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Jew Watch – Jewish Atrocities – The Lavon Affair – History

Israel and Terror in Egypt

Pinhas Lavon

The Lavon affair (“Esek Habish” – the shameful affair) was one of the most bizarre chapters in Israeli history. In 1954, the Israeli secret service set up a spy ring in Egypt, with the purpose of blowing up US and British targets. The operation was code-named “Susanah.” The terrorist hits were to be blamed on the regime of Egyptian President Gamal Abdul Nasser, with the purpose of alienating the US and Britain from Egypt and Nasser and somehow preventing Egyptian nationalization of the Suez canal. The ring was discovered. Strict censorship ensured that that the Israeli public officially knew little or nothing of the affair for many years. Names were not mentioned, the affair was called “Esek Bish” – the affair of shame, and key protagonists were referred to as “X” and “the third man.” Unofficially and through leaks, most people knew at least the outlines of the affair.

No ingredient was omitted that could make this affair a totally morally repugnant fiasco. The affair occurred during a difficult time in Israel. Terrorist raids on Israel and reprisals had provoked a public debate about the efficacy of reprisals. David Ben-Gurion, the founding Prime Minister, had retired to his kibbutz, Sde Boker, in September 1953 claiming fatigue and age. In October 1954, an Israeli reprisal raid in Qibieh, in the West Bank, lead by Ariel Sharon, had miscarried, resulting in the death of 69 civilians. An acrimonious debate was kindled between “activists” who advocated continuing such raids, and doves, led by PM Sharett, who were against them. It was presumed that the “activists,” proteges of Ben Gurion, and in particular Moshe Dayan who was IDF Chief of Staff, initiated the operation on the orders of Ben Gurion. Ben Gurion, on the other hand, disowned Defense Minister Lavon, and claimed that Lavon had given the orders. The left wing of the Labor party adopted the cause of Lavon. The right adopted the cause of Ben Gurion, Shimon Peres and Moshe Dayan. Nothing definite could ever be proven.

The prisoners of the Lavon affair remained forgotten in Egyptian jails, and were not exchanged after the Sinai campaign. Since they were mostly Sephardi Jews, their cause became a cause celebre of those who claimed that Israel, and in particular the Mapai party, discriminated against Sephardi Jews.

The arrest of the ring resulted in an affair that dominated Israeli politics for over a decade. Israel was embarrassed, as it had been caught trying to harm American and British interests for no reason and in instigating terror attacks against innocent targets. The spies who were not executed were left to rot in Egyptian jails. Meanwhile, a wave of persecution forced the emigration of tens of thousands of Jews from Egypt, leaving behind property, memories and roots. Investigations in Israel led to a trail of forged documents and perjured testimony, as everyone involved tried to implicate others. To all of the above would be added the ignominy of betrayal, as it became evident eventually that Israeli agent Avri Seidenberg (Avri Elad) had probably betrayed the operation to the Egyptians.

The spy ring was not run by the Israeli Mossad intelligence service, but rather by unit 131 of AMAN (IDF intelligence). The rationale behind creation of this group was that they would be local sleeper agents, trained in various techniques, who would remain in place and be activated only in case of war. At some point, someone decided, for unknown reasons, to activate the ring without waiting for war.

In those days the intelligence services were comparatively inexperienced, under budgeted and unprofessional, though the Mossad was to achieve notable success, mainly through luck, such as obtaining a copy of the twentieth party congress speech of Soviet Premier Krushchev. Israeli intelligence was easy to infiltrate. They had a relatively low opinion of intelligence services of Arab countries and were therefore not on their guard. Their vetting procedures for new agents were poor. Soviet and other intelligence agencies also had no little trouble recruiting agents among new immigrants.

The Egyptian spies were poorly compartmentalized. They were not trained to resist torture. The operation was not compartmentalized: the spies knew each other’s identities. Thus, there was a danger that under interrogation, any one of them could betray the entire group. Worse, it is now believed that in fact they were betrayed by the Israeli agent in charge of the operation. The sensational revelations about the spy ring endangered the entire Egyptian Jewish community, which numbered about 50,000, as well as the credibility of Israel.

The Egyptian Jews known to have been recruited for the spy ring were:

Shmuel Azar

Yosef Carmon

Victor Levy

Dr. Moshe Marzouk

Meir Meyuhas

Robert Dassa

Phillip Nathanson

Marcelle Ninio

Meir Za’afran

There may have been others, including an additional Israeli agent. They were recruited and trained by Avraham Dar, an Israeli agent who went by the name of John Darling, supposedly a British businessman. They were flown to France and then to Israel and trained in use of explosives.

