 1984 and 1985 to Israeli officials and that he is not a flight risk, Reuters reported.

Pollard pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiracy to commit espionage in connection with providing Israeli contacts with hundreds of classified documents he had obtained as a civilian intelligence specialist for the U.S. Navy.

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JONATHAN POLLARD (KIKE) LOSES BID TO RELAX US PAROLE …

A federal appeals court on Wednesday rejected a bid by Jonathan Pollard, the former US Navy intelligence officer who served 30 years in prison after being convicted of spying for Israel, to relax his parole conditions.

The US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan said the US Parole Commission acted within its discretion in requiring Pollard to wear an electronic tracking device, obey a curfew and allow his computers to be monitored.

Eliot Lauer, Pollards attorney, told The Jerusalem Post that he was disappointed in two respects. First the result. Second in that the court did not step out of the checklist and confront the commission on the manifest injustice of the onerous and unnecessary restrictions.

The Free Pollard campaign responded that the timing and substance of the Second Circuits denial of Pollards appeal to lift his parole restrictions reflect politics, not due process.

The courts decision was handed down with unprecedented speed obviously calculated to occur simultaneously with Presidents Trumps departure from Israel and with Yom Yerushalyim, the campaign said. Clearly the timing of this decision, which normally takes months but was delivered less than a week after oral arguments, was intended as a slap across Israels face.

Coming on the heels of the US presidents compromise of an Israeli intelligence operation and the consequent endangerment of the life of an Israeli agent, this unambiguous insult to Israel via the Second Circuit Court is revealing of the new US administrations continuing tolerance of an anti-Israel agenda by those elements in the American defense and intelligence communities hostile to the US-Israel special relationship, the statement continued.

This officially accepted belligerence will not be camouflaged by photo-ops and heart-warming speeches.

Unless and until Jonathan Pollard is allowed to come home to Israel, the US intelligence establishments warin- the-shadows against Israel will continue unabated, the campaign concluded.

Pollard pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiracy to commit espionage in connection with providing Israeli contacts with hundreds of classified documents.

His lawyers have said his parole conditions have prevented him from getting a job.

On Sunday, Pollard appealed to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to bring up the matter of his release during his meeting with US President Donald Trump on Monday.

Netanyahus spokesman declined to reveal whether or not he did.

Pollard made the comments during conversations he held with close friends over the weekend. His wife, Esther, recounted them to the Post.

As much as Trump needs to be held to his promise to move the embassy, it is just as important that the prime minister keep his promise to bring an agent home, Pollard reportedly said to the friends during the weekend.

Last week, Pollard appealed US District Judge Katherine Forrests decision to keep in place the parole conditions that were imposed when he was released from prison in November 2015, after serving 30 years of a life sentence for spying for Israel.

The conditions prevent Pollard from leaving his New York home after 7 p.m. and before 7 a.m., compel him to submit any computer he uses for inspection and require him to wear a GPS monitoring device that forces him to violate the Sabbath.

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JONATHAN POLLARD (KIKE) LOSES BID TO RELAX US PAROLE …

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Former Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard Loses Bid to Ease US Parole Restrictions – Algemeiner

Email a copy of “Former Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard Loses Bid to Ease US Parole Restrictions” to a friend

Jonathan and Esther Pollard. Photo: Justice for Jonathan Pollard.

JNS.org A federal appeals court rejected on Wednesday a bid by Jonathan Pollard the former US Navy intelligence analyst who was released from prison in November 2015 after serving a 30-year sentence on charges of spying for Israel to ease restrictions of his parole.

In its ruling, the US Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit in New York said the US Parole Commission acted within its discretion in setting Pollards curfew, internet restrictions and tracking devices.

Eliot Lauer, Pollards attorney, told The Jerusalem Post he was disappointed in two respects. First, the result. Second, in that the court did not step out of the checklist and confront the commission on the manifest injustice of the onerous and unnecessary restrictions.

Since his release, Pollard has been barred from leaving his New York home between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. His parole conditions also forbid him from freely using the internet and speaking with the media. He is obliged to wear a GPS monitoring apparatus at all times and cannot leave the US.

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Jonathan Pollard loses bid to relax US parole conditions – The Jerusalem Post


The Jerusalem Post
Jonathan Pollard loses bid to relax US parole conditions
The Jerusalem Post
Eliot Lauer, Pollard's attorney, told The Jerusalem Post that he was disappointed in two respects. First the result. Second in that the court did not step out of the checklist and confront the commission on the manifest injustice of the onerous and
Jonathan Pollard Loses Bid To Ease Parole ConditionsForward
Convicted spy Pollard loses bid to relax US parole conditions | ReutersReuters
Court rejects Jonathan Pollard's bid to ease parole conditionsThe Times of Israel (blog)
Arutz Sheva
all 6 news articles »

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About – Pollard PLLC – Florida Non-Compete & Trade Secret …

Pollard PLLC is a litigation boutique focused on competition law. The firm and its members have extensive experience litigating non-compete, trade secret and antitrust disputes.

In April 2012, Jonathan Pollard left Boies, Schiller & Flexners Fort Lauderdale office to launch his own practice. Many lawyers who leave big firms to strike out on their own are partners who have books of business. Pollard was a third-year associate. At first, Pollard was a true solo practitioner. He had no other lawyers and no support staff. But that did not stop him from winning cases.

Over the next few years, Pollard went from being a solo practitioner to being the principal of a small but growing litigation shop. Among the lawyers are graduates of top colleges and law schools, law review members, and members of academic honor societies such asOrder of the Coif and Phi Beta Kappa.

