Archive for the ‘Ku Klux Klan’ Category

Waterville-area students, residents and clergy rally against the Ku … – Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

WATERVILLE More than 100 students, residents and faith leaders gathered at Watervilles City Hall Sunday afternoon to rally against the Ku Klux Klan less than a week after fliers advertising a Klan-branded neighborhood watch appeared in a Waterville neighborhood.

As sunlight filtered through budding trees and small children chased one another around Castonguay Square, protesters held signs declaring, Black Lives Matter and Hatred is Not a Family Value while clergy from area congregations spoke out against the reappearance in Maine of one of the countrys most notorious hate groups.

Were here because the KKK showed up in as cowardly a fashion as possible, distributing anonymous letters (in our community), said Kurt Nelson, dean of religious and spiritual life at Colby College.

The fliers first appeared in January in Augusta, Gardiner and Freeport neighborhoods. Residents in Hallowell and Waterville woke recently to find leaflets on their cars and in driveways, several delivered in plastic bags weighted with rocks, likely thrown from a passing car.

Many of the fliers are emblazoned with a hooded Klansman flanked by burning KKKs and the groups blood drop cross insignia and include contact information for a 24-hour Klanline for residents to report troubles in their neighborhood.

You can sleep tonight knowing the Klan is awake, the flier declares. Contact the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Today!

A call to the hotline was answered by an automated message inviting callers to dial an extension or visit the groups website. The message thanks callers and instructs them to have a great white day.

The fliers appearance in Waterville comes on the heels of a December incident in which residents found a large swastika spray painted on a rock at the Quarry Road Recreation area. Following that incident, more than 200 people gathered at Watervilles Beth Israel Congregation to support the states Jewish community. The next month Colby students, faculty and others came together to protest the Trump administrations controversial travel ban.

At Sundays gathering, several of those present expressed concern about the impact such racially charged incidents are having on Watervilles growing minority population.

I heard from other students on Colbys campus, specifically students of color, who said that they felt unsafe downtown, said Marilee Getgen, 18, a Colby freshman from Pennsylvania. They should be made to feel safe in the community that they are going to be in for four years.

Others questioned why more representatives from city leadership were not present at the rally and worried how that silence would be perceived by newcomers to the area.

Were not sending strong signals from City Hall, said Julie de Sherbinin, a retired professor of German and Russian at Colby. Theres nothing thats saying this is a welcoming town. This is a university town.

City Councilors Winifred Tate, of Ward 6, and Lauren Lessing, of Ward 3, did appear at the rally alongside former city councilor and current state representative Thomas Longstaff. Tate urged the crowd to make activism a part of their daily lives, citing lots of divisive and important issues facing our community.

But De Sherbinins concern is only heightened as a group of refugees she has been helping prepares to move to downtown Waterville. The Munezero siblings, three sisters and two brothers aged between 20 and 30 years old, fled war in the Democratic Republic of Congo and recently immigrated to the U.S. from Burundi. The Waterville Area New Mainers Project, a group of more than 100 people, have banded together to provide English language tutoring, transportation and other support for the siblings, but De Sherbinin worries for their safety in Waterville. The siblings do not yet speak English well, De Sherbinin pointed out, and members of the project were concerned that even interactions with police could be problematic with the current language barrier.

But on this crisp, Palm Sunday those residents who did turn out appeared united in their desire to make their city a safer place for people like the Munezero siblings.

Now is the time weve been practicing for, the group sang in unison. Led by Colby professor Elizabeth Leonard, their voices grew stronger with each iteration. We are ready. We are ready. Let us rise, take a breath, and begin.

Kate McCormick 861-9218

[emailprotected]

Twitter: @KateRMcCormick

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Ku Klux Klan Leaflets Distributed in Small Northern Ohio Town … – Cleveland Scene Weekly

We’ve reported that loose, decentralized arms of the Ku Klux Klan have been eyeing Ohio for future membership recruitment. With an eight-percent pro-Trump margin in the 2016 presidential election, it’s hard not to see the state as fertile ground for fringe ideologues. And even with the reality of Trump policies setting in the sort of stuff that works againstrational self-interest and, like, kindness plenty of Ohioans cling to a passion for demagoguery.

“We have people all over Ohio already. There is a large membership of Loyal White Knights there,” said Amanda Lee, a North Carolina woman who acts as the national imperial commander for a Klan faction known as the Loyal White Knights. “When things start going wrong, it’s time for us to start retaliating. It’s time for us to get active.”

And so we arrive at an ongoing investigation in Perkins Township, just south of Sandusky, where detectives are looking into KKK leaflets that were distributed around town, according to the Register. The leaflets bore the name of, yep, the Loyal White Knights.

The leaflet mentions drug and alcohol abuse resources, and it’s unclear what other goals were in place with this distribution.

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Fighting discrimination Franco-Americans and the Ku Klux Klan – Bangor Daily News

Often, people are surprised, including many in Maine, to learn just how active the Ku Klux Klan was during the 1920s in New England, a history documented by Mark Richard in : Not a Catholic Nation: The Ku Klux Klan Confronts New England in the 1920s- The forgotten story of Catholic resistance to the rise of the KKK in New England. In fact, the anti-discrimination group NAACP, working with the KnightsofColumbus, fought the Klan during their dreaded acts of ethnic oppression in the 1920s, against French speaking Roman Catholics, a report heard at a Bowdoin College seminar in 2014, by Benjamin Jealous.

RVEIL- Waking up French, created by Ben Levine, contains film footage of Ku Klux Klan activities in Maine, when the group targeted its activities against the French-Canadian immigrants.

Waking Up French provides film footage showing Ku Klux Klan activities in Maine

Unfortunately, haunting images and reminders of past discrimination spread by the KKK hate group are again appearing throughout Maines communities.

During the 1920s, another period when anti-immigration sentiments were high, particularly focused against Roman Catholics, the Franco-American population was among the targets of Ku Klux Klan rallies in Maine. Although the passage of time, over the past century, has overcome sharp religious divides between American Roman Catholics and Protestants, a recurrence of the Ku Klux Klan propaganda is showing up again in many Maine communities.

Maine State Senator Shenna Bellows wrote the following social media post about the scary Ku Klux Klan messages showing up in her home town of Hallowell, and gave me permission to post her response on this Franco-American blog:

Shenna Bellows

A constituent in Hallowell was targeted by the Ku Klux Klan. Someone, presumably a member of the KKK, entered her property and put Klan recruitment materials on her vehicle, most likely because of her Black Lives Matter bumper sticker.

Maine has been standing up against the Klan for a long time. Mainers opposed them when they threatened, intimidated and attacked Franco-Americans and other Catholics who came here to work and to raise their families. We stood up to them when they descended on Lewiston to frighten refugees who had settled in the city. Today, the Klan sees an opening for renewed recruitment and activity. Once again, they are threatening Mainers, new residents in our state and families with generational roots alike. But they will be disappointed, because while the Klan may be a pathetic shell of what it once was, Mainers vigilance has never wavered. Wherever the KKK rears its ugly head, it should expect resistance from the Mainers who have stood against it for decades. There can be no room made for white supremacy in our community, in our state or in our world.

Sadly, other places have been the targets of recent Ku Klux Klan in Maine, incidents reported since Senator Bellows posted her message on her social media page.

House Speaker Sara Gideon, of Freeport, said she found the KKK wording on fliers distributed in Freeport to be threatening, not just to her neighbors, but to all Mainers. Even if the fliers are protected under the First Amendment, she said, Mainers need to reject the sentiment of the fliers and the KKK. (Residents notify police after finding the messages in their yards, but the distribution is not considered a hate crime because it doesnt include threats.)

