Archive for the ‘Ku Klux Klan’ Category

Colorado’s long history and uncertain present with the KKK and other hate groups – The Denver Post

Hate never left Colorado.

From massacres of American Indians in the 19th Century to the Ku Klux Klans control of state politics in the 1920s to modern acts of violence such as the 2013 assassination of the state prisons director by a white supremacist gang member, Colorado has dealt with its share of racism.

Now, though, a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., that turned violent and a president who has struggled to outright denounce the racists or their actions have raised awareness across the country, including in Colorado. And people are ready to speak out.

It seems louder for people who deny it ever existed, said the Rev. Timothy Tyler, pastor of Shorter Community AME Church in Denver. But for those of us who have grown up with it and have lived it, we are saying, I told you so.

Were going to do all we can to address a wound that has been scratched over the presidents words and what happened in Charlottesville.

Last year, the Southern Poverty Law Center, an Alabama-based organization that fights extremism, identified 16 hate groups in the state the same number listed in 2015, although some groups had fallen off the list and others had been added.

Of the 16 groups listed in 2016, five were white supremacist/racist groups, while the others were singled out because of their views toward Muslims, immigrants, gay people and white people. Among the white supremacist groups were a Wheat Ridge-based company that distributes neo-Nazi music and books and a group founded in Finland that conducted a so-called patrol through LoDo and posted a video of it on YouTube.

Most of the time, those groups operate under the publics radar, proclaiming their views on social media and refraining from public gatherings. But since Donald Trumps election, many people believe they are becoming more bold and more visible.

Were seeing a greater number of public events, folks who are more willing to express their extremist beliefs and ideologies in a public forum, said Jeremy Shaver, associate director for the Anti-Defamation League Rocky Mountain States region.

In 2015, the Anti-Defamation League recorded 18 reported anti-Semitic incidents but that number more than doubled in 2016 to 45, Shaver said. This year, more than 30 incidents have been reported thus far.

Those incidents include July vandalism at Chabad Lubavitch Jewish Center in Colorado Springs. William Scott Planer, a Denver resident who is accused of affixing a Fight Terror, Nuke Israel sticker on the building, is being held on a $500,000 bond in the El Paso County jail. He also is wanted on a warrant out of California after being accused of attacking a protester during a white supremacists march in June 2106.

Planer and his roommates became notorious figures in November in Denvers Capitol Hill neighborhood after someone put their names, faces and address on fliers to notify area residents that white supremacists live nearby.

The Denver Post attempted to talk to residents at the home last week, but a man inside refused to answer the door and yelled, Go away!

Also this summer, white supremacists have attended an anti-Sharia law rally at the state Capitol and a rally held in Boulder by a group that celebrates misogyny. Those alt-right groups attract white supremacists and are helping bring more public activity, Shaver said.

The take-home message is no community is immune to white supremacy and no state is immune to white supremacy, he said. Colorado is no exception.

And the state never has been the exception.

Courtesy of the Royal Gorge Regional Museum and History Center

This April 1926 photo by Clinton Rolfe shows members of the Ku Klux Klan posing on a ferris wheel at the fairgrounds in Caon City, Colorado.

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

Members of the KKK, in pointed hoods that cover the face and dark or white robes, stand around a tall cross in a boulder field on the summit of Pikes Peak in El Paso County, Colorado on July 4, 1923. They raise their arms in salute. Shows an American flag and the tops of automobiles.

Denver Post archive photo

Members of the Ku Klux Klan march in a parade on Larimer Street in Denver, May 31, 1926. They wear hoods and robes as spectators look on. Parked automobiles line the street. A sign on a building reads: “Western Clothing Co.”

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

A Klan member at “Klan Day” at the races at Overland Park in July 1925. Ku Klux Klan members inspect the Miller Special race car owned by Ralph de Palma at Overland Park race track in Denver, Colorado. People crowd the bleachers. The driver, identified as Mr. Miller, wears a duster and holds a cap.

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

This undated photo shows crosses burning at a KKK night ceremony held on Table Top Mountain in Golden . A row of men in white hoods that cover the face and robes encircles men in street clothes who kneel with their backs to the camera. Spectators sit in chairs outside the circle, some have on white hoods. Shows a flagpole and the American flag. (Photo courtesy of Denver Public LibraryWesternHistory/Genealogy Dept.)

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

This photograph made between 1924 and 1925 shows a panoramic night view of men, members of the KKK, in pointed hoods that cover the face and dark or white robes who stand, or sit on horseback, on Table Top Mountain near Golden (Jefferson County), Colorado. Men in bandanna masks and street clothes kneel before a table with three hooded men; one holds an American flag. Many of the men salute.

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

Two women and a man wearing hoods and robes, members of the Ku Klux Klan, stand near a burning cross at night in 1924 or 1925, probably in Denver.

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

Governor Clarence J. Morely poses for a photo as he signs a document in the Governor’s office. Morely served as Governor of Colorado from 1925 to 1927, he was known as the Ku Klux Klan Governor during the political peak of the Klan in the 1920’s.

Denver Post archive photo

This 1925 group portrait shows men (with drums) and women in Ku Klux Klan costumes and Revolutionary era uniforms, in Denver.

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

Members of the Ku Klux Klan kneel and stand around a U. S. flag in a ceremony on Golden Road near Denver on April 16, 1922. A cross illuminated by flashlights is nearby. The men wear hoods and robes.

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

A cross burns at a night meeting of the Ku Klux Klan on Table Top Mountain near Golden in 1924 or 1925. Men in white robes and hoods encircle a group of men in street clothes who kneel in front of the burning cross. A container and cups on a tray sit behind rows of chairs.

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

Ku Klux Klan members wearing hoods and robes light candles in metal cans buried in a dirt mound on May 7, 1940, probably in Denver.

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

A burning cross and a man in Ku Klux Klan uniform and hood on Ruby Hill, in Denver, sometime in the 1920s.

Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept.

Klansmen exchange documents with one another in front of a burning cross and an American flag as other members of the group watch at a rally of the Boulder Chapter of the Ku Klux Klan in Boulder County, ca. 1925.

Duane Howell, The Denver Post

Denver policemen protect a flag-waving member of the Ku Klux Klan at 16th Street and Court Place about 11:45 a.m., Sept. 14, 1979, during a Chicano march through downtown Denver, kicking off festivities for Mexican Independence Day, celebrated Sunday. One of the marchers was confronted by a policeman, left, as he attempted to approach the Klansman. Shortly after, the unidentified Klansman rolled up his sign and flag and left.

John Sunderland, The Denver Post

Fred Wilkins, the state organizer of the Ku Klux Klan, announces his resignation as head of that organization Aug. 10, 1980 to join the National Association for the Advancement of White People, a group that had been recently formed by the head of the national Ku Klux Klan. Wilkins said the Klan had suffered from a negative image and that the new group should be seen as a pro-white organization instead of an anti-black one.

The power structure of settlements and territories in the early American West called for the destruction of Indians, said Patty Limerick, the states historian laureate and director of the Center for the American West at the University of Colorado Boulder. The times were not much easier for Mexicans or Asian immigrants, who suffered from discrimination and oppression, she said.

In fact, lynching has a very Western story, Limerick said, with Mexicans as the primary victims.

In the 1920s, Colorado politics were dominated by the Ku Klux Klan albeit a branch that, while loyal to its Southern brotherhood, was more preoccupied with Catholics and Jews than black people, Limerick said.

The Klan came to power after World War I during a period where Americans were coming off the anxieties and tensions associated with war but finding that times were not prosperous for farmers and laborers, Limerick said. White Protestants were trying to hang onto their power so immigrants, who were likely to be Irish or Italian Catholics, were targets.

The Klans Denver power broker was a doctor named John Galen Locke, a Spanish-American War veteran from New York.

Klansmen occupied the governors office and represented the majority in both houses of the state legislature and held numerous statewide offices. Denver Mayor Benjamin Stapleton won office because he joined the Klan, and Denver Police Chief William Candish was a klansman.

Limerick described Locke as a weird bird.

His decline came when he was charged with various crimes and the whole movement fell apart, she said.

While Limerick objects to the notion of history repeating itself, the 1920s provide cautionary tales for todays leaders. Stapleton, for example, was not driven solely by hatred of black people, Catholics and Jews, but he knew he needed Klan support to win an election, she said.

It hast gone well for him over the years, Limerick said. He made that devils bargain. He later separated himself from the Klan, but he left himself with that record of being a part of the Klan.

It says something about how long-range someone should think of his heritage and his legacy.

In Denver, there has been a movement to remove Stapletons name from the neighborhood that bears his name, built on the site of a former airport also named after him.

Limerick suggested having an event she described as Stapleton Remembrance Day where people gathered to listen to scholars discuss his choice to form an alliance with such an abhorrent movement. As part of the event, people could spend time talking about their actions today and what legacy they will leave.

I wish we could quit with the tug-of-war over the names of places and statues, Limerick said, because people and their stories are muddled and complicated. I wish we could put a mirror up to ourselves and think, Are we doing that?’

Tyler, the church pastor, said he had grown tired of talking about race but now sees a renewed opportunity form new allies. His church hosted a community discussion about race on Saturday and another is planned for Aug. 31.

I think were going to have to do a lot of talking to get peoples heads around how this is affecting our society, he said.

Barbara Gunion, a 51-year-old from Centennial, has felt the call to act since Trump was elected in November. She joined two national groups that consider themselves organized resistance to the president, and the increased visibility of armed militias, neo-Nazis and other alt-right groups have led to a sense of urgency for her.

I feel like Charlottesville and Trumps statements are a real tipping point for the left, Gunion said. Its not just racheted it up. Its caused a whole different way of thinking.

This experience has made me realize its also my problem. Its my responsibility. Im white but its not an excuse to be silent. Its the reason not to be silent.

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Colorado’s long history and uncertain present with the KKK and other hate groups – The Denver Post

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Ku Klux Klan to attend Boston rally – Boston Herald

Massachusetts members of the Ku Klux Klan reportedly are headed to Boston Common for the so-called Boston Free Speech Rally this Saturday, but a rally organizer said he doesnt want the event hijacked by white supremacists.