The firm has litigated dozens of cases to favorable resolutions, won multiple appeals in the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and the Florida District Courts of Appeal and advised hundreds of individuals and businesses on competition issues. The firm routinely wins key legal decisions in which the court cites the firms own prior cases as precedent.

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About – Pollard PLLC – Florida Non-Compete & Trade Secret …

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No decision yet on Pollard parole conditions after appeal – Jerusalem Post Israel News


Jerusalem Post Israel News
No decision yet on Pollard parole conditions after appeal
Jerusalem Post Israel News
Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard leaves a federal courthouse in New York. (photo credit:REUTERS). A federal appeals court in New York with three judges heard an appeal from Israeli agent Jonathan Pollard on Wednesday and decided not to give an immediate …
Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard Seeks to Ease Parole ConditionsVoice of America
A Spy's Memory Takes Focus in Jonathan Pollard AppealCourthouse News Service
US court urged to relax convicted Israeli spy's parole conditionsNew York Daily News

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US, Israeli spies upset that Trump shared intel with Russia – Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Top News

Associated Press

Posted May 18, 2017

May 18, 2017

Updated May 18, 2017 9:50am

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump meets with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington.

WASHINGTON >> The United States and Israel are publicly brushing aside President Donald Trumps reported sharing of a highly classified tip from Israel with Russia, but spy professionals on both sides are frustrated and fearful about the repercussions to a critical intelligence partnership.

I know how things work in Israeli intelligence, said Uri Bar-Joseph, a professor at Haifa University in Israel who has studied and written widely about the Jewish states spy operations. I have some friends I talk with. Theyre upset. They are sincerely frustrated and angry.

Meeting Russias foreign minister and ambassador to Washington in the Oval Office last week, Trump shared intelligence about an Islamic State threat involving laptops carried on airplanes, according to a senior U.S. official who wasnt authorized to talk about the sensitive material and spoke on condition of anonymity.

U.S. and Israeli officials have tried to allay concerns. National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster told reporters that Trumps disclosure was wholly appropriate. Israeli Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman tweeted that the allies will continue to have a deep, meaningful and unprecedented security relationship.

But some of the people whove spent years safeguarding that relationship say there will be consequences.

Trump made two very serious mistakes, former CIA director John Brennan said today at a financial industry event in Las Vegas.

We shared a lot of sensitive intelligence about terrorism operations that were planned against the Russians, he said. But we shared it through intelligence channels, and you also make sure that the language of what you are sharing is not going in any way compromise your collections systems. Mr. Trump didnt do that.

Shabtai Shavit, former chief of Israels Mossad spy agency, told The Associated Press that his gut feeling is that anyone who belongs to the professional club is very angry. Danny Yatom, another ex-Mossad boss, told an Israeli radio station that if reports were accurate, Trump likely caused heavy damage to Israeli and American security.

Bar-Joseph, the writer, said: I wont say they wont share secrets anymore, but when it comes to the most sensitive information, there will be a second thought. Of Trump, he added, If you cant count on the president, who can you count on?

Both nations gain much from the exchange of information.

Israel, which lives in close proximity to Arab enemies and Iran, has human spies in parts of the volatile Middle East where the U.S. doesnt. It also has robust cyber capabilities, enabling it to sometimes get word of plots that the United States doesnt know about.

Washington, in turn, provides Israel with financial and military assistance, and intelligence that U.S. agencies collect on threats far beyond Israels immediate borders.

They have keen insight into things that we dont, and obviously, we have keen insights into things they dont, said California Rep. Adam Schiff, the House intelligence committees top Democrat, stressing that he wasnt confirming that Trump shared an Israeli intelligence tip. Working as partners, we are both stronger and safer as a result. They have certain skills and accesses that we dont, and vice versa. We have our blind spots and they have theirs and we share information extensively.

No one thinks the incident will derail the long-standing alliance. But subtle changes and a more careful approach to sharing may be inevitable.

Intelligence professionals in the United States are deeply concerned, frustrated and increasingly disillusioned, one former intelligence official said. Another former intelligence official said the concern is that Israel will start fuzzing intelligence it shares with the U.S., avoiding specifics or detailing how information is obtained. Both individuals spoke on condition of anonymity because they werent authorized to relay the sentiments they gleaned from conversations with current intelligence officials.

Soon after the incident was reported, Trump spoke by telephone Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whom the U.S. leader is visiting next week. White House press secretary Sean Spicer said they talked only about the trip.

Netanyahu really needs Trump right now to bolster his standing in Israel, said Elie Jacobs, an analyst on U.S.-Israeli relations, explaining the lack of official Israeli criticism.

But its not a threat some Israeli officials didnt foresee. Even before Trump took office, Jacobs said, Israeli professionals expressed concern that his loose lips would intentionally or inadvertently lead to Israeli intelligence being shared with Russia. That, in turn, might mean the intelligence ends up with Iran, a sworn enemy of Israel.

Its possible that high-level information may not be shared for the time being, he said.

In Europe, where U.S. allies are more directly concerned about the threat from Russia, Trump has garnered support.

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said he is absolutely certain allies can share and handle sensitive information. German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel said its necessary to maintain U.S. intelligence cooperation.

Israel and the U.S. have had far more intelligence run-ins over the years. Jonathan Pollard, a former U.S. Navy intelligence research specialist, pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiring to deliver national defense information to a foreign government Israel and served 30 years in prison.

And Trump isnt the first U.S. or Israeli leader to disclose intelligence in a way that made spy professionals cringe.

