Archive for the ‘Ku Klux Klan’ Category

Ku Klux Klan rally attracts large counterprotest in …

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. – A rally here by the Ku Klux Klan and its supporters to protest the Charlottesville city council’s decision to remove a statue honoring Confederate General Robert E. Lee encountered a loud and angry counterprotest Saturday afternoon.

Members of the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, which is based in Pelham, North Carolina near the Virginia border, gathered at Justice Park, situated in a quiet, leafy residential neighborhood in downtown Charlottesville. They shouted “white power” and some wore white robes.

About 30 Klansmen were escorted to and from the rally by police in riot gear who were out on a hot day to separate the rally-goers and approximately 1,000 counterprotesters who greeted them with jeers. Attempts by Klan leaders to address the crowd were repeatedly drowned out by boos and chants. Some of the Klan members arrived armed, carrying handguns in holsters at their belts.

Scroll through the gallery to see photos from the rally and protest.

Photo: ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images

A member of the Ku Klux Klan shouts at counter protesters during a rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet university town has been authorized by officials in Virginia and stirred heated debate in America, where critics say the far right has been energized by Donald Trump’s election to the presidency.

A member of the Ku Klux Klan shouts at counter protesters during a rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this

A counter-protester holds up a sign before a Ku Klux Klan rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet university town has been authorized by officials in Virginia and stirred heated debate in America, where critics say the far right has been energized by Donald Trump’s election to the presidency.

A counter-protester holds up a sign before a Ku Klux Klan rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet

A Ku Klux Klan group from North Carolina protested in Justice Park in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. Must credit: Washington Post photo by Michael S. Williamson

A Ku Klux Klan group from North Carolina protested in Justice Park in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. Must credit: Washington Post photo by Michael S. Williamson

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: The Ku Klux Klan protests on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: The Ku Klux Klan protests on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA -JULY 08: Some of the crowd of anti-KKK protestors are reflected in the sunglasses of a KKK member. A KKK group from North Carolina called the Loyal White Knights protested in Justice Park (formerly Jackson Park) because they aren’t happy with decisions being made by the city that will effect Civil War memorials in city parks. Less than 50 KKK members attended but hundreds of counter protestors showed up against them.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA -JULY 08: Some of the crowd of anti-KKK protestors are reflected in the sunglasses of a KKK member. A KKK group from North Carolina called the Loyal White Knights protested in Justice Park

Members of the Ku Klux Klan arrive for a rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet university town has been authorized by officials in Virginia and stirred heated debate in America, where critics say the far right has been energized by Donald Trump’s election to the presidency.

Members of the Ku Klux Klan arrive for a rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet university town has

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: Officers clash with counter protestors after the Ku Klux Klan staged a protest on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: Officers clash with counter protestors after the Ku Klux Klan staged a protest on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: A woman who had been tear gassed is helped away after a counter protest to the Ku Klux Klan on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: A woman who had been tear gassed is helped away after a counter protest to the Ku Klux Klan on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal

Police are covered in tear gas used on counter-protesters following a Ku Klux Klan rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet university town has been authorized by officials in Virginia and stirred heated debate in America, where critics say the far right has been energized by Donald Trump’s election to the presidency.

Police are covered in tear gas used on counter-protesters following a Ku Klux Klan rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: A protestor has his face washed after being tear gassed during a counter protest to the Ku Klux Klan on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: A protestor has his face washed after being tear gassed during a counter protest to the Ku Klux Klan on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: Counter protestors gather during a planned Ku Klux Klan protest on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments.

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: Counter protestors gather during a planned Ku Klux Klan protest on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General

Ku Klux Klan rally attracts large counterprotest in Charlottesville

The rally was held about a block away from Emancipation Park – the renamed Lee Park – where the statue of Lee astride a horse still stands. Charlottesville police reported that vandals had painted messages in green and red paint on the statue overnight.

More than one hundred officers from the Virginia state police, Albemarle County police and University of Virginia police were prepared to assist Charlottesville police in maintaining order.

After the Klan rally ended, police led several people away in handcuffs after a large group of counterprotesters remained near the vicinity of the park. Police asked those still gathered nearby to disperse. Wearing riot gear and gas masks, the police declared the counterprotesters “an unlawful assembly” and used gas canisters to compel them to leave the area.

Police said Sunday that 22 people were arrested. Authorities said three people were hospitalized – two for heat-related issues and one for an alcohol-related issue.

Story continues below.

“I was pleased with the professionalism and commitment of our law enforcement partners as our safety plan was well executed. Officers traveled from near and far to assist the CPD in maintaining law and order during this difficult endeavor,” Charlottesville Police Chief Al Thomas said Sunday.

“Hundreds of local citizens rose up in a non-violent protest against the hate that was being spewed in Justice Park,” Thomas said in a statement. “When Klan members arrived, the atmosphere quickly became emotionally charged. Several outside groups made it clear they would become confrontational; however, we were prepared for the unrest that occurred near the conclusion of the event which unfortunately resulted in a number of arrests. Order was quickly restored and our community remains safe.”

Charlottesville, a city of close to 50,000 and home to the prestigious public flagship campus of the University of Virginia, had become increasingly tense as the rally approached. “A CITY ON EDGE” read the front-page headline in the local paper, The Daily Progress, on Saturday.

City leaders organized diversionary events elsewhere in the city and encouraged residents and visitors to not confront the KKK members directly. While many took that advice, others wanted to make sure the rally participants heard their voices.

“It is important for me to be here because the Klan was ignored in the 1920s and they metastasized,” said Jalane Schmidt, a professor at the University of Virginia who has been among those leading the call for the Lee statue removal. “They need to know that their ideology is not acceptable.”

“I teach about slavery and African-American history and it’s important to face the Klan and to face the demons of our collective history and our original sin of slavery. We do it on behalf of our ancestors who were terrorized by them.”

Though the council voted to remove the statue, a court order has stopped the city from acting on that decision until a hearing next month. Some observers predict a protracted legal battle that would further delay the removal.

In an editorial last month, city councilwoman Kristin Szakos said the council voted to remove the statue and join a “growing group of cities around the nation that have decided that they no longer want to give pride of place to tributes to the Confederate Lost Cause erected in the early part of the 20th century.”

The Klan says the city’s decision to remove the Lee statue is part of a wider effort to get rid of white history.

“They’re trying to erase the white culture right out of the history books,” Klan member James Moore said on Thursday.

Brandi Fisher, of Ridgeley, West Virginia, drove hours to attend the rally.

“I don’t agree with everything the Klan believes, but I do believe our history should not be taken away,” said Fisher, 41. “Are we going to remove the Washington and Jefferson memorials because they were slave owners?”

Ezra Israel, 32, who is African-American, says the statue should stay up as a reminder of slavery and the people who supported it.

“It’s hiding history to take it down,” he said as he made his way to the rally. “We need to leave it up so people can see it and see that we were oppressed and we’re still a product of that today.”

Toung Nguyen, an immigrant from Vietnam who moved to Charlottesville as a child in the early 1980s, believes the money that will be spent on removing the statue could be better used improving the local school system. But he says racism has gotten worse in the last couple of years and he understands why many believe the statue needs to go.

“It’s just disappointing that we still have to deal with this kind of nonsense,” Nguyen said. “Our country feels like it’s going full circle.”

Charlottesville is already planning for another protest next month. Several white nationalist groups have a permit for an Aug. 12 rally also calling for the council’s decision on the statue to be reversed.

– – –

The Washington Post’s T. Rees Shapiro contributed to this report.

Video: The Ku Klux Klan held a rally in Charlottesville, VA protesting the city’s decision to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Approximately 1000 counterprotesters surrounded them in opposition. (Zoeann Murphy / The Washington Post)

URL:

http://wapo.st/2tVzOxv

Embed code:

Originally posted here:

Ku Klux Klan rally attracts large counterprotest in …

Fair Usage Law

July 10, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

UPDATE: 22 arrested, tear gas deployed as Ku Klux Klan …

CHARLOTTESVILLE After seeing the Ku Klux Klan in the movies, Jabril Carter thought he knew a little bit about what to expect Saturday. But coming face to face with around 50 Klan members rallying in Charlottesville stirred something deeper he couldnt easily explain.

My adrenaline is pumping right now, the 23-year-old cook said as he paused on the chaotic downtown streets of the progressive college town he grew up in. It hurt my soul, man.

Carter was part of a group of young African-American men who stood directly in front of the Klan rally, taunting the robe-wearing, Confederate flag-waving group as a crowd of protesters estimated at over 1,000 drowned out the Klans white-pride speeches.

The 45-minute rally in Justice Park newly renamed as part of Charlottesvilles push to rid itself of public parks designed to honor the Confederacy while elevating African-American history was mostly peaceful due to a massive police presence involving more than 100 Charlottesville and Virginia State Police personnel.

Protesters hurled a few water bottles and pieces of fruit at the ralliers, and a few Klansmen shouted racial slurs and directed white-power salutes at the crowd. Direct physical confrontations were avoided as police escorted the Klan members in and out of the park and enforced a strict barricade between the two groups.

