Archive for the ‘Ku Klux Klan’ Category

Why are Ku Klux Klan groups increasing in Florida? | Miami Herald – Miami Herald


Miami Herald
Why are Ku Klux Klan groups increasing in Florida? | Miami Herald
Miami Herald
For many people, hate groups are more an abstract concept than a real, physical threat. But they're growing both in the U.S. and Florida specifically and the …

and more »

Go here to see the original:

Why are Ku Klux Klan groups increasing in Florida? | Miami Herald – Miami Herald

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

‘I’m glad that girl died’ during Virginia protest, says NC KKK leader – Charlotte Observer


Charlotte Observer
'I'm glad that girl died' during Virginia protest, says NC KKK leader
Charlotte Observer
The leader of a North Carolina based group associated with the Ku Klux Klan says he is glad that a woman died while taking part in a protest in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend. Heather Heyer was killed when James Allen Fields Jr. allegedly drove
KKK leader 'glad' woman died in Charlottesville attack: reportNew York Post

all 5 news articles »

Read this article:

‘I’m glad that girl died’ during Virginia protest, says NC KKK leader – Charlotte Observer

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Three Supreme Court cases involving the Ku Klux Klan – National … – Constitution Daily (blog)

Violent public demonstrations involving white supremacists and counter-protesters in Virginia last weekend are driving a lot of attention to the long-debated subject of free speech rights in public locations.

In past situations, fundamental First Amendment questions about the ability of organized white supremacists to speak and demonstrate in the public forum were focused on a group that espoused such values: the Ku Klux Klan.

Last month, the Klan held its own public rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, at a Robert E. Lee statue located in a public park. Media reports in July indicated there were words and some shoves exchanged between Klan members and counter-protesters, before police declared the scene as an unlawful assembly when the crowd became unruly.

There are three Supreme Court cases that have established some basic First Amendment ground rules in these scenarios.

The most significant decision is also a landmark First Amendment case, Brandenburg v. Ohio from 1969. The Supreme Courts per curium opinion in Brandenburg reversed 50 years of legal decisions that greatly restricted groups that wanted to use public spaces to make unpopular speeches or to make speeches that advocated violence.

Clarence Brandenburg, an Ohio Klan leader, allowed filmmakers to depict Klan rallies for a documentary that included inflammatory public speeches. Brandenburg was then arrested under an Ohio law, which had its roots in the 1919 Red Scare, which made it illegal for a person to publicly advocate for violence.

The Supreme Court in 1919 upheld the conviction of a Socialist leader who publicly advocated for war-time draft evasion in Schenck v. United States. The Court established a clear and present danger test that allowed courts to take into consideration the context of such statements and their potential to cause harm.

Another decision, Whitney v. California in 1927, led to a broader test that allowed speech to be restricted if it was detrimental to the public welfare, tending to incite crime, disturb the public peace, or endanger the foundations of organized government and threaten its overthrow.” Justice Louis Brandeis, while concurring with the overall decision on different grounds, thought lawmakers needed to have a specific reason to restrict free speech, despite its unpopularity. The fact that speech is likely to result in some violence or in destruction of property is not enough to justify its suppression. There must be the probability of serious injury to the State, Brandeis argued.

In Brandenburg, the Court overturned the Whitney decision, and it established the imminent lawless action test still used today. Freedoms of speech and press do not permit a State to forbid advocacy of the use of force or of law violation except where such advocacy is directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and is likely to incite or produce such action, the Justices said.

Another case involving the Klan and public free speech was a decision about cross-burning, Virginia v. Black from 2003. The Court decided the constitutionality of a Virginia law that banned cross-burning; one of the two incidents in the case involved a cross-burning at a Klan rally led by Barry Black. The cross-burning was on private property.

Black objected to jury instructions that any cross-burning should be seen as sending a message of an intent to intimidate. In a complicated plurality decision from Justice Sandra Day OConnor, the Court said that Virginia could pass a law restricting speech, in the form of a cross-burning, that sought to intimidate people, but it couldnt interpret all cross-burnings as intimidation.

While a burning cross does not inevitably convey a message of intimidation, often the cross burner intends that the recipients of the message fear for their lives. And when a cross burning is used to intimidate, few if any messages are more powerful, OConnor said.

But the jury instructions in Blacks case crossed a line, OConnor said. It may be true that a cross burning, even at a political rally, arouses a sense of anger or hatred among the vast majority of citizens who see a burning cross. But this sense of anger or hatred is not sufficient to ban all cross burnings, she wrote. For these reasons, the prima facie evidence provision, as interpreted through the jury instruction and as applied in Barry Black’s case, is unconstitutional on its face.

And in 1995, the Supreme Court in Capitol Square Review Board v. Pinette said that the Klan could place a cross on the Ohio state-house plaza during the holiday season.

In a 7-2 decision, Justice Antonin Scalia said the state violated the Klans speech rights on religious grounds by restricting its access to a public forum. The display was private religious speech that is as fully protected under the Free Speech Clause as secular private expression, Scalia concluded. Because Capitol Square is a traditional public forum, the Board may regulate the content of the Klan’s expression there only if such a restriction is necessary, and narrowly drawn, to serve a compelling state interest.

Filed Under: First Amendment

Read more here:

Three Supreme Court cases involving the Ku Klux Klan – National … – Constitution Daily (blog)

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

‘Putin’s Russia’ didn’t create the Ku Klux Klan – RT

Bryan MacDonald is an Irish journalist, who is based in Russia

We need to have a conversation about Twitter threads. Especially examples where pseudo-‘Russia experts’ try to connect Moscow to every problem facing the United States (and the wider world).

Because if you believe some of these clowns, before Vladimir Putin arrived on the political scene there was no Ku Klux Klan, no Nazis and no white supremacists in America. Thats right, the political Superman himself has not only rebuilt Russia into a threat, hes also orchestrated the birth of the US far right, which didnt exist before his emergence. And this is in addition to manipulating elections across the globe and preparing to soon, presumably shirtless, lead his forces into a mass invasion of Europe. Because, after all, hes the new Hitler too.