In the early 1970s, then-Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir wanted to impress President Richard Nixon and his adviser, Henry Kissinger, with the quality of Israeli intelligence.

Despite opposition from her intelligence chief, Meir took to Washington the minutes of a Moscow meeting between former Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev. The intelligence had been collected by Ashraf Marwan, a close Sadat adviser, who was working for Israeli intelligence.

My guess is that she wouldnt have done it with Trump, said Bar-Joseph, author of a book on Marwan, who was codenamed Angel.

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US, Israeli spies upset that Trump shared intel with Russia – Honolulu Star-Advertiser

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Jonathan Pollard: The Festering Saw on the Face of US-Israeli Relations – Sputnik International

US

14:55 18.05.2017 Get short URL

Eliot Lauer, the lawyer ofconvicted spyJonathan Pollard,has called fora loosening ofconditions that require Mr. Pollard tosubmit toa curfew and regular monitoring ofthe computer he uses athis workplace. He is also prevented fromleaving home after7 p.m. or before7 a.m.

The parole conditions inplace onMr. Pollardalso prevent him fromleaving the US forfive years withoutpermission.

AP Photo/ Oded Balilty

Israeli protesters hold posters demanding the release of Jonathan Pollard, a Jewish American who was jailed for life in 1987 on charges of spying on the United States, as they stand outside the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv, Israel.

Mr. Pollard was granted Israeli citizenship in1995, butthe White House underthe Obama administration confirmed that it would intervene inthe judicial process togrant him permission tomove toIsrael, asPollard has said that he would liketo. The Trump administration is yet togive its position.

He was freed fromprison inthe year 2015 afterdoing a 30 year sentence forhanding overhighly sensitive information toIsrael. At his trial in1986, he pleaded guilty tothe allegations made againsthim, and was given a life sentence. Prosecutors atthe time said that Mr. Pollard willfully leaked state secrets toIsraeli agents while working asan intelligence specialist forthe US Navy inthe years 1984 and 1985. It was argued athis hearing that his actions “severely damaged” US national security.

AP Photo/ Sebastian Scheiner

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man walks past a banner depicting U.S. President Barack Obama, and Jonathan Pollard, a Jewish-American who was jailed for life in 1987 on charges of spying on the United States.

Mr. Pollard can comfortably be described asone ofthe most notorious spies inAmerican politics ofthe late Cold War period. For 30 years, he has been a festering wound onthe face ofrelations betweenWashington and Tel Aviv. Many inUS intelligence circles reviled him asa traitor, inIsrael he was seen asa staunch loyalist committed tothe security ofIsrael. Mr. Pollard is the only American tohave ever been sentenced tolife inprison forspying foran ally.

Illustrative ofthe support and reverence Mr. Pollard is often met within Israel, followinghis release in2015, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said ina videothat, “after three long and difficult decades, Jonathan has been reunited withhis family. May this Sabbath bring him much joy and peace that will continue inthe years and decades ahead.” He also noted how he had “raised Jonathan’s case foryears.”

In sharp juxtaposition, officials inthe US government displayed their resentment towardMr. Pollard and frustration athis early release. Joseph E. diGenova, who is the former attorney general that prosecuted Mr. Pollard said, “I’m delighted he served 30 years. I wish he would have served more.” Retired US officials fromthe second Bush administration, Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld, aswell asformer CIA director George Tenet, also all opposed his early release.

Jonathan Pollard started working forthe US Navy asa civilian intelligence analyst inthe year 1979, butreportedly grew disillusioned withthe post. By June 1984, he began tohand overentire suitcases full ofUS classified intelligence toIsraeli intelligence operatives. Allegedly, the suitcases contained photographs ofArab and Soviet weapons and information onthe weapons capabilities ofregional militaries. He also sold the National Security Agency’s ten-volume manual onhow the US gathers its signals intelligence. His leaks additionally exposed the names ofthousands ofindividuals who had worked asinformants foror cooperated withUS intelligence agencies, putting the lives ofthose people injeopardy. In exchange, he was lavished withoverseas holidays and tens ofthousands ofdollars.

Much tothe consternation ofhis supporters, Mr. Pollard has also been used asa bargaining chip byUS presidents and their administrations when trying tocoax Israel intopeace talks withthe Palestinians. Perhaps the most famous example was inthe year 1998, when then-President Bill Clinton floated the possibility ofreleasing Mr. Pollard fromprison aspart ofa peace agreement he was brokering withBenjamin Netanyahu. However, then-CIA director George Tenet threatened toresign overit, derailing the talks.

In March 2014, President Obama’s Secretary ofState, John Kerry, allegedly suggested he might be willing torelease Pollard if Israel ceased its policy ofunrelenting settlement expansion intothe occupied West Bank. Eventually, this initiative failed too.

Although Mr. Pollard’s supporters celebrated his release fromprison withIsraeli Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked declaring he was a “free man atlast” onTwitter the bargaining betweenIsrael and the US overhim looks set tocontinue. It appears that Pollard’s parole terms will replace the duration ofhis prison sentence asthe rope inthe diplomatic tug ofwar betweenboth countries’ leaders.

Mr. Lauer and Mr. Pollard are still waiting tohear back fromthe US District overwhether it will repeal the restrictive parole conditions inplace. If not, it appears that the next stop is President Trump’s White House, withMr. Lauer saying that, “if not, we hope the administration will give Jonathan the relief needed. We hope that atan appropriate time the president will take the opportunity tostudy this and take intoaccount what Jonathan has endured and fashion an appropriate response.”