I know some of our members from the Springfield area are going, said Thomas Robb, national director of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Im assuming members in the Boston area are going.

Robb did not provide details on who or how many members would attend the rally, but said they would be inconspicuous while supporting the rally.

I dont think theyre going to cause a disturbance, Robb said, adding that Knights from different areas went to the Charlottesville rally. Our members dont stand out, they dont walk around giving Nazi salutes, they might be your next door neighbor or Cub Scout leader.

Rally organizer John Medlar, who has insisted his group is not racist, told the Herald, Though we naturally respect their right to speak and assemble, we also will exercise our right to choose who we will associate with. We will not allow our platform to be hijacked by the KKK. If I see anyone bring out a swastika or throw a Hitler salute, I will immediately denounce them.

The Free Speech Rally which many fear will turn into a white nationalist protest will take place from noon to 2 p.m. at the Parkman Bandstand tomorrow, with the prospect of massive counterprotests in the wake of the violence in Charlottesville, Va., that left a woman dead.

Medlar has said his group was not involved in Charlottesville though some of the listed speakers were there and that the Boston rally is meant to promote free speech, not white supremacy.

Mayor Martin J. Walsh said about the KKK: Make no mistake: We do not welcome any hate groups to Boston and we reject their message. We have made it clear that we will not tolerate incitements to violence or any threatening behavior. I ask that everyone join me in making Boston a more inclusive, welcoming, love-filled city for all.

Counterprotest organizers said they were not surprised by the Klan threat.

Weve been prepared for the worst like that since the beginning, said Kelsey Taylor, one of the organizers for a rally that will take place in front of the State House. It doesnt change our plan, but it reminds us to be vigilant.

Im not worried about it. It would be naive to think there arent Klansmen in Massachusetts, said Angelina Camacho, one of the organizers of a Black Lives Matter rally that will march from the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center at Roxbury Community College to Boston Common Saturday. Im looking forward to having a peaceful event without incident.

Organizers on both sides of the rally have met with police to go over security plans, which include keeping Free Speech rally participants behind barriers and keeping them separated from counterprotesters. Police are urging people to not bring backpacks or strollers to the Common and are banning weapons, bicycles, signs attached to sticks and pets from the area.

Meanwhile, Christopher Cantwell of Keene, N.H., a self-described white nationalist who attended the rally in Charlottesville, said he was contacted by the FBIs Joint Terrorism Task Force about helping defuse any violence in Boston. He told reporters he isnt going because there is a warrant for his arrest in Virginia stemming from the rally there.

Herald wire services contributed to this report.

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What is the Ku Klux Klan, who was KKK Imperial Wizard Frank … – The Sun

THE Ku Klux Klan returned to prominence thanks toDonald Trump who is cited as a factor in the rise ofright-wing groups in America after they backed him to become president.

Theyre popping their robes back on, emboldened to broadcast their white supremacist message like never before. We explain everything you need to know about them.

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In a nutshell, the Ku Klux Klan (or the KKK) is an extremist hate group who believeall non-Caucasian people are inferior to them.

The group believes that America should be a nation that is free from drugs, homosexuality and immigration.

Claiming to have extreme pride in their nation, they say that they are building a better society for everyone arguing on their website that they are a group not of hate but of love.

Historically, black Americans have been the KKKs main target but more recently it has targeted Jews, immigrants, LGBT people and even Catholics.

Since its formation in 1865, the groups history can be divided into three eras.

The first Klan, founded in Tennessee, was formed by former members of the Confederate army in around 1865.

As a movement it was relatively short-lived at the outset but, as secret vigilantes, the Klan carried out acts of terrorism such as the lynchings, arson, murders, tar-and-featherings, rapes and other violent attacks historically associated with the group. During the first era, these attacks were directed towards anyone who challenged white supremacy.

The second Klan, founded in Atlanta, Georgia in 1921, presented itself as a fraternal organisation employing full-time recruiters. At its peak, it was present in every state in America claiming to have at least 4 million members, operations in Canada, and even reportedly some recruiting activity in the UK.

However, the KKKs popularity plummeted to only 30,000 members after a series of scandals.

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The third revival came in the 1960s in opposition to the civil rights movement, which in the Klans eyes threatened segregation.

The KKK name was used by a number of independent groups many members of which were convicted of murders of civil rights workers.

One of the KKKs most violent actions was the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1963 an attack which killed four young girls.

Today, it is thought there are at least 5,000 members of various KKK chapters in the United States.

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The KKK refers to its beliefs and practices as Klankraft.

Although they are a secretive group, there is some knowledge of its beliefs and practices which are all based on their white supremacist views.

Incredible imagesgive a chilling insight into white supremacist culture that still exist in all corners of America.

One of the most iconic symbols of the KKK is their white robes, which feature a conical mask. These were adopted by the first Klan, and were intended to add to the terror of their brutal attacks.

As part of their rituals, the KKK carries out cross burnings. Most Christians would say burning a cross is sacrilege but the Klan believe it is lighting it, in a symbol of members faith.

The KKK also use unique titles and greetings among their members with the leaders referred to as Grand or Imperial Wizards.

To this day the KKK attend rallies, and due the United States Constitutions First Amendment, which relates to freedom of speech, their hate speech is legal.

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Frank Ancona, a self-described Imperial Wizard of the Missouri chapter of the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, was found dead with a gunshot to the head in February 2017.

Ancona, who wrote that the KKKs mission was to preserve white culture and heritage, had been reported missing from his home afterhe told his wife Malissa that he was filing for a divorce.

After being reported missing on February 10, his body was found near the Big River, with the Sheriff describing his death as a tragic and senseless act of violence.

The 51-year-olds wife, Malissa, and her son Paul Edward Jinkerson Jr, 24, have both been charged with his murder.

Authorities believe that Malissa broke into Franks safe to get at his guns so that she could kill him.

Washington County coroner Brian DeClue told The Kansas City Star:It was not self-inflicted.This is now a homicide investigation.

Donald Trumpblasted the KKK and neo-Nazis as repugnant after being criticised for not singling out the far-right violence following the horrific car assault inCharlottesville, Virginia.

Far-right groups had gathered on August 12 to protest the decision to bring down the statue of Confederate General Robert E Lee.

Activist Richard Spencer and formerKu Klux Klanleader David Duke attended the demonstrations.

Heather Hyer, 32, died after being hit by the car, with her family saying she had been marching in a cry for social justice.

During his statement at the White House, the Trump denounced racism as evil and singled out the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazis as repugnant.

He said: Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.

Trump had attracted criticism for not being strong enough following the terrifying car assault.

David Duke was the Grand Wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, a chapter of the KKK, from 1974 to 1980.

Before 1975, he was a member of the American Nazi party and is now a Republican.

The 56-year-old, who is an antisemitic conspiracy theorist and Holocaust denier, is against what he believes to be the Jewish control of the Federal Reserve Bank, US federal government and the media. He also believes in racial segregation.

Following Donald Trumps election, David Dukethanked Wikileaks and Julian Assange describing the Wikileaks founder as a hero.

AP:Associated Press

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There are no good Nazis or Ku Klux Klan members | The Tribune – The San Luis Obispo Tribune

There are no good Nazis or Ku Klux Klan members | The Tribune
The San Luis Obispo Tribune
President Trump's description of the parties in the tragic conflict in Charlottesville as comprised of good people on both sides got me thinking.

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When the Ku Klux Klan gripped Austin and the nation

Posted: 10:00 a.m. Thursday, August 17, 2017

Hate groups, historians remind us, have always been with us.

The recent deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., might have been the largest and most brazen of such American gatherings in a decade or so. However, one of the constituent groups, the Ku Klux Klan, has emblazoned a long historical scar on Texas.

At one point during the 1920s, the group was politically and socially pervasive nationwide, almost a daily fact of life. Its Austin chapter had swelled to 1,500 members by 1922. It took a determined effort by crusaders such as future Texas Gov. Dan Moody to quell the tide.

In my lifetime, the Klan has always been dangerous, says Patricia Bernstein, Houston-based author of the recently published Ten Dollars to Hate: The Texas Man Who Fought the Klan (Texas A&M Press). And occasionally a Klansman kills someone. But the Klan as an organization has recently consisted of small groups of discredited, extremist fanatics.

Bernstein, who majored in American studies at Smith College, once thought the old Klan could never have been an organization that millions would join.

Research proved her wrong. And a few offhand references in her work led Bernstein to the story of Moody, a Taylor native who served as district attorney for the combined Williamson and Travis counties during the 1920s. Later, he was twice elected governor of Texas, the first time at age 33, and was considered a possible vice presidential running mate for Franklin D. Roosevelt.

I was surprised that Moody seemed to have been almost completely forgotten, despite his remarkable achievement in becoming the first prosecutor in the U.S. to succeed in convicting Klansmen for a brutal assault and getting them serious prison time, she says. I wanted to reclaim the story of this unsung Texas hero, whose deeds, to me, are far more important and relevant to todays world than those of the poor fellows who died at the Alamo. All Texas public school students learn about the Alamo in required Texas history courses. They should also learn about Dan Moody.

Three stages of the Klan

During Reconstruction in the 1860s, the secretive Ku Klux Klan employed lynchings, beatings, tribunals, cross burnings and other acts of violence to terrorize and intimidate recently freed slaves and drive them from the public sphere. Eventually, unapologetic Jim Crow laws did the job of separating the races.

Inspired by racial tensions during World War I and an incendiary movie, The Birth of a Nation, originally titled The Clansman, the Klan in its second phase enlisted millions of members. They controlled whole sectors of the American business and social communities, as well as law enforcement departments and local and state government officials. They were active all over the country, not just in the Deep South, and achieved widespread power by expanding their scope to target immigrants, Catholics, Jews, Asians, Latinos, bootleggers and the morally suspect.

By the end of the 1920s, however, that Klans power had dissipated.

RELATED:Crews removed Jefferson Davis, Woodrow Wilson statues from UT Main Mall

In its third phase, the Klan stayed mostly underground after World War II, except for a bloody revival during the civil rights battles of the 1960s. There were the occasional appearances of a self-publicizing leader such as David Duke, but the group has only recently emerged in a more explicit form on the national scene.