The rally was supposed to begin at 3 p.m., but got off to a late start apparently due to the logistical difficulties of safely moving the Klansmen through the crowd encircling the fenced-off demonstration area.

Police arrested several protesters who tried to block the entrance to the park before the Klan members entered around 3:45 p.m. Tensions escalated after the Klan group left the rally site. Protesters rushed through the streets trying to track the Klan and block roads as police tried to allow vehicles to exit.

Unable to reach the Klan members, several protesters shouted angrily at the police for protecting the group, chanting: Cops and the Klan go hand in hand!

Using a bullhorn, police told the group to disperse and warned that chemical agents would be used on anyone who stayed. After a group of protesters formed a line across High Street near the citys courthouses, police shot three tear gas canisters into the crowd around 5 p.m.

In a statement Sunday morning, city officials said 22 people were arrested. On Saturday, officials had reported that 23 were arrested.

Most appeared to be anti-Klan protesters, but officials could not immediately provide the affiliations of those arrested. Three people were hospitalized; two for heat-related issues and one for alcohol, officials said.

The Klan rally was the latest flashpoint in a summer of unrest in Charlottesville, where the City Council voted to strip the names of Confederate generals from two parks and begin the process of removing statues of Robert E. Lee and Thomas Stonewall Jackson. In May, alt-right figure Richard Spencer, a leader of the new wave of white identity groups, participated in a torch-lit rally around the Lee statue. Alt-right groups are planning to return to the city next month for whats being billed as a bigger rally to Unite the Right.

Saturdays Klan rally took place in the shadow of the Jackson statue in what used to be Jackson Park.

Klan members held signs with anti-Semitic and anti-black slurs. In interviews, several members said they came to Charlottesville to protect white history and argued that white people alone are told they have no right to racial pride.

Israels got a wall around their country. Why cant we have a wall around ours? said Douglas Barker, one of a few Klan members who spoke to reporters. They believe in preserving their own race. Why is it wrong for the white man to preserve their own race?

Many of the Klan members declined to give their names or say where they were from, but several who did said they had come from out of state.

Several shouting matches broke out before the rally between the protesters and a handful of people displaying Confederate flags who said that even though they dont support the Klan, the statues should still be preserved.

City leaders and University of Virginia President Teresa A. Sullivan had encouraged the Charlottesville community to avoid the Klan rally. A slate of alternative events was organized to give people other outlets and avoid drawing attention to the Klan.

Groups like this come to communities like this for the purpose of incitement and controversy and a twisted kind of celebrity, Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer said in an interview after swinging through the park in the early afternoon. The victory over them is to deny them that and keep on not only telling our story but refusing to be intimidated away from the sort of work we have been doing that has made us a target for these kinds of groups.

Plenty of others wanted to meet the Klan head-on, insisting on countering hate with direct resistance. The park was a full-blown spectacle even before the Klan arrived, with drum circles, singing and a man wearing nothing but a loincloth shimmying in front of a street preacher.

Sarah Fitzgerald, 23, of Staunton, said that even though Klan members have the right to free speech, the crowd that dwarfed the Klan has every right to counter it with their own.

That we are still allowing this straightforward hate group to still have a voice at this time in this country, its just crazy, Fitzgerald said.

Original post:

UPDATE: 22 arrested, tear gas deployed as Ku Klux Klan …

Fair Usage Law

July 10, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Readers sound off: The KKK still has a place in this country – USA TODAY

USA TODAY Published 9:05 a.m. ET July 10, 2017 | Updated 9:05 a.m. ET July 10, 2017

The Ku Klux Klan protests on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Va.(Photo: Chet Strange, Getty Images)

Protesters opposed to the Ku Klux Klan rally in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday came out in the hundreds to confront the Klan members. Comments are edited for clarity and grammar:

The KKK platoon was out protesting anything not white. No surprise from the hate-filled/hate-supporting right.

Jeff Hartung

You cant keep someone from saying something just because you dont like it. Hate speech is protected speech, no matter how much we hate it. The KKK, Black Lives Matter and other groups are prime examples of free speech.

Thomas Davis

KKK rally in Charlottesville met with throng of protesters

The KKK is not an example of free speech, its plain racism and should not be tolerated in this country.

Paul Gomez

Enough with giving these idiots a platform. Every single time they come out for their little protests, there are a dozen KKK hoods, almost five times counter-demonstrations and a sea of news media reporters.

Bill Claugherty

Simple: White nationalists are like cockroaches. For every KKK member wearing a pillowcase and bed sheet, there are tens of thousands of silent supporters who espouse the same values but simply wont admit their allegiance because it is no longer politically correct and socially viable to do so.

I applaud the Fourth Estate for keeping Americans aware and vigilant of the hate and intolerance that remain pervasive in our society.

Zheng Chen

For people who argue Black Lives Matter and the KKK are the same, they are not. Some emotions might be the same, but true Black Lives Matter supporters are fighting for equality and the forgotten deaths of unarmed black people.

The KKK is just about preserving heritage under the cover of hate and intolerance.

John Mcbald

To join the conversations about topics in USA TODAY, emailletters@usatoday.com, comment onFacebookor use #tellusatoday onTwitter.

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Read or Share this story: https://usat.ly/2u9IjWo

Continue reading here:

Readers sound off: The KKK still has a place in this country – USA TODAY

Fair Usage Law

July 10, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

23 arrested, tear gas deployed as Ku Klux Klan rallies in Charlottesville – Martinsville Bulletin

[CHARLOTTESVILLE] After seeing the Ku Klux Klan in the movies, Jabril Carter thought he knew a little bit about what to expect Saturday. But coming face to face with around 50 Klan members rallying in Charlottesville stirred something deeper he couldn’t easily explain.

“My adrenaline is pumping right now,” the 23-year-old cook said as he paused on the chaotic downtown streets of the progressive college town he grew up in. “It hurt my soul, man.”

Carter was part of a group of young African-American men who stood directly in front of the Klan rally, taunting the robe-wearing, Confederate flag-waving group as a crowd of protesters estimated at over 1,000 drowned out the Klan’s white-pride speeches.The 45-minute rally in Justice Park – newly renamed as part of Charlottesville’s push to rid itself of public parks designed to honor the Confederacy while elevating African-American history – was mostly peaceful due to a massive police presence involving more than 100 Charlottesville and Virginia State Police personnel.

Protesters hurled a few water bottles and pieces of fruit at the ralliers, and a few Klansmen shouted racial slurs and directed white-power salutes at the crowd. Direct physical confrontations were avoided as police escorted the Klan members in and out of the park and enforced a strict barricade between the two groups.

The rally was supposed to begin at 3 p.m., but got off to a late start apparently due to the logistical difficulties of safely moving the Klansmen through the crowd encircling the fenced-off demonstration area.

Police arrested several protesters who tried to block the entrance to the park before the Klan members entered around 3:45 p.m. Tensions escalated after the Klan group left the rally site. Protesters rushed through the streets trying to track the Klan and block roads as police tried to allow vehicles to exit.

Unable to reach the Klan members, several protesters shouted angrily at the police for protecting the group, chanting: “Cops and the Klan go hand in hand!”

Using a bullhorn, police told the group to disperse and warned that chemical agents would be used on anyone who stayed. After a group of protesters formed a line across High Street near the city courthouses, police shot three tear gas canisters into the crowd around 5 p.m.

Twenty-three people were arrested, according to city officials. Most appeared to be anti-Klan protesters, but officials could not immediately provide the affiliations of those arrested. Three people were hospitalized; two for heat-related issues and one for alcohol, officials said.

The Klan rally was the latest flashpoint in a summer of unrest in Charlottesville, where the City Council voted to strip the names of Confederate generals from two parks and begin the process of removing statues of Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. In May, alt-right figure Richard Spencer, a leader of the new wave of white identity groups, participated in a torch-lit rally around the Lee statue. Alt-right groups are planning to return to the city next month for what’s being billed as a bigger rally to “Unite the Right.”

Saturday’s Klan rally took place in the shadow of the Jackson statue in what used to be Jackson Park.

Klan members held signs with anti-semitic and anti-black slurs. In interviews, several members said they came to Charlottesville to protect white history and argued that white people alone are told they have no right to racial pride.

“Israel’s got a wall around their country. Why can’t we have a wall around ours?,” said Douglas Barker, one of a few Klan members who spoke to reporters. “They believe in preserving their own race. Why is it wrong for the white man to preserve their own race?”

Many of the Klan members declined to give their names or say where they were from, but several who did said they had come from out of state.

Several shouting matches broke out before the rally between the protesters and a handful of people displaying Confederate flags who said that even though they don’t support the Klan, the statues should still be preserved.

City leaders and University of Virginia President Teresa A. Sullivan had encouraged the Charlottesville community to avoid the Klan rally. A slate of alternative events was organized to give people other outlets and avoid drawing attention to the Klan.

“Groups like this come to communities like this for the purpose of incitement and controversy and a twisted kind of celebrity,” Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer said in an interview after swinging through the park in the early afternoon. “The victory over them is to deny them that and keep on not only telling our story but refusing to be intimidated away from the sort of work we have been doing that has made us a target for these kinds of groups.”