Dar’s ring was handed over to Avraham Seidenberg, who had Hebraicized his name to Avri Elad. Elad had a shady past. He had gotten in trouble with the IDF in 1948 for looting a refrigerator from an Arab house, and had been reduced in rank to private. Shimon Peres claims that Elad was a crook even as a young member of Kibbutz Alumot. Peres was then treasurer of the Kibbuts, and he relates that Elad pilfered the contents of Peres’s wallet, which had cash to be used for Kibbutz purchases (Peres, p 104). Elad was nonetheless recruited into the intelligence service owing to lax vetting procedures. He first traveled to Germany, where he posed as a former SS officer named Paul Frank. He apparently managed to discover how wanted Nazi war criminals were able to escape to Arab countries, as well as getting information about Egyptian efforts to recruit former Nazis to help it build an arms industry. However, Israeli intelligence later assessed that at some point Elad became a double agent.

The group was activated in July of 1954. The first bombs were placed in post offices on July 15, followed by the USIA libraries in Cairo and Alexandria on July 14. On July 23, more bombs were exploded intwo Cairo cinemas, in the railway terminal and central post office. The entire ring was soon rounded up, either because of information divulged under interrogation or because it had been betrayed. Ostensibly, they were caught when, by chance, incendiary bombs went off in the pocket of Phillip Nathanson while he was waiting in line outside the British owned Rio theater in Alexandria on July 23 (according to Melman and Haber). However, police who arrested Nathanson said they had been tipped off according to some versions.

Max (Meir) Binett (or Benett), another member of unit 131, IDF intelligence, was in Egypt on other business. He had previously been an agent in Tehran and Baghdad. In 1952 he was sent to Egypt as a German businessman. Unfortunately, Marcelle Ninio knew at least the license plate number of his automobile, though probably not his name, and either she, or Elad had given him away to the Egyptians.

As soon as the group was arrested, Moshe Dayan, then Chief of Staff of the IDF, fired Mordechai Ben Tzur, who had headed unit 131, replacing him with Major Yossi Harel (Hamburger) who was recalled from studies in the United States. Harel may be familiar to readers in another role – he was the commander of the immigrant ship, Exodus, in 1947. Harel ordered the withdrawal of all unit 131 agents operating in Arab countries from the field, until it could be ascertained that nobody was compromised by the arrests. They were only returned in 1956.

The Egyptians had announced the arrest of a “13 man spy ring” on October 5, 1954 (Hirst, 1977). The trial in Egypt began on December 11. The Egyptians apparently somehow concluded that the operation was ordered by the Israeli Secretary of Defense, Pinchas Lavon, though they could not possibly have had evidence from the prisoners that proved this claim. It was nonetheless a reasonable assumption. Of the thirteen defendants, two were acquitted. Max Binnet could not risk revealing his identity as an Israeli agent and committed suicide on arrest. Yosef Carmon committed suicide in prison. . Dr. Moshe Marzouk of Cairo and Shmuel Azar of Alexandria, were sentenced to death and hanged in a Cairo prison. Marzouk claimed that he had organized the ring and took full responsibility, apparently to reduce the guilt of the others. Victor Levy and Philip Nathanson, got life sentences. .Marcelle Ninio, a woman, and Robert Dassa, were both sentenced to 15 years in jail. Meir Meyuhas and Meir Za’afran, served seven year jail sentences, were released in 1962 and made their way to Israel, where they lived in obscurity. Israel did not even try to exchange any of the prisoners for Egyptian prisoners of war after the 1956 Suez campaign. In 1968 however, following the 6 day war, they were finally released, on the insistence of Meir Amit, then head of AMAN.

The Israeli cabinet had not seen fit to discuss the incident at all until the trial concluded in Egypt. The Israeli press was outraged by the allegations of the Egyptians, and alleged that it was a frame up. Perhaps the truth was not brought to the attention of the cabinet immediately. The details of the affair had remained top secret for many years. However, a version of the affair had been leaked by the army to poet Nathan Alterman, who published a poem that hinted about it esoterically in his column in Davar, the Mapai party newspaper. When the government reviewed the case after the trial, both Pinchas Lavon, who had been minister of defense, and Benjamin Gibli, who headed AMAN, resigned or were forced out. Lavon’s resignation was also influenced by his tendency to order retaliatory attacks without the approval of PM Moshe Sharett. Lavon was replaced by Ben Gurion, who returned from retirement in Sde Boker, and Gibli was replaced by Yehoshafat Harkavi, his deputy. Before his resignation, Gibli sent Elad back to Germany, perhaps to keep him from testifying.