Today, the Southern Poverty Law Center estimates there are between 5,000 and 8,000 Klan members split among dozens of groups that use the Klan name in some form. A recent report from the veteran civil rights watchdog group lists 130 different Klan groups. Nine of these are identified as being in Texas, which is characterized as hosting 55 active hate groups all together.

But we have to remember that these days groups that use the Klan name are competing with, and often inspiring, other similar groups that dont use the Klan name, Bernstein says, citing the Southern Poverty Law Center. Neo-Nazis, white nationalists, racist skinheads, Christian identity groups, neo-Confederate groups, anti-LGBT groups, anti-Muslim groups and general hate groups. Black-separatist hate groups are yet another category identified by the SPLC, but, of course, they arent in competition with the white-supremacist Klan.

The 1920s Klan

I think some of the people who were drawn into the Klans orbit in the 1920s were sincere prohibitionists who believed the Klan could help in enforcing Prohibition, Bernstein says. They believed the Klans bogus promise to clean up cities and towns by intimidating, threatening and even punishing bootleggers, moonshiners, vagrants, gamblers, prostitutes and the like.

Conservatives of the day who were scandalized by rapidly changing social and sexual mores thought the Klan would help restore traditional morality.

Only native-born, white, Anglo-Saxon Protestants were eligible to join the Klan at this time, for a $10 membership fee. They called themselves 100 percent Americans, in contrast with hyphenated Americans. This expansion of targets for bigotry helped the new KKK reach far beyond the former Confederacy. Historians estimate that the Klan recruited between 1 million and 3 million people at its height in the early 1920s.

In 1925 and 1926, the Klan marched en masse on Washington. In 1927, members headed to New York City for a big showdown, far away from the supposed home bases in the South.

The Klans grip on Austin, however, during this era was not as firm as it was in, say, Dallas, Houston, Waco or East Texas. Yet a Klan meeting hall operated on East Fifth Street, and a multi-city Klan assembly, cloaked in robes meant to provoke terror, surged up Congress Avenue to the Capitol in 1921.

David Humphreys Austin: An Illustrated History reports that Capital City Klan No. 81 claimed 1,500 members in 1922 and included among its members the sheriff of Travis County. Bernsteins book describes Klan attacks on three men and at least one murder here. Anti-Klan lawmen were never able to identify and bring to justice whoever killed Peeler Clayton, who just happened to be driving by Klan headquarters downtown at the wrong time on the night of Dec. 15, 1921.

In many locations the new Klan was extremely violent, attacking many whites as well as blacks, Bernstein says. In Dallas, for instance, a drunken Klansman bragged to a victim that he was the 67th person to be flogged at the Klan whipping post in the Trinity River bottoms.

RELATED:A closer look at 1919 Austin racial incident turns up the unexpected

It took some time before the public began to see that the Klan was committing crime, not cleaning it up. For all the Klan propaganda about enforcing laws and protecting pure womanhood, many of the top Klan leaders were exposed even arrested for violating liquor laws. Some were also shown to be compulsive womanizers, Bernstein says, and worse.

Americans today continue to misunderstand the second coming of the Klan of the 1920s, which often acted on motivations such as petty grudges and offended honor.

They think that, like all forms of the Klan, it was primarily racist, Bernstein says. When they hear the story of the attack that frames my book, people immediately assume that the Klan attacked Ralph Burleson, accusing him of conducting an illicit affair with a widow, because one member of the couple was white and one was black. In fact, both Burleson and the widow, Fannie Campbell, were white.

Who was Dan Moody?

Dan Moody was the polar opposite of the rogues who founded the second KKK, Bernstein says. He was a super-straight arrow who had worked hard from a very tender age and did not touch alcohol. But there was nothing stuffy or priggish about him.

Bernstein describes him as both extremely bright and extremely likable with an open, optimistic outlook on life.

Moody went off to the University of Texas with one suit of clothes, one pair of shoes and $65 in his pocket. After spending two years in Austin as an undergraduate and two years studying law, he sold his gold watch to pay for the bar exam.

Once he became a lawyer, the 27-year-old was quickly elected county attorney, the youngest ever to serve in Williamson County. In 1922, he was first appointed and then elected district attorney of both Williamson and Travis counties.

At the age of 29, in 1923, he was an experienced and skilled prosecutor ready to take on the Klan in the Burleson case. Before him, other prosecutors in California and Louisiana had come close to exacting appropriate punishment, but Klansmen were no-billed by Klan-dominated grand juries, or they received probation or a fine, or their sentences were overturned on appeal.

Moody had the advantages of an anti-Klan judge, James Hamilton, and an equally anti-Klan sheriff, Lee Allen, and constable, Louis Lowe. Citizens took up a collection to make sure Moody had the resources to fight the top defense attorneys backed by the Klan.

I suspect that Moody may have had an advantage in the Georgetown trials, since Williamson County had a relatively small population compared with some of the urban counties where Klan prosecutions were attempted, Bernstein says. For example, efforts to indict Klansmen in Austin had been unsuccessful. Williamson County locals probably had a pretty good idea who was in the Klan, even though membership was supposed to be secret.

Judge Hamilton allowed Moody to question prospective jurors fairly ferociously about whether they were members of the Klan, Bernstein says, and Moody was determined to keep Klansmen off his juries.

During the trial, Moody was on his toes and highly effective, she says. One observer, Jessie Daniel Ames, described him as being drunk with fight. He had a skillful way of turning defense questioning against the defense and making them look ridiculous.

As posed in Bernsteins book, the story of the first of several trials related to the case, which transfixed Williamson County, was as dramatic as any Hollywood courtroom drama, with a last-minute surprise witness for the defense who could have sunk the prosecutions case. Moody persevered and succeeded.

After his celebrated win, Moody was the man to beat for statewide office.

MORE:24 years ago, Austinites mooned Ku Klux Klan at Texas Capitol

In 1924, Miriam Ma Ferguson defeated the Klan candidate for governor, running as a surrogate for her husband, Jim Pa Ferguson, who had been impeached and removed from office in 1917 and therefore wasnt allowed to run for office again in Texas. At the same time, Moody was elected Texas attorney general.

The Fergusons, however, were extraordinarily corrupt, using the Texas Highway Commission and other methods to rake in cash.

Moody decided to run for governor against Ma in 1926.

She swore that if he beat her by one vote in the primary, she would immediately resign, Bernstein says. He beat her by over 125,000 votes, almost avoiding a runoff, but, of course, she didnt resign. When he whipped her thoroughly in the runoff, she, out of sheer spite, pardoned his first Klan defendant, who had not yet served even a year in prison.

Remembering Moody

Not everyone has forgotten Moody. Nor do they agree on the impact of his heroism.

History-minded folks in Williamson County recently erected a statue of Moody in Georgetowns courthouse square, not far from a 100-year-old image of a Confederate soldier, installed during the Jim Crow era, when many such public symbols of ongoing white supremacy appeared across the South.

Despite the bid for balance, not everyone is impressed by the Moody monument.

Well, it came about without our input, Jaquita Wilson, a leader in Georgetowns African-American community, told apublic radio reporter in June regarding the Moody statue. No one asked us. When you walk around this courthouse, theres no mention that there were Latinos, that there were Native Americans, that there were African-Americans here. Just white Georgetown.

RELATED: Williamson museum plans statue of Klan-fighting prosecutor

When Moody was elected governor, the youngest that Texas ever had, journalists all over the country celebrated his courage and success in fighting demagoguery as well as his victory over the Klan. But that was not the end of the story.

In my book, I have tried to be entirely honest about Moodys later life, Bernstein says. He, like many people, became more conservative even reactionary as he got older. He eventually turned against Roosevelt and the New Deal, perhaps partly because he often represented the oil and gas industry in court, and Texas oilmen bitterly resented increased regulation of business, the growth of the labor movement and fixed wartime prices for oil and gas. Moody came to be one of the leaders of a movement known as the Texas Regulars, which opposed Roosevelt.

Bernstein says Moody, like many other white politicians in Texas, was particularly appalled by the 1944 Supreme Court ruling in Smith v. Allwright, which ended the whites-only Democratic primary in Texas. Moody proposed, in response, that the party revert to using a convention system, instead of a primary, to nominate candidates, the implication being though not stated explicitly by him that it would be easier to keep blacks out of a convention than out of a primary.

He led the fight at the 1944 Democratic National Convention in Chicago for a plank in the national platform that would allow states to keep blacks from voting and to maintain poll taxes and segregated schools, hospitals and public transportation.

Although he fought against anti-Semitic, anti-Catholic and anti-immigrant sentiments, partly because of his lifelong friendships with those in the affected communities, his record was far from pure.

In other words, like most white men of his time in the South even bright, educated, ethical white men Dan Moody was a racist, Bernstein says. But he was never one of the many rabid racists of his time. As a politician, he never indulged in the crude race-baiting rhetoric common to Southern politicians in those days. Like all our other heroes, Dan Moody had feet of clay.

PATRICIA BERNSTEIN SPEAKS ABOUT THE KLAN AND DAN MOODY

When: 7 p.m. Nov. 1

Where: Austin Jewish Community Center, 7300 Hart Lane

Information:jewishbookfair.org

When: Noon Sept. 6

Where: Bullock Texas State History Museum, 1800 Congress Ave.

Information: 512-936-8746,thestoryoftexas.com

WHY DID PATRICIA BERNSTEIN FOCUS ON THE KLAN IN TEXAS?

Among author Patricia Bernsteins first loves were literature and European history, especially the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Victorian era. Back then, Texas history stayed far from her mind.

My dad, who was a Texas oil and gas lawyer for over 50 years, used to try to get me more interested in Texas history, but it all seemed just kind of drab, colorless, deserty and hot, she says. I think we sometimes think that our own environment is not very romantic and doesnt have a lot of historic resonance, but we are often wrong about that.

That all changed when I encountered the picture of the lynching of Jesse Washington in 1916 in Waco in the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. I was tremendously shocked that I didnt know about this terrible story or the prevalence of lynching in my own home state during the Jim Crow era. The result was my previous book, The First Waco Horror: The Lynching of Jesse Washington and the Rise of the NAACP.