Read more

Which comes as a huge surprise to those who genuinely understand Russia. Where Putin has formed cabinets, containing a smorgasbord of ethnic backgrounds from Tatar to Tuvan and German to Chechen. Administrations that havent been anti-immigration or anti-Muslim, and have implemented policies which made Russia the worlds third largest migration destination. Bear in mind, before Angela Merkel opened Germanys doors two years ago, it was second to the US.

Furthermore, hes regarded as notably friendly to Jewish interests and has adroitly undermined domestic nationalists, who are far more associated with the opposition politician, Alexey Navalny. A figure, incidentally, almost universally supported by the Western media, which glosses over these links and incorrectly portrays him as a liberal, to satisfy their own agenda.

For most reasonable people, this weekends Nazi and KKK rallies – and the inexcusable violence and terror they caused – in America’s Charlottesville induced feelings of horror, if not huge surprise. After all, the United States has had problems with public displays of racism throughout its history. And, at various times, white supremacist outfits like the KKK have been close to the mainstream. Indeed, its only 60 odd years since Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus boycott.

American silence on far right revanchism and historical revisionism in Eastern Europe has also been disturbing. For instance, Washington has mostly ignored attempts to rehabilitate Baltic Nazi collaborators, and its media has downplayed the topic. To make matters worse, in Ukraine, US politicians have openly colluded with fascists. Such as when John McCain and Paul Ryan spoke glowingly of Andrey Parubiy, the chair of Kievs parliament, who founded a party which described itself as the last hope of the white race.

So whats this got to do with Russia, you may ask? Well, those of you who use Twitter will have noticed how a bunch of previously obscure analysts, who formerly focused on ex-Soviet republics or other mundane topics, have recently become popular on the platform as “Russia experts.” Mainly by peddling absolute codswallop in the form of lengthy tweet threads, which are lapped up by crestfallen Hilary Clinton supporters who want to believe the Kremlin was responsible for her defeat in last years election. And this has led to commissions in the mainstream print media and plenty of TV appearances. All of which probably beats writing for an audience of policy wonks about stuff like migration trends in Uzbekistan and Abkhazia.

One of the most prominent is Molly McKew who, this year, has fallen up from the pages of something called The Washington Free Beacon to more well-established outlets like Politico, the Washington Post, and Foreign Policy. Presumably because, these days, the mainstream isnt interested in real Russia expertise and prefers hacks who will eagerly contribute to the new McCarthyism. And genuine Russian specialists, of real quality, need not apply.

McKew, once an advisor to former Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili, who is wanted on criminal charges in his homeland and was recently made stateless by Ukraine, has been banging out threads at a rate of knots. At the weekend, she launched one, shared thousands of times, which attempted to pin the blame for Charlottesville on the Kremlin.

Citing the Gerasimov doctrine, something Ive never heard anyone mention in Russia, she described Americas alt-right (think Steve Bannon, David Duke and friends) as an internal opposition marching to Putins beat. Notwithstanding, of course, how Duke has far more connections to US-ally Ukraine. Having taught at Kievs largest university and accepted a doctorate there.

But, before we move on, I need to loop back to the Gerasimov nonsense for a moment. McKew seems to be referring to a form of non-traditional, or to use a buzzword hybrid, war some Western Russia watchers accredit to, the army general, Valery Gerasimov (incidentally, a Tatarstan native) because of a 2013 article which they circulated on social media to make themselves feel all warm and fuzzy inside. But these oxygen thieves arent exactly reliable sources.

You see, media hype about this style of conflict began after the Georgian assault on South Ossetia in 2008, and Russias reaction to it. And, back then, Nikolai Makarov was army chief. So you might as well call it the Makarov roadmap or, more accurately, the nothing-burger. Because there is not a single person in Russia, who speaks of the Gerasimov doctrine. Only foreign Russia watchers use the term, and they are about as useful in understanding the subject as a fork in a soup kitchen.

McKew also cites somebody called Heimbach, presumably, the relative non-entity Matthew Heimbach, saying Russia (is) leading the white world, but the attached text mentions the free world and doesnt specify a color preference. Plus, McKew appears unaware that Russia has a bigger Muslim population, per capita than Britain, France, Italy or the USA.

Next, she states Russia invaded Crimea, changing borders of Europe by force for (the) first time since WWII. Which is another entry crafted in ignorance. Because, with thousands of soldiers already in Crimea, under treaty rights, Putin didnt need to invade. And the second part is also wrong. As even secondary school history students know, NATO member Turkey forcibly took Northern Cyprus in 1974 and America itself led an illegal bombing campaign against Yugoslavia, which dismembered the Balkan nation in the late 1990s. Also, its worth noting that Crimea was part of Russia after the Second World War, as it had been for centuries, and was only later transferred to Ukraine for administrative reasons, by Soviet authorities in the 1950’s.

McKew then proceeds to throw Evangelical Christians and the National Rifle Association into the mix, as Kremlin-linked groups. But this ignores how they also enthusiastically supported the last Republican president, George W Bush. And he was hardly walking hand-in-hand with Moscow.

Rants like these, and the traction they get, are a window into the madness currently enveloping American liberals. They are popular because it’s far easier to blame foreign actors for every problem befalling the United States than accept the reality, which is the growing inequality and Trump himself are all homegrown phenomena.

Also, it wasnt Russia that brought the KKK or white supremacy to America, and you cant pin slavery, the civil war or the slaughter of the native population on Moscow either. Not forgetting, of course, that the biggest victims of the actual Nazis were Russians. Which is not something most Americans understand.

Yarns trying to hoodwink people into believing Russia is responsible for the American far right are pure hogwash. American racism is behind America racism, and these guys dont need any outside assistance to fuel their hate.

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.

Visit link:

‘Putin’s Russia’ didn’t create the Ku Klux Klan – RT

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

An 1868 article about the KKK captures the ethical paradox of talking about terrorism today – Quartz

After troubling violence around a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia this weekend, photos of protestors wielding torches and making the Nazi salute quickly spread online. Reddit users shared a picture of a shirt reportedly worn in Charlottesville that quoted Hitler, and bystanders videos of a car attack on pedestrians were embedded by news organizations. But our ability to share such terrifying imagery creates a paradox: Sharing photos spreads awareness and helps defend against a social danger, and simultaneously also gives racist groups free publicity, fueling the fire.