A committee of two, composed of Yitzhak Olshan, president of the Supreme court, and Yaakov Dori, first IDF chief of staff, was appointed to investigate the affair. They were unable to answer the question, “who gave the order” because people involved lied systematically and forged documents.

Isser Harel, head of the Mossad and the Sherut Bitachon Klali (Shin Bet – the General Security Services, responsible for internal security) in the 1950s, had been suspicious of Elad, because he had gotten out of the affair unscathed. The evidence was suggestive. However, Harel had no proof and he had no real influence in AMAN, which was part of the IDF, or in unit 131. Without proof, he could do little.

In January 1955, Elad was ordered back to Israel to testify. Givli tried to travel to Germany and suborn Elad, but the plan was discovered by Dayan, who blocked the trip. Givli managed to send a message by special courier. He also met Elad at the airport and “guided” his testimony. Elad perjured himself and supported Givli’s version, giving a date for the order supposedly issued by Ben Tzur that corresponded with the date given in a letter that had been forged on Givli’s orders. In a book he wrote long after the event, Elad admitted he had lied on the orders of his superiors, claiming that he did it in order to save the image of the IDF. Elad’s perjured testimony was probably crucial in preventing the Olshan-Dori committee from discovering who had given the order for the operation. The committee reported on January 13, 1955:

“We were not convinced beyond reasonable doubt that the head of military intelligence [Givli] did not receive the order from the Minister of Defense [Lavon]. At the same time, we are not sure that the Minister of Defense did give the order attributed to him.” (Peres, pp 103-104).

Elad was apparently no longer working for military intelligence. However, returned to Germany, ostensibly to care for his father, who was very ill. At the beginning of 1956, he was ordered back to Israel and questioned again by Yossi Harel, but to no avail. Elad again returned to Germany. Apparently without getting permission from his former superiors in AMAN, Elad contacted Colonel Othman Nuri, who was deputy-commander of Egyptian intelligence.

In 1957, David Kimche, then a junior Mossad agent, tried to recruit a former Wehrmacht intelligence officer, Robert Jensen. Kimche claimed he was working for a “European intelligence service.” Jensen told Kimche that he knew that he must come from Nuri. An Egyptian agent had told him to tell Nuri that “Wagner sent him.” The name of this “Egyptian agent” according to Jensen, was Paul Frank. Kimche was aghast. Paul Frank was Elad’s cover name.

This information reached David Ben-Gurion, now Prime Minister again, the next day. He ordered IDF field security to investigate. Elad was an Israeli hero and had to be treated with kid gloves. Versions differ on how Elad was enticed to come back to Israel. He was offered various business deals according to Ya’akov Hefetz, who had been put in charge of the investigation. Elad claimed in his book that he returned of his own free will to find out the truth in the Lavon affair. In any event, he was invited for interrogation by IDF field security, in the company of Unit 131 commander, Yossi Harel.

Yaakov Hefetz, head of IDF field security, interrogated Elad. Microphones broadcast the interrogation to an adjacent room, where Tzvi Aharoni and Victor Cohen, Shin Bet agents, were listening in. Aharoni had been given a special appointment as a senior police officer for this mission.

Hefetz, who knew Elad well as a comrade in arms, began by saying, “Avri, I am not speaking to you now as Yankele Hefetz, your friend, but as the head of the IDF Field Security department talking to Captain Avri Seidenberg.

Elad cut him off and said, using Yiddish slang mixed with Hebrew, “Never mind the hush hush stuff and get to the point.”

Hefetz said, “You do not have to respond, but what you say may be held in evidence against you. Avri, have you ever betrayed your country?”

Elad paled, according to Hefetz, and said, most amazingly, “Wait, Wait, let me think about that and remember.”

This was enough for Tzvi Aharoni, who cut the interview short, entered the room and said, ” I am arresting you on the grounds of suspicions I hold against you.”