Plenty of others wanted to meet the Klan head-on, insisting on countering hate with direct resistance. The park was a full-blown spectacle even before the Klan arrived, with drum circles, singing and a man wearing nothing but a loincloth shimmying in front of a street preacher.

Sarah Fitzgerald, 30, of Staunton, said that even though Klan members have the right to free speech, the crowd that dwarfed the Klan has every right to counter it with their own.

“That we are still allowing this straightforward hate group to still have a voice at this time in this country, it’s just crazy,” Fitzgerald said.

Go here to read the rest:

23 arrested, tear gas deployed as Ku Klux Klan rallies in Charlottesville – Martinsville Bulletin

Fair Usage Law

July 10, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Ku Klux Klan rally draws loud counterprotest in …

(Zoeann Murphy/The Washington Post)

CHARLOTTESVILLE A rally here by the Ku Klux Klan and its supporters to protest the Charlottesville City Councils decision to remove a statue honoring Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee encountered a loud and angry counterprotest Saturday afternoon.

Members of the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, which is based in Pelham, N.C., near the Virginia border, gathered at Justice Park, situated in a quiet, leafy residential neighborhood in downtown Charlottesville. They shouted white power, and some wore white robes.

About 30 Klansmen were escorted to and from the rally by police in riot gear who were out on a hot day to separate the rallygoers and approximately 1,000 counterprotesters who greeted them with jeers. Attempts by Klan leaders to address the crowd were repeatedly drowned out by boos and chants. Some of the Klan members arrived armed, carrying handguns in holsters at their belts.

[KKK marchers say they will be armed Saturday at Charlottesville rally]

The rally was held about a block away from Emancipation Park the renamed Lee Park where the statue of Lee astride a horse still stands. Charlottesville police reported that vandals had painted messages in green and red paint on the statue overnight.

More than 100 officers from the Virginia State Police, Albemarle County police and University of Virginia police were prepared to assist Charlottesville police in maintaining order.

After the Klan rally ended, police led several people away in handcuffs after a large group of counterprotesters remained near the vicinity of the park. Police asked those still gathered nearby to disperse. Wearing riot gear and gas masks, the police declared the counterprotesters an unlawful assembly and used gas canisters to compel them to leave the area.

Charlottesville, a city of close to 50,000 and home to the prestigious public flagship campus of the University of Virginia, had become increasingly tense as the rally approached. A CITY ON EDGE read the front-page headline in the local paper, the Daily Progress, on Saturday.

[White nationalist Richard Spencer leads torch-bearing protesters defending Lee statue]

City leaders organized diversionary events elsewhere in the city and encouraged residents and visitors not to confront the KKK members directly. While many took that advice, others wanted to make sure the rally participants heard their voices.

It is important for me to be here because the Klan was ignored in the 1920s, and they metastasized, said Jalane Schmidt, a professor at the University of Virginia who has been among those leading the call for the Lee statue removal. They need to know that their ideology is not acceptable.

I teach about slavery and African American history, and its important to face the Klan and to face the demons of our collective history and our original sin of slavery. We do it on behalf of our ancestors who were terrorized by them.

Though the council voted to remove the statue, a court order has stopped the city from acting on that decision until a hearing next month. Some observers predict a protracted legal battle that would further delay the removal.

In an editorial last month, city councilwoman Kristin Szakos said the council voted to remove the statue and join a growing group of cities around the nation that have decided that they no longer want to give pride of place to tributes to the Confederate Lost Cause erected in the early part of the 20th century.

[The Ku Klux Klan was dead. The first Hollywood blockbuster revived it.]

The Klan says the citys decision to remove the Lee statue is part of a wider effort to get rid of white history.

Theyre trying to erase the white culture right out of the history books, Klan member James Moore said Thursday.

Brandi Fisher, of Ridgeley, W.Va., drove hours to attend the rally.

I dont agree with everything the Klan believes, but I do believe our history should not be taken away, said Fisher, 41. Are we going to remove the Washington and Jefferson memorials because they were slave owners?

Ezra Israel, 32, who is African American, says the statue should stay up as a reminder of slavery and the people who supported it.

Its hiding history to take it down, he said as he made his way to the rally. We need to leave it up so people can see it and see that we were oppressed and were still a product of that today.

Toung Nguyen, an immigrant from Vietnam who moved to Charlottesville as a child in the early 1980s, said he believes the money that will be spent on removing the statue could be better used improving the local school system. But he says racism has gotten worse in the last couple of years and he understands why many believe the statue needs to go.

Its just disappointing that we still have to deal with this kind of nonsense, Nguyen said. Our country feels like its going full circle.

Charlottesville is already planning for another protest next month. Several white nationalist groups have a permit for an Aug.12 rally also calling for the councils decision on the statue to be reversed.

T. Rees Shapiro contributed to this report.

Link:

Ku Klux Klan rally draws loud counterprotest in …

Fair Usage Law

July 9, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Ku Klux Klan rally in Charlottesville sparks large protest – WSET

CHARLOTESVILLE, Va. (WSET) — Hours before the Ku Klux Klan arrived at Justice Park in Charlottesville, more than 1,000 people were already protesting. Police in full riot gear made more than 20 arrests.

About 50 Klansmen were delayed by protesters but finally arrived to a harsh welcome – armed and ready to speak out against plans to remove Confederate monuments.

There was screaming between the Klan and the protesters, who said they were there to confront the Klan and resist white supremacy.

“The Klan is Jefferson’s legacy. The Klan is the legacy of these Confederate statues and the legacies that these statues represent,” said Mimi Albreit, a protest organizer.

The Klan briefly addressed the crowd, and one, James Moore, Imperial Kludd of the loyal White Knights, had choice words about the city’s Vice Mayor.

“Wes Bellamy, he’s a sicko. He gets on Twitter making comments saying ‘If she moans, it’s not rape, and so forth.’ These are the kind of people we’re electing into the government here in Charlottesville, which goes to show that the whole thing is corrupt and we’re standing against it,” said Moore.

KKK supporters said the Klan has the right to exercise free speech and said protesters are wasting theirs.

“The statues people are (expletive) about, they shouldn’t have to do that. Statues have nothing to do with it,” said Albert Clatterbuck, a Klan supporter.

Protest organizers are demanding the city take steps to end racial oppression and make reparations.

The rally ended with police confrontations and tear gas when the crowd refused to leave.

See the rest here:

Ku Klux Klan rally in Charlottesville sparks large protest – WSET

Fair Usage Law

July 9, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

The Ku Klux Klan was dead. The first Hollywood blockbuster revived it. – Washington Post

In 1915, more than 40 years after President Ulysses S. Grant annihilated the Ku Klux Klan, a group of white men in white bedsheets paraded down Peachtree Street in Atlanta to attend a movie premiere, firing rifles into the air.

Their leader: William J. Simmons, a theatrical local preacher who a month earlier, after Thanksgiving supper, had bussed 15 racist men up Stone Mountain, made several declarations about purity and honor, then set flames to a cross, reigniting the KKK.

The rites incident to the founding of the order were most interesting and the occasion will be remembered long by the participants, the Atlanta Constitution reported in a story headlined, KLAN IS ESTABLISHED WITH IMPRESSIVENESS.

Simmons led his men down Peachtree to celebrate the opening of D.W. Griffiths The Birth of a Nation, Hollywoods first big-budget, blockbuster movie that many still consider a masterpiece despite its subject matter. It depicted life after the Civil War in a way that glorified Klansmen who supposedly saved the South, using violence to protect whites from, among other things, packs of black rapists.

Ku Klux Klan members march on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington on Sept. 13, 1926.

Critics hailed Griffiths cinematic storytelling. Off screen, the film became a propaganda tool to relaunch the KKK.

That legacy will be on display Saturday in Charlottesville, where a North Carolina chapter of the KKK plans to hold an armed rally to protest the decision to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a public park.

Sooner or later just about every Klansman worthy of his robe sees the film that romanticizes racial violence, according to a history of the KKK published by the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks extremist groups. The story it tells fits perfectly with the version of history the Klan preaches.

Except it isnt history at all.

[Hunting down runaway slaves: The cruel ads of Andrew Jackson and the master class]

The Klan was originally a secret society created in 1866 by a few ex-Confederate soldiers in Pulaski, Tenn. Their intentions were neither violent nor overtly racist, although they were interested in preserving Southern culture as more black faces moved to town. Their leadership titles were intentionally goofy: grand cyclops, grand magi, grand turk, grand scribe. Members were called Ghouls. The name Ku Klux Klan derived fromthe Greek word kuklos, meaning circle.

After becoming public, members and officersbegan dressing up in sheets, apparently for publicity. They rode around at night on horses. Had that been all there was to the Ku Klux Klan, it probably would have disappeared as quietly as it was born, the SPLC wrote, adding:

But at some point in early 1866, the club added new members from nearby towns and began to have a chilling effect on local blacks. the intimidating night rides were soon the centerpiece of the hooded order: bands of white-sheeted ghouls paid late night visits to black homes, admonishing the terrified occupants to behave themselves and threatening more visits if they didnt. It didnt take long for the threats to be converted into violence against blacks who insisted on exercising their new rights and freedom. Before its six founders realized what had happened, the Ku Klux Klan had become something they may not have originally intended something deadly serious.