At that point I was tuned into Texas history and all the stories we dont know beyond the Alamo and Six Flags and the Texas Rangers. But I cant just dwell for many years of research on the worst that humanity is capable of lynching, the Klan, etc. Im always looking for the real, unsung heroes, the people who stood up against evil in their own time and made a difference. If we are going to dwell on the worst, Id also like to spend some time on the best that humans are capable of.

Though the mass-movement Klan did not last for many years, Bernstein says, the damage it did lingered for decades. For instance, the Klan helped support the passage of the Immigration Law of 1924, which prohibited immigration into the U.S. by East Asians, Middle Easterners and Indians and established quotas for European countries that favored the so-called Nordic nations.

Less than 20 years later, this law played a central role in preventing many Jewish refugees from finding a haven in the United States during the Holocaust.

This is personal for me, Bernstein says. Most of my grandfathers extended family his sisters, their husbands, nephews and nieces perished in Poland during the Holocaust. The implications for attitudes toward immigrants and efforts to keep refugees out of our country today are obvious.

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When the Ku Klux Klan gripped Austin and the nation

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Police: Ku Klux Klan flyers dropped at homes near Cincinnati – WKBN.com

By WKBN Staff and The Associated Press Published: August 18, 2017, 7:14 am Updated: August 18, 2017, 8:10 am

GREEN TWP., Ohio (WKBN/AP) A community in Ohio is feeling the aftermath of the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Packages with Ku Klux Klanflyers were dropped on dozens of doorsteps in Green Township, near Cincinnati.

The flyers were in faded orange plastic wrappers, taped inside employment guides. The message inside a white envelope said, Racial purity is Americas security.

Most people either ignored or drove over them at the bottom of their driveways, but authorities said they still received several calls from upset residents.

If my kids were older and they were to open it and they were to read that, they would have all kinds of questions. I mean, I dont want to have to explain that kind of hatred to them,Tracy Noel said.

Police suspect someone probably saw an easy opportunity to hide their messages inside the guides which were dated back in January and then re-distribute them.

Green Township police say theyre not investigating this as a hate crime and whats in the message is protected by the first amendment.

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Ku Klux Klan recruits New Mexicans to join group – KRQE News 13

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) Less than a week after a rally in Charlottesville captured the nations attention and put the spotlight on the growing number of hate groups, the KKK has launched a recruiting website in New Mexico.

The website details why the Ku Klux Klan thinks New Mexico should be a fertile recruiting ground.

Oh no, no. I dont understand how people can do that, said Norma Baca, an Albuquerque resident.

The KKK posted a message on their website saying that while their history in the state is limited, New Mexicos location is a target for immigration problems.

The group also says theyre now in New Mexico and theyre recruiting new people everyday who want to safeguard the American way of life. An alarming thought for many.

We dont want hate you know? We need peace. We are people who work and need to have peace, said Baca.

In a statement to KRQE News 13, the FBIs Albuquerque Division says they investigate crimes and threats to national security, and their focus is not based on a groups ideology or beliefs.

The FBI investigates activity which may constitute a federal crime or pose a threat to national security. Our focus is not on membership in particular groups or adherence to particular ideologies or beliefs but on criminal activity. The FBI cannot initiate an investigation based solely on an individuals race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, or the exercise of the First Amendment or other Constitutional rights, and we remain committed to protecting those rights for all Americans.

Meanwhile, Albuquerques NAACP President says they will rise against any attempt by the KKK or any other hate group that tries to violate any rights of New Mexico citizens.

The KKK recruiting page for New Mexico even has a questionnaire page for people who want to apply. It looks like the group behind the site is based in Indiana.

According to a national civil rights organization, there are more than 900 active hate groups in the United States. Only one of them is based in New Mexico, a group called Aggressive Christianity, located near the Arizona state line.

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Ku Klux Klan recruits New Mexicans to join group – KRQE News 13

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The day 30000 white supremacists in KKK robes marched in the nation’s capital – Washington Post

By Terence McArdle By Terence McArdle August 17 at 6:00 AM

At the height of its popularity, the Ku Klux Klan brought more than 30,000 of its members to participate in a parade in downtown D.C. on Aug. 8, 1925. (British Path)

The Ku Klux Klan was at the height of its popularity when more than 30,000 members racists and anti-Semites marching 22 abreast and 14 rows deep paraded down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington on Aug. 8, 1925.

White-robed Klan cheered on march in nations capital, read the front-page headline in The Washington Post the next day.

The gathering dwarfed the hundreds of white nationalists, Klan members and neo-Nazis who descended on Charlottesville Saturday to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The rally turned into a riot as the white supremacists clashed with counterprotests, leaving 32-year-old Heather Heyer dead and many others injured.

Nearly a century ago, the Klan was welcomed to segregated Washington by its white residents, as the breathless coverage in The Post demonstrated.

Phantom-like hosts of the Ku Klux Klan spread their white robe over the most historic thoroughfare yesterday in one of the greatest demonstrations this city has ever known, read The Posts account.

[The Ku Klux Klan was dead. The first Hollywood blockbuster revived it.]

Led by L.A. Mueller, the grand Kleagle of Washington, the Ku Klux Klan booked 18 trains for their march and rally. Hotels filled with the hooded men. Lunch stands and tobacco shops quickly sold out. The Klan even brought their own ambulances to escort those felled by the August heat.

The Post story rhapsodizes about their parade pageantry but says very little about the groups espousal of hatred. However, it does criticize their parade skills: There were few drilled marchers in the parade. At times their lines, extending the full length of the Avenue, swayed hopelessly back and forth.

The Klansmen marched for over three hours before arriving at the Washington Monument grounds for speeches, only to be greeted by a torrential downpour.

Dont leave, Mueller exhorted. God wont let it rain.

But the rains came, washing out the demonstration, and many left.

The next day a Klan contingent crossed over the river to Arlington. They placed wreaths on the Tomb of the Unknowns and the grave of William Jennings Bryan. That evening 75,000 people witnessed many watching from roadsides and their back yards the burning of an electrically lit 80-foot cross at the Arlington Park horse grounds. The ceremony initiated some 200 new members into the hooded order.

The Klan returned to Washington to parade again on Sept. 13, 1926. However, this time only 15,000 less than half the previous years crowd marched.

To understand the prevalence of the Klan in the 1920s, try to imagine what the tea party on steroids would look like, said historian Ibram X. Kendi, author of Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America. That was the scope and power that the KKK had in the 1920s.

[Leo Frank was lynched for a murder he didnt commit. Now neo-Nazis are trying to rewrite history.]

Many of the hooded marchers showed their faces a rather telling indication that the group, responsible for lynchings and other acts of terror, could operate with impunity. At the time, the Klan boasteda national dues-paying membership of nearly 5 million men and 500,000 women. The shedding of the masks was a subject of internal debate for the group, a move that some felt would grant their organization added legitimacy and respectability.

You had many members of the KKK who were politicians senators, congressmen, statehouse representatives, said Kendi, and that only encouraged the members to appear publicly without their hoods.

Indeed, the 1924 Democratic convention was known as the Klanbake, because the party by a razor-thin margin voted against an anti-Klan plank in its platform.

If you were a member of the Democratic Party, a powerful member, you probably had some sort of affiliation to the KKK either publicly or privately, said Kendi. Though there were also members of the Klan in the Republican Party, they had most of their power in the Democratic Party.

The original Ku Klux Klan had fallen by the wayside after reconstruction, only to see its fortunes revived with director D.W. Griffiths 1915 movie The Birth of A Nation. President Woodrow Wilson screened the film twice for guests at the White House.

The revived Klan drew its members not only from the South but from the Midwest and industrial North and saw itself as the protector of white Protestant supremacy. In addition to African Americans, they hatedCatholic and Jewish immigrants and feared the Northern migration of African Americans.

They also saw themselves as great moralists. In additional to their campaign of terror against African Americans and ethnic minorities, the Klan broke up stills in the name of prohibition and flayed and flogged adulterers in the name of traditional family values.

Kendi sees parallels between the Klan of the 1920s and the alt-right that inspired the recent violence in Charlottesville.

When you have a set of circumstances occurring, like those over the last 40 years stagnating wages, immigration occurring, economic inequality growing it allows demagogues to say this is occurring because of diversity, because of civil rights for people of color.

These white supremacists are conditioned to believe this even though it flies in the face of facts.

Read more Retropolis:

Death of a devil: The white supremacist got hit by a car. His victims celebrated.

Google memorializes the Silent Parade when 10,000 black people protested lynchings

When Portland banned blacks: Oregons shameful history as an all-white state

Life or death for black travelers: How fear led to The Negro Motorist Green-Book

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KKK denied permit to burn cross atop symbolic mountain in Georgia – The Guardian

A Confederate memorial at Stone Mountain Park, Georgia, features Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E Lee. Photograph: Alamy

Georgias Stone Mountain park has denied the Ku Klux Klans request to burn a cross at the top of the mountain, where the second KKK was founded in 1915.

Joey Hobbs, of the Sacred Knights Ku Klux Klan, submitted a permit application request for 20 people to attend a cross-burning on top of the mountain, which is notorious for being tied to the KKK.

We will light our cross and 20 minutes later we will be gone, Hobbs wrote on the permit.

The Stone Mountain Memorial Association this week denied the request for a 21 October cross-burning and said in a statement that it condemns the beliefs and actions of the Ku Klux Klan and believes the denial of this Public Assembly request is in the best interest of all parties.

We dont want any of these groups at the park, quite frankly, John Bankhead, a spokesman for the association, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

He said the burning would have been an act of intimidation, in keeping with the KKKs history of burning crosses to intimidate black Americans, and that the park would not allow that.

The park, site of the second founding of the KKK, has a giant carved Confederate memorial of Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E Lee, which was completed in the 1960s, decades after initial work was halted. There has been a spate of white supremacist rallies at the park in recent years, though they are often attended by more protesters than supporters.