Elad was interrogated at length, but denied everything. Victor Cohen, who had known virtually nothing about “operation Sussanah” was amazed, and was also skeptical of Elad’s version of the story. Elad had stayed in Egypt for 12 days after the arrest of the ring. He had sold his De Soto automobile. He even took the trouble to remove the bumper to reduce its tax value. He claimed that he had smuggled out of Egypt film of rockets being developed with the aid of German technicians. All this was incredible. Nonetheless, Elad was still treated with kid gloves. According to Melman and Haber, on the way to his incarceration in Ramle prison, he persuaded his guards to allow him to stop in his apartment. He arranged for a friend, Peter Landesman, to pick up a suitcase from his apartment, and to stop a shipment of personal effects on its way to Hamburg. Landesman put the freight in storage in a locker in Haifa. When he opened the suitcase, he found it was full of top-secret documents and burned them.

However, Elad gave his sister, who visited him in jail, a note for Landesman. The note was intercepted by the Shin Bet, and Landesman was interrogated and confessed to burning the documents. The freight originally destined for Hamburg contained Elad’s diary, but there was nothing in it to incriminate him in betrayal of the Israeli spy ring in Egypt. Additional documents, held by his wife in Germany, disappeared.

Elad was tried in 1958 and sentenced to ten years in prison for relatively minor offences. The judges noted the strong suspicion that he had betrayed the spy ring, but his role could not be proven.

Failure has no fathers. It was time to pass the buck. Ben Gurion insisted that Defense Minister Pinhas Lavon was responsible for the fiasco. Lavon insisted that Colonel Benjamin Givli, a protege of Ben Gurion and head of Aman (Military intelligence) had organized the operation behind his back. Lavon insisted on re-opening the affair. Ben Gurion appointed a committee of three members, Supreme Court Justice Haim Cohen and two army officers. However, Lavon also testified to the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Security Committee. He blamed Givli and accused Givli and others of an elaborate frame-up and cover up. The testimony was leaked, causing a scandal.

Lavon claimed Ben-Gurion was persecuting him, and insisted on that his name be cleared. The cabinet backed Lavon. A commission of inquiry consisting of 7 ministers was set up to investigate. They found that Moshe Dayan and Shimon Peres forged a document, apparently the letter giving the order, to incriminate Lavon. On December 24,1960, the Israeli cabinet unanimously exonerated Lavon of all guilt in the ‘disastrous security adventure in Egypt’. According to a New York Times article (New York Times, 10 February 1961) the Attorney General had found ‘conclusive evidence of forgeries as well as false testimony in an earlier inquiry’. This was most likely the testimony of Elad and Givli, and the forged letter that Givli had produced.

Ben-Gurion insisted that the committee was politically motivated, and that ministers could not be judges. In the subsequent 1961 elections, Ben-Gurion declared that he would only accept office if Lavon was fired as First Secretary of the Histadrut, Israel’s labor union organization. His demands were met. Lavon was forced to resign, but his supporters organized protest demonstrations. However, in 1964 Ben Gurion claimed there was new evidence and demanded that the government reopen the investigation with a proper judicial commission. According to Shimon Peres, Ben Gurion felt that Lavon had at least ministerial overall responsibility, and that it was unjust for him to place all the blame on Givli, an army officer. However, in the absence of proof, Ben Gurion was content with the ambiguous ruling of Olshan and Drori. When Lavon insisted on exoneration however, Ben-Gurion insisted on some sort of judicial commission. At this time, there was no law regarding judicial investigations in Israel. The procedure for such investigations was established by law only in 1968, as a result of the Lavon Affair. (Peres, pp 110-111).

Ben Gurion tried to force his political party Mapai, The Israel Workers Party, to resolve this issue during 1964-1965. Instead, Ben-Gurion was forced to leave the party he had founded. The party cleared and rehabilitated Lavon completely in May 1964. Ben-Gurion founded the Min Hayesod faction with Shimon Peres and Moshe Dayan. This later became the Rafi party which won ten mandates, but then was reduced to four members as the Reshima Mamlachtit party after Dayan and Peres returned to the Labor party in 1967. Ben-Gurion failed to attract a significant number of votes, and retained a permanent enmity to Levy Eshkol, who had replaced him as Prime Minister. In 1967, in part because of this enmity, Ben Gurion and his supporters were able to bring about the enlargement of the Eshkol government just before the 6-Day War.

History had passed by the founder of the Israeli state because of this one affair. Ben-Gurion retired to his home in Sde Boker in the Negev, to live in relative obscurity, and influence events from the side lines through his proteges – Moshe Dayan and Shimon Peres, until they returned to the Labor party.