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US, Israeli spies upset that Trump shared intel with Russia – WRAL.com

By DEB RIECHMANN, Associated Press

WASHINGTON The United States and Israel are publicly brushing aside President Donald Trump’s reported sharing of a highly classified tip from Israel with Russia, but spy professionals on both sides are frustrated and fearful about the repercussions to a critical intelligence partnership.

“I know how things work in Israeli intelligence,” said Uri Bar-Joseph, a professor at Haifa University in Israel who has studied and written widely about the Jewish state’s spy operations. “I have some friends I talk with. They’re upset. They are sincerely frustrated and angry.”

Meeting Russia’s foreign minister and ambassador to Washington in the Oval Office last week, Trump shared intelligence about an Islamic State threat involving laptops carried on airplanes, according to a senior U.S. official who wasn’t authorized to talk about the sensitive material and spoke on condition of anonymity.

U.S. and Israeli officials have tried to allay concerns. National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster told reporters that Trump’s disclosure was “wholly appropriate.” Israeli Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman tweeted that the allies will continue to have a “deep, meaningful and unprecedented” security relationship.

But some of the people who’ve spent years safeguarding that relationship say there will be consequences.

Trump made “two very serious mistakes,” former CIA director John Brennan said Thursday at a financial industry event in Las Vegas.

“We shared a lot of sensitive intelligence about terrorism operations that were planned against the Russians,” he said. “But we shared it through intelligence channels, and you also make sure that the language of what you are sharing is not going in any way compromise your collections systems. Mr. Trump didn’t do that.”

Shabtai Shavit, former chief of Israel’s Mossad spy agency, told The Associated Press that his “gut feeling is that anyone who belongs to the professional club is very angry.” Danny Yatom, another ex-Mossad boss, told an Israeli radio station that if reports were accurate, Trump likely caused “heavy damage” to Israeli and American security.

Bar-Joseph, the writer, said: “I won’t say they won’t share secrets anymore, but when it comes to the most sensitive information, there will be a second thought.” Of Trump, he added, “If you can’t count on the president, who can you count on?”

Both nations gain much from the exchange of information.

Israel, which lives in close proximity to Arab enemies and Iran, has human spies in parts of the volatile Middle East where the U.S. doesn’t. It also has robust cyber capabilities, enabling it to sometimes get word of plots that the United States doesn’t know about.

Washington, in turn, provides Israel with financial and military assistance, and intelligence that U.S. agencies collect on threats far beyond Israel’s immediate borders.

“They have keen insight into things that we don’t, and obviously, we have keen insights into things they don’t,” said California Rep. Adam Schiff, the House intelligence committee’s top Democrat, stressing that he wasn’t confirming that Trump shared an Israeli intelligence tip. “Working as partners, we are both stronger and safer as a result. They have certain skills and accesses that we don’t, and vice versa. We have our blind spots and they have theirs and we share information extensively.”

No one thinks the incident will derail the long-standing alliance. But subtle changes and a more careful approach to sharing may be inevitable.

Intelligence professionals in the United States are “deeply concerned, frustrated and increasingly disillusioned,” one former intelligence official said. Another former intelligence official said the concern is that Israel will start “fuzzing” intelligence it shares with the U.S., avoiding specifics or detailing how information is obtained. Both individuals spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to relay the sentiments they gleaned from conversations with current intelligence officials.

Soon after the incident was reported, Trump spoke by telephone Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whom the U.S. leader is visiting next week. White House press secretary Sean Spicer said they talked only about the trip.

“Netanyahu really needs Trump right now to bolster his standing in Israel,” said Elie Jacobs, an analyst on U.S.-Israeli relations, explaining the lack of official Israeli criticism.

But it’s not a threat some Israeli officials didn’t foresee. Even before Trump took office, Jacobs said, Israeli professionals expressed concern that his loose lips would intentionally or inadvertently lead to Israeli intelligence being shared with Russia. That, in turn, might mean the intelligence ends up with Iran, a sworn enemy of Israel.

“It’s possible that high-level information may not be shared for the time being,” he said.

In Europe, where U.S. allies are more directly concerned about the threat from Russia, Trump has garnered support.

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said he is “absolutely certain” allies can share and handle sensitive information. German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel said it’s necessary to maintain U.S. intelligence cooperation.

Israel and the U.S. have had far more intelligence run-ins over the years. Jonathan Pollard, a former U.S. Navy intelligence research specialist, pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiring to deliver national defense information to a foreign government Israel and served 30 years in prison.

And Trump isn’t the first U.S. or Israeli leader to disclose intelligence in a way that made spy professionals cringe.

In the early 1970s, then-Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir wanted to impress President Richard Nixon and his adviser, Henry Kissinger, with the quality of Israeli intelligence.

Despite opposition from her intelligence chief, Meir took to Washington the minutes of a Moscow meeting between former Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev. The intelligence had been collected by Ashraf Marwan, a close Sadat adviser, who was working for Israeli intelligence.

“My guess is that she wouldn’t have done it with Trump,” said Bar-Joseph, author of a book on Marwan, who was codenamed “Angel.”

___

Associated Press writers Robert Burns in Washington, Josef Federman in Jerusalem and Regina Garcia Cano in Las Vegas contributed to this report.

