Archive for the ‘Ku Klux Klan’ Category

US president promoting Islamophobia, racism: Journalist – Press TV

US President Donald Trump leaves in his limousine after the annual Friends of Ireland luncheon at the Capitol March 16, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by AFP)

The White House has announced it will appeal against the rulings of two federal judges who blocked President Donald Trumps second executive order about travel ban on citizens of Muslim-majority countries. Two federal judges in Hawaii and Maryland froze Trumps order to close US borders to nationals from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. Press TV has asked Sander Hicks, an investigative journalist, and Peter Sinnott, an independent scholar, both from New York about the argument on theban in the United States.

Hicks said that the new US president showedhis racist and anti-Islam nature during the 2016 presidential race.

Trump was Islamophobic and his targeting of Muslims is now a part of this legal complaint, the analyst said on Thursday night.

He said several judges and pro-migrant activists are going to file a lawsuit against the US presidents travel ban.

Everything that happened in the past year with the campaign and all the clear Islamophobia is now in a legal document, he added.

Referring to the background of the Trump family in promoting racism, he said, Fred Trump, Donald Trumps father, was arrested in 1927 at a Ku Klux Klan riot.

The Department of Justice in 1973 prosecuted Donald Trump and Fred Trump for racist discriminatory practices; so, Trumps scapegoating of Islam is the oldest trick in the book, Hicks noted.

He went on to say that the courts are stopping Trump from his Islamophobic, racist anddiscriminatory ban on any immigrants or any refugees from the top six countries.

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The immigration problem that the US and other Western states are facing are the consequences of former American president George W. Bushs decision to invade Iraq in 2003 and goes back to the 9/11 terrorist attack and its cover-up by Bush and his vice president Dick Cheney, he argued.

According to the commentator, the United States so-called war on terror is in fact a war for US oil and a war for US global strategic interests.

Sinnott saidTrumps executive order is not a travel ban against Muslims.Pointing to judicial attempts to block Trumps order, he said the setback is merely political.

The US Supreme Court, he said, will uphold the order “based on its wording, because the wording does not discriminate against Muslims.

He touched on Yemen, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Syria as the countries whichhave difficulties with war and terrorism and cannot vet immigrants.

Iran is a different case in the travel ban list and it could be negotiated to solve long-term problems between Washington and Tehran, he said.

Unlike any of the others on the list, Iran has the opportunity to change the parameters, because its not a country in civil war or incredible turmoil.

Referring to the exemption of Saudi Arabia from the travel ban list, he said, It is the center of a philosophy that has been attacking the United States and it is one of the main exporters of a philosophy and of a people that in the end are involved in terrorism.

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US president promoting Islamophobia, racism: Journalist – Press TV

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March 17, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

KKK ‘not welcome’ in Asheboro, NC, over planned cross-burning, mayor says – Washington Times

The Ku Klux Klan isnt welcome in Asheboro, North Carolina, the citys mayor said Monday, notwithstanding its plan to hold a cross-burning there in a matter of weeks.

A KKK offshoot known as the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan announced plans last week to gather in Asheboro, north of Charlotte, for a whites only event on May 6, spurring condemnation from the city and a local congressman.

Mayor David Smith doubled down on the citys stance Monday and told local reporters that Klan members arent welcome in Asheboro as far as hes concerned.

Its contrary to what we believe. Its contrary to what most people in Asheboro believe, Mr. Smith told the Asheboro Courtier-Tribune Monday. Its contrary to the message of the City of Asheboro. Our position is, dont come here.

We would prefer that they not come to Asheboro, they are not welcome in Asheboro, he told a local Fox News affiliate.

The Loyal White Knights is based out of Pelham and is considered to be perhaps the most active Klan group in the United States, according to the Anti-Defamation League. That particular faction boasted upwards of 200 members across 15 states last year, the ADL said in a 2016 report.

On its website last week, the Loyal White Knight said itll congregate on May 6 in Asheboro for a rally that will include a klavern meeting, speeches, dinner and a crosslighting at dark.

The people of Asheboro have worked too hard to unify our community to let an outside group come in and spread racist views without raising our voices loudly in protest. They may have a right to peacefully assemble, but we also have a right to object at the top of our collective voice, the mayor said in a statement issued by the city Sunday.

The rally may be constitutional, but this groups message and legacy are an affront to our core value that all people are created equal, U.S. Rep. Mark Walker, North Carolina Republican, said in a statement of his own Monday.

But with less than two months until the scheduled event, Asheboro officials this week said the Klan has yet to begin the bureaucratic process of seeking the citys permission. Marching on city streets and using a city-managed facility would both require permits, but the Klan has so far failed to request an application for either, the city manager said Sunday.

The Loyal White Knights did not respond to requests for comment, the Courier-Tribune reported.

In December, the Loyal White Knights organized a victory parade near Pelham to celebrate President Trumps White House victory. Their celebration was cut short, however, when a party the night beforeresulted in criminal charges for two Klansmen and a trip to the hospital for another.

The KKK maintained 130 chapters across the U.S. during 2016, the Southern Poverty Law Center reported last month, including the Loyal White Knights.

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KKK ‘not welcome’ in Asheboro, NC, over planned cross-burning, mayor says – Washington Times

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Remember This? The Ku Klux Klan would forever regret their expansion into the Town of Barrie – BarrieToday

What do you picture when you think of the Ku Klux Klan?

Likely, you think of a group of bigoted fanatics in white robes and hoods, centred in the American south, carrying out their cause of promoting all things white and Protestant.

You might be surprised to learn that the reach of the KKK spread north of the border, and at the height of their national popularity, the most infamous of their Canadian actions occurred right here in Barrie.

The Klan was born immediately after the American Civil War when returning Confederate soldiers found their way of life forever changed and they put the blame largely on freed black men and their sympathizers. The United States government had no patience for continued violence in the South and so the KKK was outlawed in 1871.

The Klan re-formed just after World War 1. So-called ordinary Americans were becoming very concerned about their communities and their jobs in the face of mass immigration from Europe. Black Americans were slowly being allowed more rights. Many white Americans saw the Klan as the guardians of their way of life and joined in huge numbers.

At the same time, enough Canadians were worried about seeing this country lose its Britishness,meaning increased ethic and religious diversity, that KKK chapters formed here too in the 1920s.

The KKK in Canada attempted to set itself apart from their American counterparts by denouncing lawlessness and violence.

However, the Klan would forever regret their expansion into the Town of Barrie because it was here that their movement started its rapid decline into unpopularity.

His father had sent him away. William Skelly was in his late twenties but had already lived a lifetime of troubles. In his native Northern Ireland, he had witnessed sectarian violence including the death of a girl he had loved. Skelly fought for Britain in the Great War and had been badly wounded, resulting in the metal plate now protecting his skull. He married but it seems he was charged with assaulting his wife. Other charges included drunkenness and assaulting a police officer. A fresh start was in order.

The young Irishman jobbed about in Ontario for many months before arriving in Simcoe County. He worked for a farmer in Innisfil for a time before finding employment with A.J. Tuck in his junk store on Dunlop St. in Barrie. Far from home, friendless and having no real prospects, William Skelly was ripe for the picking when the Ku Klux Klan brought their roadshow to town in June 1926.

On a hill, more or less where the Travelodge hotel stands at Bayfield St. and the 400, an eighty-foot cross was set on fire and was seen for miles around. It attracted the disenfranchised young man and he became a member of the Klan that night.

William Skelly first met William Butler, a local young man about his own age, who was Kleagle, or membership recruiter, of the Barrie klavern. In turn, he came to know Clare Lee who was klavern secretary and a co-worker of Butler at the shoe factory where both were employed.

Quite quickly after becoming acquainted, the three Klansmen decided that they needed to perform some sort of action to cement their commitment to the ideals of the Klan and, at first, chose the Champlain monument in Orillia for a demonstration of their dedication. It was a symbol of Roman Catholicism, or so they believed, and as such was counter to what they thought the KKK stood for.

Skelly took a revolver from his employers shop and purchased bullets, dynamite, fuse and blasting caps at a local hardware store on June 10, 1926. The trio was unable to find any means of transportation to Orillia, but their determination to make a clear anti-Catholic statement that day was unwavering and so they settled on something nearby. Skelly, Butler and Lee decided to blow up St. Marys Catholic Church.

Just after 6:00 a.m. on Friday, June 11, the church caretaker, Mr. LeClair, arrived at St. Marys and found a door on the north side of the building wide open. He was shocked to find that some kind of explosion had occurred, blowing a hole 4 feet around in the floor in the area of the centre aisle, and had sent chunks of wood flying through stained glass windows, broken light fixtures and shattered floor joists.

The police were called and almost immediately identified a piece of time fuse left at the scene. The act was called variably an outrage and a desecration in Barrie papers, and the local police began an intense but short investigation into who could have done this. A visit to a hardware store quickly pinpointed a suspect the Irish chap working at A.J. Tucks shop.

When staying in Barrie became too hot a prospect, Butler and Lee helped him get away to Toronto. Skelly was at first helped by Klansmen there but they soon decided that he should be handed to the authorities and that the Klan should immediately cut ties with him.

William Skelly was arrested at King and Yonge St. in Toronto about 10 days after his crime, given up by Klan organizer, Major Proctor. He carried a letter, that he had been instructed to sign, stating that the attack on the church was all his idea and had nothing to do with the Klan.

Skelly was brought back to Barrie and lodged in the Barrie Jail. At the courthouse, he was eager to confess, lay out the whole sordid tale and easily implicate his accomplices, Butler and Lee. The townsfolk, who had been aghast at the crime committed by this outsider and the hate group from the south, were taken aback by the involvement of two local sons.

William Skelly was assessed by a psychiatrist in August of 1926 and, although the deed was an exercise in madness, Skelly was deemed fit for trial. As the trial approached, he offered to plead guilty but Justice Logie refused to accept the plea and moved for a full court hearing.

That third week of October, the trial began with standing room only and reports of curious citizens peering in the courthouse windows when they couldnt get a seat inside.