In the 1980s, Benjamin Givli’s secretary, Dalia Goldstein, confessed to forging the letter giving the orders, supposedly sent by Ben Tzur, that had been used to incriminate Lavon. The forged letter to Elad activating the ring, was given an incorrect date. As noted, Givli had also suborned Elad to give false testimony. By that time, Ben Gurion was dead. The Labor party, partly owing to the scandal set in motion by the Lavon affair, was out of power. Elad had moved to California and written his memoirs, protesting his innocence.

To this day the truth about who gave the orders in the Lavon affair cannot be ascertained. We do not have all the pieces of the puzzle. Probably we never will. In the absence of real information, the Lavon affair has been fertile grounds for speculation by various interested parties, but none of the theories offered fits all the facts. For many years, Israeli leftist parties sided with Lavon against Ben-Gurion, Dayan and Peres. Peres continues to maintain his innocence, and claims that Lavon had become eccentric and held extremist anti-American and anti-western views. Rumor claims that Lavon was an alcoholic. The affair continues to do damage to this day, because every bigot, crank and eccentric can use it to prove their favorite contention. Most recently, it has been used to “prove” that Israel engineered the Al-Qaida terror attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001.

Curiously, the alleged motivation for the operation has not been questioned. Who could really have benefited had it been successful?

Shabtai Tevet, Ben Gurion’s biographer, stated that the assignment was “To undermine Western confidence in the existing [Egyptian] regime by generating public insecurity and actions to bring about arrests, demonstrations, and acts of revenge, while totally concealing the Israeli factor. The team was accordingly urged to avoid detection, so that suspicion would fall on the Muslim Brotherhood, the Communists, ‘unspecified malcontents’ or ‘local nationalists’.” (Tevet, p. 81).

“The team was.. urged to avoid detection” is an absurd statement. Did Tevet mean to imply that otherwise, Israeli espionage teams are not urged to avoid detection? Of course it is a good idea to avoid detection if you are Israeli agents blowing up public and foreign facilities in an Arab country. The team would hardly need urging on that score. But if secrecy was of the essence, why wasn’t the operation compartmentalized? Why weren’t team members taught to resist torture? These techniques were certainly known to the Israeli intelligence establishment, and had been used in the preparation of paratroopers sent behind Nazi lines in WW II.

On examination, the motives offered are far-fetched. The ostensible purpose was to prevent the withdrawal of British occupying forces from Suez, which would supposedly leave Israeli defenses naked to Egyptian attack. Firstly, the British were in no position to stop an Egyptian attack with their small occupation force. Secondly, if, as often claimed, the affair was the work of the Israeli activist faction, it made no sense. The activists wanted decisive action against Egypt. This was not possible as long as the British were in Suez, in close proximity to Sinai and defending the canal. With the British gone, and no longer committed to defense of Egypt and the canal, the way became open to contemplate a large scale military operation such as the Sinai campaign.

The possible gains from the bombings carried out by this group would in any case have been minor. There is no reason to assume the US would necessarily have blamed the Egyptian government for activities of opposition as some claim (See for example, Hirst, 1977). On the contrary, Nasser could claim he was carrying out a pro-Western policy against the wishes of the opposition, and that removal of British troops was needed to satisfy anti-Western sentiment. The British pullout was not dependent on the stability of the Egyptian regime. Egypt had just undergone a revolution that was not quite completed, and was known to be unstable anyway. It is a fact that several of the bombs were in fact set off, but American and British policy were totally unaffected. In all, it is extremely doubtful if the operation would have accomplished anything even if the ring had not been caught. Even had they been convinced that Nasser’s regime was unstable, the US and Britain tend to prop up their unstable allies, not abandon them. That could have been easily foreseen Why then, would Israel risk the safety of Egyptian Jews, its relations with the US and Britain and its agents? The argument that Lavon was a scapegoat of “activists” who wanted him out of the way so that they could perform more reprisal raids doesn’t make sense either, because Lavon was apparently an extreme hawk.

If Givli acted on the orders of Dayan in forging the letter, then why did Dayan try to stop him from coordinating testimony with Elad, as Melman and Haber claim? If Givli acted on his own, or if in reality Lavon had given the order, what were their motivations? Is it possible that Givli was somehow involved with Elad’s activities as a double agent, that Elad was indeed trying to raise money for his sick father, but selling real secrets instead of fake ones as he claimed? Givli might have been sharing profits with Elad, and may have seen the need to cover his tracks. A foreign power who knew about the ring may have induced Elad or Givli to activate it in order to embarrass Israel or to cause an Egyptian rift with the west, or to provide Egypt for an excuse for stepping up infiltration against Israel. All of these were in fact direct or indirect consequences of the fiasco, and they could have been easily foreseen, especially since whoever instigated it knew about the ring. Given the contempt of Israeli intelligence for Arab intelligence services, and their false sense of security regarding foreign penetration in general, it is doubtful that this possibility was ever investigated. Given the number of espionage fiascos due to penetration by foreign agents in those years, it is a possibility that should have been investigated.