In March 1868 (pdf), a New York Times correspondent in Tennessee writing about the nascent Ku Klux Klan captured the same problem. When the very first KKK formed in Tennessee in 1868, its objective was to terrorize black Americans and prevent them from exercising their right to vote. Like today, people werent sure how seriously to take the fringe group: Was the KKK a military threat? Were they a political party? An outrageous hate group threatening progress? Or was it nothing more than bluster?

Controversial Tennessee governor William Gannaway Brownlow raised an early alarm about the newly formed KKK in his state, describing the group as an armed rebellion. The Times writer, Omega, responded sharply, calling Brownlow a demagogue and taking him to task for exaggerating the threat. It was precisely this alarmism, Omega wrote, that would give the Klan its power:

I have means of information quite reliable enough to warrant me in contradicting these alarming, sensational, political canards, even though indorsed (sic) by the terrified demagogues of the State, who are fit subjects for the ingenious, mysterious and wicked devices of the KuKlux Klan.

With racist condescension, the writer also blamed black Americans for spreading fear about the group that hated them. The supremacists mysterious and horrible midnight demonstrations prove that its founders have a thorough and perfect knowledge of the negro character, Omega wrote. On the streets, in the fields and in their churches this mysterious organization and its midnight revelations are discussed by the blacks, and exaggerated accounts of its horrors repeated.

What Omega forecast was, indeed, the power of the KKKs spectacle of costumes and burning crosses to make headlines and spread whispers. But what he didnt predict then at the groups onset was the actual horror and death that the Klan would spread by the next year. It would inspire thousands of deaths by lynching by the turn of the century. By talking about terror, even if it carried misinformation or fear-mongering, people could prepare for a real danger.

In his plea for level-headedness, Omega underestimated the possibility that the Klans initial publicity stunts could empower and inspire far more horrific crimes. And his reaction to the rising terror illustrates the challenge that the US faces now as it tries to parse how big the growing white supremacist, or neo-Nazi, or alt-right movement isor indeed what to call themand what theyre really capable of.

The author dismissed the actual racism of the KKK and the hate they used, criticizing instead the justifiable fear of their targets.

Telling Americans, in essence, to calm down in the face of hostility of the highest order, lays the blame squarely at the feet of the wrong mob. In this tense national moment, do we remain measured, and wait for something truly catastrophic to happen, or risk action with all the rage and fear that it requires?

The rest is here:

An 1868 article about the KKK captures the ethical paradox of talking about terrorism today – Quartz

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Financial Supporter of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo Makes KKK Reference About Black Democrat Leader – Newsweek

A hedge fund manager and prominent political donor made a racial remark in reference to a black Democratic leader in New York, saying she has done more damage to people of color than anyone who has ever donned a hood.

Daniel Loeb, a major supporter of Democratic New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, made the comment in a Facebook post in response to an article shared by The New York Times regarding a confrontation between Cuomo and Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins, the Democratic leader in the New York state Senate.

The article detailed a private meeting at which Stewart-Cousins accused Cuomo of prejudging her based on her race and gender. You look at me, Mr. Governor, but you dont see me. You see my black skin and a woman, but you dont realize I am a suburban legislator, Stewart-Cousins said, according to the Times.

Daily Emails and Alerts – Get the best of Newsweek delivered to your inbox

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is applauded by officials, including New York state Senate Leader Andrew Stewart-Cousins, after he signed a law that will gradually raise New York’s minimum wage to $15, at the Javits Convention Center, in New York, on April 4, 2016. Richard Drew/Pool/Reuters

The comments were made during a heated discussion about the role of eight breakaway Democrats, led by Senator Jeffrey Klein, in the New York state Senate. The group has allowed Republicans to exert control over the Democrat-led Senate.

Read more: White nationalists from all corners of the internet are uniting for the largest racist protest in decades

In a Facebook comment that has since been deleted, but was reported by the Times, Loeb backed Klein and criticized Stewart-Cousins.

Thank God for Jeff Klein and those who stand for educational choice and support Charter funding that leads to economic mobility and opportunity for poor knack [sic] kids, said Loeb, appearing to make an error when typing black. Meanwhile hypocrites like Stewart-Cousins who pay fealty to powerful union thugs and bosses do more damage to people of color than anyone who has ever donned a hood.

The last comment appeared to be in reference to the Ku Klux Klan, a white supremacist group in the United States that was notorious in the past for persecuting nonwhites and murdering civil rights activists.

Hedge fund manager Daniel Loeb speaks during a Reuters Newsmaker event in New York City on September 21, 2016. Andrew Kelly/Reuters

After the Times report, Loeb issued a statement. I regret the language I used in expressing my passion for education choice, he said. I apologize to Senator Stewart-Cousins and anyone I offended. I have taken down the post from Facebook.

Stewart-Cousins has not publicly responded to Loebs comment. A spokesman for Governor Cuomo told the Times that the governor had no connection with these comments whatsoever and that they were entirely inappropriate and have no place in the public discourse.

Loeb has been a major political donor to congressional Republicans, as well as the Democrat Cuomo. State records show that Loeb and his wife have given more than $170,000 to Cuomo in recent years.

The investor has also given more than $1 million to Republican causes in recent years, including $500,000 to a super PAC supporting Jeb Bush in 2015, $150,000 to the Republican National Committee in the same yearand $700,000 to a super PAC backing House Republicans in 2016.

Originally posted here:

Financial Supporter of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo Makes KKK Reference About Black Democrat Leader – Newsweek

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

The Charlottesville White Supremacists Didn’t Wear Hoods – The … – The Atlantic

In July 2017, the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society invited members of the press to a private conference to discuss a sensitive pair of items from the organizations collection: a pair of robes that might have originally belonged to founding members of the local Ku Klux Klan, established near Thomas Jeffersons tomb in 1921.

The robes, which the society said were donated in 1993, drew attention when local activists and scholars started asking about them. Its probably some old respectable family name which adorns a current Charlottesville building, street or park, speculated one of the scholars whod requested more detail on the robes, according to Charlottesvilles Daily Progress. But Steven Meeks, the societys president, declined to reveal who donated the artifacts. I will tell you this much, Meeks said to the newspaper, neither one of them was a prominent person in the Charlottesville community.