The court heard that the three men drew paper scraps to see which of them would carry out the mission, and that Skelly drew one depicting a fiery cross which gave him the assignment. Lee showed him where the church was located and how to get into it. After fortifying Skelly with some dandelion wine, his co-conspirators sent him of to do the deed.

Skelly set his explosives on the top of a brick wall running north-south in the church basement and lit the fuse. He ran away and fired one shot of the revolver to alert Lee, who lived nearby, that the thing was done. Next came the sound of the explosion, which sounded innocuous enough to those who heard it, much like the backfire of a car.

In the end, all three were found guilty and sent to Kingston Penitentiary. Skelly drew the harshest sentence of four years at hard labour with a recommendation from Justice Logie that he be deported at the end of his sentence. The Justice had a few words to add in closing.

In this country, I am told, for many years Catholics and Protestants have lived in amity, side by side, never troubling each other. That is as it should be. We do not want in this country conditions which formerly prevailed in that distressful isle, Ireland, nor do we want those conditions if the press is to be believed which prevail at the present moment in the republic to the south.

Afterwards, the Ku Klux Klan was held in very low esteem by the outraged Canadian people, both for its hateful mandate and for shaping a lost immigrant into a criminal and then turning their backs on him. The KKK quickly lost any favour they had built up in this country after that.

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Remember This? The Ku Klux Klan would forever regret their expansion into the Town of Barrie – BarrieToday

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What Do Holy Cross, An African-American Newspaper, and the Ku Klux Klan Have in Common? – NewBostonPost (blog)

By Evan Lips | March 15, 2017, 21:52 EDT

Printed from: http://newbostonpost.com/2017/03/15/what-do-holy-cross-an-african-american-newspaper-and-the-ku-klux-klan-have-in-common/

For much of the past 40 years, the student newspaper at Worcesters College of the Holy Cross has coincidentally shared the same name as the chief publication of the Ku Klux Klan.

Apparently, this innocent unintended co-occurrence did not become a problem that needed addressing by Holy Cross professors until 2017.

Last month, the editors-in-chief of The Crusader, the schools student-run newspaper, received a letter signed by 48 faculty members calling on them to consider a name change in response to the growing anti-Muslim tensions in our country, and to the fact that the Ku Klux Klan official newspaper shares the same name as our own.

Historically, the term crusader refers to the period of medieval Crusades, in which Christian solders fought with Muslim forces in an effort to seize control of the disputed Holy Land, which had been under Islamic control.

The undersigned professors cited the message in the colleges mission statement, which is marked by freedom, mutual respect and civility, in the letter and stressed that they question the value of a connection to names and imagery that are often used by others in ways counter to our mission and goals.

Students running the paper responded with a letter of their own in which they voiced their agreement with the undersigned faculty.

In another coincidence, the papers editors-in-chief indicate that the original change in name of the newspaper from The Tomahawk to The Crusader as the former name referred to Native American culture.

In 1955, the editors of this newspaper adopted the name Crusader in place of the former Tomahawk, announcing that the new name would better represent the values of Holy Cross and of the publication, the newspapers response stated. Effective immediately, we would like to initiate an ongoing discussion open to all students, faculty, staff, and alumni to determine whether this claim remains accurate in the year 2017.

The student editors also mentioneda letter they received from an entity not associated with the college that denounced mainline, controlled liberal media and claimed that multiculturalism is a prescription for white genocide.

The student editors wrote that they wondered whether the name of our publication might have been one influence behind this individuals decision to send such a vitriolic letter and later tried to make a connection between the authors denunciation of mainline, controlled liberal media and the alt-right.

We do not doubt that many would consider the Ku Klux Klans The Crusader to be a form of alternative media, and we consider our association with this label to be worthy of urgent discussion, the editors concluded.

That discussion is slated for Thursday night at 6 p.m., and will be held inside the universitys Rehm Library.

Left unreported, however, is the fact that the Chicago Crusader a newspaper aimed at serving the African-American communities in Chicago, Illinois, and Gary, Indiana, also shares the same name as the colleges newspaper.

The Chicago Crusaders mission statement notes that blacks must control their own community to the unconquerable host of Africans who are laying their sacrifices upon the editorial altar for their race.

The publication does not appear to be considering a name change at this time.

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What Do Holy Cross, An African-American Newspaper, and the Ku Klux Klan Have in Common? – NewBostonPost (blog)

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In Georgia, reaction to KKK banner is a sign of the times – Washington Post

DAHLONEGA, Ga. The mayor was still home when his phone started ringing. The reverend was still down with the flu when he began getting one message after another. Valerie Fambrough had just dropped off her daughters at day care when she heard.

Have you seen the sign in the square? a parent asked her on a cold morning three weeks ago. Theres a Ku Klux Klan sign in the town square.

And, in fact, there was. Just past the old brick courthouse and across the street from candy stores and antique shops, a large rectangular banner was screwed tight into the cracked wood siding of a long-vacant building on East Main Street. Historic Ku Klux Klan Meeting Hall, it said.

It had a cartoonish drawing of a white-sheeted person raising a hand. In addition, there was a Confederate battle flag at one corner of the building and a red flag with a white cross and the letters KKK at the other. They were fluttering in the wind blowing across Dahlonega, and what happened next would become one more pocket of America dealing with a disturbing incident at a time when hate crimes have been on the rise and new brands of white nationalism have been making a comeback across the country.

In Upstate New York, the home of a Jewish man was spray-painted with swastikas. In Virginia, fliers were distributed in several neighborhoods with the words, Make America WHITE again-and greatness will follow. In Colorado, two typewritten notes that read WERE GONNA BLOW UP ALL OF YOU REFUGEES, were left at a community center serving mainly Muslim immigrants. Now whatever was happening in other parts of the country seemed to have arrived in Dahlonega.

The mayor got dressed and headed for the square. The reverend called the sheriff. Fambrough recalled how she hurried over to see for herself, saying No, no, not here, the whole way, and Hell, no, until she was there, alone, staring at the banner.

She was a white 37-year-old mother of two, a program specialist in the biology department at the University of North Georgia who called Dahlonega a sweet, loving town and had never protested anything in her life. Now she felt her anger rising. She remembered the flip-chart paper in her trunk left over from a presentation a month before and made two signs Not in my town, she wrote, and Love Lives Here then got out and stood in her sandals holding them.

She was freezing. The square was still quiet, with all the shops closed. She scanned the windows across the street to see if someone was watching. She planned which way she would run if something happened. Cars passed, and she scrutinized each face.

A woman shook her head and kept going.

A man gave her a thumbs-up.

A woman called out of her window, Did you put that sign up? and Fambrough said No, no! and then Bridget Kahn parked, got out, and now there were the two of them.

A woman in a red minivan stopped and yelled Yall are angry! Youre angry, angry people! and drove off.

A black pickup truck parked across the street, and a muscular man got out, and a reporter from the local paper whod just arrived told the women it was Chester Doles, a former leader in the Klan and a white-separatist group called the National Alliance who had gone to prison on federal weapons charges. He lived just outside town and was currently a personal trainer who also worked promoting hate rock concerts around the country. He pulled out a cellphone and began taking photographs. He said something to the women, but they couldnt hear.

Whats that, sir? Kahn called out, and the women heard him say something about how glorious it was to see such a sign in the light of day, and then he drove off, even as more people were arriving white-haired locals, college students and others who said they were appalled; a Native American man who brought a ladder and tried to rip the banner down; a white man who argued the KKK banner and flag should come down but not the Confederate battle flag; a young black man who stood there crying.

Here came the mayor and the sheriff trying to figure out what was going on.

Here came two pickup trucks circling the square, revving their engines. The woman in the red minivan returned, honking her horn and seeming to veer too close to the protesters.

A school bus passed, and now Fambrough was crying as the town dispatched a cherry picker to the scene, and workers began ratcheting out the first of 21 screws holding the banner in place.

Another truck arrived, this one belonging to a local roofing company and plastered with Confederate logos, and several workers climbed on the roof and began removing the flags.

And that was how the banner came down, and the flags came down, and all the rest began.

***

All over town that first day, people kept saying this was not the Dahlonega they knew.

Our little pocket of loveliness is how one resident described the former gold mining town an hour north of Atlanta, known for its redbrick square lined with antique shops and wine tasting rooms. It was the seat of Lumpkin County, which did not have the reputation for racial violence that many other north Georgia counties did, though no one disputed that there were probably Klan members scattered around. It was overwhelmingly white and Republican, though Dahlonega itself was home to a small, deeply rooted, black population, and had in recent years attracted a more liberal crowd who considered themselves part of the progressive South.

Now, though, all anyone could talk about was what happened in the town square.

Even before the last screw came out of the banner, photos of it were appearing all over social media with captions like WTF, Dahlonega? and people began speculating about who did it.

Maybe it was a college prank. Maybe it was an outsider. Maybe it really was the Klan, a relic coming back to life. In an area that voted heavily for Donald Trump, speculation began that the whole thing was the work of anti-Trump activists, and when she got home, Fambrough went online and saw that people were accusing her of putting up the banner, saying she was part of the alt-left.

By evening, though, people had found out who was really responsible: It was one of their own, an 84-year-old white woman named Roberta Green-Garrett, the owner of the building in question who lives in a brick mansion with four white columns on a hill overlooking the town.

Offering no explanation and declining to speak with reporters, she had told town officials that she had allowed the banner to go up and might try to put it up again. She had been seeking permission to build a hotel on the square, and people speculated that it was all an audacious ploy to embarrass the town into approving her plans.

An isolated case of Mrs. Green, is how the mayor, Gary McCullough, described it, saying that there was no evidence the building was ever used by the Klan and that he hoped people would move on.

For many people, though, it was too late for that. The point wasnt who did it. The point was that it had happened, and whatever it had unleashed was taking on a life of its own.

As day two began, a local Unitarian church was organizing a unity march for later that afternoon.

Fambrough heard and began calling her friends. Its about showing people that they have nothing to be afraid of in our town! she told them.

More calls were made, including one to the minister, John Webb, a former town council member who is black, who had heard by then who had done it, which didnt make it less worrying to him. He said he had noticed more pickup trucks roaring around during the presidential campaign, Confederate battle flags flying Guys I know, he said, saying the South will rise again and all that stuff and that regardless of why the banner went up, Its very possible it could boomerang into something bigger than it is.