Ami Isseroff

Sources

Hirst, David, The Gun and the Olive Branch, 1977.

Melman, Yossi and Haber, Eitan, The Spies: Israel’s Counter Espionage Wars (Hameraglim: Parashot Rigul Bimdinat Yisrael), Miskal – Yediot Ahronot and Chemed Books, Tel-Aviv, 2002, pp 33-50. (Hebrew only)

Peres, Shimon, Battling for Peace, Orion, 1995, pp 98-115.

Tevet, S. Ben-Gurion’s Spy, Columbia University Press, 1996.

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Jew Watch – Jewish Atrocities – The Lavon Affair – History

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FSI | CISAC – The Lavon Affair: How a false-flag operation …

Abstract

The Lavon Affair, a failed Israeli covert operation directed against Egypt in 1954, triggered a chain of events that have had profound consequences for power relationships in the Middle East; the affairs effects still reverberate today. Those events included a public trial and conviction of eight Egyptian Jews who carried out the covert operation, two of whom were subsequently executed; a retaliatory military incursion by Israel into Gaza that killed 39 Egyptians; a subsequent EgyptianSoviet arms deal that angered American and British leaders, who then withdrew previously pledged support for the building of the Aswan Dam; the announced nationalization of the Suez Canal by Nasser in retaliation for the withdrawn support; and the subsequent failed invasion of Egypt by Israel, France, and Britain in an attempt to topple Nasser. In the wake of that failed invasion, France expanded and accelerated its ongoing nuclear cooperation with Israel, which eventually enabled the Jewish state to build nuclear weapons.

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THE LAVON AFFAIR – IS HISTORY REPEATING ITSELF?

In 1954, Israeli agents working in Egypt planted bombs in several buildings, including a United States diplomatic facility, and left evidence behind implicating Egyptian Muslims as the culprits. The ruse would have worked, had not one of the bombs detonated prematurely, allowing the Egyptians to capture and identify one of the bombers, which in turn led to the round up of an Israeli spy ring.

Some of the spies were from Israel, while others were recruited from the local Jewish population. Israel responded to the scandal with claims in the media that there was no spy ring, that it was all a hoax perpetrated by “anti-Semites”.

But as the public trial progressed, it was evident that Israel had indeed been behind the bombing. Eventually, Israeli’s Defense Minister Pinhas Lavon was brought down by the scandal, although it appears that he was himself the victim of a frame-up by the real authors of the bombing project, code named “Operation Susannah.”

It is therefore a fact that Israel has a prior history of setting off bombs with the intent to blame Arabs for them.

This is not the only example of a “False Flag” operation designed to trick the United States into attacking Israel’s enemies. According to Victor Ostrovsky, a Mossad defector now living in Canada, Ronald Reagan was tricked into bombing Libya by means of a radio transmitter smuggled into Tripoli by the Mossad, which broadcast messages designed to fool the United States into thinking Libya was about to launch a massive terror attack on the west. On the basis of this fake evidence, the US bombed Libya, killing Khadaffi’s daughter.

The Jews of Iraq is a story by a Jewish writer revealing yet another false flag operation where Israelis used bombs and planted the blame on Arabs

More recently, Captain Ward Boston, who served as senior legal counsel for the Navy’s Court of Inquiry into the Israeli attack on USS Liberty, has come forward to report that the Court of Inquiry was ORDERED to conclude that the attack was an accident by President Lyndon Johnson. In hindsight, given the use of unmarked aircraft and boats by Israel during the actual attack, it appears that Israel intended to sink the US ship and frame Egypt for the attack, tricking the US into the war against Egypt.

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THE LAVON AFFAIR – IS HISTORY REPEATING ITSELF?

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lavon affair – Tag Archive | Veterans Today

By Kevin Barrett on August 23, 2013 9-11, 9/11, assad, bollyn, chemical weapons, Ehud Barak, false flag, israel, lavon affair, netanyahu, Syria, uss liberty, zionism Syria

After big Israeli false-flags, Israeli leaders incriminate themselves by knowing too much too soon.