The Klan spread rapidly, with Nathan Bedford Forrest, an ex-Confederate general, taking control. The 1868 presidential election was dominated by discussions of the Klan. Grant, who led the Union Army to victory, ran on the slogan, Let Us Have Peace. After he won, Grant plotted to take out the Klan, supporting a series of laws to protect the rights of blacks to vote and serve on juries.

In 1871, Grant signed the most important one the Ku Klux Klan Act, which gave him authority to suspend the writ of habeas corpus and use federal troops to arrest and prosecute murderous Klansmen. Several thousand people were indicted under the law, crippling the KKK within a year. Although lynchings and violence against blacks continued, the KKK as an organization was quickly wiped out.

That is, until 1915.

Simmons and other Southern whites were increasingly outraged bythe arrival of Jews, Roman Catholics and immigrants. Then a 13-year-old Atlanta girl named Mary Phagan was killed.

Phagan worked in a pencil factory. Leo Frank, her Jewish boss, was charged with killing her. The evidence was thin, but Frank was convicted and sentenced to death. After his sentence was reduced to life in prison, two dozen men calling themselves the Knights of Mary Phagan kidnapped Frank and hung him. Afterward, they burned a cross on Stone Mountain.

[Leo Frank was lynched for a murder he didnt commit. Now neo-Nazis are trying to rewrite history.]

The way Georgians had reacted to the Frank lynching convinced Simmons that that reestablishing the Klan was a timely idea, according to a history of The Birth of a Nation and the KKK by Melvyn Stokes. Simmons was bed ridden after a car accident. While convalescing, he devised plans for his new KKK, drawing inspiration from news stories about the release of Griffiths film. Stokes wrote:

The film and the saturation publicity associated with it had already helped mold both fashion and social life in the North. Manufacturers produced Ku-Klux hats modeled after those worn by the riders in Birth and KK kitchen aprons. New York society ladies organized K-Klux balls and on Halloween, 2,000 University of Chicago students partied in Klan costumes. By late November 1915, the film had already been shown very successfully in several Southern cities and its first showing in Atlanta was due. Simmons realized that this offered an opportunity too great to be missed to publicize his new organization.

So he marched his men to the theater.

The movie and the Klan marched across the South.

They became locked, Stokes wrote, in a marriage of publicity-oriented convenience.

Klansmen in other cities imitated the Atlanta parade. Theater ushers wore white sheets. In local newspapers, the Klan advertised for recruits alongside movie times.

By the early 1920s, as the Klan spread beyond its base in the South, Stokes wrote, it continued to exploit The Birth of a Nation as part of its recruitment and propaganda drive.

Riots over the movie broke out in major urban areas. There were organized protests by civil rights groups. Eventually, theaters stopped showing the film.

Now in the public domain, the spinning of The Birth of a Nation continues, even as the KKKsorganizational hold on hate has been usurped by the alt-right and online networkssuch as Stormfront, where the movie is frequently discussed.

Watched it today for the first time, a poster wrote not long ago. Classic and prophetic masterpiece.

Read more Retropolis:

Unsolved and overlooked murders: Investigating cold cases of the civil rights era

When Portland banned blacks: Oregons shameful history as an all-white state

Life or death for black travelers: How fear led to The Negro Motorist Green-Book

Youve got bad blood: The horror of the Tuskegee syphilis experiment

When Henrietta Lacks had cervical cancer, it was a death sentence. Her cells would help change that.

Read more here:

The Ku Klux Klan was dead. The first Hollywood blockbuster revived it. – Washington Post

Fair Usage Law

July 8, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

KKK marchers say they will be armed Saturday at Charlottesville rally – Washington Post

A Ku Klux Klan chapter holding a rally in downtown Charlottesville on Saturday afternoon says it expects 80 to 100 members and supporters to take part in the protest and that most will have guns with them.

Its an open-carry state, so our members will be armed, said James Moore, a member of the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, which is headquartered in Pelham, N.C., near the Virginia border. Moore said that if members are attacked, they will defend themselves.

The KKK is protesting the Charlottesville City Councils decision this year to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a public park and rename that park. Once called Lee Park, it is now Emancipation Park. A court injunction has halted the statues removal until a November hearing. On Thursday, a Confederate Heroes plaque attached to the statue was removed by city workers.

[The Ku Klux Klan wants to rally in Charlottesville. Now this college town is on edge again]

The liberals are taking away our heritage, Moore said. By taking these monuments away, thats what theyre working on. Theyre trying to erase the white culture right out of the history books.

Ahead of the 3p.m. rally in Justice Park, Charlottesville leaders are urging calm and encouraging residents and visitors to avoid direct confrontations with the Klan. They say the Klan would like nothing more than a violent showdown, because it would bring the group attention.

Our approach all the way through, from our police chief on down, has been to urge people not to take this totally discredited fringe organizations putrid bait at all, Mayor Michael Signer said. The only thing they seem to want is division and confrontation and a twisted kind of celebrity. The most successful defiance will be to refuse to take their bait and continue to tell our story. Then their memory of Charlottesville will be of a community that repudiated them by not getting drawn into their pathetic drama.

While Charlottesville officials and police are hoping that the rally goes off without incident, the city is prepared to respond quickly if there are problems, Signer said.

Public safety is our most sacrosanct duty to our public and our visitors, he said. If any one of these people breaks any law, including those governing assault and disorderly conduct, they will be swiftly dealt with and brought to justice.

The city is supporting numerous community groups, churches, businesses and organizations that have joined forces to present various activities, concerts and prayer services away from the protest site throughout the day. In addition, the University of Virginia has issued a statement condemning the KKK and urging members of the university community to avoid confrontation and support the other events.

Hunter Smith, owner of a local brewery, formed Unity C-Ville in response to the rally plans. Smith, 31, said he wanted to provide activities for city residents to express their solidarity on Saturday without directly confronting the marchers.

I was concerned that a bunch of people were going to go and give these folks exactly what they were looking for, which is attention, Smith said. The best-case scenario is that these guys come in and have their sad little rally and talk to themselves and leave and that we demonstrate that this is not a place that will be divided.

But others say its important to confront the Klan directly.

We want them to know theres no platform for white supremacy, said Grace Aheron, who works for a nonprofit organization in Charlottesville and is taking part in a counterdemonstration with the group Showing Up for Racial Justice. They say to ignore them and that theyre just a small group, but weve watched the rise of many people, including our current president, who hold many similar views. Its enraging that the city would give a permit to a known terrorist organization.

[White nationalist Richard Spencer leads torch-bearing protesters defending Lee statue]

The councils decision to remove the Lee statue has attracted opposition from a number of groups, including white supremacists. In May, the self-proclaimed white nationalist leader Richard Spencer took part in two protests against the decision, including a nighttime gathering where dozens of participants carried torches.

Reached by phone Thursday, Spencer said he had not heard about the KKKs protest and had no plans to attend. He said that while he did not want to be associated with the group, he supported its call to keep the Lee statue in place.

Doron Ezickson, the Washington regional director for the Anti-Defamation League, says the emboldening of white nationalist groups and the KKK across the country is a concern, but he hopes their impact is limited. He also recommended that counterprotesters avoid direct confrontation that could lead to violence.

The more attention they get, the more hope that they have to increase their impact, Ezickson said. We would respectfully suggest that the appropriate and smart thing to do is to come together as communities but dont do so in a way that risks physical altercation.

Original post:

KKK marchers say they will be armed Saturday at Charlottesville rally – Washington Post

Fair Usage Law

July 8, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Former Alabama KKK leader sentenced to prison for sex crime – The Seattle Times

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) A onetime Ku Klux Klan leader who served time for burning a cross near a black neighborhood is going back to prison after being convicted of sexually abusing a woman in southern Alabama.

Dale County Circuit Judge William Fillmore sentenced Steven Joshua Dinkle to 10 years in prison and fined him $1,000, according to a court order signed Thursday.

A jury convicted Dinkle, 31, of sexual abuse in June after prosecutors claimed he recorded himself sexually abusing an incapacitated woman. A letter from the victim filed this week in court asked for a tough sentence for Dinkle.

Dont go easy on him like everyone else. Show him there are consequences for his actions, the woman wrote.

The judge gave Dinkle the maximum sentence, District Attorney Kirke Adams told reporters.

Defense attorney David Harrison said Dinkle disagreed with the verdict and plans an appeal. Harrison said he didnt know anything about Dinkles involvement with the KKK.

Federal authorities said Dinkle once was the exalted cyclops of the Ozark branch of the International Keystone Knights, a KKK group based in Arkansas. His mother was the chapter secretary, according to the Justice Department.

Dinkle was indicted in 2013 on charges of helping burn a large cross four years earlier near a predominantly black neighborhood in Ozark, located about 85 miles (137 km) southeast of Montgomery. He later pleaded guilty to hate crime and obstruction charges.