The park clamped down on event safety after an April 2016 white supremacist gathering swelled with hundreds of protesters opposed to the rally, which was ultimately attended by just a few dozen white supremacists.

The association cited the April 2016 rally and said the cross-burning would require more safety resources than could be provided.

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Colorado’s long history and uncertain present with the KKK and other hate groups – The Denver Post

Hate never left Colorado. From massacres of American Indians in the 19th Century to the Ku Klux Klans control of state politics in the 1920s to modern acts of violence such as the 2013 assassination of the state prisons director by a white supremacist gang member, Colorado has dealt with its share of racism. Now, though, a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., that turned violent and a president who has struggled to outright denounce the racists or their actions have raised awareness across the country, including in Colorado. And people are ready to speak out. It seems louder for people who deny it ever existed, said the Rev. Timothy Tyler, pastor of Shorter Community AME Church in Denver. But for those of us who have grown up with it and have lived it, we are saying, I told you so. Were going to do all we can to address a wound that has been scratched over the presidents words and what happened in Charlottesville. Last year, the Southern Poverty Law Center, an Alabama-based organization that fights extremism, identified 16 hate groups in the state the same number listed in 2015, although some groups had fallen off the list and others had been added. Of the 16 groups listed in 2016, five were white supremacist/racist groups, while the others were singled out because of their views toward Muslims, immigrants, gay people and white people. Among the white supremacist groups were a Wheat Ridge-based company that distributes neo-Nazi music and books and a group founded in Finland that conducted a so-called patrol through LoDo and posted a video of it on YouTube. Most of the time, those groups operate under the publics radar, proclaiming their views on social media and refraining from public gatherings. But since Donald Trumps election, many people believe they are becoming more bold and more visible. Were seeing a greater number of public events, folks who are more willing to express their extremist beliefs and ideologies in a public forum, said Jeremy Shaver, associate director for the Anti-Defamation League Rocky Mountain States region. In 2015, the Anti-Defamation League recorded 18 reported anti-Semitic incidents but that number more than doubled in 2016 to 45, Shaver said. This year, more than 30 incidents have been reported thus far. Those incidents include July vandalism at Chabad Lubavitch Jewish Center in Colorado Springs. William Scott Planer, a Denver resident who is accused of affixing a Fight Terror, Nuke Israel sticker on the building, is being held on a $500,000 bond in the El Paso County jail. He also is wanted on a warrant out of California after being accused of attacking a protester during a white supremacists march in June 2106. Planer and his roommates became notorious figures in November in Denvers Capitol Hill neighborhood after someone put their names, faces and address on fliers to notify area residents that white supremacists live nearby. The Denver Post attempted to talk to residents at the home last week, but a man inside refused to answer the door and yelled, Go away! Also this summer, white supremacists have attended an anti-Sharia law rally at the state Capitol and a rally held in Boulder by a group that celebrates misogyny. Those alt-right groups attract white supremacists and are helping bring more public activity, Shaver said. The take-home message is no community is immune to white supremacy and no state is immune to white supremacy, he said. Colorado is no exception. And the state never has been the exception. Courtesy of the Royal Gorge Regional Museum and History Center This April 1926 photo by Clinton Rolfe shows members of the Ku Klux Klan posing on a ferris wheel at the fairgrounds in Caon City, Colorado. Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. Members of the KKK, in pointed hoods that cover the face and dark or white robes, stand around a tall cross in a boulder field on the summit of Pikes Peak in El Paso County, Colorado on July 4, 1923. They raise their arms in salute. Shows an American flag and the tops of automobiles. Denver Post archive photo Members of the Ku Klux Klan march in a parade on Larimer Street in Denver, May 31, 1926. They wear hoods and robes as spectators look on. Parked automobiles line the street. A sign on a building reads: “Western Clothing Co.” Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. A Klan member at “Klan Day” at the races at Overland Park in July 1925. Ku Klux Klan members inspect the Miller Special race car owned by Ralph de Palma at Overland Park race track in Denver, Colorado. People crowd the bleachers. The driver, identified as Mr. Miller, wears a duster and holds a cap. Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. This undated photo shows crosses burning at a KKK night ceremony held on Table Top Mountain in Golden . A row of men in white hoods that cover the face and robes encircles men in street clothes who kneel with their backs to the camera. Spectators sit in chairs outside the circle, some have on white hoods. Shows a flagpole and the American flag. (Photo courtesy of Denver Public LibraryWesternHistory/Genealogy Dept.) Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. This photograph made between 1924 and 1925 shows a panoramic night view of men, members of the KKK, in pointed hoods that cover the face and dark or white robes who stand, or sit on horseback, on Table Top Mountain near Golden (Jefferson County), Colorado. Men in bandanna masks and street clothes kneel before a table with three hooded men; one holds an American flag. Many of the men salute. Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. Two women and a man wearing hoods and robes, members of the Ku Klux Klan, stand near a burning cross at night in 1924 or 1925, probably in Denver. Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. Governor Clarence J. Morely poses for a photo as he signs a document in the Governor’s office. Morely served as Governor of Colorado from 1925 to 1927, he was known as the Ku Klux Klan Governor during the political peak of the Klan in the 1920’s. Denver Post archive photo This 1925 group portrait shows men (with drums) and women in Ku Klux Klan costumes and Revolutionary era uniforms, in Denver. Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. Members of the Ku Klux Klan kneel and stand around a U. S. flag in a ceremony on Golden Road near Denver on April 16, 1922. A cross illuminated by flashlights is nearby. The men wear hoods and robes. Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. A cross burns at a night meeting of the Ku Klux Klan on Table Top Mountain near Golden in 1924 or 1925. Men in white robes and hoods encircle a group of men in street clothes who kneel in front of the burning cross. A container and cups on a tray sit behind rows of chairs. Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. Ku Klux Klan members wearing hoods and robes light candles in metal cans buried in a dirt mound on May 7, 1940, probably in Denver. Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. A burning cross and a man in Ku Klux Klan uniform and hood on Ruby Hill, in Denver, sometime in the 1920s. Denver Public Library, Western History/Genealogy Dept. Klansmen exchange documents with one another in front of a burning cross and an American flag as other members of the group watch at a rally of the Boulder Chapter of the Ku Klux Klan in Boulder County, ca. 1925. Duane Howell, The Denver Post Denver policemen protect a flag-waving member of the Ku Klux Klan at 16th Street and Court Place about 11:45 a.m., Sept. 14, 1979, during a Chicano march through downtown Denver, kicking off festivities for Mexican Independence Day, celebrated Sunday. One of the marchers was confronted by a policeman, left, as he attempted to approach the Klansman. Shortly after, the unidentified Klansman rolled up his sign and flag and left. John Sunderland, The Denver Post Fred Wilkins, the state organizer of the Ku Klux Klan, announces his resignation as head of that organization Aug. 10, 1980 to join the National Association for the Advancement of White People, a group that had been recently formed by the head of the national Ku Klux Klan. Wilkins said the Klan had suffered from a negative image and that the new group should be seen as a pro-white organization instead of an anti-black one. The power structure of settlements and territories in the early American West called for the destruction of Indians, said Patty Limerick, the states historian laureate and director of the Center for the American West at the University of Colorado Boulder. The times were not much easier for Mexicans or Asian immigrants, who suffered from discrimination and oppression, she said. In fact, lynching has a very Western story, Limerick said, with Mexicans as the primary victims. In the 1920s, Colorado politics were dominated by the Ku Klux Klan albeit a branch that, while loyal to its Southern brotherhood, was more preoccupied with Catholics and Jews than black people, Limerick said. The Klan came to power after World War I during a period where Americans were coming off the anxieties and tensions associated with war but finding that times were not prosperous for farmers and laborers, Limerick said. White Protestants were trying to hang onto their power so immigrants, who were likely to be Irish or Italian Catholics, were targets. The Klans Denver power broker was a doctor named John Galen Locke, a Spanish-American War veteran from New York. Klansmen occupied the governors office and represented the majority in both houses of the state legislature and held numerous statewide offices. Denver Mayor Benjamin Stapleton won office because he joined the Klan, and Denver Police Chief William Candish was a klansman. Limerick described Locke as a weird bird. His decline came when he was charged with various crimes and the whole movement fell apart, she said. While Limerick objects to the notion of history repeating itself, the 1920s provide cautionary tales for todays leaders. Stapleton, for example, was not driven solely by hatred of black people, Catholics and Jews, but he knew he needed Klan support to win an election, she said. It hast gone well for him over the years, Limerick said. He made that devils bargain. He later separated himself from the Klan, but he left himself with that record of being a part of the Klan. It says something about how long-range someone should think of his heritage and his legacy. In Denver, there has been a movement to remove Stapletons name from the neighborhood that bears his name, built on the site of a former airport also named after him. Limerick suggested having an event she described as Stapleton Remembrance Day where people gathered to listen to scholars discuss his choice to form an alliance with such an abhorrent movement. As part of the event, people could spend time talking about their actions today and what legacy they will leave. I wish we could quit with the tug-of-war over the names of places and statues, Limerick said, because people and their stories are muddled and complicated. I wish we could put a mirror up to ourselves and think, Are we doing that?’ Tyler, the church pastor, said he had grown tired of talking about race but now sees a renewed opportunity form new allies. His church hosted a community discussion about race on Saturday and another is planned for Aug. 31. I think were going to have to do a lot of talking to get peoples heads around how this is affecting our society, he said. Barbara Gunion, a 51-year-old from Centennial, has felt the call to act since Trump was elected in November. She joined two national groups that consider themselves organized resistance to the president, and the increased visibility of armed militias, neo-Nazis and other alt-right groups have led to a sense of urgency for her. I feel like Charlottesville and Trumps statements are a real tipping point for the left, Gunion said. Its not just racheted it up. Its caused a whole different way of thinking. This experience has made me realize its also my problem. Its my responsibility. Im white but its not an excuse to be silent. Its the reason not to be silent.