Evidence about the Ku Klux Klan in Maine has appeared sporadically over the years. Always in a caustic way, the group erupts when we least expect to see it and stirs the memories of those who witnessed the 1920s activities, during the height of its influence. People have contracted me over the years to discuss their experiences.

I remember the day when a carpenter called, to ask what I recommended he should do with a Ku Klux Klan white hood he happened to find hidden in an old colonial homes attic, while he was doing renovations. Eventually, the hood was given to the Franco-American Center at the University of Maine in Orono, for their museum.

Published in the Bailey Island: Memories Pictures & Lore by Nancy Orr and Johnson Jensen 2003.

A few years ago, I happened to find a local history about the Ku Klux Klan activities during the 1920s, reported in the seemingly serene history of Bailey Island, Maine. I was shocked to find evidence of the groups history in Bailey Island- Memories, Pictures and Lore, purchased at a local librarys used book sale. Its one of the best direct reports about Ku Klux Klan activity in Maine that I have ever seen and read, because it includes photographs, including a group picture taken at an annual family outing.

In the pictorial history, published in 2003, the authors Nancy Orr and Johnson Jensen quote a local, who described his experience with the KKK (on page 50): The Ku Klux Klan come to our town in 1924. It had the principle of brotherly love for feller members and they had a high moral tone to it. In fact, the authors report, the Klans motto was Service for humanity, home , country and God. Locals became divided about the Klan because the organization strongly favored the building of the Bailey Island Bridge and made their strong feelings known. After a stay of nearly two years, the Klan left. In the interviews, the islanders who remembered the KKK said they probably were forced out, because they became suspicious of their presence and didnt like being told how they should vote in political matters. Harassment from the KKK was further confirmed and reported in other interviews by the authors. A picture of a local establishment known as the Spring House was evidence of the KKKs presence.

Scary memories about the hateful messages and activities spread by the KKK continue to be disturbing. It is our responsibility to remember how the group did not succeed in Maine, as Ms. Bellows reported. They must continue to be identified as a hate group, wherever they try to spread their ugly influence. As the NAACP leader Mr. Jealous said in his interview with the Bowdoin Orient, Its ultimately those acts of solidarity with our fellow citizens, our fellow Americansno matter where they live or what status they havethat defines us as great to ourselves.

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Fighting discrimination Franco-Americans and the Ku Klux Klan – Bangor Daily News

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Waterville neighborhood latest to be hit with KKK fliers … – Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

WATERVILLE When David Anderman found a flier advertising the Ku Klux Klan early Monday afternoon in his driveway, he first felt a bit worried that he was being targeted.

Anderman, a retired pastor of the First Congregational Church, United Church of Christ on Eustis Parkway, spoke at the annual breakfast honoring the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. at Spectrum Generations Muskie Center in January.

I hope its not a precursor of something worse, Anderman said.

But police say they received at least six reports of KKK fliers that had appeared Monday morning on driveways in the streets around Western Avenue and Pleasant Street.

The fliers appear identical to those that were found in January in driveways in Gardiner, Augusta and Freeport. The flier is headlined Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, with a drawing of a figure in a white hood underneath. The words Neighborhood Watch are above an American flag. Beneath it, the flier reads, You can sleep tonight knowing the Klan is awake.

The flier also lists a toll-free telephone number, which it says is a 24 Hour Klanline people can call if there are troubles in their neighborhoods.

Police Chief Joseph Massey said the department has received at least six reports of residents finding fliers on their property. They were in bags and weighed down with rocks, which leads Massey to believe they were most likely thrown out of a car window, he said.

Some people were very alarmed, and rightfully so, Massey said. I think it represents an extremist view of racial intolerance.

Massey said that what the KKK stands for is offensive to a lot of people. The KKK is a secretive society that was organized in the South after the Civil War. Its members believe in white supremacy, and the group has a long history of violence against blacks, immigrants, Jews and other groups.

It wasnt so long ago that hundreds of Mainers, sometimes thousands, gathered in public halls in Saco, Portland, Hallowell and Rockland to hear polite lectures on the principles of the KKK. The group was once a driving force in Maine, a state where as recently as 1924 membership grew to 40,000 and buoyed itself on anti-Catholic sentiment. By 1930, though, only about 225 Klan members remained. KKK literature appeared in spots throughout Maine in the 1990s, but those were mostly isolated events.

While distributing fliers is not a crime, police are trying to find who is now spreading them in Waterville. So far, they have no leads, and none of the residents who received the fliers saw who put them there.

This is something we know can inflame a community, Massey said. Itd be nice to know where its coming from.

Massey said there isnt a tolerance for this kind of literature in the city, just as there wasnt for the swastikas that appeared in December 2016 on the large rocks at Quarry Road Recreation Center.

Fliers found in other parts of the state in January disturbed residents and drew ire from community leaders. Gov. Paul LePage also condemned them on a Bangor-based radio show, calling the reports appalling.

In February, about 20 people gathered under light rain on the Margaret Chase Smith Bridges in Skowhegan in response to the distribution of KKK fliers. The rallys purpose was to show the KKK that its not welcome in Maine, organizers said.

Madeline St. Amour 861-9239

[emailprotected]

Twitter: @madelinestamour

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Waterville neighborhood latest to be hit with KKK fliers … – Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

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KKK fliers in Skowhegan prompt school letters, renew tension over ‘Indians’ mascot – Press Herald

SKOWHEGAN School officials sent letters to families this week saying that some Ku Klux Klan fliers have been distributed in the community and that school officials will not tolerate hate speech and bigotry.

The letters follow KKK fliers that were reported to police in Waterville and were similar to ones distributed earlier this year in Augusta, Gardiner and Freeport.

In Skowhegan, reports of the KKK fliers are stirring new tension over the school boards refusal to drop the Indians school mascot name.

Native American leader Barry Dana of Solon said the boards decision illustrates how the town has this mentality among some people.

Dana said he realizes that not all members of the community are bigots or racists, but if the silent majority continues to allow the name Indians to stand, then they maintain fertile ground for this type of hate and bigotry.

The KKK fliers were delivered in plastic bags, similar to the way fliers were found in other communities.

The flier appears to be a copy of those found in Waterville, headlined Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, with a drawing of a figure in a white hood underneath. The words Neighborhood Watch are above an American flag. Beneath it, the flier reads, You can sleep tonight knowing the Klan is awake.

It lists a toll-free telephone number, which it says is a 24 Hour Klanline people can call if there are troubles in their neighborhoods. Calling the number prompts a message in which a man thanks the caller for calling the Tradititionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, asks the caller to dial a number if you know your partys extension, twice gives its website address and closes with, Thank you, and have a great white day.

Brent Colbry, superintendent of Skowhegan-based School Administrative District 54, said letters were sent to the families of students in all seven of the districts towns at the urging of Brandon Baldwin, program manager of the Civil Rights Team Project in the Maine Attorney Generals Office.

The letter, written by Assistant Superintendent Jonathan Moody, said the fliers were left on the driveways and doorsteps of some homes in Skowhegan and possibly some neighboring towns. Colbry said the schools in the district were not targeted.

The letter to parents says the fliers are a sad reminder that we can never stop educating our children about our countrys history and our fundamental belief that we are all created equal under the law.

Weve taught our kids that bigotry and hate have no place in our schools or communities, the letter says.

But Dana, onetime chief of the Penobscot Nation, said Wednesday that the school district cant have it both ways the community either supports hate and bigotry or it doesnt, and keeping the Indians mascot is an insulting form of bigotry.

Dana has made that argument to the school board in recent years as part of the effort to get the school to stop using the nickname.