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Jonathan Pollard loses appeal to ease parole conditions …

Jonathan Pollard, left, arrives at a federal courthouse in New York with his wife, Esther, to check in at a probation office just hours after he was released from prison, Nov. 20, 2015. (Ilana Gold/WCBS-TV via AP Images) (JTA) A federal appeals court has rejected convicted spy for Israel Jonathan Pollards request to lift restrictive parole conditions. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan issued the judgment on Wednesday, a week after hearing arguments. The parole terms issued upon Pollards release from a federal prison in November 2015 after serving 30 years of a life sentence require him to stay in his New York home from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m.; to submit any computer he uses for inspection, and to wear a GPS-monitoring device at all times. The device means that Pollard, who is Orthodox, is forced to violate Shabbat observance, his lawyer has said. Pollard, 62, also must remain in the United States for five years, despite his desire to move to Israel. Pollards attorney argued that the terms are overly severe because Pollard cannot remember the classified information he provided in 1984 and 1985 to Israeli officials and that he is not a flight risk, Reuters reported. Pollard pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiracy to commit espionage in connection with providing Israeli contacts with hundreds of classified documents he had obtained as a civilian intelligence specialist for the U.S. Navy.

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JONATHAN POLLARD (KIKE) LOSES BID TO RELAX US PAROLE …

A federal appeals court on Wednesday rejected a bid by Jonathan Pollard, the former US Navy intelligence officer who served 30 years in prison after being convicted of spying for Israel, to relax his parole conditions. The US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in Manhattan said the US Parole Commission acted within its discretion in requiring Pollard to wear an electronic tracking device, obey a curfew and allow his computers to be monitored. Eliot Lauer, Pollards attorney, told The Jerusalem Post that he was disappointed in two respects. First the result. Second in that the court did not step out of the checklist and confront the commission on the manifest injustice of the onerous and unnecessary restrictions. The Free Pollard campaign responded that the timing and substance of the Second Circuits denial of Pollards appeal to lift his parole restrictions reflect politics, not due process. The courts decision was handed down with unprecedented speed obviously calculated to occur simultaneously with Presidents Trumps departure from Israel and with Yom Yerushalyim, the campaign said. Clearly the timing of this decision, which normally takes months but was delivered less than a week after oral arguments, was intended as a slap across Israels face. Coming on the heels of the US presidents compromise of an Israeli intelligence operation and the consequent endangerment of the life of an Israeli agent, this unambiguous insult to Israel via the Second Circuit Court is revealing of the new US administrations continuing tolerance of an anti-Israel agenda by those elements in the American defense and intelligence communities hostile to the US-Israel special relationship, the statement continued. This officially accepted belligerence will not be camouflaged by photo-ops and heart-warming speeches. Unless and until Jonathan Pollard is allowed to come home to Israel, the US intelligence establishments warin- the-shadows against Israel will continue unabated, the campaign concluded. Pollard pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiracy to commit espionage in connection with providing Israeli contacts with hundreds of classified documents. His lawyers have said his parole conditions have prevented him from getting a job. On Sunday, Pollard appealed to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to bring up the matter of his release during his meeting with US President Donald Trump on Monday. Netanyahus spokesman declined to reveal whether or not he did. Pollard made the comments during conversations he held with close friends over the weekend. His wife, Esther, recounted them to the Post. As much as Trump needs to be held to his promise to move the embassy, it is just as important that the prime minister keep his promise to bring an agent home, Pollard reportedly said to the friends during the weekend. Last week, Pollard appealed US District Judge Katherine Forrests decision to keep in place the parole conditions that were imposed when he was released from prison in November 2015, after serving 30 years of a life sentence for spying for Israel. The conditions prevent Pollard from leaving his New York home after 7 p.m. and before 7 a.m., compel him to submit any computer he uses for inspection and require him to wear a GPS monitoring device that forces him to violate the Sabbath. Like Loading…

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Former Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard Loses Bid to Ease US Parole Restrictions – Algemeiner

Email a copy of “Former Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard Loses Bid to Ease US Parole Restrictions” to a friend Jonathan and Esther Pollard. Photo: Justice for Jonathan Pollard. JNS.org A federal appeals court rejected on Wednesday a bid by Jonathan Pollard the former US Navy intelligence analyst who was released from prison in November 2015 after serving a 30-year sentence on charges of spying for Israel to ease restrictions of his parole. In its ruling, the US Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit in New York said the US Parole Commission acted within its discretion in setting Pollards curfew, internet restrictions and tracking devices. Eliot Lauer, Pollards attorney, told The Jerusalem Post he was disappointed in two respects. First, the result. Second, in that the court did not step out of the checklist and confront the commission on the manifest injustice of the onerous and unnecessary restrictions. Since his release, Pollard has been barred from leaving his New York home between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. His parole conditions also forbid him from freely using the internet and speaking with the media. He is obliged to wear a GPS monitoring apparatus at all times and cannot leave the US.

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Jonathan Pollard loses bid to relax US parole conditions – The Jerusalem Post

The Jerusalem Post Jonathan Pollard loses bid to relax US parole conditions The Jerusalem Post Eliot Lauer, Pollard's attorney, told The Jerusalem Post that he was disappointed in two respects. First the result. Second in that the court did not step out of the checklist and confront the commission on the manifest injustice of the onerous and … Jonathan Pollard Loses Bid To Ease Parole Conditions Forward Convicted spy Pollard loses bid to relax US parole conditions | Reuters Reuters Court rejects Jonathan Pollard's bid to ease parole conditions The Times of Israel (blog) Arutz Sheva all 6 news articles »

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About – Pollard PLLC – Florida Non-Compete & Trade Secret …