Dinkles mother, Pamela Morris, pleaded guilty in 2014 after being accused of lying to grand jurors about her involvement in the Klan, court documents show.

Sentenced to two years in prison, Dinkle was released on probation and later charged with being a convicted felon in possession of a firearm. He pleaded guilty to illegally possessing a pistol in April 2016.

The state sentence will run along with a 15-month federal term that Dinkle already is serving on the gun charge, records show.

See original here:

Former Alabama KKK leader sentenced to prison for sex crime – The Seattle Times

Fair Usage Law

July 8, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Ku Klux Klan rally attracts large counterprotest in …

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. – A rally here by the Ku Klux Klan and its supporters to protest the Charlottesville city council’s decision to remove a statue honoring Confederate General Robert E. Lee encountered a loud and angry counterprotest Saturday afternoon. Members of the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, which is based in Pelham, North Carolina near the Virginia border, gathered at Justice Park, situated in a quiet, leafy residential neighborhood in downtown Charlottesville. They shouted “white power” and some wore white robes. About 30 Klansmen were escorted to and from the rally by police in riot gear who were out on a hot day to separate the rally-goers and approximately 1,000 counterprotesters who greeted them with jeers. Attempts by Klan leaders to address the crowd were repeatedly drowned out by boos and chants. Some of the Klan members arrived armed, carrying handguns in holsters at their belts. Scroll through the gallery to see photos from the rally and protest. Photo: ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images A member of the Ku Klux Klan shouts at counter protesters during a rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet university town has been authorized by officials in Virginia and stirred heated debate in America, where critics say the far right has been energized by Donald Trump’s election to the presidency. A member of the Ku Klux Klan shouts at counter protesters during a rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this A counter-protester holds up a sign before a Ku Klux Klan rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet university town has been authorized by officials in Virginia and stirred heated debate in America, where critics say the far right has been energized by Donald Trump’s election to the presidency. A counter-protester holds up a sign before a Ku Klux Klan rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet A Ku Klux Klan group from North Carolina protested in Justice Park in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. Must credit: Washington Post photo by Michael S. Williamson A Ku Klux Klan group from North Carolina protested in Justice Park in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday. Must credit: Washington Post photo by Michael S. Williamson CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: The Ku Klux Klan protests on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments. CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: The Ku Klux Klan protests on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA -JULY 08: Some of the crowd of anti-KKK protestors are reflected in the sunglasses of a KKK member. A KKK group from North Carolina called the Loyal White Knights protested in Justice Park (formerly Jackson Park) because they aren’t happy with decisions being made by the city that will effect Civil War memorials in city parks. Less than 50 KKK members attended but hundreds of counter protestors showed up against them. CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA -JULY 08: Some of the crowd of anti-KKK protestors are reflected in the sunglasses of a KKK member. A KKK group from North Carolina called the Loyal White Knights protested in Justice Park Members of the Ku Klux Klan arrive for a rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet university town has been authorized by officials in Virginia and stirred heated debate in America, where critics say the far right has been energized by Donald Trump’s election to the presidency. Members of the Ku Klux Klan arrive for a rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet university town has CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: Officers clash with counter protestors after the Ku Klux Klan staged a protest on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments. CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: Officers clash with counter protestors after the Ku Klux Klan staged a protest on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: A woman who had been tear gassed is helped away after a counter protest to the Ku Klux Klan on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments. CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: A woman who had been tear gassed is helped away after a counter protest to the Ku Klux Klan on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal Police are covered in tear gas used on counter-protesters following a Ku Klux Klan rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The afternoon rally in this quiet university town has been authorized by officials in Virginia and stirred heated debate in America, where critics say the far right has been energized by Donald Trump’s election to the presidency. Police are covered in tear gas used on counter-protesters following a Ku Klux Klan rally, calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia on July 8, 2017. The CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: A protestor has his face washed after being tear gassed during a counter protest to the Ku Klux Klan on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments. CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: A protestor has his face washed after being tear gassed during a counter protest to the Ku Klux Klan on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: Counter protestors gather during a planned Ku Klux Klan protest on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee, and calling for the protection of Southern Confederate monuments. CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA – JULY 08: Counter protestors gather during a planned Ku Klux Klan protest on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. The KKK is protesting the planned removal of a statue of General Ku Klux Klan rally attracts large counterprotest in Charlottesville The rally was held about a block away from Emancipation Park – the renamed Lee Park – where the statue of Lee astride a horse still stands. Charlottesville police reported that vandals had painted messages in green and red paint on the statue overnight. More than one hundred officers from the Virginia state police, Albemarle County police and University of Virginia police were prepared to assist Charlottesville police in maintaining order. After the Klan rally ended, police led several people away in handcuffs after a large group of counterprotesters remained near the vicinity of the park. Police asked those still gathered nearby to disperse. Wearing riot gear and gas masks, the police declared the counterprotesters “an unlawful assembly” and used gas canisters to compel them to leave the area. Police said Sunday that 22 people were arrested. Authorities said three people were hospitalized – two for heat-related issues and one for an alcohol-related issue. Story continues below. “I was pleased with the professionalism and commitment of our law enforcement partners as our safety plan was well executed. Officers traveled from near and far to assist the CPD in maintaining law and order during this difficult endeavor,” Charlottesville Police Chief Al Thomas said Sunday. “Hundreds of local citizens rose up in a non-violent protest against the hate that was being spewed in Justice Park,” Thomas said in a statement. “When Klan members arrived, the atmosphere quickly became emotionally charged. Several outside groups made it clear they would become confrontational; however, we were prepared for the unrest that occurred near the conclusion of the event which unfortunately resulted in a number of arrests. Order was quickly restored and our community remains safe.” Charlottesville, a city of close to 50,000 and home to the prestigious public flagship campus of the University of Virginia, had become increasingly tense as the rally approached. “A CITY ON EDGE” read the front-page headline in the local paper, The Daily Progress, on Saturday. City leaders organized diversionary events elsewhere in the city and encouraged residents and visitors to not confront the KKK members directly. While many took that advice, others wanted to make sure the rally participants heard their voices. “It is important for me to be here because the Klan was ignored in the 1920s and they metastasized,” said Jalane Schmidt, a professor at the University of Virginia who has been among those leading the call for the Lee statue removal. “They need to know that their ideology is not acceptable.” “I teach about slavery and African-American history and it’s important to face the Klan and to face the demons of our collective history and our original sin of slavery. We do it on behalf of our ancestors who were terrorized by them.” Though the council voted to remove the statue, a court order has stopped the city from acting on that decision until a hearing next month. Some observers predict a protracted legal battle that would further delay the removal. In an editorial last month, city councilwoman Kristin Szakos said the council voted to remove the statue and join a “growing group of cities around the nation that have decided that they no longer want to give pride of place to tributes to the Confederate Lost Cause erected in the early part of the 20th century.” The Klan says the city’s decision to remove the Lee statue is part of a wider effort to get rid of white history. “They’re trying to erase the white culture right out of the history books,” Klan member James Moore said on Thursday. Brandi Fisher, of Ridgeley, West Virginia, drove hours to attend the rally. “I don’t agree with everything the Klan believes, but I do believe our history should not be taken away,” said Fisher, 41. “Are we going to remove the Washington and Jefferson memorials because they were slave owners?” Ezra Israel, 32, who is African-American, says the statue should stay up as a reminder of slavery and the people who supported it. “It’s hiding history to take it down,” he said as he made his way to the rally. “We need to leave it up so people can see it and see that we were oppressed and we’re still a product of that today.” Toung Nguyen, an immigrant from Vietnam who moved to Charlottesville as a child in the early 1980s, believes the money that will be spent on removing the statue could be better used improving the local school system. But he says racism has gotten worse in the last couple of years and he understands why many believe the statue needs to go. “It’s just disappointing that we still have to deal with this kind of nonsense,” Nguyen said. “Our country feels like it’s going full circle.” Charlottesville is already planning for another protest next month. Several white nationalist groups have a permit for an Aug. 12 rally also calling for the council’s decision on the statue to be reversed. – – – The Washington Post’s T. Rees Shapiro contributed to this report. — Video: The Ku Klux Klan held a rally in Charlottesville, VA protesting the city’s decision to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. Approximately 1000 counterprotesters surrounded them in opposition. (Zoeann Murphy / The Washington Post) URL: http://wapo.st/2tVzOxv Embed code:

Fair Usage Law

July 10, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

UPDATE: 22 arrested, tear gas deployed as Ku Klux Klan …

CHARLOTTESVILLE After seeing the Ku Klux Klan in the movies, Jabril Carter thought he knew a little bit about what to expect Saturday. But coming face to face with around 50 Klan members rallying in Charlottesville stirred something deeper he couldnt easily explain. My adrenaline is pumping right now, the 23-year-old cook said as he paused on the chaotic downtown streets of the progressive college town he grew up in. It hurt my soul, man. Carter was part of a group of young African-American men who stood directly in front of the Klan rally, taunting the robe-wearing, Confederate flag-waving group as a crowd of protesters estimated at over 1,000 drowned out the Klans white-pride speeches. The 45-minute rally in Justice Park newly renamed as part of Charlottesvilles push to rid itself of public parks designed to honor the Confederacy while elevating African-American history was mostly peaceful due to a massive police presence involving more than 100 Charlottesville and Virginia State Police personnel. Protesters hurled a few water bottles and pieces of fruit at the ralliers, and a few Klansmen shouted racial slurs and directed white-power salutes at the crowd. Direct physical confrontations were avoided as police escorted the Klan members in and out of the park and enforced a strict barricade between the two groups. The rally was supposed to begin at 3 p.m., but got off to a late start apparently due to the logistical difficulties of safely moving the Klansmen through the crowd encircling the fenced-off demonstration area. Police arrested several protesters who tried to block the entrance to the park before the Klan members entered around 3:45 p.m. Tensions escalated after the Klan group left the rally site. Protesters rushed through the streets trying to track the Klan and block roads as police tried to allow vehicles to exit. Unable to reach the Klan members, several protesters shouted angrily at the police for protecting the group, chanting: Cops and the Klan go hand in hand! Using a bullhorn, police told the group to disperse and warned that chemical agents would be used on anyone who stayed. After a group of protesters formed a line across High Street near the citys courthouses, police shot three tear gas canisters into the crowd around 5 p.m. In a statement Sunday morning, city officials said 22 people were arrested. On Saturday, officials had reported that 23 were arrested. Most appeared to be anti-Klan protesters, but officials could not immediately provide the affiliations of those arrested. Three people were hospitalized; two for heat-related issues and one for alcohol, officials said. The Klan rally was the latest flashpoint in a summer of unrest in Charlottesville, where the City Council voted to strip the names of Confederate generals from two parks and begin the process of removing statues of Robert E. Lee and Thomas Stonewall Jackson. In May, alt-right figure Richard Spencer, a leader of the new wave of white identity groups, participated in a torch-lit rally around the Lee statue. Alt-right groups are planning to return to the city next month for whats being billed as a bigger rally to Unite the Right. Saturdays Klan rally took place in the shadow of the Jackson statue in what used to be Jackson Park. Klan members held signs with anti-Semitic and anti-black slurs. In interviews, several members said they came to Charlottesville to protect white history and argued that white people alone are told they have no right to racial pride. Israels got a wall around their country. Why cant we have a wall around ours? said Douglas Barker, one of a few Klan members who spoke to reporters. They believe in preserving their own race. Why is it wrong for the white man to preserve their own race? Many of the Klan members declined to give their names or say where they were from, but several who did said they had come from out of state. Several shouting matches broke out before the rally between the protesters and a handful of people displaying Confederate flags who said that even though they dont support the Klan, the statues should still be preserved. City leaders and University of Virginia President Teresa A. Sullivan had encouraged the Charlottesville community to avoid the Klan rally. A slate of alternative events was organized to give people other outlets and avoid drawing attention to the Klan. Groups like this come to communities like this for the purpose of incitement and controversy and a twisted kind of celebrity, Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer said in an interview after swinging through the park in the early afternoon. The victory over them is to deny them that and keep on not only telling our story but refusing to be intimidated away from the sort of work we have been doing that has made us a target for these kinds of groups. Plenty of others wanted to meet the Klan head-on, insisting on countering hate with direct resistance. The park was a full-blown spectacle even before the Klan arrived, with drum circles, singing and a man wearing nothing but a loincloth shimmying in front of a street preacher. Sarah Fitzgerald, 23, of Staunton, said that even though Klan members have the right to free speech, the crowd that dwarfed the Klan has every right to counter it with their own. That we are still allowing this straightforward hate group to still have a voice at this time in this country, its just crazy, Fitzgerald said.

Fair Usage Law

July 10, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Readers sound off: The KKK still has a place in this country – USA TODAY

USA TODAY Published 9:05 a.m. ET July 10, 2017 | Updated 9:05 a.m. ET July 10, 2017 The Ku Klux Klan protests on July 8, 2017 in Charlottesville, Va.(Photo: Chet Strange, Getty Images) Protesters opposed to the Ku Klux Klan rally in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday came out in the hundreds to confront the Klan members. Comments are edited for clarity and grammar: The KKK platoon was out protesting anything not white. No surprise from the hate-filled/hate-supporting right. Jeff Hartung You cant keep someone from saying something just because you dont like it. Hate speech is protected speech, no matter how much we hate it. The KKK, Black Lives Matter and other groups are prime examples of free speech. Thomas Davis KKK rally in Charlottesville met with throng of protesters The KKK is not an example of free speech, its plain racism and should not be tolerated in this country. Paul Gomez Enough with giving these idiots a platform. Every single time they come out for their little protests, there are a dozen KKK hoods, almost five times counter-demonstrations and a sea of news media reporters. Bill Claugherty Simple: White nationalists are like cockroaches. For every KKK member wearing a pillowcase and bed sheet, there are tens of thousands of silent supporters who espouse the same values but simply wont admit their allegiance because it is no longer politically correct and socially viable to do so. I applaud the Fourth Estate for keeping Americans aware and vigilant of the hate and intolerance that remain pervasive in our society. Zheng Chen For people who argue Black Lives Matter and the KKK are the same, they are not. Some emotions might be the same, but true Black Lives Matter supporters are fighting for equality and the forgotten deaths of unarmed black people. The KKK is just about preserving heritage under the cover of hate and intolerance. John Mcbald To join the conversations about topics in USA TODAY, emailletters@usatoday.com, comment onFacebookor use #tellusatoday onTwitter. Autoplay Show Thumbnails Show Captions Read or Share this story: https://usat.ly/2u9IjWo

Fair Usage Law

July 10, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

23 arrested, tear gas deployed as Ku Klux Klan rallies in Charlottesville – Martinsville Bulletin

[CHARLOTTESVILLE] After seeing the Ku Klux Klan in the movies, Jabril Carter thought he knew a little bit about what to expect Saturday. But coming face to face with around 50 Klan members rallying in Charlottesville stirred something deeper he couldn’t easily explain. “My adrenaline is pumping right now,” the 23-year-old cook said as he paused on the chaotic downtown streets of the progressive college town he grew up in. “It hurt my soul, man.” Carter was part of a group of young African-American men who stood directly in front of the Klan rally, taunting the robe-wearing, Confederate flag-waving group as a crowd of protesters estimated at over 1,000 drowned out the Klan’s white-pride speeches.The 45-minute rally in Justice Park – newly renamed as part of Charlottesville’s push to rid itself of public parks designed to honor the Confederacy while elevating African-American history – was mostly peaceful due to a massive police presence involving more than 100 Charlottesville and Virginia State Police personnel. Protesters hurled a few water bottles and pieces of fruit at the ralliers, and a few Klansmen shouted racial slurs and directed white-power salutes at the crowd. Direct physical confrontations were avoided as police escorted the Klan members in and out of the park and enforced a strict barricade between the two groups. The rally was supposed to begin at 3 p.m., but got off to a late start apparently due to the logistical difficulties of safely moving the Klansmen through the crowd encircling the fenced-off demonstration area. Police arrested several protesters who tried to block the entrance to the park before the Klan members entered around 3:45 p.m. Tensions escalated after the Klan group left the rally site. Protesters rushed through the streets trying to track the Klan and block roads as police tried to allow vehicles to exit. Unable to reach the Klan members, several protesters shouted angrily at the police for protecting the group, chanting: “Cops and the Klan go hand in hand!” Using a bullhorn, police told the group to disperse and warned that chemical agents would be used on anyone who stayed. After a group of protesters formed a line across High Street near the city courthouses, police shot three tear gas canisters into the crowd around 5 p.m. Twenty-three people were arrested, according to city officials. Most appeared to be anti-Klan protesters, but officials could not immediately provide the affiliations of those arrested. Three people were hospitalized; two for heat-related issues and one for alcohol, officials said. The Klan rally was the latest flashpoint in a summer of unrest in Charlottesville, where the City Council voted to strip the names of Confederate generals from two parks and begin the process of removing statues of Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. In May, alt-right figure Richard Spencer, a leader of the new wave of white identity groups, participated in a torch-lit rally around the Lee statue. Alt-right groups are planning to return to the city next month for what’s being billed as a bigger rally to “Unite the Right.” Saturday’s Klan rally took place in the shadow of the Jackson statue in what used to be Jackson Park. Klan members held signs with anti-semitic and anti-black slurs. In interviews, several members said they came to Charlottesville to protect white history and argued that white people alone are told they have no right to racial pride. “Israel’s got a wall around their country. Why can’t we have a wall around ours?,” said Douglas Barker, one of a few Klan members who spoke to reporters. “They believe in preserving their own race. Why is it wrong for the white man to preserve their own race?” Many of the Klan members declined to give their names or say where they were from, but several who did said they had come from out of state. Several shouting matches broke out before the rally between the protesters and a handful of people displaying Confederate flags who said that even though they don’t support the Klan, the statues should still be preserved. City leaders and University of Virginia President Teresa A. Sullivan had encouraged the Charlottesville community to avoid the Klan rally. A slate of alternative events was organized to give people other outlets and avoid drawing attention to the Klan. “Groups like this come to communities like this for the purpose of incitement and controversy and a twisted kind of celebrity,” Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer said in an interview after swinging through the park in the early afternoon. “The victory over them is to deny them that and keep on not only telling our story but refusing to be intimidated away from the sort of work we have been doing that has made us a target for these kinds of groups.” Plenty of others wanted to meet the Klan head-on, insisting on countering hate with direct resistance. The park was a full-blown spectacle even before the Klan arrived, with drum circles, singing and a man wearing nothing but a loincloth shimmying in front of a street preacher. Sarah Fitzgerald, 30, of Staunton, said that even though Klan members have the right to free speech, the crowd that dwarfed the Klan has every right to counter it with their own. “That we are still allowing this straightforward hate group to still have a voice at this time in this country, it’s just crazy,” Fitzgerald said.