The SAD 54 school board voted 11-9 in May 2015 against changing the Indians mascot for sports teams, after months of passionate debate.

In response to Danas comments, Colbry said he doesnt see the appearance of KKK propaganda in Skowhegan and the matter of the Indians mascot as related issues.

We were reacting yesterday to the KKK flier; we were not trying to link those two things, Colbry said. We were just reacting to the concern that this might be frightening to children and their parents. We werent focused on the issue of discrimination.

Richard Irwin, a 30-year veteran of the school board who voted to keep the Indians name in 2015, agreed with Colbry. I think they are two completely different issues, he said.

The school districts letter says officials believe that it is fundamental to ensure that all our students and their families, regardless of their race, religion or background, feel that our schools are places where they are safe and loved.

The KKK was once a force in Maine, where as recently as 1924 membership was 40,000 and buoyed itself on anti-Catholic sentiment. By 1930, only about 225 Klan members remained. KKK literature appeared in spots throughout Maine in the 1990s, but those were mostly isolated events.

Skowhegan Police Chief Joel Cummings said it appears the plastic bags containing the fliers were weighted down with fish tank stones, as were the fliers distributed in Waterville.

Cummings said the police department has received five complaints about the fliers over the past three or four days.

He said, Although this activity is protected under the First Amendment, the fact that these fliers are being distributed in the dark of night underscores the storied past of this organization and its wish to remain relevant.

Doug Harlow can be contact at 612-2367 or at:

[emailprotected]

Twitter:@Doug_Harlow

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Ku Klux Klan fliers left on lawns in Perkins Twp. – newsnet5.com … – newsnet5.com

PERKINS TWP, Ohio –

Less than two months after a chapter of the Ku Klux Klan announced plans to increase recruitment in Ohio, some residents in Perkins Twp started finding KKK fliers on their doorsteps.

The plastic bags are filled with rice and include a message from The Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.

Perkins Twp. Police began receiving reports from residents on a stretch of Strub Road starting on April 1.

Several baggies could still be found on front lawns on Monday afternoon.

RELATED: Is the Ku Klux Klan setting their sights on Ohio?

Many residents in the area were upset to learn about the messages.

I almost take that as vandalism, one resident who asked not to be identified told News 5. And I think its even more disgusting that were right behind the high school, so obviously theres a lot of kids in this area.

The message includes a federal hotline for drug and alcohol addiction help.

Save Our Nation. You Arent the Only One at the End of your Rope, the flier reads, Your family members friends and even neighbors could be next.

The notice is followed by a North Carolina number that leads to a voicemail from the Klan chapter.

We certainly dont want that here, said Assist. Chief Robb Parthemore, Perkins Twp. Police Dept., And we want our community to be safe we want everybody to be safe.

But Parthemore said that prosecution would be difficult, even if they had a suspect. Propaganda fliers like these are considered protected speech unless they specifically threaten an individual or family.

As far as a criminal offense, possibly littering? he said. We would have to stretch it.

Similar fliers were spotted in North Carolina, Illinois and Maine starting in February. That’s whenthe Loyal White Knights and other Klan groups announced renewed efforts towards recruiting members in Ohio and other states.

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The Ku Klux Klan in Buena Vista County – Pilot Tribune

The start of an initiation for new recruits. Recruiters received $3 a head.

What?! The Ku Klux Klan–in peaceful, pastoral, rural Buena Vista County? Say it aint so, George!

OVERVIEW: Yes, it is so; and not just historically, either. Although the peak of Klan activity occurred in BVC during the 1920s, there have been Klan activities as late as the early 2,000s. During the height of the KKK in BVC, there were konklaves (chapters) established, members recruited, meetings, some parades, demonstrations, rallies, and a few cross burnings (with occasional dynamite explosions), and other activities (even social). Towns in the area with KKK activities included Storm Lake, Rembrandt, Newell, Marathon, and Sioux Rapidsnot to mention Sioux City, Schaller, Cherokee, Laurens, Varina, Webb, and others. Members included government officials, businessmen, law enforcement, clergy, farmers, and other members of society. They had significant influence in politics, governance, religion, economics, and social activities. Membership seemed to be not only acceptable, but also prestigious. The Great Depression of the 1930s and WWII pretty well wiped out memberships. However, there have been occasional resurgences of KKK activity as late as the early 2,000S.

NATIONAL HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: After the Civil War (1866), former Confederate veterans in the South formed for southern vets. They named it the Ku Klux Klan. A year later, the membership had grown and it became The Invisible Empire of the South. It established a mission: to re-establish white supremacy. Three years later (1869), the KKK disbanded for lack of membership. During WWI (1915), there was a revival and expansion, at least partly due to the influence of D.W. Griffiths famous (or infamous?) film Birth of a Nation (which played in Des Moines). The film influenced attitudes against blacks, Catholics, Jews, labor unions, and foreigners, fueled by the influx of immigrants. By 1924, there were over 4,000,000 Klansmen nationally, with 100,000 in Iowa. The KKK had its ups and downs: devastated by The Great Depression; a resurgence during WWWII, until it disbanded when the government slapped it with a suit for back taxes; and again a resurgence in the South during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, resulting in an era of atrocities against blacks. The mayhem quieted down during the 1970s until the 1990s while the large Klans divided and spread out into smaller Klans, and aligned with neo-Nazis and other extreme far right groups. Early in the 1990s, national membership was estimated to be 6,000-10,000 active members, mostly in the South.

KKK Sacred Alter for conducting rituals to naturalize new members.

THE KKK IN BUENA VISTA COUNTY: The first Konklave established in Iowa was in Dubuque in 1920. Des Moines was not far behind. Its Konklave (in 1923), promoted and supported the development of Klans in small cities and towns in Northwest Iowathus, the Klans came to Buena Vista County. Towns and villages not large enough to form Klans joined those that had them, became members, and participated in those that existed. Klan members were active in Storm Lake, Marathon, Rembrandt, Newell, and Sioux Rapids. Klan members in BVC included businessmen, government officials, clergymen, teachers, farmers, and from all walks of life. The Klans put up members (and voted for them) to run for elective offices in all areas and at all levels of government, to achieve influence in the county and state. Klan business owners were encouraged to hire only Klansmen. The Klansmen participated in social activities of the towns, county, and organized community activities of their own. They were accepted in the communities, and membership in the klans even seemed to carry a certain amount of prestige.

The BVC Klans had their internal problemsthe greatest was in recruiting members. The population of BVC was sparse; therefore, potential members were also sparse. For example: the population of one of the active Klans, in Marathon, was 520; of which only 10 were Klan members. The Klans had to compete for members from the same population; and they even wooed members away from the each other.

Also, they had a lot of personal dissension in their ranks as to temperament, protocol, activities, policies, etc. It got so bad that KKK state officials had to come several times to quell the problems, lest they reflect badly on the Klans reputationand they severely chastised the members.

On one occasion, the Storm Lake Klan applied for a town parade permit. Fearing trouble, the popular resident travelling semi-pro baseball team (the all black team The Tennessee Rats) abandoned their field in Casino Beachand never returned. The incident was not appreciated by the regional citizens. However, the parade went off as planned, drawing large crowds of participant and spectators from numerous counties. The event was without incident.

Since the BVC Klans were small and naive about KKK protocol, they were considerably influenced by the larger and more active Cherokee Klan (in which BVC often participated); and which itself was influenced by the much larger Sioux City Klan. In 1924, the Cherokee newspaper carried a large promotion of an upcoming KKK huge event: during the day would be a rally in a pasture, and during the night would be a parade through downtown Cherokee. The event drew tremendous crowds of Klansmen and spectators from far and wide, including from Buena Vista, Sac, Ida, Clay, OBrien, Plymouth, Woodbury, and counties from other extended regions. The daytime rally numbered 2,000. (Recruiters were paid $3.00 a head for each inductee.) The night parade consisted of about 1,000 participants (Klansmen and Klanswomen) with numerous horsemen, 30 autos, and marchers 4 abreast. No significant problems were reported.