The tussle over revealing the identities of long-ago Klansmen in Charlottesville, the potential shame to their living relatives or descendants, feels itself like an artifact of history at this moment, when people unadorned by masks or hoods are marching for white supremacy openly on the citys streets and lawns. It hearkens back to a time when the likes of the Klan achieved terror partially through a uniform that often obscured the face of its wearer. Anonymity wasnt quite the point, as Alison Kinney pointed out in The New Republic. And indeed, in many places, for much of the Klan’s history, members marched openly. While the hoods could assure their wearers personal anonymity, their force came from declaring membership in a safe, privileged identity that was anything but secret. But where open racism was less acceptable, the hood offered a useful disguise. We could be anywhere, the uniform warned. We could be your neighbors.

But the images we saw in Charlottesville today and yesterday convey an entirely different sort of threat. They draw their menace not from what is theremostly, young white men in polos and T-shirts goofily brandishing tiki torchesbut from what isnt: the masks, the hoods, the secrecy that could at least imply a sort of shame. We used to whisper these thoughts, the new white supremacists suggest. But now we can say them out loud. The Unite the Right rally wasnt intended to be a Klan rally at all. It was a pride march.

The shameless return of white supremacy into Americas public spaces seems to be happening by degrees, and quickly. It wasnt until most journalists left the conference of the innocuously named National Policy Institute in November that my colleague Daniel Lombroso captured Richard Spencer leading the attendees in open Nazi salutes. Spencers intentionto make normal that gesture and all the sentiments that underpin itis no more secret than the identities of his tiki torch-wielding bannermen. “I don’t see myself as a marginal figure who’s going to be hated by society, Spencer said to Daniel. I see myself as a mainstream figure.

For the moment, you can still spot the subtle boundaries that will have shifted if Spencer and his fellow-travelers succeed. One appeared, for example, in Graeme Woods June 2017 Atlantic story on Spencer, when one of his associates requested anonymity: I have a normie [conventional] job, the young man said, and I dont want to get punished for this. How soon until that young man no longer fears the consequences of his ideas?

Norms is such a bloodless, abstract word, which is a shame, because it describes such a bloody real thing. Norms impose genuine and manifold restraints on human behavior. They undergird all the gentle, civic niceties that make human society possible. Laws can codify and reinforce these norms, but the norms are what keep us from savagery.

It would recently have been normal for a president to condemn in harsh tones the participants in a march for white supremacy on the streets of an American city. Today it is not.

Excerpt from:

The Charlottesville White Supremacists Didn’t Wear Hoods – The … – The Atlantic

Fair Usage Law

August 15, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

The charlatan who grew Maine’s KKK and how it flamed out … – Bangor Daily News

The weekends news was dominated by the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a white nationalist sympathizing with demonstrators there killed a woman after he allegedly plowed into a crowd of counter-protesters with a car.

It began with a protest of Charlottesvilles pending move to take down a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The Southern Poverty Law Center called the gathering the largest hate-gathering of its kind in decades and it drew fringe neo-Nazis and white supremacists.

Some of those were members of the Ku Klux Klan, whose historical reputation as a terrorizing, racist movement across the South in different iterations belies its small membership now, estimated at between 5,000 and 8,000 members in loose factions across the country.

But they were millions strong in the 1920s and one stronghold was Maine, where the KKK mostly formed as a Protestant nativist group opposed to the rise of Catholicism, which came with a wave of immigration from Quebec, Ireland and Italy during the preceding 90 years or so.

Their leader was a charismatic man named F. Eugene Farnsworth, who proclaimed that he was head of the Maine KKK in a 1923 speech, according to a history of the group on Mount Desert Island. But there was much more to his story.

In 1901, he was doing a stage act in Rhode Island that required an assistant to balance a large rock on his stomach while an audience member tried to break it. But the rock slipped and killed his assistant, so he left there in disgrace.

After bouncing around and using a different name, he proclaimed himself head of Maines KKK in a 1923 speech in Portland. The group largely portrayed itself as a fraternal one and it avoided violence. According to a book on Maines villains, Farnsworth once said while he didnt hate Catholics, the U.S. will always be a Protestant nation.

Klan chapters popped up all over Maine and they held parades, rallies and even a Klam Bake in Trenton after helping elect Republican Gov. Owen Brewster in 1924. Rallies persisted into 1925, but it was a quick fall for the group after that.

The national KKK didnt like Farnsworth: He charged women $10 to join (more than the male rate of $5), signed up Canadian members (including his wife and daughter) and he was suspected of keeping $4 out of every $10 he collected. He resigned in 1926 and died just after.

In the 1970s, a contractor from Mount Desert Island told a local historian that young people joined the group thinking it was kind of like a cross between the Masons and the Boy Scouts. Heres an excerpt from that account:

It wasnt long before we were told we had to hate black people. We werent excited by that, but there werent many blacks around MDI then, so it didnt make much of a practical difference.

Next, we were told we had to hate Jews. Guys started to get uncomfortable, then. There werent many Jews around but there were people like Dan Rosenthal, a peddler who came in summer. Everybody liked Dan. He was a good man.

Then we were told we had to hate Catholics. Well, that did it. There were a lot of Catholics around. We knew damned well they were good people. A Catholic priest in Northeast Father Kinney was active in the fire company, for example. There was a Catholic church on Lookout Way in Northeast Harbor. The Catholic church had just bought one of the old local houses on Summit Road and was renovating it for a rectory. The Catholic church was enlarging that story-and-a-half little house into a larger three-story rectory.

Well, just about all the workmen in Northeast Harbor donated at least a days work on that rectory job and we all signed our work. That was our message to the Ku Klux Klan, from every damn one of us. Youll find our signatures all over that house. That was the end of the KKK for Northeast Harbor.

This item was originally published in Daily Brief, a free political newsletter distributed Monday through Friday by the Bangor Daily News to inform dialogue about Maine politics and government. To read more of todays Daily Brief, click here. To have the Daily Brief delivered daily to your inbox, click here.

Read more from the original source:

The charlatan who grew Maine’s KKK and how it flamed out … – Bangor Daily News

Fair Usage Law

August 15, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

No tolerance for white supremacists, neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan: US VP Pence – Business Standard

US Vice President Mike Pence on Monday condemned far-right groups that staged a rally in Virginia that descended into deadly violence, saying there is “no tolerance for hate and violence.”