By Kevin Barrett on March 1, 2013 9/11, chertoff, conspiracy, dancing israelis, israel, lavon affair, mike harari, mossad, netanyahu, Terrorism, Twin Towers Of Interest

For more than eleven years, Israel has been wildly celebrating the success of its 9/11 operation against the United States of America.

By Dr. Ashraf Ezzat on August 21, 2011 aipac, Dr. Ashraf Ezzat, lavon affair, Muslim Brotherhood, October 1973 War, Sinai, uss liberty Egypt, Israel, World

The toppling and the trial of Mubarak has altered scenarios that were already underway and hindered plans for the Middle East that were in the making under the auspices of ardent Zionists in Washington, Cairo and Tel Aviv.

By Veterans Today on January 24, 2011 9/11, bush, dancing israelis, freedom flotilla, israel, lavon affair, mossad, netanyahu, uss liberty 9/11, WarZone

9/11Mission Accomplished? By Nila Sagadevan for Veterans Today The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. Edmund Burke Having researched the 9/11 cover-up full-time for several years and done my bit as an activist, I had finally decided to withdraw in utter frustration at my seeming []

By Dr. Ashraf Ezzat on January 12, 2011 Ashraf Ezzat, Culture, Dr. Ashraf Ezzat, Egypt, israel, lavon affair, mossad, Muslim Brotherhood World

The terrorist attack was highly planned and professionally executed and the culprits seemed to have worked out a thoroughly detailed operation but they missed out on one vital detail, namely the culture and traditions of Egyptians

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lavon affair – Tag Archive | Veterans Today

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Local playwright premieres new comedy

What happens when you feel the world has left you behind and you’re at a loss with all the changes around you?

Lawrence Fox has written a tongue-in-cheek and somewhat autobiographical comedy about “a poor schlepp who has lived in Bethlehem all his life and now is an senior citizen and does not understand what’s happening.”

The show, “But I’m Still Slightly Confused,” premieres Friday at the Blast Furnace Room at the ArtsQuest Center in Bethlehem.

Fox, an attorney in Bethlehem, says he was seeing humorous things happening in his life and wanted to memorialize them.

“There is a little poetic license but most of it is true,” he says.

Fox says the play’s nine scenes confront eclectic things unique to the Lehigh Valley, from the video games in the bathroom at Coca-Cola Park to the building of a casino on the site of the former Bethlehem Steel plant.

Fox says his third comedy to be produced in the area is his funniest. “I am very proud of it,” he says.

For the first time, Fox also acts. He plays Reggy, a senior citizen who feels he is a stranger in an alien world where he is the only person who still drives a car with hand-crank windows, who uses a AAA road map, who pays for gas with cash and sits in line to pay tolls because he doesn’t have an EZPass. The play also includes “a mandatory trial scene,” which he includes in all his plays.

The play is directed by Ralph Montesano, who directed Fox’s previous plays.

“He’s a genius,” Fox says of Montesano, adding that he also added significant sound effects that have enhanced the play.

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Local playwright premieres new comedy

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Pinhas Lavon – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pinhas Lavon (Hebrew: , 12 July 1904 24 January 1976) was an Israeli politician, minister and labor leader, best known for the Lavon Affair.

Lavon was born as Pinhas Lubianiker in Kopychyntsi in what was previously Galicia in Austria-Hungary (now in Ukraine). He studied law at the University of Lviv, where he organized Histadrut organizations in the region. He made aliyah and moved to Mandate Palestine in 1929.

Lavon was elected to the first Knesset in 1949, and served briefly as the leader of the Histadrut in 194950. He was appointed Minister of Agriculture in David Ben-Gurion’s second government.

He retained his seat in the 1951 elections, and in 1952 was appointed Minister without Portfolio. Following Ben-Gurion’s resignation, he was appointed Minister of Defense in 1954. However, he resigned from the cabinet after he was accused of authorizing an Israeli false flag operation in Egypt, which came to be known as the Lavon Affair.

Nevertheless, he remained an MK following elections in 1955 and 1959 and returned to the leadership of the Histadrut from 1956 to 1961. Lavon was later absolved of any involvement in the Egyptian bombings. He retired from public life in 1964 after a long-standing discord with Ben-Gurion and died in Tel Aviv in 1976.[1]

During his tenure, Lavon strained relations with the Chief of Staff of the IDF Moshe Dayan by holding important policy meetings without Dayan being present, directly contacting IDF officers without following the established chain of command and attempting to scuttle Israeli purchases of arms from France. The culmination came when Operation Susannah (as the Lavon affair was officially called) was launched when Dayan was out of the country.