He was 72, a veteran of the civil rights struggle still sick from the flu, but he was going, and he called others to go, too, and as word spread about the coming demonstration, so did a parallel set of rumors.

The KKK was coming. The neo-Nazis were coming. Black Lives Matter was coming. Fambrough heard that a so-called antifascist group from Atlanta was coming and began feeling sick imagining windows being smashed and businesses being torched. The sheriff called for backup and readied a plan in case a riot or something worse was about to happen in Dahlonega.

In the late afternoon, people began rallying around the square, waving signs.

Not OKKK America, one said. Dahlonega Loves Yall, read another, and Really, Roberta?

People honked horns in support. A local fiddler came. A member of the folk-rock duo Indigo Girls came and everybody sang This Land Is Your Land.

Soon, several pickup trucks arrived, revving their engines and circling the square, with Confederate battle flags and Make America Great Again flags flying. When a protester started yelling at one of them, Fambrough yelled at the protester, Dont make assumptions!

By the third day, events began taking another turn.

More s— stirrers! someone posted online about the protesters. You all are the ones that are going to ruin that town and jobs will be lost!!! Good job, morons!!

All crybabies jump on board! wrote someone else.

Let it go, a woman posted.

But people were not letting it go.

Its like a certain political climate has opened up, said Paul Dunlap, a professor at the university, sitting at the end of the fifth day around a fire with friends at Shenanigans pub on the square. An openly gay man, he said he had never experienced any kind of bigotry in his two decades in Dahlonega.

I think its a good idea not to be naive, said Deb Rowe, the pubs owner, and now they started talking about Chester Doles, who sometimes came in for a beer at the bar. Someone had noticed that on the building where the banner had been, inside a locked glass case near the door, there was a flier for Doless personal training services, showing him oiled up and smiling in full bodybuilder pose.

Is this indicative of something bigger? said Dunlap. Like, do they think they have a voice?

I think Robertas using the national polarization against us all, said Jeremy Sharp, a white student at the university who was organizing a boycott of her businesses, which included two buildings she rented out to antique dealers, several hundred units of student housing, and a Holiday Inn Express.

A peaceable revolution, Sharp said at a news conference on the sixth day as residents crowded into a small room at the university to hear.

A few days ago, we had an obtuse sign put up, he began. When I walked out and saw that, it scared me. It scared me as a Catholic. It scared me as a person who has friends who look different than me. We are here because we are afraid.

People clapped and cheered as Sharp began explaining a plan to withhold rent from Green-Garrett and barrage Holiday Inns corporate offices with phone calls, which would lead the hotel chains parent company, IHG, to issue a statement saying that they had expressed our concerns to Green-Garrett and that This is not the type of activity that we want any of our brands associated with. As Sharp kept talking, two Dahlonega council members arrived, explaining that they were only there to get the public sentiment.

So, no comment? a young woman yelled at them.

The only comment Ill make is that the KKK does not represent the values of this town, one of the men said.

Then whyd you vote for it? Whyd you vote for it? the woman yelled, getting more upset, and even though there was never such a vote, some people began cheering her on.

Lets keep this civil! They did not vote for that sign! said another young woman trying to quiet the room, but emotions were high.

A man said that the KKK had recently applied unsuccessfully to take part in the Adopt-A-Highway program in a neighboring county. A woman said she was worried about all the undertones of hate being brought out of the woodwork.

Im very concerned, said Daniel Blackman, a former state Senate candidate who was the first black person ever to run for office from nearby Forsyth County, which has a long history of violence against blacks and was until the late 1980s known as a whites only county. Whether its a stunt or whether Ms. Garrett really feels that way, the fact is there are children here that might be threatened or afraid and weve got to get ahead of it. The last thing you want to see is someone crazy enough to do something stupid.

Soon, the meeting ended, and as everyone was heading out into the cold Dahlonega night, an older white man, trying to be sensitive, said to Blackman, Be careful.

The next morning, all of this was the topic of North Georgia talk radio, and the host was taking callers. A woman named Sharon was on the line.

Its not just fake news, its a fake agenda, she began, and explained that the banner might have been part of an elaborate plot not only to create chaos in Dahlonega, but also to undermine the presidency of Donald Trump and ultimately, the nation.

She knew all of this, she said, because she had gone online and discovered a website for a group with locations across the country including in Dahlonega that was made up of former congressional staffers working for the previous administration. They are supporting the impeachment. They support open borders. They are supporting Obamacare. They are promoting disruption at town halls I call it bullying and they have a potential for violence.

I hope everyone is aware that this type of activity I call it subversion, with a fake narrative is taking root in the area, she continued, and meanwhile, in Dahlonega, another new development was unfolding.

Over at town hall, an assistant to Green-Garrett was filing paperwork for a new sign permit.

Size of sign: 4×6.

Material of sign: wood (painted).

Color of sign: Gold with Black Lettering.

How sign will be attached to wall: Screwed.

It was an application to make the sign permanent. It would say, Historic Ku Klux Klan Meeting Hall, and that was how the seventh day ended.

***

And then, two days after that, the application was withdrawn.

Green-Garrett issued her first statement since unleashing all of this eight days before, saying that she had been trying to get a hotel built only to meet opposition at every turn. I have no other motivation other than to bring businesses and tax revenue to the city, her statement said. I want to move forward and do something positive for the city of Dahlonega.

She said nothing about the KKK banner, and when she was reached by phone at her winter home in Florida, she said no comment and hung up.

At her real estate office in a worn-out strip mall on the edge of town, her assistant, Barbara Bridges, said the banner was there, rolled up and stored in a closet.

The town issued an official statement saying that Dahlonega is a welcoming community for people of diverse backgrounds and that recent episodes are not indicative of a change in our character or philosophy.

The students called off the boycott and declared victory.

And now it was a sunny afternoon on the town square.

People were stopping by the candy shop, or wandering down the aisles of antique shops where Kenny G was playing through the speakers, or eating a sandwich across from the building where a KKK banner had been.

Yeah, its the site of one of the last major gold rushes, a man standing on the square said to a woman, explaining what he knew about Dahlonega.

Do you have this in a large? a woman asked at a T-shirt shop.

Reverend Webb, home this afternoon, said he was heartened to see how so many people had taken a stand. Dahlonega is a sacred place for everybody, he said.

At the same time, he said, the episode was not simply about the banner. To him, it was about a banner that had appeared after an election in which the new president had said certain things that had appealed to white nationalists and other hatemongers, whether he intended to or not, opening the door to events that could spiral out of control.

The atmosphere hes created in America today has caused people to think they have some kind of power again, he said. I thought that before, and I still do.

Doles, who was out driving in his truck, said he agreed with this assessment. He had been on the way home from the gym when he first saw the banner and the flags, he said, and thought to himself, Its been a long time coming. He said he had recently raised his own flag for the first time in years the American one, because he finally feels pleased with the direction of the country.

In the last 50 years, I didnt think we had the votes to elect a governor, much less a president, Doles said. And yet here we are today.

All of this was what worried Valerie Fambrough, sitting outside at a coffee shop on the pleasant afternoon. She felt good about all the people, including Trump supporters, who had come out to proclaim a message of love. She felt unsettled that some people thought she was part of an alt-left agenda. It all felt like the beginning of something, not the end.

Im just scared these days, she said, even though the banner was no longer anywhere in sight.

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In Georgia, reaction to KKK banner is a sign of the times – Washington Post

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Then Again: Klan crosses burned in Vermont, but not for long – vtdigger.org

Members of the Ku Klux Klan gather in Montpelier in 1927. Photo courtesy of Vermont Historical Society

(Then Again is Mark Bushnells column about Vermont history.)

The incident, which occurred during the mid-1920s, was recounted years later by a woman whose husband had helped light the crosses. The woman said her husband felt no need to hide his involvement. After the crosses were lit, she said, My husband came down Main Street carrying rope and an oil can and was smudged with smoke.

The fires set that night no doubt burned brightly but briefly, much like the Klans popularity in Vermont.

The unidentified womans quote, and indeed most of what we know about the Klan in Vermont, comes from Maudean Neills 1989 book Fiery Crosses in the Green Mountains.

The Ku Klux Klan was founded in the South immediately after the Civil War. During the Reconstruction era, former Confederates saw it as a way of intimidating African-Americans and carpetbaggers, Northerners accused of profiting from the Souths miseries.

Fervor for the Klan died down, but then rekindled in the early 1920s as an organization with national ambitions. The Klan began sending emissaries to states far from its birthplace in the Deep South. By 1922, the Klan was winning converts in Vermont.

With few blacks to harass in Vermont, the Klan here turned its wrath on anyone who was not a white Protestant, including Catholics, Jews and recent immigrants.

Joining the Klan was simple; applicants had to answer 10 questions, including: Are you a native-born, white, Gentile, American citizen?; Do you believe in the tenets of the Christian religion?; and Do you believe in and will you faithfully strive for the eternal maintenance of white supremacy? Ten yes answers and $10 and you were in. The money was divided among Klan leaders. New members also had to rent their robes and hoods.

The groups secretiveness alienated many Vermonters. Ministers railed against the Klan from their pulpits, one stating that he had never done anything he felt so ashamed of that hed had to hide his face.

The Legislature also attacked the Klans hoods, debating a bill to ban the wearing of hoods or masks. Offenders could face three months in jail and a $500 fine. When legislators realized this would have put a severe damper on Halloween and masquerade balls, they tried to write exceptions into the law. Seeing the complexity of rewriting the law, or perhaps embarrassed by their simplistic approach to a complex problem, they let the bill die.

The Klan burned crosses across the state in Barre, Rutland, St. Johnsbury, Lyndon and many other communities. A gathering in St. Johnsbury in 1924 reportedly drew 2,000 people. Thousands more attended Klan rallies in Morrisville and Montpelier the following year. How many of them were actually Vermonters is unclear. Klansmen and Klanswomen from across New England attended the events, as evidenced by the many out-of-state license plates newspaper reporters noted on vehicles parked in the surrounding fields.