“We have no tolerance for hate and violence from white supremacists, neo Nazis or the KKK,” Pence said in response to a question at a news conference in Cartagena, Colombia, where he was on the first leg of a Latin American tour.

Pence’s comments were in contrast to those of President Donald Trump in the aftermath of the violence Saturday in Charlottesville, Virginia, in which he failed to No tolerance for white supremacists, neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan: US VP Penceexplicitly condemn white supremacists.

Go here to see the original:

No tolerance for white supremacists, neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan: US VP Pence – Business Standard

Fair Usage Law

August 15, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Why are Ku Klux Klan groups increasing in Florida? | Miami Herald – Miami Herald

Miami Herald Why are Ku Klux Klan groups increasing in Florida? | Miami Herald Miami Herald For many people, hate groups are more an abstract concept than a real, physical threat. But they're growing both in the U.S. and Florida specifically and the … and more »

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

‘I’m glad that girl died’ during Virginia protest, says NC KKK leader – Charlotte Observer

Charlotte Observer 'I'm glad that girl died' during Virginia protest, says NC KKK leader Charlotte Observer The leader of a North Carolina based group associated with the Ku Klux Klan says he is glad that a woman died while taking part in a protest in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend. Heather Heyer was killed when James Allen Fields Jr. allegedly drove … KKK leader 'glad' woman died in Charlottesville attack: report New York Post all 5 news articles »

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Three Supreme Court cases involving the Ku Klux Klan – National … – Constitution Daily (blog)

Violent public demonstrations involving white supremacists and counter-protesters in Virginia last weekend are driving a lot of attention to the long-debated subject of free speech rights in public locations. In past situations, fundamental First Amendment questions about the ability of organized white supremacists to speak and demonstrate in the public forum were focused on a group that espoused such values: the Ku Klux Klan. Last month, the Klan held its own public rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, at a Robert E. Lee statue located in a public park. Media reports in July indicated there were words and some shoves exchanged between Klan members and counter-protesters, before police declared the scene as an unlawful assembly when the crowd became unruly. There are three Supreme Court cases that have established some basic First Amendment ground rules in these scenarios. The most significant decision is also a landmark First Amendment case, Brandenburg v. Ohio from 1969. The Supreme Courts per curium opinion in Brandenburg reversed 50 years of legal decisions that greatly restricted groups that wanted to use public spaces to make unpopular speeches or to make speeches that advocated violence. Clarence Brandenburg, an Ohio Klan leader, allowed filmmakers to depict Klan rallies for a documentary that included inflammatory public speeches. Brandenburg was then arrested under an Ohio law, which had its roots in the 1919 Red Scare, which made it illegal for a person to publicly advocate for violence. The Supreme Court in 1919 upheld the conviction of a Socialist leader who publicly advocated for war-time draft evasion in Schenck v. United States. The Court established a clear and present danger test that allowed courts to take into consideration the context of such statements and their potential to cause harm. Another decision, Whitney v. California in 1927, led to a broader test that allowed speech to be restricted if it was detrimental to the public welfare, tending to incite crime, disturb the public peace, or endanger the foundations of organized government and threaten its overthrow.” Justice Louis Brandeis, while concurring with the overall decision on different grounds, thought lawmakers needed to have a specific reason to restrict free speech, despite its unpopularity. The fact that speech is likely to result in some violence or in destruction of property is not enough to justify its suppression. There must be the probability of serious injury to the State, Brandeis argued. In Brandenburg, the Court overturned the Whitney decision, and it established the imminent lawless action test still used today. Freedoms of speech and press do not permit a State to forbid advocacy of the use of force or of law violation except where such advocacy is directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and is likely to incite or produce such action, the Justices said. Another case involving the Klan and public free speech was a decision about cross-burning, Virginia v. Black from 2003. The Court decided the constitutionality of a Virginia law that banned cross-burning; one of the two incidents in the case involved a cross-burning at a Klan rally led by Barry Black. The cross-burning was on private property. Black objected to jury instructions that any cross-burning should be seen as sending a message of an intent to intimidate. In a complicated plurality decision from Justice Sandra Day OConnor, the Court said that Virginia could pass a law restricting speech, in the form of a cross-burning, that sought to intimidate people, but it couldnt interpret all cross-burnings as intimidation. While a burning cross does not inevitably convey a message of intimidation, often the cross burner intends that the recipients of the message fear for their lives. And when a cross burning is used to intimidate, few if any messages are more powerful, OConnor said. But the jury instructions in Blacks case crossed a line, OConnor said. It may be true that a cross burning, even at a political rally, arouses a sense of anger or hatred among the vast majority of citizens who see a burning cross. But this sense of anger or hatred is not sufficient to ban all cross burnings, she wrote. For these reasons, the prima facie evidence provision, as interpreted through the jury instruction and as applied in Barry Black’s case, is unconstitutional on its face. And in 1995, the Supreme Court in Capitol Square Review Board v. Pinette said that the Klan could place a cross on the Ohio state-house plaza during the holiday season. In a 7-2 decision, Justice Antonin Scalia said the state violated the Klans speech rights on religious grounds by restricting its access to a public forum. The display was private religious speech that is as fully protected under the Free Speech Clause as secular private expression, Scalia concluded. Because Capitol Square is a traditional public forum, the Board may regulate the content of the Klan’s expression there only if such a restriction is necessary, and narrowly drawn, to serve a compelling state interest. Filed Under: First Amendment