The height of Klan activity in BVC, as well as nationally, was during the period of 1923 through 1926, with 1924 being at its peak. Because of the notoriety of the KKK activities, the Iowa legislature, in 1924, began actively enforcing statutes prohibiting assault and intimidation while masked. Forced to abandon the secrecy aspect of the KKK led to the decline of the Klans. The Great Depression of the 1930s pretty much depleted the Klans, as personal survival was the first priority of the people. During WWII, patriotism and the draft depleted the KKK members. On top of that, in 1944, the U.S. government sued the KKK for back taxes, and the Klans essentially disbanded.

The1960s Civil Rights Movement saw a national revival of the KKK, mostly in the South. In response to the Movement, the southern Klans perpetuated inconceivable atrocities against blacks: hangings, bombings, shootings, burnings, and other atrocities. During the 1970s until the 1990s, the violence became more isolated because Klansmen were spinning off of the larger ones, spreading out and forming their own Klans, and aligning themselves with other extreme groups like the neo-Nazis.

Klan interest within BVC had lain dormant for quite sometime. But, in 2006, an outside Klan (from Denison?) distributed membership flyers in Storm Lake and other towns. An Alta Klansman, organizer and promoter of a major event in Storm Lake, was arrested for outstanding warrants for Klan activities in Missouri. Klansmen from the state Brotherhood of Klans began active recruiting activities in various towns in BVC, including Storm Lake. These activities sparked renewed interest, and it wasnt long before there began Klan activity again in BVC.

In 2007, the KKK publicized the intent to organize a Klan parade and rally in Storm Lake, in opposition to immigration. The event was sponsored by the Grand Dragon of the Church of the National Knights, who had oversight of KKK programs in both Iowa and Missouri. He was a recent resident of Storm Lake. The events anticipated some 2,000 attendees from at least six states. However, the permit was never actually applied for, probably because of the citys concern for potential trouble.

Upon learning of the Storm Lake KKK planned event, a man and wife pastors in Spencer became upset. They applied for a permit for a Peace Rally on the same site and date that the KKK had planned its event. The permit was granted on the basis of the Constitutional rights of free speech, association, assembly, and religion. The rally was scheduled for Saturday, November 17th, 2007. A crowd of attendees included Caucasion Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latino Americans, and folks from all walks of life. There was handholding, singing, praying, speeches, and entertainmentall promoting the abolishment of racism. The two police officers observing from across the courthouse lawn were un-needed, for the peace rally was truly harmonious.

I moved into BVC shortly after that event. Beyond it, my research has provided no additional information, nor have I read or heard any thing, of KKK activities in BVC. Perhaps the Peace Rally, as well as the changing American culture, have ushered in a new era of attitude for humankind.

* Specific photos of BVC KKK activities were nowhere that I could discover. Photos of neighboring related activities in which BVC Klan members attended are represented as typical of the area.

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The Ku Klux Klan in Buena Vista County – Pilot Tribune

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Disturbing: Some Sandusky residents alarmed to find Ku Klux Klan fliers in driveways – fox8.com

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SANDUSKY, Ohio — People who live along Hayes Avenue, Mason Road, and Strub Road in Sandusky made a disturbing discovery Friday morning.

Fliers from the Ku Klux Klan were apparently dropped in their driveways.

A man who did not want to be identified said he spotted over a hundred fliers inside plastic bags.

Erving Rickard lives along Strub Road and discovered a flier in his driveway.

“I was amazed because most people in Sandusky get along,” said Rickard.

In addition to some KKK literature, the flier urged people to just say no to drugs.

Meantime, it’s a mystery as to who dropped the fliers off overnight.

“I am going to throw it away. I honestly would have never paid much attention to it,” said Rickard.

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Timeline History of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK)

Updated February 19, 2017

The Ku Klux Klan was and is undeniably a terrorist organization — but what made the Klan an especially insidious terrorist organization, and a threat to civil liberties, was that it functioned as the unofficial paramilitary arm of Southern segregationist governments. This allowed its members to kill with impunityand allowed Southern segregationists to eliminate activists by force without alerting federal authorities. Although the Klan is much less active today, it will be remembered as an instrument of cowardly Southern politicians who hid their faces behind hoods, and their ideology behind an unconvincing facade of patriotism.

The Ku Klux Klan is founded.

Former Confederate general and noted white supremacist Nathan Bedford Forrest, architect of the Fort Pillow Massacre, becomes the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. The Klan murders several thousand people in the former Confederate states as an effort to suppress the political participation of black Southerners and their allies.

The Ku Klux Klan publishes its Organization and Principles. Although early supporters of the Klan claimed that it was philosophically a Christian, patriotic organization rather than a white supremacist group, a cursory glance at the Klan’s catechism reveals otherwise:

5. Are you opposed to Negro equality both social and political?

7. Are you in favor of constitutional liberty, and a government of equitable laws instead of a government of violence and oppression?

8. Are you in favor of maintaining the constitutional rights of the South?

9. Are you in favor of the reenfranchisement and emancipation of the white men of the South, and the restitution of the Southern people to all their rights, alike proprietary, civil, and political?

10. Do you believe in the inalienable right of self-preservation of the people against the exercise of arbitrary and unlicensed power?

The “inalienable right to self-preservation” is a clear reference to the Klan’s violent activities — and its emphasis, even at this early stage, is clearly white supremacy.

Congress passes the Klan Act, allowing the federal government to intervene and arrest Klan members on a large scale. Over the next several years, the Klan largely disappears and is replaced by other violent white supremacist groups.

Thomas Dixon Jr. adapts his second Ku Klux Klan novel, The Clansman, into a play. Although fictional, the novel introduces the burning cross as a symbol for the Ku Klux Klan:

Although Dixon implies that the Klan had always used the burning cross, it was, in fact, his invention. Dixon’s fawning adoration for the Klan, presented less than a half-century after the American Civil War, begins to revive the long-dormant organization.

D.W. Griffith’s wildly popular film Birth of a Nation, an adaptation of Dixon’s The Clansman, revives national interest in the Klan. A Georgia lynch mob led by William J. Simmons — and including numerous prominent (but anonymous) members of the community, such as former Georgia governor Joe Brown — murders Jewish factory superintendent Leo Frank, then burns a cross on a hilltop and dubs itself the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.

The Klan becomes a more public organizationand expands its platform to include Prohibition, anti-Semitism, xenophobia, anti-Communism, and anti-Catholicism. Spurred on by the romanticized white supremacist history portrayed in Birth of a Nation, bitter whites throughout the country begin to form local Klan groups.

Indiana Klan Grand Dragon D.C. Stephenson is convicted of murder. Members subsequently begin to realize that they may actually face criminal charges for their behavior, and the Klan largely disappears — except in the South, where local groups continue to operate.

Members of the Ku Klux Klan firebomb the home of NAACP Florida executive director Harry Tyson Moore and his wife, Harriet, on Christmas Eve. Both are killed in the blast. The murders are the first high-profile Southern Klan killings among many during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s — most of which either go unprosecutedor result in acquittals by all-white juries.

Members of the Ku Klux Klan bomb the predominantly black 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four little girls.

The Mississippi chapter of the Ku Klux Klan firebombs twenty predominantly black churches, and then (with the aid of local police) murders civil rights activists James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner.