No one seems to doubt that hundreds of Vermonters joined the Klan. Some historians put the number as high as 10,000 to 14,000. Others believe it was no more than 2,000. What drew people to the group varied. Some were certainly drawn to its message of hatred and exclusion, that if things werent going well for you, it was the fault of African-Americans or Jews or immigrants or organized labor.

But others claimed they werent drawn by the groups message of hate. Those Vermonters said they saw the Klan as little more than a social club, akin to the Masons or the Rotary Club. Indeed, Neill wrote her book after seeing pictures of Klan gatherings in her mother-in-laws photo album. When she asked about the photos, her mother-in-law said that it was just a club. A lot of her friends were in it and it seemed like fun, something social to do.

In conducting interviews for her book, Neill found many who echoed her mother-in-laws opinions, including a South Barre couple who were talked into joining by friends. It was part of a deal. They would join the Klan if the other couple joined the Grange. By and large, Neill found, people who joined were community-minded, well-respected and religiously inclined.

Photos of the day seem to bear this out. In the collection at the Vermont Historical Society, most of the Klan-related photos show people wearing the white outfits but with the hoods pulled back, faces plain to see. The photos are at once reassuring perhaps these people didnt quite understand the hatred the national organization stood for and haunting, because the images run so contrary to the widely held view of Vermont as a bastion of tolerance.

Klan membership in Vermont in the 1920s never amounted to more than a tiny fraction of the states population, which at the time was slightly more than 350,000. Indeed, many communities pushed back.

Rutland and Burlington temporarily prohibited people from wearing masks and hoods in public. Rutland officials fired a police officer after learning he had attended a Klan rally, and Rutland residents boycotted businessmen who were reportedly members of the group. When Klan members held an outdoor rally in East Clarendon, a group of citizens drove a small convoy of cars to the event and scared them off.

The states newspapers also attacked the Klan. The Burlington Free Press declared the group was as welcome in Vermont as the plague, and the St. Albans Messenger predicted the Klan wouldnt survive the biting blast of Vermont common sense.

A well-publicized crime by several Klansmen incensed many Vermonters and hastened the groups decline in the state. In August 1924, three Klansmen, loaded with liquor and little common sense, broke into Burlingtons St. Marys Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. The cathedral, one Klansman convinced the others, was the staging area for a Catholic plot. He claimed the building stood above a massive cache of guns, ammunition, poisonous gas, acid, even airplanes enough to kill all the Protestants in northern New England.

When they found that the cathedral contained no such cache, they decided instead to steal some of the churchs vestments, a cross, some candles and other items. Police, alerted by a priest who had seen a light in the church, arrived quickly. As the burglars fled, one of them fired a revolver. The Klansmen were eventually arrested, convicted and given sentences ranging from four months to three years.

If some Vermonters sense of tolerance ever included acceptance of the Klan, that feeling was short-lived. After the convictions, and allegations that leaders had embezzled from the group, the Klan lost what support it once had in Vermont, and the sight of crosses burning became a thing of the past.

Read the original here:

Then Again: Klan crosses burned in Vermont, but not for long – vtdigger.org

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March 12, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Asheboro mayor on KKK rally: ‘We also have right to object’ – Asheboro Courier Tribune

By Chip Womick cwomick@courier-tribune.com Twitter: @ChipWomickCT

ASHEBORO The City of Asheboro issued a press release Sunday afternoon in response to KKK plans an event in Asheboro in May.

On Friday, March 10, the News and Observer reported that The Loyal White Knights had announced an event would be held in Asheboro in May.

The City of Asheboro feels it important to respond to this announcement and denounces, in the strongest terms possible, the message of hate and division advocated by the Ku Klux Klan and its affiliates.

The people of Asheboro have worked too hard to unify our community to let an outside group come in and spread racist views without raising our voices loudly in protest, said Mayor David H. Smith on Saturday afternoon. They may have a right to peacefully assemble, but we also have a right to object at the top of our collective voice.

City Manager John N. Ogburn reports that no applications have been received by the city related to the event. Mayor Smith went on to say, Its a shame that we spent countless hours collaborating as a community to win the coveted All-America City award last year, only to be reminded that forces of division are out there seeking to tear communities down. If anything, this announcement strengthens my resolve to make Asheboro the most inclusive and welcoming city in North Carolina to all.

The city will share any information it receives related to this event upon receipt.

The News & Observer story said that The Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, which is based in Pelham an unincorporated community about 45 minutes north of Burlington, near the Virginia line had announced on its website that it would hold a rally with speeches, dinner and a cross burning at dark in May in Asheboro.

The group has held other events, including a parade through Roxboro in December. The parade, to celebrate Donald Trumps presidential election victory, drew more than 100 participants.

In a Facebook posted dated March 8, a group called the Silver Valley Redneck Revolt also addressed the announced rally:

The Loyal White Nights of the KKK in Asheboro, NC recently announced on their website that they will be holding a klavern rally and cross burning at an unknown location on May 6th. Klaverns are meetings for confirmed Klan members and new prospective members to be inducted into their white supremacist cult. We need to let the Klan know that if they leave their enclaves their will be a broad response from the community. This event is to publicly denounce the Klan, thier beliefs, and show that we will not back down.

Exact times and location of the counter demo are TBD. If you wish to co-host this event with a group you organize with please direct message us.

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Asheboro mayor on KKK rally: ‘We also have right to object’ – Asheboro Courier Tribune

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KKK announces cross burning, rally in North Carolina town – News & Observer


News & Observer
KKK announces cross burning, rally in North Carolina town
News & Observer
A North Carolina Ku Klux Klan group has announced on its website that it will hold a rally and cross burning in May in Asheboro. The event was scheduled by The Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, which is based in Pelham an unincorporated …
KKK plans to rally in AsheboroGreensboro News & Record
Vermont high court weighs hate crime case involving KKK recruitment fliersWashington Times
College newspaper rethinks name over KKK mixupNew York Post
MassLive.com –Observer –WRAL.com
all 16 news articles »

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KKK announces cross burning, rally in North Carolina town – News & Observer

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March 11, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

KKK Wizard Found Dead Smelled of Cat Piss; Wife Accused of Killing Him – The Root

Frank Ancona (MSNBC, All in With Chris Hayes screenshot)

The imperial wizard of the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, who was recently found dead near a river in Missouri, apparently smelled like cat piss and stunk to high heaven during his life.

According to the River Front Times, the scent permeated from Frank Anconas clothes, clinging to him like a blanket, even on his hair and mustache. The news article notes that he was aware of his stench but did not know what to do about it.

Much of his odor seemed to be the result of his wife Malissa Anconas determination to see their home turned into a giant kennel. The 44-year-old kept dozens of cats and two dogs within her space, which was, by all reports, a pigsty (though that might be an insult to pigsties). A neighbor told the Times that as many as 70 cats lived there at one time. The animals made homes out of piles of dirty clothes, went through open garbage and kicked liter across the floors.

My dad said sometimes he had to sleep on the couch because the bedroom was so trashed, Frank Anconas son from a previous marriage, Frank Ancona Jr., told the Times.

The couple apparently argued all the time, with one neighbor, James Russell, saying that she could hear Malissa Ancona screaming at the white supremacist night and day.

It is Malissa Ancona who is accused of killing her husband. And by all accounts, she was not a great person to be around. She had a history of relying on pills, she allegedly stole from him, and of course, there was the house that was unfit for any animal, human or not, to live in.

About six months ago, the senior Frank Ancona reportedly called his wifes ex-husband, Paul Jinkerson Sr., and asked if he would take her back.

I was like, Youre out of your mind, Jinkerson told the Times. I guess he thought for a brief, fleeting moment that I would alleviate his pain and take her off his hands.

Frank Ancona then tried Malissas grown children, pleading with them to take their mother.

Is there anybody in your family that will let your mother [move] with them, he asked, according to the report. I cannot take her being around me another minute; her life, her drug-dealing, her stealing. … I cant take anymore of it and she needs a place to go ASAP.

Frank Ancona told Malissas daughter, 25-year-old Lauren Jinkerson, that he suspected that she was slipping the blood pressure medicine Clonidine into his coffee to knock him out so she could steal his medication, the Times reports.

Really what she did could be considered attempted murder i think, he texted to his stepdaughter, according to the report. I can barely move or think straight right now…..very weak dizzy and blurred vision.

Its like Im a prisoner in my own home, he added, explaining that he was hesitant to throw Malissa out, fearing that she would hurt herself or call the cops and frame him for abuse.

Shes a huge drug addict, and you need to get rid of her or else shell drug you one day and shell kill you instead, Lauren warned her stepfather.

Lauren Jinkersons predictions may have turned out to be true.

On Feb. 13, both Malissa Ancona and her son, Paul Jinkerson Jr., were charged with first-degree murder, armed criminal action, tampering with evidence and abandonment of a corpse in Frank Anconas death.

Frank Ancona had been shot with a 9 mm handgun, and then again with a shotgun.

Malissa Ancona told detectives that she and her son killed Frank during the early-morning hours of Feb. 9, with her son being the one to pull the trigger, authorities said.

Ms. Ancona admitted to me in an audio video recorded interview that her biological son Paul Edward Jinkerson Jr., shot and killed Frank Ancona while he was asleep in the master bedroom of the residence, St. Francois County Sheriffs Detective Matt Wampler wrote in a probable cause statement. Ms. Ancona admitted that she failed to report the crime and additionally attempted to destroy blood evidence and altered the crime scene in an attempt to conceal the offense and was acting in concert with her son Paul Jinkerson Jr.

Both suspects entered not guilty pleas last month during their initial court appearance.

However, Paul Jinkerson Jr.s father and siblings apparently believe that he could have been framed by his mother. They described the 24-year-old as one of the few who had not completely cut ties with the matriarch, adding that he was a computer science student before he got caught up in meth and pills.

He was a geek, Paul Jinkerson Sr. told the Times regarding his son, who he said has probably never fired a gun in his life or even been in a fistfight. He wasnt somebody who would go out and do this.

In fact, the family believes that the young man was drugged.