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

‘Putin’s Russia’ didn’t create the Ku Klux Klan – RT

Bryan MacDonald is an Irish journalist, who is based in Russia We need to have a conversation about Twitter threads. Especially examples where pseudo-‘Russia experts’ try to connect Moscow to every problem facing the United States (and the wider world). Because if you believe some of these clowns, before Vladimir Putin arrived on the political scene there was no Ku Klux Klan, no Nazis and no white supremacists in America. Thats right, the political Superman himself has not only rebuilt Russia into a threat, hes also orchestrated the birth of the US far right, which didnt exist before his emergence. And this is in addition to manipulating elections across the globe and preparing to soon, presumably shirtless, lead his forces into a mass invasion of Europe. Because, after all, hes the new Hitler too. Read more Which comes as a huge surprise to those who genuinely understand Russia. Where Putin has formed cabinets, containing a smorgasbord of ethnic backgrounds from Tatar to Tuvan and German to Chechen. Administrations that havent been anti-immigration or anti-Muslim, and have implemented policies which made Russia the worlds third largest migration destination. Bear in mind, before Angela Merkel opened Germanys doors two years ago, it was second to the US. Furthermore, hes regarded as notably friendly to Jewish interests and has adroitly undermined domestic nationalists, who are far more associated with the opposition politician, Alexey Navalny. A figure, incidentally, almost universally supported by the Western media, which glosses over these links and incorrectly portrays him as a liberal, to satisfy their own agenda. For most reasonable people, this weekends Nazi and KKK rallies – and the inexcusable violence and terror they caused – in America’s Charlottesville induced feelings of horror, if not huge surprise. After all, the United States has had problems with public displays of racism throughout its history. And, at various times, white supremacist outfits like the KKK have been close to the mainstream. Indeed, its only 60 odd years since Rosa Parks and the Montgomery bus boycott. American silence on far right revanchism and historical revisionism in Eastern Europe has also been disturbing. For instance, Washington has mostly ignored attempts to rehabilitate Baltic Nazi collaborators, and its media has downplayed the topic. To make matters worse, in Ukraine, US politicians have openly colluded with fascists. Such as when John McCain and Paul Ryan spoke glowingly of Andrey Parubiy, the chair of Kievs parliament, who founded a party which described itself as the last hope of the white race. So whats this got to do with Russia, you may ask? Well, those of you who use Twitter will have noticed how a bunch of previously obscure analysts, who formerly focused on ex-Soviet republics or other mundane topics, have recently become popular on the platform as “Russia experts.” Mainly by peddling absolute codswallop in the form of lengthy tweet threads, which are lapped up by crestfallen Hilary Clinton supporters who want to believe the Kremlin was responsible for her defeat in last years election. And this has led to commissions in the mainstream print media and plenty of TV appearances. All of which probably beats writing for an audience of policy wonks about stuff like migration trends in Uzbekistan and Abkhazia. One of the most prominent is Molly McKew who, this year, has fallen up from the pages of something called The Washington Free Beacon to more well-established outlets like Politico, the Washington Post, and Foreign Policy. Presumably because, these days, the mainstream isnt interested in real Russia expertise and prefers hacks who will eagerly contribute to the new McCarthyism. And genuine Russian specialists, of real quality, need not apply. McKew, once an advisor to former Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili, who is wanted on criminal charges in his homeland and was recently made stateless by Ukraine, has been banging out threads at a rate of knots. At the weekend, she launched one, shared thousands of times, which attempted to pin the blame for Charlottesville on the Kremlin. Citing the Gerasimov doctrine, something Ive never heard anyone mention in Russia, she described Americas alt-right (think Steve Bannon, David Duke and friends) as an internal opposition marching to Putins beat. Notwithstanding, of course, how Duke has far more connections to US-ally Ukraine. Having taught at Kievs largest university and accepted a doctorate there. But, before we move on, I need to loop back to the Gerasimov nonsense for a moment. McKew seems to be referring to a form of non-traditional, or to use a buzzword hybrid, war some Western Russia watchers accredit to, the army general, Valery Gerasimov (incidentally, a Tatarstan native) because of a 2013 article which they circulated on social media to make themselves feel all warm and fuzzy inside. But these oxygen thieves arent exactly reliable sources. You see, media hype about this style of conflict began after the Georgian assault on South Ossetia in 2008, and Russias reaction to it. And, back then, Nikolai Makarov was army chief. So you might as well call it the Makarov roadmap or, more accurately, the nothing-burger. Because there is not a single person in Russia, who speaks of the Gerasimov doctrine. Only foreign Russia watchers use the term, and they are about as useful in understanding the subject as a fork in a soup kitchen. McKew also cites somebody called Heimbach, presumably, the relative non-entity Matthew Heimbach, saying Russia (is) leading the white world, but the attached text mentions the free world and doesnt specify a color preference. Plus, McKew appears unaware that Russia has a bigger Muslim population, per capita than Britain, France, Italy or the USA. Next, she states Russia invaded Crimea, changing borders of Europe by force for (the) first time since WWII. Which is another entry crafted in ignorance. Because, with thousands of soldiers already in Crimea, under treaty rights, Putin didnt need to invade. And the second part is also wrong. As even secondary school history students know, NATO member Turkey forcibly took Northern Cyprus in 1974 and America itself led an illegal bombing campaign against Yugoslavia, which dismembered the Balkan nation in the late 1990s. Also, its worth noting that Crimea was part of Russia after the Second World War, as it had been for centuries, and was only later transferred to Ukraine for administrative reasons, by Soviet authorities in the 1950’s. McKew then proceeds to throw Evangelical Christians and the National Rifle Association into the mix, as Kremlin-linked groups. But this ignores how they also enthusiastically supported the last Republican president, George W Bush. And he was hardly walking hand-in-hand with Moscow. Rants like these, and the traction they get, are a window into the madness currently enveloping American liberals. They are popular because it’s far easier to blame foreign actors for every problem befalling the United States than accept the reality, which is the growing inequality and Trump himself are all homegrown phenomena. Also, it wasnt Russia that brought the KKK or white supremacy to America, and you cant pin slavery, the civil war or the slaughter of the native population on Moscow either. Not forgetting, of course, that the biggest victims of the actual Nazis were Russians. Which is not something most Americans understand. Yarns trying to hoodwink people into believing Russia is responsible for the American far right are pure hogwash. American racism is behind America racism, and these guys dont need any outside assistance to fuel their hate. The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

An 1868 article about the KKK captures the ethical paradox of talking about terrorism today – Quartz