Edgar Ray Killen, the architect of the 1964 Chaney-Goodman-Schwerner murders, is convicted on manslaughter charges and sentenced to 60 years in prison.

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Timeline History of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK)

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March 30, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Waterville-area students, residents and clergy rally against the Ku … – Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

WATERVILLE More than 100 students, residents and faith leaders gathered at Watervilles City Hall Sunday afternoon to rally against the Ku Klux Klan less than a week after fliers advertising a Klan-branded neighborhood watch appeared in a Waterville neighborhood. As sunlight filtered through budding trees and small children chased one another around Castonguay Square, protesters held signs declaring, Black Lives Matter and Hatred is Not a Family Value while clergy from area congregations spoke out against the reappearance in Maine of one of the countrys most notorious hate groups. Were here because the KKK showed up in as cowardly a fashion as possible, distributing anonymous letters (in our community), said Kurt Nelson, dean of religious and spiritual life at Colby College. The fliers first appeared in January in Augusta, Gardiner and Freeport neighborhoods. Residents in Hallowell and Waterville woke recently to find leaflets on their cars and in driveways, several delivered in plastic bags weighted with rocks, likely thrown from a passing car. Many of the fliers are emblazoned with a hooded Klansman flanked by burning KKKs and the groups blood drop cross insignia and include contact information for a 24-hour Klanline for residents to report troubles in their neighborhood. You can sleep tonight knowing the Klan is awake, the flier declares. Contact the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan Today! A call to the hotline was answered by an automated message inviting callers to dial an extension or visit the groups website. The message thanks callers and instructs them to have a great white day. The fliers appearance in Waterville comes on the heels of a December incident in which residents found a large swastika spray painted on a rock at the Quarry Road Recreation area. Following that incident, more than 200 people gathered at Watervilles Beth Israel Congregation to support the states Jewish community. The next month Colby students, faculty and others came together to protest the Trump administrations controversial travel ban. At Sundays gathering, several of those present expressed concern about the impact such racially charged incidents are having on Watervilles growing minority population. I heard from other students on Colbys campus, specifically students of color, who said that they felt unsafe downtown, said Marilee Getgen, 18, a Colby freshman from Pennsylvania. They should be made to feel safe in the community that they are going to be in for four years. Others questioned why more representatives from city leadership were not present at the rally and worried how that silence would be perceived by newcomers to the area. Were not sending strong signals from City Hall, said Julie de Sherbinin, a retired professor of German and Russian at Colby. Theres nothing thats saying this is a welcoming town. This is a university town. City Councilors Winifred Tate, of Ward 6, and Lauren Lessing, of Ward 3, did appear at the rally alongside former city councilor and current state representative Thomas Longstaff. Tate urged the crowd to make activism a part of their daily lives, citing lots of divisive and important issues facing our community. But De Sherbinins concern is only heightened as a group of refugees she has been helping prepares to move to downtown Waterville. The Munezero siblings, three sisters and two brothers aged between 20 and 30 years old, fled war in the Democratic Republic of Congo and recently immigrated to the U.S. from Burundi. The Waterville Area New Mainers Project, a group of more than 100 people, have banded together to provide English language tutoring, transportation and other support for the siblings, but De Sherbinin worries for their safety in Waterville. The siblings do not yet speak English well, De Sherbinin pointed out, and members of the project were concerned that even interactions with police could be problematic with the current language barrier. But on this crisp, Palm Sunday those residents who did turn out appeared united in their desire to make their city a safer place for people like the Munezero siblings. Now is the time weve been practicing for, the group sang in unison. Led by Colby professor Elizabeth Leonard, their voices grew stronger with each iteration. We are ready. We are ready. Let us rise, take a breath, and begin. Kate McCormick 861-9218 [emailprotected] Twitter: @KateRMcCormick

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Ku Klux Klan Leaflets Distributed in Small Northern Ohio Town … – Cleveland Scene Weekly

We’ve reported that loose, decentralized arms of the Ku Klux Klan have been eyeing Ohio for future membership recruitment. With an eight-percent pro-Trump margin in the 2016 presidential election, it’s hard not to see the state as fertile ground for fringe ideologues. And even with the reality of Trump policies setting in the sort of stuff that works againstrational self-interest and, like, kindness plenty of Ohioans cling to a passion for demagoguery. “We have people all over Ohio already. There is a large membership of Loyal White Knights there,” said Amanda Lee, a North Carolina woman who acts as the national imperial commander for a Klan faction known as the Loyal White Knights. “When things start going wrong, it’s time for us to start retaliating. It’s time for us to get active.” And so we arrive at an ongoing investigation in Perkins Township, just south of Sandusky, where detectives are looking into KKK leaflets that were distributed around town, according to the Register. The leaflets bore the name of, yep, the Loyal White Knights. The leaflet mentions drug and alcohol abuse resources, and it’s unclear what other goals were in place with this distribution.

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Fighting discrimination Franco-Americans and the Ku Klux Klan – Bangor Daily News

Often, people are surprised, including many in Maine, to learn just how active the Ku Klux Klan was during the 1920s in New England, a history documented by Mark Richard in : Not a Catholic Nation: The Ku Klux Klan Confronts New England in the 1920s- The forgotten story of Catholic resistance to the rise of the KKK in New England. In fact, the anti-discrimination group NAACP, working with the KnightsofColumbus, fought the Klan during their dreaded acts of ethnic oppression in the 1920s, against French speaking Roman Catholics, a report heard at a Bowdoin College seminar in 2014, by Benjamin Jealous. RVEIL- Waking up French, created by Ben Levine, contains film footage of Ku Klux Klan activities in Maine, when the group targeted its activities against the French-Canadian immigrants. Waking Up French provides film footage showing Ku Klux Klan activities in Maine Unfortunately, haunting images and reminders of past discrimination spread by the KKK hate group are again appearing throughout Maines communities. During the 1920s, another period when anti-immigration sentiments were high, particularly focused against Roman Catholics, the Franco-American population was among the targets of Ku Klux Klan rallies in Maine. Although the passage of time, over the past century, has overcome sharp religious divides between American Roman Catholics and Protestants, a recurrence of the Ku Klux Klan propaganda is showing up again in many Maine communities. Maine State Senator Shenna Bellows wrote the following social media post about the scary Ku Klux Klan messages showing up in her home town of Hallowell, and gave me permission to post her response on this Franco-American blog: Shenna Bellows A constituent in Hallowell was targeted by the Ku Klux Klan. Someone, presumably a member of the KKK, entered her property and put Klan recruitment materials on her vehicle, most likely because of her Black Lives Matter bumper sticker. Maine has been standing up against the Klan for a long time. Mainers opposed them when they threatened, intimidated and attacked Franco-Americans and other Catholics who came here to work and to raise their families. We stood up to them when they descended on Lewiston to frighten refugees who had settled in the city. Today, the Klan sees an opening for renewed recruitment and activity. Once again, they are threatening Mainers, new residents in our state and families with generational roots alike. But they will be disappointed, because while the Klan may be a pathetic shell of what it once was, Mainers vigilance has never wavered. Wherever the KKK rears its ugly head, it should expect resistance from the Mainers who have stood against it for decades. There can be no room made for white supremacy in our community, in our state or in our world. Sadly, other places have been the targets of recent Ku Klux Klan in Maine, incidents reported since Senator Bellows posted her message on her social media page. House Speaker Sara Gideon, of Freeport, said she found the KKK wording on fliers distributed in Freeport to be threatening, not just to her neighbors, but to all Mainers. Even if the fliers are protected under the First Amendment, she said, Mainers need to reject the sentiment of the fliers and the KKK. (Residents notify police after finding the messages in their yards, but the distribution is not considered a hate crime because it doesnt include threats.) Evidence about the Ku Klux Klan in Maine has appeared sporadically over the years. Always in a caustic way, the group erupts when we least expect to see it and stirs the memories of those who witnessed the 1920s activities, during the height of its influence. People have contracted me over the years to discuss their experiences. I remember the day when a carpenter called, to ask what I recommended he should do with a Ku Klux Klan white hood he happened to find hidden in an old colonial homes attic, while he was doing renovations. Eventually, the hood was given to the Franco-American Center at the University of Maine in Orono, for their museum. Published in the Bailey Island: Memories Pictures & Lore by Nancy Orr and Johnson Jensen 2003. A few years ago, I happened to find a local history about the Ku Klux Klan activities during the 1920s, reported in the seemingly serene history of Bailey Island, Maine. I was shocked to find evidence of the groups history in Bailey Island- Memories, Pictures and Lore, purchased at a local librarys used book sale. Its one of the best direct reports about Ku Klux Klan activity in Maine that I have ever seen and read, because it includes photographs, including a group picture taken at an annual family outing. In the pictorial history, published in 2003, the authors Nancy Orr and Johnson Jensen quote a local, who described his experience with the KKK (on page 50): The Ku Klux Klan come to our town in 1924. It had the principle of brotherly love for feller members and they had a high moral tone to it. In fact, the authors report, the Klans motto was Service for humanity, home , country and God. Locals became divided about the Klan because the organization strongly favored the building of the Bailey Island Bridge and made their strong feelings known. After a stay of nearly two years, the Klan left. In the interviews, the islanders who remembered the KKK said they probably were forced out, because they became suspicious of their presence and didnt like being told how they should vote in political matters. Harassment from the KKK was further confirmed and reported in other interviews by the authors. A picture of a local establishment known as the Spring House was evidence of the KKKs presence. Scary memories about the hateful messages and activities spread by the KKK continue to be disturbing. It is our responsibility to remember how the group did not succeed in Maine, as Ms. Bellows reported. They must continue to be identified as a hate group, wherever they try to spread their ugly influence. As the NAACP leader Mr. Jealous said in his interview with the Bowdoin Orient, Its ultimately those acts of solidarity with our fellow citizens, our fellow Americansno matter where they live or what status they havethat defines us as great to ourselves.