Paul Jinkerson Sr. told the news site that two weeks before Ancona was killed, his son mentioned that Malissa wanted to kill Frank and that she wanted him [the son] to help her clean it up.

The elder Jinkerson understandably lost his cool, and the pair drove over to the Anconas home so that Jinkerson Jr. could pick up his laptop that he had left over there. Jinkerson Sr. told his son that he was not going to be talking to his mother anymore.

However, Malissa Ancona was at home, and the situation quickly turned sour and deteriorated.

In retrospect, I should have done so much more, he said. I should have called Frank. I should have told Malissa we knew.

Read more at the River Front Times.

Excerpt from:

KKK Wizard Found Dead Smelled of Cat Piss; Wife Accused of Killing Him – The Root

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March 10, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

US president promoting Islamophobia, racism: Journalist – Press TV

US President Donald Trump leaves in his limousine after the annual Friends of Ireland luncheon at the Capitol March 16, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by AFP) The White House has announced it will appeal against the rulings of two federal judges who blocked President Donald Trumps second executive order about travel ban on citizens of Muslim-majority countries. Two federal judges in Hawaii and Maryland froze Trumps order to close US borders to nationals from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. Press TV has asked Sander Hicks, an investigative journalist, and Peter Sinnott, an independent scholar, both from New York about the argument on theban in the United States. Hicks said that the new US president showedhis racist and anti-Islam nature during the 2016 presidential race. Trump was Islamophobic and his targeting of Muslims is now a part of this legal complaint, the analyst said on Thursday night. He said several judges and pro-migrant activists are going to file a lawsuit against the US presidents travel ban. Everything that happened in the past year with the campaign and all the clear Islamophobia is now in a legal document, he added. Referring to the background of the Trump family in promoting racism, he said, Fred Trump, Donald Trumps father, was arrested in 1927 at a Ku Klux Klan riot. The Department of Justice in 1973 prosecuted Donald Trump and Fred Trump for racist discriminatory practices; so, Trumps scapegoating of Islam is the oldest trick in the book, Hicks noted. He went on to say that the courts are stopping Trump from his Islamophobic, racist anddiscriminatory ban on any immigrants or any refugees from the top six countries. Read More: The immigration problem that the US and other Western states are facing are the consequences of former American president George W. Bushs decision to invade Iraq in 2003 and goes back to the 9/11 terrorist attack and its cover-up by Bush and his vice president Dick Cheney, he argued. According to the commentator, the United States so-called war on terror is in fact a war for US oil and a war for US global strategic interests. Sinnott saidTrumps executive order is not a travel ban against Muslims.Pointing to judicial attempts to block Trumps order, he said the setback is merely political. The US Supreme Court, he said, will uphold the order “based on its wording, because the wording does not discriminate against Muslims. He touched on Yemen, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Syria as the countries whichhave difficulties with war and terrorism and cannot vet immigrants. Iran is a different case in the travel ban list and it could be negotiated to solve long-term problems between Washington and Tehran, he said. Unlike any of the others on the list, Iran has the opportunity to change the parameters, because its not a country in civil war or incredible turmoil. Referring to the exemption of Saudi Arabia from the travel ban list, he said, It is the center of a philosophy that has been attacking the United States and it is one of the main exporters of a philosophy and of a people that in the end are involved in terrorism.

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March 17, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

KKK ‘not welcome’ in Asheboro, NC, over planned cross-burning, mayor says – Washington Times

The Ku Klux Klan isnt welcome in Asheboro, North Carolina, the citys mayor said Monday, notwithstanding its plan to hold a cross-burning there in a matter of weeks. A KKK offshoot known as the Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan announced plans last week to gather in Asheboro, north of Charlotte, for a whites only event on May 6, spurring condemnation from the city and a local congressman. Mayor David Smith doubled down on the citys stance Monday and told local reporters that Klan members arent welcome in Asheboro as far as hes concerned. Its contrary to what we believe. Its contrary to what most people in Asheboro believe, Mr. Smith told the Asheboro Courtier-Tribune Monday. Its contrary to the message of the City of Asheboro. Our position is, dont come here. We would prefer that they not come to Asheboro, they are not welcome in Asheboro, he told a local Fox News affiliate. The Loyal White Knights is based out of Pelham and is considered to be perhaps the most active Klan group in the United States, according to the Anti-Defamation League. That particular faction boasted upwards of 200 members across 15 states last year, the ADL said in a 2016 report. On its website last week, the Loyal White Knight said itll congregate on May 6 in Asheboro for a rally that will include a klavern meeting, speeches, dinner and a crosslighting at dark. The people of Asheboro have worked too hard to unify our community to let an outside group come in and spread racist views without raising our voices loudly in protest. They may have a right to peacefully assemble, but we also have a right to object at the top of our collective voice, the mayor said in a statement issued by the city Sunday. The rally may be constitutional, but this groups message and legacy are an affront to our core value that all people are created equal, U.S. Rep. Mark Walker, North Carolina Republican, said in a statement of his own Monday. But with less than two months until the scheduled event, Asheboro officials this week said the Klan has yet to begin the bureaucratic process of seeking the citys permission. Marching on city streets and using a city-managed facility would both require permits, but the Klan has so far failed to request an application for either, the city manager said Sunday. The Loyal White Knights did not respond to requests for comment, the Courier-Tribune reported. In December, the Loyal White Knights organized a victory parade near Pelham to celebrate President Trumps White House victory. Their celebration was cut short, however, when a party the night beforeresulted in criminal charges for two Klansmen and a trip to the hospital for another. The KKK maintained 130 chapters across the U.S. during 2016, the Southern Poverty Law Center reported last month, including the Loyal White Knights.

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Remember This? The Ku Klux Klan would forever regret their expansion into the Town of Barrie – BarrieToday

What do you picture when you think of the Ku Klux Klan? Likely, you think of a group of bigoted fanatics in white robes and hoods, centred in the American south, carrying out their cause of promoting all things white and Protestant. You might be surprised to learn that the reach of the KKK spread north of the border, and at the height of their national popularity, the most infamous of their Canadian actions occurred right here in Barrie. The Klan was born immediately after the American Civil War when returning Confederate soldiers found their way of life forever changed and they put the blame largely on freed black men and their sympathizers. The United States government had no patience for continued violence in the South and so the KKK was outlawed in 1871. The Klan re-formed just after World War 1. So-called ordinary Americans were becoming very concerned about their communities and their jobs in the face of mass immigration from Europe. Black Americans were slowly being allowed more rights. Many white Americans saw the Klan as the guardians of their way of life and joined in huge numbers. At the same time, enough Canadians were worried about seeing this country lose its Britishness,meaning increased ethic and religious diversity, that KKK chapters formed here too in the 1920s. The KKK in Canada attempted to set itself apart from their American counterparts by denouncing lawlessness and violence. However, the Klan would forever regret their expansion into the Town of Barrie because it was here that their movement started its rapid decline into unpopularity. His father had sent him away. William Skelly was in his late twenties but had already lived a lifetime of troubles. In his native Northern Ireland, he had witnessed sectarian violence including the death of a girl he had loved. Skelly fought for Britain in the Great War and had been badly wounded, resulting in the metal plate now protecting his skull. He married but it seems he was charged with assaulting his wife. Other charges included drunkenness and assaulting a police officer. A fresh start was in order. The young Irishman jobbed about in Ontario for many months before arriving in Simcoe County. He worked for a farmer in Innisfil for a time before finding employment with A.J. Tuck in his junk store on Dunlop St. in Barrie. Far from home, friendless and having no real prospects, William Skelly was ripe for the picking when the Ku Klux Klan brought their roadshow to town in June 1926. On a hill, more or less where the Travelodge hotel stands at Bayfield St. and the 400, an eighty-foot cross was set on fire and was seen for miles around. It attracted the disenfranchised young man and he became a member of the Klan that night. William Skelly first met William Butler, a local young man about his own age, who was Kleagle, or membership recruiter, of the Barrie klavern. In turn, he came to know Clare Lee who was klavern secretary and a co-worker of Butler at the shoe factory where both were employed. Quite quickly after becoming acquainted, the three Klansmen decided that they needed to perform some sort of action to cement their commitment to the ideals of the Klan and, at first, chose the Champlain monument in Orillia for a demonstration of their dedication. It was a symbol of Roman Catholicism, or so they believed, and as such was counter to what they thought the KKK stood for. Skelly took a revolver from his employers shop and purchased bullets, dynamite, fuse and blasting caps at a local hardware store on June 10, 1926. The trio was unable to find any means of transportation to Orillia, but their determination to make a clear anti-Catholic statement that day was unwavering and so they settled on something nearby. Skelly, Butler and Lee decided to blow up St. Marys Catholic Church. Just after 6:00 a.m. on Friday, June 11, the church caretaker, Mr. LeClair, arrived at St. Marys and found a door on the north side of the building wide open. He was shocked to find that some kind of explosion had occurred, blowing a hole 4 feet around in the floor in the area of the centre aisle, and had sent chunks of wood flying through stained glass windows, broken light fixtures and shattered floor joists. The police were called and almost immediately identified a piece of time fuse left at the scene. The act was called variably an outrage and a desecration in Barrie papers, and the local police began an intense but short investigation into who could have done this. A visit to a hardware store quickly pinpointed a suspect the Irish chap working at A.J. Tucks shop. When staying in Barrie became too hot a prospect, Butler and Lee helped him get away to Toronto. Skelly was at first helped by Klansmen there but they soon decided that he should be handed to the authorities and that the Klan should immediately cut ties with him. William Skelly was arrested at King and Yonge St. in Toronto about 10 days after his crime, given up by Klan organizer, Major Proctor. He carried a letter, that he had been instructed to sign, stating that the attack on the church was all his idea and had nothing to do with the Klan. Skelly was brought back to Barrie and lodged in the Barrie Jail. At the courthouse, he was eager to confess, lay out the whole sordid tale and easily implicate his accomplices, Butler and Lee. The townsfolk, who had been aghast at the crime committed by this outsider and the hate group from the south, were taken aback by the involvement of two local sons. William Skelly was assessed by a psychiatrist in August of 1926 and, although the deed was an exercise in madness, Skelly was deemed fit for trial. As the trial approached, he offered to plead guilty but Justice Logie refused to accept the plea and moved for a full court hearing. That third week of October, the trial began with standing room only and reports of curious citizens peering in the courthouse windows when they couldnt get a seat inside. The court heard that the three men drew paper scraps to see which of them would carry out the mission, and that Skelly drew one depicting a fiery cross which gave him the assignment. Lee showed him where the church was located and how to get into it. After fortifying Skelly with some dandelion wine, his co-conspirators sent him of to do the deed. Skelly set his explosives on the top of a brick wall running north-south in the church basement and lit the fuse. He ran away and fired one shot of the revolver to alert Lee, who lived nearby, that the thing was done. Next came the sound of the explosion, which sounded innocuous enough to those who heard it, much like the backfire of a car. In the end, all three were found guilty and sent to Kingston Penitentiary. Skelly drew the harshest sentence of four years at hard labour with a recommendation from Justice Logie that he be deported at the end of his sentence. The Justice had a few words to add in closing. In this country, I am told, for many years Catholics and Protestants have lived in amity, side by side, never troubling each other. That is as it should be. We do not want in this country conditions which formerly prevailed in that distressful isle, Ireland, nor do we want those conditions if the press is to be believed which prevail at the present moment in the republic to the south. Afterwards, the Ku Klux Klan was held in very low esteem by the outraged Canadian people, both for its hateful mandate and for shaping a lost immigrant into a criminal and then turning their backs on him. The KKK quickly lost any favour they had built up in this country after that.