Pollard PLLC is a litigation boutique focused on competition law. The firm and its members have extensive experience litigating non-compete, trade secret and antitrust disputes. In April 2012, Jonathan Pollard left Boies, Schiller & Flexners Fort Lauderdale office to launch his own practice. Many lawyers who leave big firms to strike out on their own are partners who have books of business. Pollard was a third-year associate. At first, Pollard was a true solo practitioner. He had no other lawyers and no support staff. But that did not stop him from winning cases. Over the next few years, Pollard went from being a solo practitioner to being the principal of a small but growing litigation shop. Among the lawyers are graduates of top colleges and law schools, law review members, and members of academic honor societies such asOrder of the Coif and Phi Beta Kappa. The firm has litigated dozens of cases to favorable resolutions, won multiple appeals in the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit and the Florida District Courts of Appeal and advised hundreds of individuals and businesses on competition issues. The firm routinely wins key legal decisions in which the court cites the firms own prior cases as precedent. Save

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May 23, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

No decision yet on Pollard parole conditions after appeal – Jerusalem Post Israel News

Jerusalem Post Israel News No decision yet on Pollard parole conditions after appeal Jerusalem Post Israel News Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard leaves a federal courthouse in New York. (photo credit:REUTERS). A federal appeals court in New York with three judges heard an appeal from Israeli agent Jonathan Pollard on Wednesday and decided not to give an immediate … Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard Seeks to Ease Parole Conditions Voice of America A Spy's Memory Takes Focus in Jonathan Pollard Appeal Courthouse News Service US court urged to relax convicted Israeli spy's parole conditions New York Daily News all 11 news articles »

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May 21, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

US, Israeli spies upset that Trump shared intel with Russia – Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Top News Associated Press Posted May 18, 2017 May 18, 2017 Updated May 18, 2017 9:50am ASSOCIATED PRESS President Donald Trump meets with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. WASHINGTON > > The United States and Israel are publicly brushing aside President Donald Trumps reported sharing of a highly classified tip from Israel with Russia, but spy professionals on both sides are frustrated and fearful about the repercussions to a critical intelligence partnership. I know how things work in Israeli intelligence, said Uri Bar-Joseph, a professor at Haifa University in Israel who has studied and written widely about the Jewish states spy operations. I have some friends I talk with. Theyre upset. They are sincerely frustrated and angry. Meeting Russias foreign minister and ambassador to Washington in the Oval Office last week, Trump shared intelligence about an Islamic State threat involving laptops carried on airplanes, according to a senior U.S. official who wasnt authorized to talk about the sensitive material and spoke on condition of anonymity. U.S. and Israeli officials have tried to allay concerns. National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster told reporters that Trumps disclosure was wholly appropriate. Israeli Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman tweeted that the allies will continue to have a deep, meaningful and unprecedented security relationship. But some of the people whove spent years safeguarding that relationship say there will be consequences. Trump made two very serious mistakes, former CIA director John Brennan said today at a financial industry event in Las Vegas. We shared a lot of sensitive intelligence about terrorism operations that were planned against the Russians, he said. But we shared it through intelligence channels, and you also make sure that the language of what you are sharing is not going in any way compromise your collections systems. Mr. Trump didnt do that. Shabtai Shavit, former chief of Israels Mossad spy agency, told The Associated Press that his gut feeling is that anyone who belongs to the professional club is very angry. Danny Yatom, another ex-Mossad boss, told an Israeli radio station that if reports were accurate, Trump likely caused heavy damage to Israeli and American security. Bar-Joseph, the writer, said: I wont say they wont share secrets anymore, but when it comes to the most sensitive information, there will be a second thought. Of Trump, he added, If you cant count on the president, who can you count on? Both nations gain much from the exchange of information. Israel, which lives in close proximity to Arab enemies and Iran, has human spies in parts of the volatile Middle East where the U.S. doesnt. It also has robust cyber capabilities, enabling it to sometimes get word of plots that the United States doesnt know about. Washington, in turn, provides Israel with financial and military assistance, and intelligence that U.S. agencies collect on threats far beyond Israels immediate borders. They have keen insight into things that we dont, and obviously, we have keen insights into things they dont, said California Rep. Adam Schiff, the House intelligence committees top Democrat, stressing that he wasnt confirming that Trump shared an Israeli intelligence tip. Working as partners, we are both stronger and safer as a result. They have certain skills and accesses that we dont, and vice versa. We have our blind spots and they have theirs and we share information extensively. No one thinks the incident will derail the long-standing alliance. But subtle changes and a more careful approach to sharing may be inevitable. Intelligence professionals in the United States are deeply concerned, frustrated and increasingly disillusioned, one former intelligence official said. Another former intelligence official said the concern is that Israel will start fuzzing intelligence it shares with the U.S., avoiding specifics or detailing how information is obtained. Both individuals spoke on condition of anonymity because they werent authorized to relay the sentiments they gleaned from conversations with current intelligence officials. Soon after the incident was reported, Trump spoke by telephone Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whom the U.S. leader is visiting next week. White House press secretary Sean Spicer said they talked only about the trip. Netanyahu really needs Trump right now to bolster his standing in Israel, said Elie Jacobs, an analyst on U.S.-Israeli relations, explaining the lack of official Israeli criticism. But its not a threat some Israeli officials didnt foresee. Even before Trump took office, Jacobs said, Israeli professionals expressed concern that his loose lips would intentionally or inadvertently lead to Israeli intelligence being shared with Russia. That, in turn, might mean the intelligence ends up with Iran, a sworn enemy of Israel. Its possible that high-level information may not be shared for the time being, he said. In Europe, where U.S. allies are more directly concerned about the threat from Russia, Trump has garnered support. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said he is absolutely certain allies can share and handle sensitive information. German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel said its necessary to maintain U.S. intelligence cooperation. Israel and the U.S. have had far more intelligence run-ins over the years. Jonathan Pollard, a former U.S. Navy intelligence research specialist, pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiring to deliver national defense information to a foreign government Israel and served 30 years in prison. And Trump isnt the first U.S. or Israeli leader to disclose intelligence in a way that made spy professionals cringe. In the early 1970s, then-Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir wanted to impress President Richard Nixon and his adviser, Henry Kissinger, with the quality of Israeli intelligence. Despite opposition from her intelligence chief, Meir took to Washington the minutes of a Moscow meeting between former Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev. The intelligence had been collected by Ashraf Marwan, a close Sadat adviser, who was working for Israeli intelligence. My guess is that she wouldnt have done it with Trump, said Bar-Joseph, author of a book on Marwan, who was codenamed Angel.