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Waterville neighborhood latest to be hit with KKK fliers … – Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

WATERVILLE When David Anderman found a flier advertising the Ku Klux Klan early Monday afternoon in his driveway, he first felt a bit worried that he was being targeted. Anderman, a retired pastor of the First Congregational Church, United Church of Christ on Eustis Parkway, spoke at the annual breakfast honoring the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. at Spectrum Generations Muskie Center in January. I hope its not a precursor of something worse, Anderman said. But police say they received at least six reports of KKK fliers that had appeared Monday morning on driveways in the streets around Western Avenue and Pleasant Street. The fliers appear identical to those that were found in January in driveways in Gardiner, Augusta and Freeport. The flier is headlined Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, with a drawing of a figure in a white hood underneath. The words Neighborhood Watch are above an American flag. Beneath it, the flier reads, You can sleep tonight knowing the Klan is awake. The flier also lists a toll-free telephone number, which it says is a 24 Hour Klanline people can call if there are troubles in their neighborhoods. Police Chief Joseph Massey said the department has received at least six reports of residents finding fliers on their property. They were in bags and weighed down with rocks, which leads Massey to believe they were most likely thrown out of a car window, he said. Some people were very alarmed, and rightfully so, Massey said. I think it represents an extremist view of racial intolerance. Massey said that what the KKK stands for is offensive to a lot of people. The KKK is a secretive society that was organized in the South after the Civil War. Its members believe in white supremacy, and the group has a long history of violence against blacks, immigrants, Jews and other groups. It wasnt so long ago that hundreds of Mainers, sometimes thousands, gathered in public halls in Saco, Portland, Hallowell and Rockland to hear polite lectures on the principles of the KKK. The group was once a driving force in Maine, a state where as recently as 1924 membership grew to 40,000 and buoyed itself on anti-Catholic sentiment. By 1930, though, only about 225 Klan members remained. KKK literature appeared in spots throughout Maine in the 1990s, but those were mostly isolated events. While distributing fliers is not a crime, police are trying to find who is now spreading them in Waterville. So far, they have no leads, and none of the residents who received the fliers saw who put them there. This is something we know can inflame a community, Massey said. Itd be nice to know where its coming from. Massey said there isnt a tolerance for this kind of literature in the city, just as there wasnt for the swastikas that appeared in December 2016 on the large rocks at Quarry Road Recreation Center. Fliers found in other parts of the state in January disturbed residents and drew ire from community leaders. Gov. Paul LePage also condemned them on a Bangor-based radio show, calling the reports appalling. In February, about 20 people gathered under light rain on the Margaret Chase Smith Bridges in Skowhegan in response to the distribution of KKK fliers. The rallys purpose was to show the KKK that its not welcome in Maine, organizers said. Madeline St. Amour 861-9239 [emailprotected] Twitter: @madelinestamour

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KKK fliers in Skowhegan prompt school letters, renew tension over ‘Indians’ mascot – Press Herald

SKOWHEGAN School officials sent letters to families this week saying that some Ku Klux Klan fliers have been distributed in the community and that school officials will not tolerate hate speech and bigotry. The letters follow KKK fliers that were reported to police in Waterville and were similar to ones distributed earlier this year in Augusta, Gardiner and Freeport. In Skowhegan, reports of the KKK fliers are stirring new tension over the school boards refusal to drop the Indians school mascot name. Native American leader Barry Dana of Solon said the boards decision illustrates how the town has this mentality among some people. Dana said he realizes that not all members of the community are bigots or racists, but if the silent majority continues to allow the name Indians to stand, then they maintain fertile ground for this type of hate and bigotry. The KKK fliers were delivered in plastic bags, similar to the way fliers were found in other communities. The flier appears to be a copy of those found in Waterville, headlined Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, with a drawing of a figure in a white hood underneath. The words Neighborhood Watch are above an American flag. Beneath it, the flier reads, You can sleep tonight knowing the Klan is awake. It lists a toll-free telephone number, which it says is a 24 Hour Klanline people can call if there are troubles in their neighborhoods. Calling the number prompts a message in which a man thanks the caller for calling the Tradititionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, asks the caller to dial a number if you know your partys extension, twice gives its website address and closes with, Thank you, and have a great white day. Brent Colbry, superintendent of Skowhegan-based School Administrative District 54, said letters were sent to the families of students in all seven of the districts towns at the urging of Brandon Baldwin, program manager of the Civil Rights Team Project in the Maine Attorney Generals Office. The letter, written by Assistant Superintendent Jonathan Moody, said the fliers were left on the driveways and doorsteps of some homes in Skowhegan and possibly some neighboring towns. Colbry said the schools in the district were not targeted. The letter to parents says the fliers are a sad reminder that we can never stop educating our children about our countrys history and our fundamental belief that we are all created equal under the law. Weve taught our kids that bigotry and hate have no place in our schools or communities, the letter says. But Dana, onetime chief of the Penobscot Nation, said Wednesday that the school district cant have it both ways the community either supports hate and bigotry or it doesnt, and keeping the Indians mascot is an insulting form of bigotry. Dana has made that argument to the school board in recent years as part of the effort to get the school to stop using the nickname. The SAD 54 school board voted 11-9 in May 2015 against changing the Indians mascot for sports teams, after months of passionate debate. In response to Danas comments, Colbry said he doesnt see the appearance of KKK propaganda in Skowhegan and the matter of the Indians mascot as related issues. We were reacting yesterday to the KKK flier; we were not trying to link those two things, Colbry said. We were just reacting to the concern that this might be frightening to children and their parents. We werent focused on the issue of discrimination. Richard Irwin, a 30-year veteran of the school board who voted to keep the Indians name in 2015, agreed with Colbry. I think they are two completely different issues, he said. The school districts letter says officials believe that it is fundamental to ensure that all our students and their families, regardless of their race, religion or background, feel that our schools are places where they are safe and loved. The KKK was once a force in Maine, where as recently as 1924 membership was 40,000 and buoyed itself on anti-Catholic sentiment. By 1930, only about 225 Klan members remained. KKK literature appeared in spots throughout Maine in the 1990s, but those were mostly isolated events. Skowhegan Police Chief Joel Cummings said it appears the plastic bags containing the fliers were weighted down with fish tank stones, as were the fliers distributed in Waterville. Cummings said the police department has received five complaints about the fliers over the past three or four days. He said, Although this activity is protected under the First Amendment, the fact that these fliers are being distributed in the dark of night underscores the storied past of this organization and its wish to remain relevant. Doug Harlow can be contact at 612-2367 or at: [emailprotected] Twitter:@Doug_Harlow