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March 17, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

What Do Holy Cross, An African-American Newspaper, and the Ku Klux Klan Have in Common? – NewBostonPost (blog)

By Evan Lips | March 15, 2017, 21:52 EDT Printed from: http://newbostonpost.com/2017/03/15/what-do-holy-cross-an-african-american-newspaper-and-the-ku-klux-klan-have-in-common/ For much of the past 40 years, the student newspaper at Worcesters College of the Holy Cross has coincidentally shared the same name as the chief publication of the Ku Klux Klan. Apparently, this innocent unintended co-occurrence did not become a problem that needed addressing by Holy Cross professors until 2017. Last month, the editors-in-chief of The Crusader, the schools student-run newspaper, received a letter signed by 48 faculty members calling on them to consider a name change in response to the growing anti-Muslim tensions in our country, and to the fact that the Ku Klux Klan official newspaper shares the same name as our own. Historically, the term crusader refers to the period of medieval Crusades, in which Christian solders fought with Muslim forces in an effort to seize control of the disputed Holy Land, which had been under Islamic control. The undersigned professors cited the message in the colleges mission statement, which is marked by freedom, mutual respect and civility, in the letter and stressed that they question the value of a connection to names and imagery that are often used by others in ways counter to our mission and goals. Students running the paper responded with a letter of their own in which they voiced their agreement with the undersigned faculty. In another coincidence, the papers editors-in-chief indicate that the original change in name of the newspaper from The Tomahawk to The Crusader as the former name referred to Native American culture. In 1955, the editors of this newspaper adopted the name Crusader in place of the former Tomahawk, announcing that the new name would better represent the values of Holy Cross and of the publication, the newspapers response stated. Effective immediately, we would like to initiate an ongoing discussion open to all students, faculty, staff, and alumni to determine whether this claim remains accurate in the year 2017. The student editors also mentioneda letter they received from an entity not associated with the college that denounced mainline, controlled liberal media and claimed that multiculturalism is a prescription for white genocide. The student editors wrote that they wondered whether the name of our publication might have been one influence behind this individuals decision to send such a vitriolic letter and later tried to make a connection between the authors denunciation of mainline, controlled liberal media and the alt-right. We do not doubt that many would consider the Ku Klux Klans The Crusader to be a form of alternative media, and we consider our association with this label to be worthy of urgent discussion, the editors concluded. That discussion is slated for Thursday night at 6 p.m., and will be held inside the universitys Rehm Library. Left unreported, however, is the fact that the Chicago Crusader a newspaper aimed at serving the African-American communities in Chicago, Illinois, and Gary, Indiana, also shares the same name as the colleges newspaper. The Chicago Crusaders mission statement notes that blacks must control their own community to the unconquerable host of Africans who are laying their sacrifices upon the editorial altar for their race. The publication does not appear to be considering a name change at this time. comments

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March 17, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