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Ku Klux Klan to attend Boston rally – Boston Herald

Massachusetts members of the Ku Klux Klan reportedly are headed to Boston Common for the so-called Boston Free Speech Rally this Saturday, but a rally organizer said he doesnt want the event hijacked by white supremacists. I know some of our members from the Springfield area are going, said Thomas Robb, national director of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. Im assuming members in the Boston area are going. Robb did not provide details on who or how many members would attend the rally, but said they would be inconspicuous while supporting the rally. I dont think theyre going to cause a disturbance, Robb said, adding that Knights from different areas went to the Charlottesville rally. Our members dont stand out, they dont walk around giving Nazi salutes, they might be your next door neighbor or Cub Scout leader. Rally organizer John Medlar, who has insisted his group is not racist, told the Herald, Though we naturally respect their right to speak and assemble, we also will exercise our right to choose who we will associate with. We will not allow our platform to be hijacked by the KKK. If I see anyone bring out a swastika or throw a Hitler salute, I will immediately denounce them. The Free Speech Rally which many fear will turn into a white nationalist protest will take place from noon to 2 p.m. at the Parkman Bandstand tomorrow, with the prospect of massive counterprotests in the wake of the violence in Charlottesville, Va., that left a woman dead. Medlar has said his group was not involved in Charlottesville though some of the listed speakers were there and that the Boston rally is meant to promote free speech, not white supremacy. Mayor Martin J. Walsh said about the KKK: Make no mistake: We do not welcome any hate groups to Boston and we reject their message. We have made it clear that we will not tolerate incitements to violence or any threatening behavior. I ask that everyone join me in making Boston a more inclusive, welcoming, love-filled city for all. Counterprotest organizers said they were not surprised by the Klan threat. Weve been prepared for the worst like that since the beginning, said Kelsey Taylor, one of the organizers for a rally that will take place in front of the State House. It doesnt change our plan, but it reminds us to be vigilant. Im not worried about it. It would be naive to think there arent Klansmen in Massachusetts, said Angelina Camacho, one of the organizers of a Black Lives Matter rally that will march from the Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center at Roxbury Community College to Boston Common Saturday. Im looking forward to having a peaceful event without incident. Organizers on both sides of the rally have met with police to go over security plans, which include keeping Free Speech rally participants behind barriers and keeping them separated from counterprotesters. Police are urging people to not bring backpacks or strollers to the Common and are banning weapons, bicycles, signs attached to sticks and pets from the area. Meanwhile, Christopher Cantwell of Keene, N.H., a self-described white nationalist who attended the rally in Charlottesville, said he was contacted by the FBIs Joint Terrorism Task Force about helping defuse any violence in Boston. He told reporters he isnt going because there is a warrant for his arrest in Virginia stemming from the rally there. Herald wire services contributed to this report.

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What is the Ku Klux Klan, who was KKK Imperial Wizard Frank … – The Sun

THE Ku Klux Klan returned to prominence thanks toDonald Trump who is cited as a factor in the rise ofright-wing groups in America after they backed him to become president. Theyre popping their robes back on, emboldened to broadcast their white supremacist message like never before. We explain everything you need to know about them. Getty Images In a nutshell, the Ku Klux Klan (or the KKK) is an extremist hate group who believeall non-Caucasian people are inferior to them. The group believes that America should be a nation that is free from drugs, homosexuality and immigration. Claiming to have extreme pride in their nation, they say that they are building a better society for everyone arguing on their website that they are a group not of hate but of love. Historically, black Americans have been the KKKs main target but more recently it has targeted Jews, immigrants, LGBT people and even Catholics. Since its formation in 1865, the groups history can be divided into three eras. The first Klan, founded in Tennessee, was formed by former members of the Confederate army in around 1865. As a movement it was relatively short-lived at the outset but, as secret vigilantes, the Klan carried out acts of terrorism such as the lynchings, arson, murders, tar-and-featherings, rapes and other violent attacks historically associated with the group. During the first era, these attacks were directed towards anyone who challenged white supremacy. The second Klan, founded in Atlanta, Georgia in 1921, presented itself as a fraternal organisation employing full-time recruiters. At its peak, it was present in every state in America claiming to have at least 4 million members, operations in Canada, and even reportedly some recruiting activity in the UK. However, the KKKs popularity plummeted to only 30,000 members after a series of scandals. Getty Images The third revival came in the 1960s in opposition to the civil rights movement, which in the Klans eyes threatened segregation. The KKK name was used by a number of independent groups many members of which were convicted of murders of civil rights workers. One of the KKKs most violent actions was the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1963 an attack which killed four young girls. Today, it is thought there are at least 5,000 members of various KKK chapters in the United States. Getty Images The KKK refers to its beliefs and practices as Klankraft. Although they are a secretive group, there is some knowledge of its beliefs and practices which are all based on their white supremacist views. Incredible imagesgive a chilling insight into white supremacist culture that still exist in all corners of America. One of the most iconic symbols of the KKK is their white robes, which feature a conical mask. These were adopted by the first Klan, and were intended to add to the terror of their brutal attacks. As part of their rituals, the KKK carries out cross burnings. Most Christians would say burning a cross is sacrilege but the Klan believe it is lighting it, in a symbol of members faith. The KKK also use unique titles and greetings among their members with the leaders referred to as Grand or Imperial Wizards. To this day the KKK attend rallies, and due the United States Constitutions First Amendment, which relates to freedom of speech, their hate speech is legal. Facebook Frank Ancona, a self-described Imperial Wizard of the Missouri chapter of the Traditionalist American Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, was found dead with a gunshot to the head in February 2017. Ancona, who wrote that the KKKs mission was to preserve white culture and heritage, had been reported missing from his home afterhe told his wife Malissa that he was filing for a divorce. After being reported missing on February 10, his body was found near the Big River, with the Sheriff describing his death as a tragic and senseless act of violence. The 51-year-olds wife, Malissa, and her son Paul Edward Jinkerson Jr, 24, have both been charged with his murder. Authorities believe that Malissa broke into Franks safe to get at his guns so that she could kill him. Washington County coroner Brian DeClue told The Kansas City Star:It was not self-inflicted.This is now a homicide investigation. Donald Trumpblasted the KKK and neo-Nazis as repugnant after being criticised for not singling out the far-right violence following the horrific car assault inCharlottesville, Virginia. Far-right groups had gathered on August 12 to protest the decision to bring down the statue of Confederate General Robert E Lee. Activist Richard Spencer and formerKu Klux Klanleader David Duke attended the demonstrations. Heather Hyer, 32, died after being hit by the car, with her family saying she had been marching in a cry for social justice. During his statement at the White House, the Trump denounced racism as evil and singled out the Ku Klux Klan and neo-Nazis as repugnant. He said: Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans. Trump had attracted criticism for not being strong enough following the terrifying car assault. David Duke was the Grand Wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, a chapter of the KKK, from 1974 to 1980. Before 1975, he was a member of the American Nazi party and is now a Republican. The 56-year-old, who is an antisemitic conspiracy theorist and Holocaust denier, is against what he believes to be the Jewish control of the Federal Reserve Bank, US federal government and the media. He also believes in racial segregation. Following Donald Trumps election, David Dukethanked Wikileaks and Julian Assange describing the Wikileaks founder as a hero. AP:Associated Press

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There are no good Nazis or Ku Klux Klan members | The Tribune – The San Luis Obispo Tribune

There are no good Nazis or Ku Klux Klan members | The Tribune The San Luis Obispo Tribune President Trump's description of the parties in the tragic conflict in Charlottesville as comprised of good people on both sides got me thinking. and more »

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When the Ku Klux Klan gripped Austin and the nation