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Ku Klux Klan fliers left on lawns in Perkins Twp. – newsnet5.com … – newsnet5.com

PERKINS TWP, Ohio – Less than two months after a chapter of the Ku Klux Klan announced plans to increase recruitment in Ohio, some residents in Perkins Twp started finding KKK fliers on their doorsteps. The plastic bags are filled with rice and include a message from The Loyal White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Perkins Twp. Police began receiving reports from residents on a stretch of Strub Road starting on April 1. Several baggies could still be found on front lawns on Monday afternoon. RELATED: Is the Ku Klux Klan setting their sights on Ohio? Many residents in the area were upset to learn about the messages. I almost take that as vandalism, one resident who asked not to be identified told News 5. And I think its even more disgusting that were right behind the high school, so obviously theres a lot of kids in this area. The message includes a federal hotline for drug and alcohol addiction help. Save Our Nation. You Arent the Only One at the End of your Rope, the flier reads, Your family members friends and even neighbors could be next. The notice is followed by a North Carolina number that leads to a voicemail from the Klan chapter. We certainly dont want that here, said Assist. Chief Robb Parthemore, Perkins Twp. Police Dept., And we want our community to be safe we want everybody to be safe. But Parthemore said that prosecution would be difficult, even if they had a suspect. Propaganda fliers like these are considered protected speech unless they specifically threaten an individual or family. As far as a criminal offense, possibly littering? he said. We would have to stretch it. Similar fliers were spotted in North Carolina, Illinois and Maine starting in February. That’s whenthe Loyal White Knights and other Klan groups announced renewed efforts towards recruiting members in Ohio and other states.

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The Ku Klux Klan in Buena Vista County – Pilot Tribune

The start of an initiation for new recruits. Recruiters received $3 a head. What?! The Ku Klux Klan–in peaceful, pastoral, rural Buena Vista County? Say it aint so, George! OVERVIEW: Yes, it is so; and not just historically, either. Although the peak of Klan activity occurred in BVC during the 1920s, there have been Klan activities as late as the early 2,000s. During the height of the KKK in BVC, there were konklaves (chapters) established, members recruited, meetings, some parades, demonstrations, rallies, and a few cross burnings (with occasional dynamite explosions), and other activities (even social). Towns in the area with KKK activities included Storm Lake, Rembrandt, Newell, Marathon, and Sioux Rapidsnot to mention Sioux City, Schaller, Cherokee, Laurens, Varina, Webb, and others. Members included government officials, businessmen, law enforcement, clergy, farmers, and other members of society. They had significant influence in politics, governance, religion, economics, and social activities. Membership seemed to be not only acceptable, but also prestigious. The Great Depression of the 1930s and WWII pretty well wiped out memberships. However, there have been occasional resurgences of KKK activity as late as the early 2,000S. NATIONAL HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE: After the Civil War (1866), former Confederate veterans in the South formed for southern vets. They named it the Ku Klux Klan. A year later, the membership had grown and it became The Invisible Empire of the South. It established a mission: to re-establish white supremacy. Three years later (1869), the KKK disbanded for lack of membership. During WWI (1915), there was a revival and expansion, at least partly due to the influence of D.W. Griffiths famous (or infamous?) film Birth of a Nation (which played in Des Moines). The film influenced attitudes against blacks, Catholics, Jews, labor unions, and foreigners, fueled by the influx of immigrants. By 1924, there were over 4,000,000 Klansmen nationally, with 100,000 in Iowa. The KKK had its ups and downs: devastated by The Great Depression; a resurgence during WWWII, until it disbanded when the government slapped it with a suit for back taxes; and again a resurgence in the South during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, resulting in an era of atrocities against blacks. The mayhem quieted down during the 1970s until the 1990s while the large Klans divided and spread out into smaller Klans, and aligned with neo-Nazis and other extreme far right groups. Early in the 1990s, national membership was estimated to be 6,000-10,000 active members, mostly in the South. KKK Sacred Alter for conducting rituals to naturalize new members. THE KKK IN BUENA VISTA COUNTY: The first Konklave established in Iowa was in Dubuque in 1920. Des Moines was not far behind. Its Konklave (in 1923), promoted and supported the development of Klans in small cities and towns in Northwest Iowathus, the Klans came to Buena Vista County. Towns and villages not large enough to form Klans joined those that had them, became members, and participated in those that existed. Klan members were active in Storm Lake, Marathon, Rembrandt, Newell, and Sioux Rapids. Klan members in BVC included businessmen, government officials, clergymen, teachers, farmers, and from all walks of life. The Klans put up members (and voted for them) to run for elective offices in all areas and at all levels of government, to achieve influence in the county and state. Klan business owners were encouraged to hire only Klansmen. The Klansmen participated in social activities of the towns, county, and organized community activities of their own. They were accepted in the communities, and membership in the klans even seemed to carry a certain amount of prestige. The BVC Klans had their internal problemsthe greatest was in recruiting members. The population of BVC was sparse; therefore, potential members were also sparse. For example: the population of one of the active Klans, in Marathon, was 520; of which only 10 were Klan members. The Klans had to compete for members from the same population; and they even wooed members away from the each other. Also, they had a lot of personal dissension in their ranks as to temperament, protocol, activities, policies, etc. It got so bad that KKK state officials had to come several times to quell the problems, lest they reflect badly on the Klans reputationand they severely chastised the members. On one occasion, the Storm Lake Klan applied for a town parade permit. Fearing trouble, the popular resident travelling semi-pro baseball team (the all black team The Tennessee Rats) abandoned their field in Casino Beachand never returned. The incident was not appreciated by the regional citizens. However, the parade went off as planned, drawing large crowds of participant and spectators from numerous counties. The event was without incident. Since the BVC Klans were small and naive about KKK protocol, they were considerably influenced by the larger and more active Cherokee Klan (in which BVC often participated); and which itself was influenced by the much larger Sioux City Klan. In 1924, the Cherokee newspaper carried a large promotion of an upcoming KKK huge event: during the day would be a rally in a pasture, and during the night would be a parade through downtown Cherokee. The event drew tremendous crowds of Klansmen and spectators from far and wide, including from Buena Vista, Sac, Ida, Clay, OBrien, Plymouth, Woodbury, and counties from other extended regions. The daytime rally numbered 2,000. (Recruiters were paid $3.00 a head for each inductee.) The night parade consisted of about 1,000 participants (Klansmen and Klanswomen) with numerous horsemen, 30 autos, and marchers 4 abreast. No significant problems were reported. The height of Klan activity in BVC, as well as nationally, was during the period of 1923 through 1926, with 1924 being at its peak. Because of the notoriety of the KKK activities, the Iowa legislature, in 1924, began actively enforcing statutes prohibiting assault and intimidation while masked. Forced to abandon the secrecy aspect of the KKK led to the decline of the Klans. The Great Depression of the 1930s pretty much depleted the Klans, as personal survival was the first priority of the people. During WWII, patriotism and the draft depleted the KKK members. On top of that, in 1944, the U.S. government sued the KKK for back taxes, and the Klans essentially disbanded. The1960s Civil Rights Movement saw a national revival of the KKK, mostly in the South. In response to the Movement, the southern Klans perpetuated inconceivable atrocities against blacks: hangings, bombings, shootings, burnings, and other atrocities. During the 1970s until the 1990s, the violence became more isolated because Klansmen were spinning off of the larger ones, spreading out and forming their own Klans, and aligning themselves with other extreme groups like the neo-Nazis. Klan interest within BVC had lain dormant for quite sometime. But, in 2006, an outside Klan (from Denison?) distributed membership flyers in Storm Lake and other towns. An Alta Klansman, organizer and promoter of a major event in Storm Lake, was arrested for outstanding warrants for Klan activities in Missouri. Klansmen from the state Brotherhood of Klans began active recruiting activities in various towns in BVC, including Storm Lake. These activities sparked renewed interest, and it wasnt long before there began Klan activity again in BVC. In 2007, the KKK publicized the intent to organize a Klan parade and rally in Storm Lake, in opposition to immigration. The event was sponsored by the Grand Dragon of the Church of the National Knights, who had oversight of KKK programs in both Iowa and Missouri. He was a recent resident of Storm Lake. The events anticipated some 2,000 attendees from at least six states. However, the permit was never actually applied for, probably because of the citys concern for potential trouble. Upon learning of the Storm Lake KKK planned event, a man and wife pastors in Spencer became upset. They applied for a permit for a Peace Rally on the same site and date that the KKK had planned its event. The permit was granted on the basis of the Constitutional rights of free speech, association, assembly, and religion. The rally was scheduled for Saturday, November 17th, 2007. A crowd of attendees included Caucasion Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latino Americans, and folks from all walks of life. There was handholding, singing, praying, speeches, and entertainmentall promoting the abolishment of racism. The two police officers observing from across the courthouse lawn were un-needed, for the peace rally was truly harmonious. I moved into BVC shortly after that event. Beyond it, my research has provided no additional information, nor have I read or heard any thing, of KKK activities in BVC. Perhaps the Peace Rally, as well as the changing American culture, have ushered in a new era of attitude for humankind. * Specific photos of BVC KKK activities were nowhere that I could discover. Photos of neighboring related activities in which BVC Klan members attended are represented as typical of the area.