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May 21, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

Jonathan Pollard: The Festering Saw on the Face of US-Israeli Relations – Sputnik International

US 14:55 18.05.2017 Get short URL Eliot Lauer, the lawyer ofconvicted spyJonathan Pollard,has called fora loosening ofconditions that require Mr. Pollard tosubmit toa curfew and regular monitoring ofthe computer he uses athis workplace. He is also prevented fromleaving home after7 p.m. or before7 a.m. The parole conditions inplace onMr. Pollardalso prevent him fromleaving the US forfive years withoutpermission. AP Photo/ Oded Balilty Israeli protesters hold posters demanding the release of Jonathan Pollard, a Jewish American who was jailed for life in 1987 on charges of spying on the United States, as they stand outside the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv, Israel. Mr. Pollard was granted Israeli citizenship in1995, butthe White House underthe Obama administration confirmed that it would intervene inthe judicial process togrant him permission tomove toIsrael, asPollard has said that he would liketo. The Trump administration is yet togive its position. He was freed fromprison inthe year 2015 afterdoing a 30 year sentence forhanding overhighly sensitive information toIsrael. At his trial in1986, he pleaded guilty tothe allegations made againsthim, and was given a life sentence. Prosecutors atthe time said that Mr. Pollard willfully leaked state secrets toIsraeli agents while working asan intelligence specialist forthe US Navy inthe years 1984 and 1985. It was argued athis hearing that his actions “severely damaged” US national security. AP Photo/ Sebastian Scheiner An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man walks past a banner depicting U.S. President Barack Obama, and Jonathan Pollard, a Jewish-American who was jailed for life in 1987 on charges of spying on the United States. Mr. Pollard can comfortably be described asone ofthe most notorious spies inAmerican politics ofthe late Cold War period. For 30 years, he has been a festering wound onthe face ofrelations betweenWashington and Tel Aviv. Many inUS intelligence circles reviled him asa traitor, inIsrael he was seen asa staunch loyalist committed tothe security ofIsrael. Mr. Pollard is the only American tohave ever been sentenced tolife inprison forspying foran ally. Illustrative ofthe support and reverence Mr. Pollard is often met within Israel, followinghis release in2015, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said ina videothat, “after three long and difficult decades, Jonathan has been reunited withhis family. May this Sabbath bring him much joy and peace that will continue inthe years and decades ahead.” He also noted how he had “raised Jonathan’s case foryears.” In sharp juxtaposition, officials inthe US government displayed their resentment towardMr. Pollard and frustration athis early release. Joseph E. diGenova, who is the former attorney general that prosecuted Mr. Pollard said, “I’m delighted he served 30 years. I wish he would have served more.” Retired US officials fromthe second Bush administration, Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld, aswell asformer CIA director George Tenet, also all opposed his early release. Jonathan Pollard started working forthe US Navy asa civilian intelligence analyst inthe year 1979, butreportedly grew disillusioned withthe post. By June 1984, he began tohand overentire suitcases full ofUS classified intelligence toIsraeli intelligence operatives. Allegedly, the suitcases contained photographs ofArab and Soviet weapons and information onthe weapons capabilities ofregional militaries. He also sold the National Security Agency’s ten-volume manual onhow the US gathers its signals intelligence. His leaks additionally exposed the names ofthousands ofindividuals who had worked asinformants foror cooperated withUS intelligence agencies, putting the lives ofthose people injeopardy. In exchange, he was lavished withoverseas holidays and tens ofthousands ofdollars. Much tothe consternation ofhis supporters, Mr. Pollard has also been used asa bargaining chip byUS presidents and their administrations when trying tocoax Israel intopeace talks withthe Palestinians. Perhaps the most famous example was inthe year 1998, when then-President Bill Clinton floated the possibility ofreleasing Mr. Pollard fromprison aspart ofa peace agreement he was brokering withBenjamin Netanyahu. However, then-CIA director George Tenet threatened toresign overit, derailing the talks. In March 2014, President Obama’s Secretary ofState, John Kerry, allegedly suggested he might be willing torelease Pollard if Israel ceased its policy ofunrelenting settlement expansion intothe occupied West Bank. Eventually, this initiative failed too. Although Mr. Pollard’s supporters celebrated his release fromprison withIsraeli Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked declaring he was a “free man atlast” onTwitter the bargaining betweenIsrael and the US overhim looks set tocontinue. It appears that Pollard’s parole terms will replace the duration ofhis prison sentence asthe rope inthe diplomatic tug ofwar betweenboth countries’ leaders. Mr. Lauer and Mr. Pollard are still waiting tohear back fromthe US District overwhether it will repeal the restrictive parole conditions inplace. If not, it appears that the next stop is President Trump’s White House, withMr. Lauer saying that, “if not, we hope the administration will give Jonathan the relief needed. We hope that atan appropriate time the president will take the opportunity tostudy this and take intoaccount what Jonathan has endured and fashion an appropriate response.”