Fair Usage Law

July 10, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Ku Klux Klan rally draws loud counterprotest in …

(Zoeann Murphy/The Washington Post) CHARLOTTESVILLE A rally here by the Ku Klux Klan and its supporters to protest the Charlottesville City Councils decision to remove a statue honoring Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee encountered a loud and angry counterprotest Saturday afternoon. Members of the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, which is based in Pelham, N.C., near the Virginia border, gathered at Justice Park, situated in a quiet, leafy residential neighborhood in downtown Charlottesville. They shouted white power, and some wore white robes. About 30 Klansmen were escorted to and from the rally by police in riot gear who were out on a hot day to separate the rallygoers and approximately 1,000 counterprotesters who greeted them with jeers. Attempts by Klan leaders to address the crowd were repeatedly drowned out by boos and chants. Some of the Klan members arrived armed, carrying handguns in holsters at their belts. [KKK marchers say they will be armed Saturday at Charlottesville rally] The rally was held about a block away from Emancipation Park the renamed Lee Park where the statue of Lee astride a horse still stands. Charlottesville police reported that vandals had painted messages in green and red paint on the statue overnight. More than 100 officers from the Virginia State Police, Albemarle County police and University of Virginia police were prepared to assist Charlottesville police in maintaining order. After the Klan rally ended, police led several people away in handcuffs after a large group of counterprotesters remained near the vicinity of the park. Police asked those still gathered nearby to disperse. Wearing riot gear and gas masks, the police declared the counterprotesters an unlawful assembly and used gas canisters to compel them to leave the area. Charlottesville, a city of close to 50,000 and home to the prestigious public flagship campus of the University of Virginia, had become increasingly tense as the rally approached. A CITY ON EDGE read the front-page headline in the local paper, the Daily Progress, on Saturday. [White nationalist Richard Spencer leads torch-bearing protesters defending Lee statue] City leaders organized diversionary events elsewhere in the city and encouraged residents and visitors not to confront the KKK members directly. While many took that advice, others wanted to make sure the rally participants heard their voices. It is important for me to be here because the Klan was ignored in the 1920s, and they metastasized, said Jalane Schmidt, a professor at the University of Virginia who has been among those leading the call for the Lee statue removal. They need to know that their ideology is not acceptable. I teach about slavery and African American history, and its important to face the Klan and to face the demons of our collective history and our original sin of slavery. We do it on behalf of our ancestors who were terrorized by them. Though the council voted to remove the statue, a court order has stopped the city from acting on that decision until a hearing next month. Some observers predict a protracted legal battle that would further delay the removal. In an editorial last month, city councilwoman Kristin Szakos said the council voted to remove the statue and join a growing group of cities around the nation that have decided that they no longer want to give pride of place to tributes to the Confederate Lost Cause erected in the early part of the 20th century. [The Ku Klux Klan was dead. The first Hollywood blockbuster revived it.] The Klan says the citys decision to remove the Lee statue is part of a wider effort to get rid of white history. Theyre trying to erase the white culture right out of the history books, Klan member James Moore said Thursday. Brandi Fisher, of Ridgeley, W.Va., drove hours to attend the rally. I dont agree with everything the Klan believes, but I do believe our history should not be taken away, said Fisher, 41. Are we going to remove the Washington and Jefferson memorials because they were slave owners? Ezra Israel, 32, who is African American, says the statue should stay up as a reminder of slavery and the people who supported it. Its hiding history to take it down, he said as he made his way to the rally. We need to leave it up so people can see it and see that we were oppressed and were still a product of that today. Toung Nguyen, an immigrant from Vietnam who moved to Charlottesville as a child in the early 1980s, said he believes the money that will be spent on removing the statue could be better used improving the local school system. But he says racism has gotten worse in the last couple of years and he understands why many believe the statue needs to go. Its just disappointing that we still have to deal with this kind of nonsense, Nguyen said. Our country feels like its going full circle. Charlottesville is already planning for another protest next month. Several white nationalist groups have a permit for an Aug.12 rally also calling for the councils decision on the statue to be reversed. T. Rees Shapiro contributed to this report.

Fair Usage Law

July 9, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Ku Klux Klan rally in Charlottesville sparks large protest – WSET

CHARLOTESVILLE, Va. (WSET) — Hours before the Ku Klux Klan arrived at Justice Park in Charlottesville, more than 1,000 people were already protesting. Police in full riot gear made more than 20 arrests. About 50 Klansmen were delayed by protesters but finally arrived to a harsh welcome – armed and ready to speak out against plans to remove Confederate monuments. There was screaming between the Klan and the protesters, who said they were there to confront the Klan and resist white supremacy. “The Klan is Jefferson’s legacy. The Klan is the legacy of these Confederate statues and the legacies that these statues represent,” said Mimi Albreit, a protest organizer. The Klan briefly addressed the crowd, and one, James Moore, Imperial Kludd of the loyal White Knights, had choice words about the city’s Vice Mayor. “Wes Bellamy, he’s a sicko. He gets on Twitter making comments saying ‘If she moans, it’s not rape, and so forth.’ These are the kind of people we’re electing into the government here in Charlottesville, which goes to show that the whole thing is corrupt and we’re standing against it,” said Moore. KKK supporters said the Klan has the right to exercise free speech and said protesters are wasting theirs. “The statues people are (expletive) about, they shouldn’t have to do that. Statues have nothing to do with it,” said Albert Clatterbuck, a Klan supporter. Protest organizers are demanding the city take steps to end racial oppression and make reparations. The rally ended with police confrontations and tear gas when the crowd refused to leave.

Fair Usage Law

July 9, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

The Ku Klux Klan was dead. The first Hollywood blockbuster revived it. – Washington Post