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Disturbing: Some Sandusky residents alarmed to find Ku Klux Klan fliers in driveways – fox8.com

Please enable Javascript to watch this video SANDUSKY, Ohio — People who live along Hayes Avenue, Mason Road, and Strub Road in Sandusky made a disturbing discovery Friday morning. Fliers from the Ku Klux Klan were apparently dropped in their driveways. A man who did not want to be identified said he spotted over a hundred fliers inside plastic bags. Erving Rickard lives along Strub Road and discovered a flier in his driveway. “I was amazed because most people in Sandusky get along,” said Rickard. In addition to some KKK literature, the flier urged people to just say no to drugs. Meantime, it’s a mystery as to who dropped the fliers off overnight. “I am going to throw it away. I honestly would have never paid much attention to it,” said Rickard. 41.448940 -82.707961

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April 1, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Timeline History of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK)

Updated February 19, 2017 The Ku Klux Klan was and is undeniably a terrorist organization — but what made the Klan an especially insidious terrorist organization, and a threat to civil liberties, was that it functioned as the unofficial paramilitary arm of Southern segregationist governments. This allowed its members to kill with impunityand allowed Southern segregationists to eliminate activists by force without alerting federal authorities. Although the Klan is much less active today, it will be remembered as an instrument of cowardly Southern politicians who hid their faces behind hoods, and their ideology behind an unconvincing facade of patriotism. The Ku Klux Klan is founded. Former Confederate general and noted white supremacist Nathan Bedford Forrest, architect of the Fort Pillow Massacre, becomes the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. The Klan murders several thousand people in the former Confederate states as an effort to suppress the political participation of black Southerners and their allies. The Ku Klux Klan publishes its Organization and Principles. Although early supporters of the Klan claimed that it was philosophically a Christian, patriotic organization rather than a white supremacist group, a cursory glance at the Klan’s catechism reveals otherwise: 5. Are you opposed to Negro equality both social and political? 7. Are you in favor of constitutional liberty, and a government of equitable laws instead of a government of violence and oppression? 8. Are you in favor of maintaining the constitutional rights of the South? 9. Are you in favor of the reenfranchisement and emancipation of the white men of the South, and the restitution of the Southern people to all their rights, alike proprietary, civil, and political? 10. Do you believe in the inalienable right of self-preservation of the people against the exercise of arbitrary and unlicensed power? The “inalienable right to self-preservation” is a clear reference to the Klan’s violent activities — and its emphasis, even at this early stage, is clearly white supremacy. Congress passes the Klan Act, allowing the federal government to intervene and arrest Klan members on a large scale. Over the next several years, the Klan largely disappears and is replaced by other violent white supremacist groups. Thomas Dixon Jr. adapts his second Ku Klux Klan novel, The Clansman, into a play. Although fictional, the novel introduces the burning cross as a symbol for the Ku Klux Klan: Although Dixon implies that the Klan had always used the burning cross, it was, in fact, his invention. Dixon’s fawning adoration for the Klan, presented less than a half-century after the American Civil War, begins to revive the long-dormant organization. D.W. Griffith’s wildly popular film Birth of a Nation, an adaptation of Dixon’s The Clansman, revives national interest in the Klan. A Georgia lynch mob led by William J. Simmons — and including numerous prominent (but anonymous) members of the community, such as former Georgia governor Joe Brown — murders Jewish factory superintendent Leo Frank, then burns a cross on a hilltop and dubs itself the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. The Klan becomes a more public organizationand expands its platform to include Prohibition, anti-Semitism, xenophobia, anti-Communism, and anti-Catholicism. Spurred on by the romanticized white supremacist history portrayed in Birth of a Nation, bitter whites throughout the country begin to form local Klan groups. Indiana Klan Grand Dragon D.C. Stephenson is convicted of murder. Members subsequently begin to realize that they may actually face criminal charges for their behavior, and the Klan largely disappears — except in the South, where local groups continue to operate. Members of the Ku Klux Klan firebomb the home of NAACP Florida executive director Harry Tyson Moore and his wife, Harriet, on Christmas Eve. Both are killed in the blast. The murders are the first high-profile Southern Klan killings among many during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s — most of which either go unprosecutedor result in acquittals by all-white juries. Members of the Ku Klux Klan bomb the predominantly black 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four little girls. The Mississippi chapter of the Ku Klux Klan firebombs twenty predominantly black churches, and then (with the aid of local police) murders civil rights activists James Chaney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. Edgar Ray Killen, the architect of the 1964 Chaney-Goodman-Schwerner murders, is convicted on manslaughter charges and sentenced to 60 years in prison. Up Next Up Next Article Up Next Article Up Next Article Up Next Article

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March 30, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed


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