After troubling violence around a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia this weekend, photos of protestors wielding torches and making the Nazi salute quickly spread online. Reddit users shared a picture of a shirt reportedly worn in Charlottesville that quoted Hitler, and bystanders videos of a car attack on pedestrians were embedded by news organizations. But our ability to share such terrifying imagery creates a paradox: Sharing photos spreads awareness and helps defend against a social danger, and simultaneously also gives racist groups free publicity, fueling the fire. In March 1868 (pdf), a New York Times correspondent in Tennessee writing about the nascent Ku Klux Klan captured the same problem. When the very first KKK formed in Tennessee in 1868, its objective was to terrorize black Americans and prevent them from exercising their right to vote. Like today, people werent sure how seriously to take the fringe group: Was the KKK a military threat? Were they a political party? An outrageous hate group threatening progress? Or was it nothing more than bluster? Controversial Tennessee governor William Gannaway Brownlow raised an early alarm about the newly formed KKK in his state, describing the group as an armed rebellion. The Times writer, Omega, responded sharply, calling Brownlow a demagogue and taking him to task for exaggerating the threat. It was precisely this alarmism, Omega wrote, that would give the Klan its power: I have means of information quite reliable enough to warrant me in contradicting these alarming, sensational, political canards, even though indorsed (sic) by the terrified demagogues of the State, who are fit subjects for the ingenious, mysterious and wicked devices of the KuKlux Klan. With racist condescension, the writer also blamed black Americans for spreading fear about the group that hated them. The supremacists mysterious and horrible midnight demonstrations prove that its founders have a thorough and perfect knowledge of the negro character, Omega wrote. On the streets, in the fields and in their churches this mysterious organization and its midnight revelations are discussed by the blacks, and exaggerated accounts of its horrors repeated. What Omega forecast was, indeed, the power of the KKKs spectacle of costumes and burning crosses to make headlines and spread whispers. But what he didnt predict then at the groups onset was the actual horror and death that the Klan would spread by the next year. It would inspire thousands of deaths by lynching by the turn of the century. By talking about terror, even if it carried misinformation or fear-mongering, people could prepare for a real danger. In his plea for level-headedness, Omega underestimated the possibility that the Klans initial publicity stunts could empower and inspire far more horrific crimes. And his reaction to the rising terror illustrates the challenge that the US faces now as it tries to parse how big the growing white supremacist, or neo-Nazi, or alt-right movement isor indeed what to call themand what theyre really capable of. The author dismissed the actual racism of the KKK and the hate they used, criticizing instead the justifiable fear of their targets. Telling Americans, in essence, to calm down in the face of hostility of the highest order, lays the blame squarely at the feet of the wrong mob. In this tense national moment, do we remain measured, and wait for something truly catastrophic to happen, or risk action with all the rage and fear that it requires?

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

Financial Supporter of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo Makes KKK Reference About Black Democrat Leader – Newsweek

A hedge fund manager and prominent political donor made a racial remark in reference to a black Democratic leader in New York, saying she has done more damage to people of color than anyone who has ever donned a hood. Daniel Loeb, a major supporter of Democratic New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, made the comment in a Facebook post in response to an article shared by The New York Times regarding a confrontation between Cuomo and Senator Andrea Stewart-Cousins, the Democratic leader in the New York state Senate. The article detailed a private meeting at which Stewart-Cousins accused Cuomo of prejudging her based on her race and gender. You look at me, Mr. Governor, but you dont see me. You see my black skin and a woman, but you dont realize I am a suburban legislator, Stewart-Cousins said, according to the Times. Daily Emails and Alerts – Get the best of Newsweek delivered to your inbox New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is applauded by officials, including New York state Senate Leader Andrew Stewart-Cousins, after he signed a law that will gradually raise New York’s minimum wage to $15, at the Javits Convention Center, in New York, on April 4, 2016. Richard Drew/Pool/Reuters The comments were made during a heated discussion about the role of eight breakaway Democrats, led by Senator Jeffrey Klein, in the New York state Senate. The group has allowed Republicans to exert control over the Democrat-led Senate. Read more: White nationalists from all corners of the internet are uniting for the largest racist protest in decades In a Facebook comment that has since been deleted, but was reported by the Times, Loeb backed Klein and criticized Stewart-Cousins. Thank God for Jeff Klein and those who stand for educational choice and support Charter funding that leads to economic mobility and opportunity for poor knack [sic] kids, said Loeb, appearing to make an error when typing black. Meanwhile hypocrites like Stewart-Cousins who pay fealty to powerful union thugs and bosses do more damage to people of color than anyone who has ever donned a hood. The last comment appeared to be in reference to the Ku Klux Klan, a white supremacist group in the United States that was notorious in the past for persecuting nonwhites and murdering civil rights activists. Hedge fund manager Daniel Loeb speaks during a Reuters Newsmaker event in New York City on September 21, 2016. Andrew Kelly/Reuters After the Times report, Loeb issued a statement. I regret the language I used in expressing my passion for education choice, he said. I apologize to Senator Stewart-Cousins and anyone I offended. I have taken down the post from Facebook. Stewart-Cousins has not publicly responded to Loebs comment. A spokesman for Governor Cuomo told the Times that the governor had no connection with these comments whatsoever and that they were entirely inappropriate and have no place in the public discourse. Loeb has been a major political donor to congressional Republicans, as well as the Democrat Cuomo. State records show that Loeb and his wife have given more than $170,000 to Cuomo in recent years. The investor has also given more than $1 million to Republican causes in recent years, including $500,000 to a super PAC supporting Jeb Bush in 2015, $150,000 to the Republican National Committee in the same yearand $700,000 to a super PAC backing House Republicans in 2016.