In Georgia, reaction to KKK banner is a sign of the times – Washington Post

DAHLONEGA, Ga. The mayor was still home when his phone started ringing. The reverend was still down with the flu when he began getting one message after another. Valerie Fambrough had just dropped off her daughters at day care when she heard. Have you seen the sign in the square? a parent asked her on a cold morning three weeks ago. Theres a Ku Klux Klan sign in the town square. And, in fact, there was. Just past the old brick courthouse and across the street from candy stores and antique shops, a large rectangular banner was screwed tight into the cracked wood siding of a long-vacant building on East Main Street. Historic Ku Klux Klan Meeting Hall, it said. It had a cartoonish drawing of a white-sheeted person raising a hand. In addition, there was a Confederate battle flag at one corner of the building and a red flag with a white cross and the letters KKK at the other. They were fluttering in the wind blowing across Dahlonega, and what happened next would become one more pocket of America dealing with a disturbing incident at a time when hate crimes have been on the rise and new brands of white nationalism have been making a comeback across the country. In Upstate New York, the home of a Jewish man was spray-painted with swastikas. In Virginia, fliers were distributed in several neighborhoods with the words, Make America WHITE again-and greatness will follow. In Colorado, two typewritten notes that read WERE GONNA BLOW UP ALL OF YOU REFUGEES, were left at a community center serving mainly Muslim immigrants. Now whatever was happening in other parts of the country seemed to have arrived in Dahlonega. The mayor got dressed and headed for the square. The reverend called the sheriff. Fambrough recalled how she hurried over to see for herself, saying No, no, not here, the whole way, and Hell, no, until she was there, alone, staring at the banner. She was a white 37-year-old mother of two, a program specialist in the biology department at the University of North Georgia who called Dahlonega a sweet, loving town and had never protested anything in her life. Now she felt her anger rising. She remembered the flip-chart paper in her trunk left over from a presentation a month before and made two signs Not in my town, she wrote, and Love Lives Here then got out and stood in her sandals holding them. She was freezing. The square was still quiet, with all the shops closed. She scanned the windows across the street to see if someone was watching. She planned which way she would run if something happened. Cars passed, and she scrutinized each face. A woman shook her head and kept going. A man gave her a thumbs-up. A woman called out of her window, Did you put that sign up? and Fambrough said No, no! and then Bridget Kahn parked, got out, and now there were the two of them. A woman in a red minivan stopped and yelled Yall are angry! Youre angry, angry people! and drove off. A black pickup truck parked across the street, and a muscular man got out, and a reporter from the local paper whod just arrived told the women it was Chester Doles, a former leader in the Klan and a white-separatist group called the National Alliance who had gone to prison on federal weapons charges. He lived just outside town and was currently a personal trainer who also worked promoting hate rock concerts around the country. He pulled out a cellphone and began taking photographs. He said something to the women, but they couldnt hear. Whats that, sir? Kahn called out, and the women heard him say something about how glorious it was to see such a sign in the light of day, and then he drove off, even as more people were arriving white-haired locals, college students and others who said they were appalled; a Native American man who brought a ladder and tried to rip the banner down; a white man who argued the KKK banner and flag should come down but not the Confederate battle flag; a young black man who stood there crying. Here came the mayor and the sheriff trying to figure out what was going on. Here came two pickup trucks circling the square, revving their engines. The woman in the red minivan returned, honking her horn and seeming to veer too close to the protesters. A school bus passed, and now Fambrough was crying as the town dispatched a cherry picker to the scene, and workers began ratcheting out the first of 21 screws holding the banner in place. Another truck arrived, this one belonging to a local roofing company and plastered with Confederate logos, and several workers climbed on the roof and began removing the flags. And that was how the banner came down, and the flags came down, and all the rest began. *** All over town that first day, people kept saying this was not the Dahlonega they knew. Our little pocket of loveliness is how one resident described the former gold mining town an hour north of Atlanta, known for its redbrick square lined with antique shops and wine tasting rooms. It was the seat of Lumpkin County, which did not have the reputation for racial violence that many other north Georgia counties did, though no one disputed that there were probably Klan members scattered around. It was overwhelmingly white and Republican, though Dahlonega itself was home to a small, deeply rooted, black population, and had in recent years attracted a more liberal crowd who considered themselves part of the progressive South. Now, though, all anyone could talk about was what happened in the town square. Even before the last screw came out of the banner, photos of it were appearing all over social media with captions like WTF, Dahlonega? and people began speculating about who did it. Maybe it was a college prank. Maybe it was an outsider. Maybe it really was the Klan, a relic coming back to life. In an area that voted heavily for Donald Trump, speculation began that the whole thing was the work of anti-Trump activists, and when she got home, Fambrough went online and saw that people were accusing her of putting up the banner, saying she was part of the alt-left. By evening, though, people had found out who was really responsible: It was one of their own, an 84-year-old white woman named Roberta Green-Garrett, the owner of the building in question who lives in a brick mansion with four white columns on a hill overlooking the town. Offering no explanation and declining to speak with reporters, she had told town officials that she had allowed the banner to go up and might try to put it up again. She had been seeking permission to build a hotel on the square, and people speculated that it was all an audacious ploy to embarrass the town into approving her plans. An isolated case of Mrs. Green, is how the mayor, Gary McCullough, described it, saying that there was no evidence the building was ever used by the Klan and that he hoped people would move on. For many people, though, it was too late for that. The point wasnt who did it. The point was that it had happened, and whatever it had unleashed was taking on a life of its own. As day two began, a local Unitarian church was organizing a unity march for later that afternoon. Fambrough heard and began calling her friends. Its about showing people that they have nothing to be afraid of in our town! she told them. More calls were made, including one to the minister, John Webb, a former town council member who is black, who had heard by then who had done it, which didnt make it less worrying to him. He said he had noticed more pickup trucks roaring around during the presidential campaign, Confederate battle flags flying Guys I know, he said, saying the South will rise again and all that stuff and that regardless of why the banner went up, Its very possible it could boomerang into something bigger than it is. He was 72, a veteran of the civil rights struggle still sick from the flu, but he was going, and he called others to go, too, and as word spread about the coming demonstration, so did a parallel set of rumors. The KKK was coming. The neo-Nazis were coming. Black Lives Matter was coming. Fambrough heard that a so-called antifascist group from Atlanta was coming and began feeling sick imagining windows being smashed and businesses being torched. The sheriff called for backup and readied a plan in case a riot or something worse was about to happen in Dahlonega. In the late afternoon, people began rallying around the square, waving signs. Not OKKK America, one said. Dahlonega Loves Yall, read another, and Really, Roberta? People honked horns in support. A local fiddler came. A member of the folk-rock duo Indigo Girls came and everybody sang This Land Is Your Land. Soon, several pickup trucks arrived, revving their engines and circling the square, with Confederate battle flags and Make America Great Again flags flying. When a protester started yelling at one of them, Fambrough yelled at the protester, Dont make assumptions! By the third day, events began taking another turn. More s— stirrers! someone posted online about the protesters. You all are the ones that are going to ruin that town and jobs will be lost!!! Good job, morons!! All crybabies jump on board! wrote someone else. Let it go, a woman posted. But people were not letting it go. Its like a certain political climate has opened up, said Paul Dunlap, a professor at the university, sitting at the end of the fifth day around a fire with friends at Shenanigans pub on the square. An openly gay man, he said he had never experienced any kind of bigotry in his two decades in Dahlonega. I think its a good idea not to be naive, said Deb Rowe, the pubs owner, and now they started talking about Chester Doles, who sometimes came in for a beer at the bar. Someone had noticed that on the building where the banner had been, inside a locked glass case near the door, there was a flier for Doless personal training services, showing him oiled up and smiling in full bodybuilder pose. Is this indicative of something bigger? said Dunlap. Like, do they think they have a voice? I think Robertas using the national polarization against us all, said Jeremy Sharp, a white student at the university who was organizing a boycott of her businesses, which included two buildings she rented out to antique dealers, several hundred units of student housing, and a Holiday Inn Express. A peaceable revolution, Sharp said at a news conference on the sixth day as residents crowded into a small room at the university to hear. A few days ago, we had an obtuse sign put up, he began. When I walked out and saw that, it scared me. It scared me as a Catholic. It scared me as a person who has friends who look different than me. We are here because we are afraid. People clapped and cheered as Sharp began explaining a plan to withhold rent from Green-Garrett and barrage Holiday Inns corporate offices with phone calls, which would lead the hotel chains parent company, IHG, to issue a statement saying that they had expressed our concerns to Green-Garrett and that This is not the type of activity that we want any of our brands associated with. As Sharp kept talking, two Dahlonega council members arrived, explaining that they were only there to get the public sentiment. So, no comment? a young woman yelled at them. The only comment Ill make is that the KKK does not represent the values of this town, one of the men said. Then whyd you vote for it? Whyd you vote for it? the woman yelled, getting more upset, and even though there was never such a vote, some people began cheering her on. Lets keep this civil! They did not vote for that sign! said another young woman trying to quiet the room, but emotions were high. A man said that the KKK had recently applied unsuccessfully to take part in the Adopt-A-Highway program in a neighboring county. A woman said she was worried about all the undertones of hate being brought out of the woodwork. Im very concerned, said Daniel Blackman, a former state Senate candidate who was the first black person ever to run for office from nearby Forsyth County, which has a long history of violence against blacks and was until the late 1980s known as a whites only county. Whether its a stunt or whether Ms. Garrett really feels that way, the fact is there are children here that might be threatened or afraid and weve got to get ahead of it. The last thing you want to see is someone crazy enough to do something stupid. Soon, the meeting ended, and as everyone was heading out into the cold Dahlonega night, an older white man, trying to be sensitive, said to Blackman, Be careful. The next morning, all of this was the topic of North Georgia talk radio, and the host was taking callers. A woman named Sharon was on the line. Its not just fake news, its a fake agenda, she began, and explained that the banner might have been part of an elaborate plot not only to create chaos in Dahlonega, but also to undermine the presidency of Donald Trump and ultimately, the nation. She knew all of this, she said, because she had gone online and discovered a website for a group with locations across the country including in Dahlonega that was made up of former congressional staffers working for the previous administration. They are supporting the impeachment. They support open borders. They are supporting Obamacare. They are promoting disruption at town halls I call it bullying and they have a potential for violence. I hope everyone is aware that this type of activity I call it subversion, with a fake narrative is taking root in the area, she continued, and meanwhile, in Dahlonega, another new development was unfolding. Over at town hall, an assistant to Green-Garrett was filing paperwork for a new sign permit. Size of sign: 4×6. Material of sign: wood (painted). Color of sign: Gold with Black Lettering. How sign will be attached to wall: Screwed. It was an application to make the sign permanent. It would say, Historic Ku Klux Klan Meeting Hall, and that was how the seventh day ended. *** And then, two days after that, the application was withdrawn. Green-Garrett issued her first statement since unleashing all of this eight days before, saying that she had been trying to get a hotel built only to meet opposition at every turn. I have no other motivation other than to bring businesses and tax revenue to the city, her statement said. I want to move forward and do something positive for the city of Dahlonega. She said nothing about the KKK banner, and when she was reached by phone at her winter home in Florida, she said no comment and hung up. At her real estate office in a worn-out strip mall on the edge of town, her assistant, Barbara Bridges, said the banner was there, rolled up and stored in a closet. The town issued an official statement saying that Dahlonega is a welcoming community for people of diverse backgrounds and that recent episodes are not indicative of a change in our character or philosophy. The students called off the boycott and declared victory. And now it was a sunny afternoon on the town square. People were stopping by the candy shop, or wandering down the aisles of antique shops where Kenny G was playing through the speakers, or eating a sandwich across from the building where a KKK banner had been. Yeah, its the site of one of the last major gold rushes, a man standing on the square said to a woman, explaining what he knew about Dahlonega. Do you have this in a large? a woman asked at a T-shirt shop. Reverend Webb, home this afternoon, said he was heartened to see how so many people had taken a stand. Dahlonega is a sacred place for everybody, he said. At the same time, he said, the episode was not simply about the banner. To him, it was about a banner that had appeared after an election in which the new president had said certain things that had appealed to white nationalists and other hatemongers, whether he intended to or not, opening the door to events that could spiral out of control. The atmosphere hes created in America today has caused people to think they have some kind of power again, he said. I thought that before, and I still do. Doles, who was out driving in his truck, said he agreed with this assessment. He had been on the way home from the gym when he first saw the banner and the flags, he said, and thought to himself, Its been a long time coming. He said he had recently raised his own flag for the first time in years the American one, because he finally feels pleased with the direction of the country. In the last 50 years, I didnt think we had the votes to elect a governor, much less a president, Doles said. And yet here we are today. All of this was what worried Valerie Fambrough, sitting outside at a coffee shop on the pleasant afternoon. She felt good about all the people, including Trump supporters, who had come out to proclaim a message of love. She felt unsettled that some people thought she was part of an alt-left agenda. It all felt like the beginning of something, not the end. Im just scared these days, she said, even though the banner was no longer anywhere in sight.

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March 12, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Then Again: Klan crosses burned in Vermont, but not for long – vtdigger.org