In 1915, more than 40 years after President Ulysses S. Grant annihilated the Ku Klux Klan, a group of white men in white bedsheets paraded down Peachtree Street in Atlanta to attend a movie premiere, firing rifles into the air. Their leader: William J. Simmons, a theatrical local preacher who a month earlier, after Thanksgiving supper, had bussed 15 racist men up Stone Mountain, made several declarations about purity and honor, then set flames to a cross, reigniting the KKK. The rites incident to the founding of the order were most interesting and the occasion will be remembered long by the participants, the Atlanta Constitution reported in a story headlined, KLAN IS ESTABLISHED WITH IMPRESSIVENESS. Simmons led his men down Peachtree to celebrate the opening of D.W. Griffiths The Birth of a Nation, Hollywoods first big-budget, blockbuster movie that many still consider a masterpiece despite its subject matter. It depicted life after the Civil War in a way that glorified Klansmen who supposedly saved the South, using violence to protect whites from, among other things, packs of black rapists. Ku Klux Klan members march on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington on Sept. 13, 1926. Critics hailed Griffiths cinematic storytelling. Off screen, the film became a propaganda tool to relaunch the KKK. That legacy will be on display Saturday in Charlottesville, where a North Carolina chapter of the KKK plans to hold an armed rally to protest the decision to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a public park. Sooner or later just about every Klansman worthy of his robe sees the film that romanticizes racial violence, according to a history of the KKK published by the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks extremist groups. The story it tells fits perfectly with the version of history the Klan preaches. Except it isnt history at all. [Hunting down runaway slaves: The cruel ads of Andrew Jackson and the master class] The Klan was originally a secret society created in 1866 by a few ex-Confederate soldiers in Pulaski, Tenn. Their intentions were neither violent nor overtly racist, although they were interested in preserving Southern culture as more black faces moved to town. Their leadership titles were intentionally goofy: grand cyclops, grand magi, grand turk, grand scribe. Members were called Ghouls. The name Ku Klux Klan derived fromthe Greek word kuklos, meaning circle. After becoming public, members and officersbegan dressing up in sheets, apparently for publicity. They rode around at night on horses. Had that been all there was to the Ku Klux Klan, it probably would have disappeared as quietly as it was born, the SPLC wrote, adding: But at some point in early 1866, the club added new members from nearby towns and began to have a chilling effect on local blacks. the intimidating night rides were soon the centerpiece of the hooded order: bands of white-sheeted ghouls paid late night visits to black homes, admonishing the terrified occupants to behave themselves and threatening more visits if they didnt. It didnt take long for the threats to be converted into violence against blacks who insisted on exercising their new rights and freedom. Before its six founders realized what had happened, the Ku Klux Klan had become something they may not have originally intended something deadly serious. The Klan spread rapidly, with Nathan Bedford Forrest, an ex-Confederate general, taking control. The 1868 presidential election was dominated by discussions of the Klan. Grant, who led the Union Army to victory, ran on the slogan, Let Us Have Peace. After he won, Grant plotted to take out the Klan, supporting a series of laws to protect the rights of blacks to vote and serve on juries. In 1871, Grant signed the most important one the Ku Klux Klan Act, which gave him authority to suspend the writ of habeas corpus and use federal troops to arrest and prosecute murderous Klansmen. Several thousand people were indicted under the law, crippling the KKK within a year. Although lynchings and violence against blacks continued, the KKK as an organization was quickly wiped out. That is, until 1915. Simmons and other Southern whites were increasingly outraged bythe arrival of Jews, Roman Catholics and immigrants. Then a 13-year-old Atlanta girl named Mary Phagan was killed. Phagan worked in a pencil factory. Leo Frank, her Jewish boss, was charged with killing her. The evidence was thin, but Frank was convicted and sentenced to death. After his sentence was reduced to life in prison, two dozen men calling themselves the Knights of Mary Phagan kidnapped Frank and hung him. Afterward, they burned a cross on Stone Mountain. [Leo Frank was lynched for a murder he didnt commit. Now neo-Nazis are trying to rewrite history.] The way Georgians had reacted to the Frank lynching convinced Simmons that that reestablishing the Klan was a timely idea, according to a history of The Birth of a Nation and the KKK by Melvyn Stokes. Simmons was bed ridden after a car accident. While convalescing, he devised plans for his new KKK, drawing inspiration from news stories about the release of Griffiths film. Stokes wrote: The film and the saturation publicity associated with it had already helped mold both fashion and social life in the North. Manufacturers produced Ku-Klux hats modeled after those worn by the riders in Birth and KK kitchen aprons. New York society ladies organized K-Klux balls and on Halloween, 2,000 University of Chicago students partied in Klan costumes. By late November 1915, the film had already been shown very successfully in several Southern cities and its first showing in Atlanta was due. Simmons realized that this offered an opportunity too great to be missed to publicize his new organization. So he marched his men to the theater. The movie and the Klan marched across the South. They became locked, Stokes wrote, in a marriage of publicity-oriented convenience. Klansmen in other cities imitated the Atlanta parade. Theater ushers wore white sheets. In local newspapers, the Klan advertised for recruits alongside movie times. By the early 1920s, as the Klan spread beyond its base in the South, Stokes wrote, it continued to exploit The Birth of a Nation as part of its recruitment and propaganda drive. Riots over the movie broke out in major urban areas. There were organized protests by civil rights groups. Eventually, theaters stopped showing the film. Now in the public domain, the spinning of The Birth of a Nation continues, even as the KKKsorganizational hold on hate has been usurped by the alt-right and online networkssuch as Stormfront, where the movie is frequently discussed. Watched it today for the first time, a poster wrote not long ago. Classic and prophetic masterpiece. Read more Retropolis: Unsolved and overlooked murders: Investigating cold cases of the civil rights era When Portland banned blacks: Oregons shameful history as an all-white state Life or death for black travelers: How fear led to The Negro Motorist Green-Book Youve got bad blood: The horror of the Tuskegee syphilis experiment When Henrietta Lacks had cervical cancer, it was a death sentence. Her cells would help change that.

Fair Usage Law

July 8, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

KKK marchers say they will be armed Saturday at Charlottesville rally – Washington Post

A Ku Klux Klan chapter holding a rally in downtown Charlottesville on Saturday afternoon says it expects 80 to 100 members and supporters to take part in the protest and that most will have guns with them. Its an open-carry state, so our members will be armed, said James Moore, a member of the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, which is headquartered in Pelham, N.C., near the Virginia border. Moore said that if members are attacked, they will defend themselves. The KKK is protesting the Charlottesville City Councils decision this year to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a public park and rename that park. Once called Lee Park, it is now Emancipation Park. A court injunction has halted the statues removal until a November hearing. On Thursday, a Confederate Heroes plaque attached to the statue was removed by city workers. [The Ku Klux Klan wants to rally in Charlottesville. Now this college town is on edge again] The liberals are taking away our heritage, Moore said. By taking these monuments away, thats what theyre working on. Theyre trying to erase the white culture right out of the history books. Ahead of the 3p.m. rally in Justice Park, Charlottesville leaders are urging calm and encouraging residents and visitors to avoid direct confrontations with the Klan. They say the Klan would like nothing more than a violent showdown, because it would bring the group attention. Our approach all the way through, from our police chief on down, has been to urge people not to take this totally discredited fringe organizations putrid bait at all, Mayor Michael Signer said. The only thing they seem to want is division and confrontation and a twisted kind of celebrity. The most successful defiance will be to refuse to take their bait and continue to tell our story. Then their memory of Charlottesville will be of a community that repudiated them by not getting drawn into their pathetic drama. While Charlottesville officials and police are hoping that the rally goes off without incident, the city is prepared to respond quickly if there are problems, Signer said. Public safety is our most sacrosanct duty to our public and our visitors, he said. If any one of these people breaks any law, including those governing assault and disorderly conduct, they will be swiftly dealt with and brought to justice. The city is supporting numerous community groups, churches, businesses and organizations that have joined forces to present various activities, concerts and prayer services away from the protest site throughout the day. In addition, the University of Virginia has issued a statement condemning the KKK and urging members of the university community to avoid confrontation and support the other events. Hunter Smith, owner of a local brewery, formed Unity C-Ville in response to the rally plans. Smith, 31, said he wanted to provide activities for city residents to express their solidarity on Saturday without directly confronting the marchers. I was concerned that a bunch of people were going to go and give these folks exactly what they were looking for, which is attention, Smith said. The best-case scenario is that these guys come in and have their sad little rally and talk to themselves and leave and that we demonstrate that this is not a place that will be divided. But others say its important to confront the Klan directly. We want them to know theres no platform for white supremacy, said Grace Aheron, who works for a nonprofit organization in Charlottesville and is taking part in a counterdemonstration with the group Showing Up for Racial Justice. They say to ignore them and that theyre just a small group, but weve watched the rise of many people, including our current president, who hold many similar views. Its enraging that the city would give a permit to a known terrorist organization. [White nationalist Richard Spencer leads torch-bearing protesters defending Lee statue] The councils decision to remove the Lee statue has attracted opposition from a number of groups, including white supremacists. In May, the self-proclaimed white nationalist leader Richard Spencer took part in two protests against the decision, including a nighttime gathering where dozens of participants carried torches. Reached by phone Thursday, Spencer said he had not heard about the KKKs protest and had no plans to attend. He said that while he did not want to be associated with the group, he supported its call to keep the Lee statue in place. Doron Ezickson, the Washington regional director for the Anti-Defamation League, says the emboldening of white nationalist groups and the KKK across the country is a concern, but he hopes their impact is limited. He also recommended that counterprotesters avoid direct confrontation that could lead to violence. The more attention they get, the more hope that they have to increase their impact, Ezickson said. We would respectfully suggest that the appropriate and smart thing to do is to come together as communities but dont do so in a way that risks physical altercation.

Fair Usage Law

July 8, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Former Alabama KKK leader sentenced to prison for sex crime – The Seattle Times

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) A onetime Ku Klux Klan leader who served time for burning a cross near a black neighborhood is going back to prison after being convicted of sexually abusing a woman in southern Alabama. Dale County Circuit Judge William Fillmore sentenced Steven Joshua Dinkle to 10 years in prison and fined him $1,000, according to a court order signed Thursday. A jury convicted Dinkle, 31, of sexual abuse in June after prosecutors claimed he recorded himself sexually abusing an incapacitated woman. A letter from the victim filed this week in court asked for a tough sentence for Dinkle. Dont go easy on him like everyone else. Show him there are consequences for his actions, the woman wrote. The judge gave Dinkle the maximum sentence, District Attorney Kirke Adams told reporters. Defense attorney David Harrison said Dinkle disagreed with the verdict and plans an appeal. Harrison said he didnt know anything about Dinkles involvement with the KKK. Federal authorities said Dinkle once was the exalted cyclops of the Ozark branch of the International Keystone Knights, a KKK group based in Arkansas. His mother was the chapter secretary, according to the Justice Department. Dinkle was indicted in 2013 on charges of helping burn a large cross four years earlier near a predominantly black neighborhood in Ozark, located about 85 miles (137 km) southeast of Montgomery. He later pleaded guilty to hate crime and obstruction charges. Dinkles mother, Pamela Morris, pleaded guilty in 2014 after being accused of lying to grand jurors about her involvement in the Klan, court documents show. Sentenced to two years in prison, Dinkle was released on probation and later charged with being a convicted felon in possession of a firearm. He pleaded guilty to illegally possessing a pistol in April 2016. The state sentence will run along with a 15-month federal term that Dinkle already is serving on the gun charge, records show.

Fair Usage Law

July 8, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."