Fair Usage Law

August 16, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

The Charlottesville White Supremacists Didn’t Wear Hoods – The … – The Atlantic

In July 2017, the Albemarle Charlottesville Historical Society invited members of the press to a private conference to discuss a sensitive pair of items from the organizations collection: a pair of robes that might have originally belonged to founding members of the local Ku Klux Klan, established near Thomas Jeffersons tomb in 1921. The robes, which the society said were donated in 1993, drew attention when local activists and scholars started asking about them. Its probably some old respectable family name which adorns a current Charlottesville building, street or park, speculated one of the scholars whod requested more detail on the robes, according to Charlottesvilles Daily Progress. But Steven Meeks, the societys president, declined to reveal who donated the artifacts. I will tell you this much, Meeks said to the newspaper, neither one of them was a prominent person in the Charlottesville community. The tussle over revealing the identities of long-ago Klansmen in Charlottesville, the potential shame to their living relatives or descendants, feels itself like an artifact of history at this moment, when people unadorned by masks or hoods are marching for white supremacy openly on the citys streets and lawns. It hearkens back to a time when the likes of the Klan achieved terror partially through a uniform that often obscured the face of its wearer. Anonymity wasnt quite the point, as Alison Kinney pointed out in The New Republic. And indeed, in many places, for much of the Klan’s history, members marched openly. While the hoods could assure their wearers personal anonymity, their force came from declaring membership in a safe, privileged identity that was anything but secret. But where open racism was less acceptable, the hood offered a useful disguise. We could be anywhere, the uniform warned. We could be your neighbors. But the images we saw in Charlottesville today and yesterday convey an entirely different sort of threat. They draw their menace not from what is theremostly, young white men in polos and T-shirts goofily brandishing tiki torchesbut from what isnt: the masks, the hoods, the secrecy that could at least imply a sort of shame. We used to whisper these thoughts, the new white supremacists suggest. But now we can say them out loud. The Unite the Right rally wasnt intended to be a Klan rally at all. It was a pride march. The shameless return of white supremacy into Americas public spaces seems to be happening by degrees, and quickly. It wasnt until most journalists left the conference of the innocuously named National Policy Institute in November that my colleague Daniel Lombroso captured Richard Spencer leading the attendees in open Nazi salutes. Spencers intentionto make normal that gesture and all the sentiments that underpin itis no more secret than the identities of his tiki torch-wielding bannermen. “I don’t see myself as a marginal figure who’s going to be hated by society, Spencer said to Daniel. I see myself as a mainstream figure. For the moment, you can still spot the subtle boundaries that will have shifted if Spencer and his fellow-travelers succeed. One appeared, for example, in Graeme Woods June 2017 Atlantic story on Spencer, when one of his associates requested anonymity: I have a normie [conventional] job, the young man said, and I dont want to get punished for this. How soon until that young man no longer fears the consequences of his ideas? Norms is such a bloodless, abstract word, which is a shame, because it describes such a bloody real thing. Norms impose genuine and manifold restraints on human behavior. They undergird all the gentle, civic niceties that make human society possible. Laws can codify and reinforce these norms, but the norms are what keep us from savagery. It would recently have been normal for a president to condemn in harsh tones the participants in a march for white supremacy on the streets of an American city. Today it is not.

Fair Usage Law

August 15, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

The charlatan who grew Maine’s KKK and how it flamed out … – Bangor Daily News

The weekends news was dominated by the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a white nationalist sympathizing with demonstrators there killed a woman after he allegedly plowed into a crowd of counter-protesters with a car. It began with a protest of Charlottesvilles pending move to take down a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The Southern Poverty Law Center called the gathering the largest hate-gathering of its kind in decades and it drew fringe neo-Nazis and white supremacists. Some of those were members of the Ku Klux Klan, whose historical reputation as a terrorizing, racist movement across the South in different iterations belies its small membership now, estimated at between 5,000 and 8,000 members in loose factions across the country. But they were millions strong in the 1920s and one stronghold was Maine, where the KKK mostly formed as a Protestant nativist group opposed to the rise of Catholicism, which came with a wave of immigration from Quebec, Ireland and Italy during the preceding 90 years or so. Their leader was a charismatic man named F. Eugene Farnsworth, who proclaimed that he was head of the Maine KKK in a 1923 speech, according to a history of the group on Mount Desert Island. But there was much more to his story. In 1901, he was doing a stage act in Rhode Island that required an assistant to balance a large rock on his stomach while an audience member tried to break it. But the rock slipped and killed his assistant, so he left there in disgrace. After bouncing around and using a different name, he proclaimed himself head of Maines KKK in a 1923 speech in Portland. The group largely portrayed itself as a fraternal one and it avoided violence. According to a book on Maines villains, Farnsworth once said while he didnt hate Catholics, the U.S. will always be a Protestant nation. Klan chapters popped up all over Maine and they held parades, rallies and even a Klam Bake in Trenton after helping elect Republican Gov. Owen Brewster in 1924. Rallies persisted into 1925, but it was a quick fall for the group after that. The national KKK didnt like Farnsworth: He charged women $10 to join (more than the male rate of $5), signed up Canadian members (including his wife and daughter) and he was suspected of keeping $4 out of every $10 he collected. He resigned in 1926 and died just after. In the 1970s, a contractor from Mount Desert Island told a local historian that young people joined the group thinking it was kind of like a cross between the Masons and the Boy Scouts. Heres an excerpt from that account: It wasnt long before we were told we had to hate black people. We werent excited by that, but there werent many blacks around MDI then, so it didnt make much of a practical difference. Next, we were told we had to hate Jews. Guys started to get uncomfortable, then. There werent many Jews around but there were people like Dan Rosenthal, a peddler who came in summer. Everybody liked Dan. He was a good man. Then we were told we had to hate Catholics. Well, that did it. There were a lot of Catholics around. We knew damned well they were good people. A Catholic priest in Northeast Father Kinney was active in the fire company, for example. There was a Catholic church on Lookout Way in Northeast Harbor. The Catholic church had just bought one of the old local houses on Summit Road and was renovating it for a rectory. The Catholic church was enlarging that story-and-a-half little house into a larger three-story rectory. Well, just about all the workmen in Northeast Harbor donated at least a days work on that rectory job and we all signed our work. That was our message to the Ku Klux Klan, from every damn one of us. Youll find our signatures all over that house. That was the end of the KKK for Northeast Harbor. This item was originally published in Daily Brief, a free political newsletter distributed Monday through Friday by the Bangor Daily News to inform dialogue about Maine politics and government. To read more of todays Daily Brief, click here. To have the Daily Brief delivered daily to your inbox, click here.

Fair Usage Law

August 15, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed

No tolerance for white supremacists, neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan: US VP Pence – Business Standard

US Vice President Mike Pence on Monday condemned far-right groups that staged a rally in Virginia that descended into deadly violence, saying there is “no tolerance for hate and violence.” “We have no tolerance for hate and violence from white supremacists, neo Nazis or the KKK,” Pence said in response to a question at a news conference in Cartagena, Colombia, where he was on the first leg of a Latin American tour. Pence’s comments were in contrast to those of President Donald Trump in the aftermath of the violence Saturday in Charlottesville, Virginia, in which he failed to No tolerance for white supremacists, neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan: US VP Penceexplicitly condemn white supremacists.

Fair Usage Law

August 15, 2017   Posted in: Ku Klux Klan  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."