Posted: 10:00 a.m. Thursday, August 17, 2017 Hate groups, historians remind us, have always been with us. The recent deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., might have been the largest and most brazen of such American gatherings in a decade or so. However, one of the constituent groups, the Ku Klux Klan, has emblazoned a long historical scar on Texas. At one point during the 1920s, the group was politically and socially pervasive nationwide, almost a daily fact of life. Its Austin chapter had swelled to 1,500 members by 1922. It took a determined effort by crusaders such as future Texas Gov. Dan Moody to quell the tide. In my lifetime, the Klan has always been dangerous, says Patricia Bernstein, Houston-based author of the recently published Ten Dollars to Hate: The Texas Man Who Fought the Klan (Texas A&M Press). And occasionally a Klansman kills someone. But the Klan as an organization has recently consisted of small groups of discredited, extremist fanatics. Bernstein, who majored in American studies at Smith College, once thought the old Klan could never have been an organization that millions would join. Research proved her wrong. And a few offhand references in her work led Bernstein to the story of Moody, a Taylor native who served as district attorney for the combined Williamson and Travis counties during the 1920s. Later, he was twice elected governor of Texas, the first time at age 33, and was considered a possible vice presidential running mate for Franklin D. Roosevelt. I was surprised that Moody seemed to have been almost completely forgotten, despite his remarkable achievement in becoming the first prosecutor in the U.S. to succeed in convicting Klansmen for a brutal assault and getting them serious prison time, she says. I wanted to reclaim the story of this unsung Texas hero, whose deeds, to me, are far more important and relevant to todays world than those of the poor fellows who died at the Alamo. All Texas public school students learn about the Alamo in required Texas history courses. They should also learn about Dan Moody. Three stages of the Klan During Reconstruction in the 1860s, the secretive Ku Klux Klan employed lynchings, beatings, tribunals, cross burnings and other acts of violence to terrorize and intimidate recently freed slaves and drive them from the public sphere. Eventually, unapologetic Jim Crow laws did the job of separating the races. Inspired by racial tensions during World War I and an incendiary movie, The Birth of a Nation, originally titled The Clansman, the Klan in its second phase enlisted millions of members. They controlled whole sectors of the American business and social communities, as well as law enforcement departments and local and state government officials. They were active all over the country, not just in the Deep South, and achieved widespread power by expanding their scope to target immigrants, Catholics, Jews, Asians, Latinos, bootleggers and the morally suspect. By the end of the 1920s, however, that Klans power had dissipated. RELATED:Crews removed Jefferson Davis, Woodrow Wilson statues from UT Main Mall In its third phase, the Klan stayed mostly underground after World War II, except for a bloody revival during the civil rights battles of the 1960s. There were the occasional appearances of a self-publicizing leader such as David Duke, but the group has only recently emerged in a more explicit form on the national scene. Today, the Southern Poverty Law Center estimates there are between 5,000 and 8,000 Klan members split among dozens of groups that use the Klan name in some form. A recent report from the veteran civil rights watchdog group lists 130 different Klan groups. Nine of these are identified as being in Texas, which is characterized as hosting 55 active hate groups all together. But we have to remember that these days groups that use the Klan name are competing with, and often inspiring, other similar groups that dont use the Klan name, Bernstein says, citing the Southern Poverty Law Center. Neo-Nazis, white nationalists, racist skinheads, Christian identity groups, neo-Confederate groups, anti-LGBT groups, anti-Muslim groups and general hate groups. Black-separatist hate groups are yet another category identified by the SPLC, but, of course, they arent in competition with the white-supremacist Klan. The 1920s Klan I think some of the people who were drawn into the Klans orbit in the 1920s were sincere prohibitionists who believed the Klan could help in enforcing Prohibition, Bernstein says. They believed the Klans bogus promise to clean up cities and towns by intimidating, threatening and even punishing bootleggers, moonshiners, vagrants, gamblers, prostitutes and the like. Conservatives of the day who were scandalized by rapidly changing social and sexual mores thought the Klan would help restore traditional morality. Only native-born, white, Anglo-Saxon Protestants were eligible to join the Klan at this time, for a $10 membership fee. They called themselves 100 percent Americans, in contrast with hyphenated Americans. This expansion of targets for bigotry helped the new KKK reach far beyond the former Confederacy. Historians estimate that the Klan recruited between 1 million and 3 million people at its height in the early 1920s. In 1925 and 1926, the Klan marched en masse on Washington. In 1927, members headed to New York City for a big showdown, far away from the supposed home bases in the South. The Klans grip on Austin, however, during this era was not as firm as it was in, say, Dallas, Houston, Waco or East Texas. Yet a Klan meeting hall operated on East Fifth Street, and a multi-city Klan assembly, cloaked in robes meant to provoke terror, surged up Congress Avenue to the Capitol in 1921. David Humphreys Austin: An Illustrated History reports that Capital City Klan No. 81 claimed 1,500 members in 1922 and included among its members the sheriff of Travis County. Bernsteins book describes Klan attacks on three men and at least one murder here. Anti-Klan lawmen were never able to identify and bring to justice whoever killed Peeler Clayton, who just happened to be driving by Klan headquarters downtown at the wrong time on the night of Dec. 15, 1921. In many locations the new Klan was extremely violent, attacking many whites as well as blacks, Bernstein says. In Dallas, for instance, a drunken Klansman bragged to a victim that he was the 67th person to be flogged at the Klan whipping post in the Trinity River bottoms. RELATED:A closer look at 1919 Austin racial incident turns up the unexpected It took some time before the public began to see that the Klan was committing crime, not cleaning it up. For all the Klan propaganda about enforcing laws and protecting pure womanhood, many of the top Klan leaders were exposed even arrested for violating liquor laws. Some were also shown to be compulsive womanizers, Bernstein says, and worse. Americans today continue to misunderstand the second coming of the Klan of the 1920s, which often acted on motivations such as petty grudges and offended honor. They think that, like all forms of the Klan, it was primarily racist, Bernstein says. When they hear the story of the attack that frames my book, people immediately assume that the Klan attacked Ralph Burleson, accusing him of conducting an illicit affair with a widow, because one member of the couple was white and one was black. In fact, both Burleson and the widow, Fannie Campbell, were white. Who was Dan Moody? Dan Moody was the polar opposite of the rogues who founded the second KKK, Bernstein says. He was a super-straight arrow who had worked hard from a very tender age and did not touch alcohol. But there was nothing stuffy or priggish about him. Bernstein describes him as both extremely bright and extremely likable with an open, optimistic outlook on life. Moody went off to the University of Texas with one suit of clothes, one pair of shoes and $65 in his pocket. After spending two years in Austin as an undergraduate and two years studying law, he sold his gold watch to pay for the bar exam. Once he became a lawyer, the 27-year-old was quickly elected county attorney, the youngest ever to serve in Williamson County. In 1922, he was first appointed and then elected district attorney of both Williamson and Travis counties. At the age of 29, in 1923, he was an experienced and skilled prosecutor ready to take on the Klan in the Burleson case. Before him, other prosecutors in California and Louisiana had come close to exacting appropriate punishment, but Klansmen were no-billed by Klan-dominated grand juries, or they received probation or a fine, or their sentences were overturned on appeal. Moody had the advantages of an anti-Klan judge, James Hamilton, and an equally anti-Klan sheriff, Lee Allen, and constable, Louis Lowe. Citizens took up a collection to make sure Moody had the resources to fight the top defense attorneys backed by the Klan. I suspect that Moody may have had an advantage in the Georgetown trials, since Williamson County had a relatively small population compared with some of the urban counties where Klan prosecutions were attempted, Bernstein says. For example, efforts to indict Klansmen in Austin had been unsuccessful. Williamson County locals probably had a pretty good idea who was in the Klan, even though membership was supposed to be secret. Judge Hamilton allowed Moody to question prospective jurors fairly ferociously about whether they were members of the Klan, Bernstein says, and Moody was determined to keep Klansmen off his juries. During the trial, Moody was on his toes and highly effective, she says. One observer, Jessie Daniel Ames, described him as being drunk with fight. He had a skillful way of turning defense questioning against the defense and making them look ridiculous. As posed in Bernsteins book, the story of the first of several trials related to the case, which transfixed Williamson County, was as dramatic as any Hollywood courtroom drama, with a last-minute surprise witness for the defense who could have sunk the prosecutions case. Moody persevered and succeeded. After his celebrated win, Moody was the man to beat for statewide office. MORE:24 years ago, Austinites mooned Ku Klux Klan at Texas Capitol In 1924, Miriam Ma Ferguson defeated the Klan candidate for governor, running as a surrogate for her husband, Jim Pa Ferguson, who had been impeached and removed from office in 1917 and therefore wasnt allowed to run for office again in Texas. At the same time, Moody was elected Texas attorney general. The Fergusons, however, were extraordinarily corrupt, using the Texas Highway Commission and other methods to rake in cash. Moody decided to run for governor against Ma in 1926. She swore that if he beat her by one vote in the primary, she would immediately resign, Bernstein says. He beat her by over 125,000 votes, almost avoiding a runoff, but, of course, she didnt resign. When he whipped her thoroughly in the runoff, she, out of sheer spite, pardoned his first Klan defendant, who had not yet served even a year in prison. Remembering Moody Not everyone has forgotten Moody. Nor do they agree on the impact of his heroism. History-minded folks in Williamson County recently erected a statue of Moody in Georgetowns courthouse square, not far from a 100-year-old image of a Confederate soldier, installed during the Jim Crow era, when many such public symbols of ongoing white supremacy appeared across the South. Despite the bid for balance, not everyone is impressed by the Moody monument. Well, it came about without our input, Jaquita Wilson, a leader in Georgetowns African-American community, told apublic radio reporter in June regarding the Moody statue. No one asked us. When you walk around this courthouse, theres no mention that there were Latinos, that there were Native Americans, that there were African-Americans here. Just white Georgetown. RELATED: Williamson museum plans statue of Klan-fighting prosecutor When Moody was elected governor, the youngest that Texas ever had, journalists all over the country celebrated his courage and success in fighting demagoguery as well as his victory over the Klan. But that was not the end of the story. In my book, I have tried to be entirely honest about Moodys later life, Bernstein says. He, like many people, became more conservative even reactionary as he got older. He eventually turned against Roosevelt and the New Deal, perhaps partly because he often represented the oil and gas industry in court, and Texas oilmen bitterly resented increased regulation of business, the growth of the labor movement and fixed wartime prices for oil and gas. Moody came to be one of the leaders of a movement known as the Texas Regulars, which opposed Roosevelt. Bernstein says Moody, like many other white politicians in Texas, was particularly appalled by the 1944 Supreme Court ruling in Smith v. Allwright, which ended the whites-only Democratic primary in Texas. Moody proposed, in response, that the party revert to using a convention system, instead of a primary, to nominate candidates, the implication being though not stated explicitly by him that it would be easier to keep blacks out of a convention than out of a primary. He led the fight at the 1944 Democratic National Convention in Chicago for a plank in the national platform that would allow states to keep blacks from voting and to maintain poll taxes and segregated schools, hospitals and public transportation. Although he fought against anti-Semitic, anti-Catholic and anti-immigrant sentiments, partly because of his lifelong friendships with those in the affected communities, his record was far from pure. In other words, like most white men of his time in the South even bright, educated, ethical white men Dan Moody was a racist, Bernstein says. But he was never one of the many rabid racists of his time. As a politician, he never indulged in the crude race-baiting rhetoric common to Southern politicians in those days. Like all our other heroes, Dan Moody had feet of clay. PATRICIA BERNSTEIN SPEAKS ABOUT THE KLAN AND DAN MOODY When: 7 p.m. Nov. 1 Where: Austin Jewish Community Center, 7300 Hart Lane Information:jewishbookfair.org When: Noon Sept. 6 Where: Bullock Texas State History Museum, 1800 Congress Ave. Information: 512-936-8746,thestoryoftexas.com WHY DID PATRICIA BERNSTEIN FOCUS ON THE KLAN IN TEXAS? Among author Patricia Bernsteins first loves were literature and European history, especially the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Victorian era. Back then, Texas history stayed far from her mind. My dad, who was a Texas oil and gas lawyer for over 50 years, used to try to get me more interested in Texas history, but it all seemed just kind of drab, colorless, deserty and hot, she says. I think we sometimes think that our own environment is not very romantic and doesnt have a lot of historic resonance, but we are often wrong about that. That all changed when I encountered the picture of the lynching of Jesse Washington in 1916 in Waco in the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee. I was tremendously shocked that I didnt know about this terrible story or the prevalence of lynching in my own home state during the Jim Crow era. The result was my previous book, The First Waco Horror: The Lynching of Jesse Washington and the Rise of the NAACP. At that point I was tuned into Texas history and all the stories we dont know beyond the Alamo and Six Flags and the Texas Rangers. But I cant just dwell for many years of research on the worst that humanity is capable of lynching, the Klan, etc. Im always looking for the real, unsung heroes, the people who stood up against evil in their own time and made a difference. If we are going to dwell on the worst, Id also like to spend some time on the best that humans are capable of. Though the mass-movement Klan did not last for many years, Bernstein says, the damage it did lingered for decades. For instance, the Klan helped support the passage of the Immigration Law of 1924, which prohibited immigration into the U.S. by East Asians, Middle Easterners and Indians and established quotas for European countries that favored the so-called Nordic nations. Less than 20 years later, this law played a central role in preventing many Jewish refugees from finding a haven in the United States during the Holocaust. This is personal for me, Bernstein says. Most of my grandfathers extended family his sisters, their husbands, nephews and nieces perished in Poland during the Holocaust. The implications for attitudes toward immigrants and efforts to keep refugees out of our country today are obvious.