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May 19, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed

US, Israeli spies upset that Trump shared intel with Russia – WRAL.com

By DEB RIECHMANN, Associated Press WASHINGTON The United States and Israel are publicly brushing aside President Donald Trump’s reported sharing of a highly classified tip from Israel with Russia, but spy professionals on both sides are frustrated and fearful about the repercussions to a critical intelligence partnership. “I know how things work in Israeli intelligence,” said Uri Bar-Joseph, a professor at Haifa University in Israel who has studied and written widely about the Jewish state’s spy operations. “I have some friends I talk with. They’re upset. They are sincerely frustrated and angry.” Meeting Russia’s foreign minister and ambassador to Washington in the Oval Office last week, Trump shared intelligence about an Islamic State threat involving laptops carried on airplanes, according to a senior U.S. official who wasn’t authorized to talk about the sensitive material and spoke on condition of anonymity. U.S. and Israeli officials have tried to allay concerns. National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster told reporters that Trump’s disclosure was “wholly appropriate.” Israeli Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman tweeted that the allies will continue to have a “deep, meaningful and unprecedented” security relationship. But some of the people who’ve spent years safeguarding that relationship say there will be consequences. Trump made “two very serious mistakes,” former CIA director John Brennan said Thursday at a financial industry event in Las Vegas. “We shared a lot of sensitive intelligence about terrorism operations that were planned against the Russians,” he said. “But we shared it through intelligence channels, and you also make sure that the language of what you are sharing is not going in any way compromise your collections systems. Mr. Trump didn’t do that.” Shabtai Shavit, former chief of Israel’s Mossad spy agency, told The Associated Press that his “gut feeling is that anyone who belongs to the professional club is very angry.” Danny Yatom, another ex-Mossad boss, told an Israeli radio station that if reports were accurate, Trump likely caused “heavy damage” to Israeli and American security. Bar-Joseph, the writer, said: “I won’t say they won’t share secrets anymore, but when it comes to the most sensitive information, there will be a second thought.” Of Trump, he added, “If you can’t count on the president, who can you count on?” Both nations gain much from the exchange of information. Israel, which lives in close proximity to Arab enemies and Iran, has human spies in parts of the volatile Middle East where the U.S. doesn’t. It also has robust cyber capabilities, enabling it to sometimes get word of plots that the United States doesn’t know about. Washington, in turn, provides Israel with financial and military assistance, and intelligence that U.S. agencies collect on threats far beyond Israel’s immediate borders. “They have keen insight into things that we don’t, and obviously, we have keen insights into things they don’t,” said California Rep. Adam Schiff, the House intelligence committee’s top Democrat, stressing that he wasn’t confirming that Trump shared an Israeli intelligence tip. “Working as partners, we are both stronger and safer as a result. They have certain skills and accesses that we don’t, and vice versa. We have our blind spots and they have theirs and we share information extensively.” No one thinks the incident will derail the long-standing alliance. But subtle changes and a more careful approach to sharing may be inevitable. Intelligence professionals in the United States are “deeply concerned, frustrated and increasingly disillusioned,” one former intelligence official said. Another former intelligence official said the concern is that Israel will start “fuzzing” intelligence it shares with the U.S., avoiding specifics or detailing how information is obtained. Both individuals spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to relay the sentiments they gleaned from conversations with current intelligence officials. Soon after the incident was reported, Trump spoke by telephone Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whom the U.S. leader is visiting next week. White House press secretary Sean Spicer said they talked only about the trip. “Netanyahu really needs Trump right now to bolster his standing in Israel,” said Elie Jacobs, an analyst on U.S.-Israeli relations, explaining the lack of official Israeli criticism. But it’s not a threat some Israeli officials didn’t foresee. Even before Trump took office, Jacobs said, Israeli professionals expressed concern that his loose lips would intentionally or inadvertently lead to Israeli intelligence being shared with Russia. That, in turn, might mean the intelligence ends up with Iran, a sworn enemy of Israel. “It’s possible that high-level information may not be shared for the time being,” he said. In Europe, where U.S. allies are more directly concerned about the threat from Russia, Trump has garnered support. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said he is “absolutely certain” allies can share and handle sensitive information. German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel said it’s necessary to maintain U.S. intelligence cooperation. Israel and the U.S. have had far more intelligence run-ins over the years. Jonathan Pollard, a former U.S. Navy intelligence research specialist, pleaded guilty in 1986 to conspiring to deliver national defense information to a foreign government Israel and served 30 years in prison. And Trump isn’t the first U.S. or Israeli leader to disclose intelligence in a way that made spy professionals cringe. In the early 1970s, then-Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir wanted to impress President Richard Nixon and his adviser, Henry Kissinger, with the quality of Israeli intelligence. Despite opposition from her intelligence chief, Meir took to Washington the minutes of a Moscow meeting between former Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev. The intelligence had been collected by Ashraf Marwan, a close Sadat adviser, who was working for Israeli intelligence. “My guess is that she wouldn’t have done it with Trump,” said Bar-Joseph, author of a book on Marwan, who was codenamed “Angel.” ___ Associated Press writers Robert Burns in Washington, Josef Federman in Jerusalem and Regina Garcia Cano in Las Vegas contributed to this report.

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May 19, 2017   Posted in: Jonathan Pollard  Comments Closed


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