Members of the Ku Klux Klan gather in Montpelier in 1927. Photo courtesy of Vermont Historical Society (Then Again is Mark Bushnells column about Vermont history.) The incident, which occurred during the mid-1920s, was recounted years later by a woman whose husband had helped light the crosses. The woman said her husband felt no need to hide his involvement. After the crosses were lit, she said, My husband came down Main Street carrying rope and an oil can and was smudged with smoke. The fires set that night no doubt burned brightly but briefly, much like the Klans popularity in Vermont. The unidentified womans quote, and indeed most of what we know about the Klan in Vermont, comes from Maudean Neills 1989 book Fiery Crosses in the Green Mountains. The Ku Klux Klan was founded in the South immediately after the Civil War. During the Reconstruction era, former Confederates saw it as a way of intimidating African-Americans and carpetbaggers, Northerners accused of profiting from the Souths miseries. Fervor for the Klan died down, but then rekindled in the early 1920s as an organization with national ambitions. The Klan began sending emissaries to states far from its birthplace in the Deep South. By 1922, the Klan was winning converts in Vermont. With few blacks to harass in Vermont, the Klan here turned its wrath on anyone who was not a white Protestant, including Catholics, Jews and recent immigrants. Joining the Klan was simple; applicants had to answer 10 questions, including: Are you a native-born, white, Gentile, American citizen?; Do you believe in the tenets of the Christian religion?; and Do you believe in and will you faithfully strive for the eternal maintenance of white supremacy? Ten yes answers and $10 and you were in. The money was divided among Klan leaders. New members also had to rent their robes and hoods. The groups secretiveness alienated many Vermonters. Ministers railed against the Klan from their pulpits, one stating that he had never done anything he felt so ashamed of that hed had to hide his face. The Legislature also attacked the Klans hoods, debating a bill to ban the wearing of hoods or masks. Offenders could face three months in jail and a $500 fine. When legislators realized this would have put a severe damper on Halloween and masquerade balls, they tried to write exceptions into the law. Seeing the complexity of rewriting the law, or perhaps embarrassed by their simplistic approach to a complex problem, they let the bill die. The Klan burned crosses across the state in Barre, Rutland, St. Johnsbury, Lyndon and many other communities. A gathering in St. Johnsbury in 1924 reportedly drew 2,000 people. Thousands more attended Klan rallies in Morrisville and Montpelier the following year. How many of them were actually Vermonters is unclear. Klansmen and Klanswomen from across New England attended the events, as evidenced by the many out-of-state license plates newspaper reporters noted on vehicles parked in the surrounding fields. No one seems to doubt that hundreds of Vermonters joined the Klan. Some historians put the number as high as 10,000 to 14,000. Others believe it was no more than 2,000. What drew people to the group varied. Some were certainly drawn to its message of hatred and exclusion, that if things werent going well for you, it was the fault of African-Americans or Jews or immigrants or organized labor. But others claimed they werent drawn by the groups message of hate. Those Vermonters said they saw the Klan as little more than a social club, akin to the Masons or the Rotary Club. Indeed, Neill wrote her book after seeing pictures of Klan gatherings in her mother-in-laws photo album. When she asked about the photos, her mother-in-law said that it was just a club. A lot of her friends were in it and it seemed like fun, something social to do. In conducting interviews for her book, Neill found many who echoed her mother-in-laws opinions, including a South Barre couple who were talked into joining by friends. It was part of a deal. They would join the Klan if the other couple joined the Grange. By and large, Neill found, people who joined were community-minded, well-respected and religiously inclined. Photos of the day seem to bear this out. In the collection at the Vermont Historical Society, most of the Klan-related photos show people wearing the white outfits but with the hoods pulled back, faces plain to see. The photos are at once reassuring perhaps these people didnt quite understand the hatred the national organization stood for and haunting, because the images run so contrary to the widely held view of Vermont as a bastion of tolerance. Klan membership in Vermont in the 1920s never amounted to more than a tiny fraction of the states population, which at the time was slightly more than 350,000. Indeed, many communities pushed back. Rutland and Burlington temporarily prohibited people from wearing masks and hoods in public. Rutland officials fired a police officer after learning he had attended a Klan rally, and Rutland residents boycotted businessmen who were reportedly members of the group. When Klan members held an outdoor rally in East Clarendon, a group of citizens drove a small convoy of cars to the event and scared them off. The states newspapers also attacked the Klan. The Burlington Free Press declared the group was as welcome in Vermont as the plague, and the St. Albans Messenger predicted the Klan wouldnt survive the biting blast of Vermont common sense. A well-publicized crime by several Klansmen incensed many Vermonters and hastened the groups decline in the state. In August 1924, three Klansmen, loaded with liquor and little common sense, broke into Burlingtons St. Marys Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. The cathedral, one Klansman convinced the others, was the staging area for a Catholic plot. He claimed the building stood above a massive cache of guns, ammunition, poisonous gas, acid, even airplanes enough to kill all the Protestants in northern New England. When they found that the cathedral contained no such cache, they decided instead to steal some of the churchs vestments, a cross, some candles and other items. Police, alerted by a priest who had seen a light in the church, arrived quickly. As the burglars fled, one of them fired a revolver. The Klansmen were eventually arrested, convicted and given sentences ranging from four months to three years. If some Vermonters sense of tolerance ever included acceptance of the Klan, that feeling was short-lived. After the convictions, and allegations that leaders had embezzled from the group, the Klan lost what support it once had in Vermont, and the sight of crosses burning became a thing of the past.

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March 12, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Asheboro mayor on KKK rally: ‘We also have right to object’ – Asheboro Courier Tribune

By Chip Womick cwomick@courier-tribune.com Twitter: @ChipWomickCT ASHEBORO The City of Asheboro issued a press release Sunday afternoon in response to KKK plans an event in Asheboro in May. On Friday, March 10, the News and Observer reported that The Loyal White Knights had announced an event would be held in Asheboro in May. The City of Asheboro feels it important to respond to this announcement and denounces, in the strongest terms possible, the message of hate and division advocated by the Ku Klux Klan and its affiliates. The people of Asheboro have worked too hard to unify our community to let an outside group come in and spread racist views without raising our voices loudly in protest, said Mayor David H. Smith on Saturday afternoon. They may have a right to peacefully assemble, but we also have a right to object at the top of our collective voice. City Manager John N. Ogburn reports that no applications have been received by the city related to the event. Mayor Smith went on to say, Its a shame that we spent countless hours collaborating as a community to win the coveted All-America City award last year, only to be reminded that forces of division are out there seeking to tear communities down. If anything, this announcement strengthens my resolve to make Asheboro the most inclusive and welcoming city in North Carolina to all. The city will share any information it receives related to this event upon receipt. The News & Observer story said that The Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, which is based in Pelham an unincorporated community about 45 minutes north of Burlington, near the Virginia line had announced on its website that it would hold a rally with speeches, dinner and a cross burning at dark in May in Asheboro. The group has held other events, including a parade through Roxboro in December. The parade, to celebrate Donald Trumps presidential election victory, drew more than 100 participants. In a Facebook posted dated March 8, a group called the Silver Valley Redneck Revolt also addressed the announced rally: The Loyal White Nights of the KKK in Asheboro, NC recently announced on their website that they will be holding a klavern rally and cross burning at an unknown location on May 6th. Klaverns are meetings for confirmed Klan members and new prospective members to be inducted into their white supremacist cult. We need to let the Klan know that if they leave their enclaves their will be a broad response from the community. This event is to publicly denounce the Klan, thier beliefs, and show that we will not back down. Exact times and location of the counter demo are TBD. If you wish to co-host this event with a group you organize with please direct message us.

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KKK announces cross burning, rally in North Carolina town – News & Observer

News & Observer KKK announces cross burning, rally in North Carolina town News & Observer A North Carolina Ku Klux Klan group has announced on its website that it will hold a rally and cross burning in May in Asheboro. The event was scheduled by The Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan , which is based in Pelham an unincorporated … KKK plans to rally in Asheboro Greensboro News & Record Vermont high court weighs hate crime case involving KKK recruitment fliers Washington Times College newspaper rethinks name over KKK mixup New York Post MassLive.com  – Observer  – WRAL.com all 16 news articles »

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March 11, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

KKK Wizard Found Dead Smelled of Cat Piss; Wife Accused of Killing Him – The Root

Frank Ancona (MSNBC, All in With Chris Hayes screenshot) The imperial wizard of the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, who was recently found dead near a river in Missouri, apparently smelled like cat piss and stunk to high heaven during his life. According to the River Front Times, the scent permeated from Frank Anconas clothes, clinging to him like a blanket, even on his hair and mustache. The news article notes that he was aware of his stench but did not know what to do about it. Much of his odor seemed to be the result of his wife Malissa Anconas determination to see their home turned into a giant kennel. The 44-year-old kept dozens of cats and two dogs within her space, which was, by all reports, a pigsty (though that might be an insult to pigsties). A neighbor told the Times that as many as 70 cats lived there at one time. The animals made homes out of piles of dirty clothes, went through open garbage and kicked liter across the floors. My dad said sometimes he had to sleep on the couch because the bedroom was so trashed, Frank Anconas son from a previous marriage, Frank Ancona Jr., told the Times. The couple apparently argued all the time, with one neighbor, James Russell, saying that she could hear Malissa Ancona screaming at the white supremacist night and day. It is Malissa Ancona who is accused of killing her husband. And by all accounts, she was not a great person to be around. She had a history of relying on pills, she allegedly stole from him, and of course, there was the house that was unfit for any animal, human or not, to live in. About six months ago, the senior Frank Ancona reportedly called his wifes ex-husband, Paul Jinkerson Sr., and asked if he would take her back. I was like, Youre out of your mind, Jinkerson told the Times. I guess he thought for a brief, fleeting moment that I would alleviate his pain and take her off his hands. Frank Ancona then tried Malissas grown children, pleading with them to take their mother. Is there anybody in your family that will let your mother [move] with them, he asked, according to the report. I cannot take her being around me another minute; her life, her drug-dealing, her stealing. … I cant take anymore of it and she needs a place to go ASAP. Frank Ancona told Malissas daughter, 25-year-old Lauren Jinkerson, that he suspected that she was slipping the blood pressure medicine Clonidine into his coffee to knock him out so she could steal his medication, the Times reports. Really what she did could be considered attempted murder i think, he texted to his stepdaughter, according to the report. I can barely move or think straight right now…..very weak dizzy and blurred vision. Its like Im a prisoner in my own home, he added, explaining that he was hesitant to throw Malissa out, fearing that she would hurt herself or call the cops and frame him for abuse. Shes a huge drug addict, and you need to get rid of her or else shell drug you one day and shell kill you instead, Lauren warned her stepfather. Lauren Jinkersons predictions may have turned out to be true. On Feb. 13, both Malissa Ancona and her son, Paul Jinkerson Jr., were charged with first-degree murder, armed criminal action, tampering with evidence and abandonment of a corpse in Frank Anconas death. Frank Ancona had been shot with a 9 mm handgun, and then again with a shotgun. Malissa Ancona told detectives that she and her son killed Frank during the early-morning hours of Feb. 9, with her son being the one to pull the trigger, authorities said. Ms. Ancona admitted to me in an audio video recorded interview that her biological son Paul Edward Jinkerson Jr., shot and killed Frank Ancona while he was asleep in the master bedroom of the residence, St. Francois County Sheriffs Detective Matt Wampler wrote in a probable cause statement. Ms. Ancona admitted that she failed to report the crime and additionally attempted to destroy blood evidence and altered the crime scene in an attempt to conceal the offense and was acting in concert with her son Paul Jinkerson Jr. Both suspects entered not guilty pleas last month during their initial court appearance. However, Paul Jinkerson Jr.s father and siblings apparently believe that he could have been framed by his mother. They described the 24-year-old as one of the few who had not completely cut ties with the matriarch, adding that he was a computer science student before he got caught up in meth and pills. He was a geek, Paul Jinkerson Sr. told the Times regarding his son, who he said has probably never fired a gun in his life or even been in a fistfight. He wasnt somebody who would go out and do this. In fact, the family believes that the young man was drugged. Paul Jinkerson Sr. told the news site that two weeks before Ancona was killed, his son mentioned that Malissa wanted to kill Frank and that she wanted him [the son] to help her clean it up. The elder Jinkerson understandably lost his cool, and the pair drove over to the Anconas home so that Jinkerson Jr. could pick up his laptop that he had left over there. Jinkerson Sr. told his son that he was not going to be talking to his mother anymore. However, Malissa Ancona was at home, and the situation quickly turned sour and deteriorated. In retrospect, I should have done so much more, he said. I should have called Frank. I should have told Malissa we knew. Read more at the River Front Times.

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March 10, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed


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