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Police: Ku Klux Klan flyers dropped at homes near Cincinnati – WKBN.com

By WKBN Staff and The Associated Press Published: August 18, 2017, 7:14 am Updated: August 18, 2017, 8:10 am GREEN TWP., Ohio (WKBN/AP) A community in Ohio is feeling the aftermath of the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Packages with Ku Klux Klanflyers were dropped on dozens of doorsteps in Green Township, near Cincinnati. The flyers were in faded orange plastic wrappers, taped inside employment guides. The message inside a white envelope said, Racial purity is Americas security. Most people either ignored or drove over them at the bottom of their driveways, but authorities said they still received several calls from upset residents. If my kids were older and they were to open it and they were to read that, they would have all kinds of questions. I mean, I dont want to have to explain that kind of hatred to them,Tracy Noel said. Police suspect someone probably saw an easy opportunity to hide their messages inside the guides which were dated back in January and then re-distribute them. Green Township police say theyre not investigating this as a hate crime and whats in the message is protected by the first amendment. WKBN 27 First News provides commenting to allow for constructive discussion on the stories we cover. In order to comment here, you acknowledge you have read and agreed to our Terms of Service. Commenters who violate these terms, including use of vulgar language or racial slurs, will be banned. No links will be permitted. Please be respectful of the opinions of others. If you see an inappropriate comment, please flag it for our moderators to review.

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Ku Klux Klan recruits New Mexicans to join group – KRQE News 13

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) Less than a week after a rally in Charlottesville captured the nations attention and put the spotlight on the growing number of hate groups, the KKK has launched a recruiting website in New Mexico. The website details why the Ku Klux Klan thinks New Mexico should be a fertile recruiting ground. Oh no, no. I dont understand how people can do that, said Norma Baca, an Albuquerque resident. The KKK posted a message on their website saying that while their history in the state is limited, New Mexicos location is a target for immigration problems. The group also says theyre now in New Mexico and theyre recruiting new people everyday who want to safeguard the American way of life. An alarming thought for many. We dont want hate you know? We need peace. We are people who work and need to have peace, said Baca. In a statement to KRQE News 13, the FBIs Albuquerque Division says they investigate crimes and threats to national security, and their focus is not based on a groups ideology or beliefs. The FBI investigates activity which may constitute a federal crime or pose a threat to national security. Our focus is not on membership in particular groups or adherence to particular ideologies or beliefs but on criminal activity. The FBI cannot initiate an investigation based solely on an individuals race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, or the exercise of the First Amendment or other Constitutional rights, and we remain committed to protecting those rights for all Americans. Meanwhile, Albuquerques NAACP President says they will rise against any attempt by the KKK or any other hate group that tries to violate any rights of New Mexico citizens. The KKK recruiting page for New Mexico even has a questionnaire page for people who want to apply. It looks like the group behind the site is based in Indiana. According to a national civil rights organization, there are more than 900 active hate groups in the United States. Only one of them is based in New Mexico, a group called Aggressive Christianity, located near the Arizona state line.

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The day 30000 white supremacists in KKK robes marched in the nation’s capital – Washington Post

By Terence McArdle By Terence McArdle August 17 at 6:00 AM At the height of its popularity, the Ku Klux Klan brought more than 30,000 of its members to participate in a parade in downtown D.C. on Aug. 8, 1925. (British Path) The Ku Klux Klan was at the height of its popularity when more than 30,000 members racists and anti-Semites marching 22 abreast and 14 rows deep paraded down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington on Aug. 8, 1925. White-robed Klan cheered on march in nations capital, read the front-page headline in The Washington Post the next day. The gathering dwarfed the hundreds of white nationalists, Klan members and neo-Nazis who descended on Charlottesville Saturday to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The rally turned into a riot as the white supremacists clashed with counterprotests, leaving 32-year-old Heather Heyer dead and many others injured. Nearly a century ago, the Klan was welcomed to segregated Washington by its white residents, as the breathless coverage in The Post demonstrated. Phantom-like hosts of the Ku Klux Klan spread their white robe over the most historic thoroughfare yesterday in one of the greatest demonstrations this city has ever known, read The Posts account. [The Ku Klux Klan was dead. The first Hollywood blockbuster revived it.] Led by L.A. Mueller, the grand Kleagle of Washington, the Ku Klux Klan booked 18 trains for their march and rally. Hotels filled with the hooded men. Lunch stands and tobacco shops quickly sold out. The Klan even brought their own ambulances to escort those felled by the August heat. The Post story rhapsodizes about their parade pageantry but says very little about the groups espousal of hatred. However, it does criticize their parade skills: There were few drilled marchers in the parade. At times their lines, extending the full length of the Avenue, swayed hopelessly back and forth. The Klansmen marched for over three hours before arriving at the Washington Monument grounds for speeches, only to be greeted by a torrential downpour. Dont leave, Mueller exhorted. God wont let it rain. But the rains came, washing out the demonstration, and many left. The next day a Klan contingent crossed over the river to Arlington. They placed wreaths on the Tomb of the Unknowns and the grave of William Jennings Bryan. That evening 75,000 people witnessed many watching from roadsides and their back yards the burning of an electrically lit 80-foot cross at the Arlington Park horse grounds. The ceremony initiated some 200 new members into the hooded order. The Klan returned to Washington to parade again on Sept. 13, 1926. However, this time only 15,000 less than half the previous years crowd marched. To understand the prevalence of the Klan in the 1920s, try to imagine what the tea party on steroids would look like, said historian Ibram X. Kendi, author of Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America. That was the scope and power that the KKK had in the 1920s. [Leo Frank was lynched for a murder he didnt commit. Now neo-Nazis are trying to rewrite history.] Many of the hooded marchers showed their faces a rather telling indication that the group, responsible for lynchings and other acts of terror, could operate with impunity. At the time, the Klan boasteda national dues-paying membership of nearly 5 million men and 500,000 women. The shedding of the masks was a subject of internal debate for the group, a move that some felt would grant their organization added legitimacy and respectability. You had many members of the KKK who were politicians senators, congressmen, statehouse representatives, said Kendi, and that only encouraged the members to appear publicly without their hoods. Indeed, the 1924 Democratic convention was known as the Klanbake, because the party by a razor-thin margin voted against an anti-Klan plank in its platform. If you were a member of the Democratic Party, a powerful member, you probably had some sort of affiliation to the KKK either publicly or privately, said Kendi. Though there were also members of the Klan in the Republican Party, they had most of their power in the Democratic Party. The original Ku Klux Klan had fallen by the wayside after reconstruction, only to see its fortunes revived with director D.W. Griffiths 1915 movie The Birth of A Nation. President Woodrow Wilson screened the film twice for guests at the White House. The revived Klan drew its members not only from the South but from the Midwest and industrial North and saw itself as the protector of white Protestant supremacy. In addition to African Americans, they hatedCatholic and Jewish immigrants and feared the Northern migration of African Americans. They also saw themselves as great moralists. In additional to their campaign of terror against African Americans and ethnic minorities, the Klan broke up stills in the name of prohibition and flayed and flogged adulterers in the name of traditional family values. Kendi sees parallels between the Klan of the 1920s and the alt-right that inspired the recent violence in Charlottesville. When you have a set of circumstances occurring, like those over the last 40 years stagnating wages, immigration occurring, economic inequality growing it allows demagogues to say this is occurring because of diversity, because of civil rights for people of color. These white supremacists are conditioned to believe this even though it flies in the face of facts. Read more Retropolis: Death of a devil: The white supremacist got hit by a car. His victims celebrated. Google memorializes the Silent Parade when 10,000 black people protested lynchings When Portland banned blacks: Oregons shameful history as an all-white state Life or death for black travelers: How fear led to The Negro Motorist Green-Book

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KKK denied permit to burn cross atop symbolic mountain in Georgia – The Guardian

A Confederate memorial at Stone Mountain Park, Georgia, features Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E Lee. Photograph: Alamy Georgias Stone Mountain park has denied the Ku Klux Klans request to burn a cross at the top of the mountain, where the second KKK was founded in 1915. Joey Hobbs, of the Sacred Knights Ku Klux Klan, submitted a permit application request for 20 people to attend a cross-burning on top of the mountain, which is notorious for being tied to the KKK. We will light our cross and 20 minutes later we will be gone, Hobbs wrote on the permit. The Stone Mountain Memorial Association this week denied the request for a 21 October cross-burning and said in a statement that it condemns the beliefs and actions of the Ku Klux Klan and believes the denial of this Public Assembly request is in the best interest of all parties. We dont want any of these groups at the park, quite frankly, John Bankhead, a spokesman for the association, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He said the burning would have been an act of intimidation, in keeping with the KKKs history of burning crosses to intimidate black Americans, and that the park would not allow that. The park, site of the second founding of the KKK, has a giant carved Confederate memorial of Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E Lee, which was completed in the 1960s, decades after initial work was halted. There has been a spate of white supremacist rallies at the park in recent years, though they are often attended by more protesters than supporters. The park clamped down on event safety after an April 2016 white supremacist gathering swelled with hundreds of protesters opposed to the rally, which was ultimately attended by just a few dozen white supremacists. The association cited the April 2016 rally and said the cross-burning would require more safety resources than could be provided.

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