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Pinhas Lavon – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Operation Himmler? The Reichstag fire? The Lavon Affair …

“If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy.” – U.S. President James Madison

“Terrorism is the best political weapon for nothing drives people harder than a fear of sudden death”. – Adolph Hitler

“Why of course the people don’t want war … But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship … Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is to tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country.” – Hermann Goering, Nazi leader.

Well, as documented by the New York Times, Iranians working for the C.I.A. in the 1950’s posed as Communists and staged bombings in Iran in order to turn the country against its democratically-elected president (see also this essay).

And, as confirmed by a former Italian Prime Minister, an Italian judge, and the former head of Italian counterintelligence, NATO, with the help of the Pentagon and CIA, carried out terror bombings in Italy and blamed the communists, in order torally peoples support for their governments in Europe in their fight against communism. As one participant in this formerly-secret program stated: “You had to attack civilians, people, women, children, innocent people, unknown people far removed from any political game. The reason was quite simple. They were supposed to force these people, the Italian public, to turn to the state to ask for greater security.”

Moreover,recently declassified documents show that in the 1960’s, the American Joint Chiefs of Staff signed off on a plan to blow up AMERICAN airplanes (using an elaborate plan involving the switching of airplanes), and also to commit terrorist acts on American soil, and then to blame it on the Cubans in order to justify an invasion of Cuba. If you view no other links in this article, please read the following ABC news report; the official documents; and watchthis interview with the former Washington Investigative Producer for ABC’s World News Tonight with Peter Jennings.

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Operation Himmler? The Reichstag fire? The Lavon Affair …

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Fug the Show: Hart of Dixie recap, season 4, episode 2

In which everyone is REALLY REALLY orange again. Did Hart of Dixie get a special deal on bronzer this season? That said: this was a very satisfying episode on many levels. Last week, Zoe told Wade she was having his baby and he drunkenly stumbled home to Lavon and George and told them. Then he drunkenly stumbled BACK over to Zoes and spent the night outside her cottage, trying to get her to come out and talk to him:

She did not, because she spent the night at Lavons Mansion of Plentiful Breakfast Items. (George is also there. Maybe George also slept over, because everyone was drunk? Lets not ask WHY Zoe decided to sleep over at Lavons instead of in her own bed, or how it was finagled that she was to sleep there without Wade who, last we saw, was WITH Lavon finding out. Secret text messages? Whatever. This is not important. But this is also why I once spent an hour trying to figure out the configuration of a room in The Royal We to determine where everyone was standing for one extremely minor moment that eventually got cut. I LOVE LOGISTICS. This is also why someone at a former job in my former life once rudely referred to me as the continuity Nazi. PERSONALLY I dont think a careful eye on continuity in storytelling IS A BAD THING BUT ANYWAY.)

Lets just bask in the many many many breakfast items on order at The House of Lavon:

As we discussed last week, and have done before, this is one of the many reasons that Lavon should not, in any just world, be single ever. He is: handsome, tall, charming, a former football mega-star, the mayor, owner of a glorious home, a snappy dresser, kind, a very good friend, a great cook, and unfailingly generous. (George, while also a decent dude, HAS left a woman at the altar, which might account for some of his romantic roadblocks. Bad PR.) So, anyway, Wade and Zoe of course run into each other over the Breakfast for A Thousand By Mayor Lavon Hayes, and Wade is basically a total idiot, although hes TRYING to have the right response to the news of his forthcoming spawn. George and Lavon make all kinds of humorous faces as Wade does things like offer to teach the baby to fish and noting that although he knows nothing about babies, Zoe is a doctor and she can do all the work. Its like a car crash. I cant look away, Lavon says. Wade says he wants to get back together, and Zoebasically storms off again. And George and Lavon are like, DUDE WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU? And Wade is like, I know. Im the worst.

I do think this is slightly insane. We all know theyre getting back together. They love each other, and theyre having a baby. And they love each other. And they live in the same compound. Now, of course, its all about the journey and actually SPOILER the getting back together happens tonight, so thats exciting and the back and forth cant really make me that irked, not really, because at least now its done, and I would have complained if there HADNT been some back and forth, so there you go. Of other import: Lavons monogrammed PJs have taught me that his middle initial is R. What do we think that stands for? Lavon Romeo Hayes?

While we ponder this, Lemon is over at the Rammer Jammer berating Carl Winslow to give up his source for the story that blew open the fact that her fake relationship with Hot Henry was in fact fake, but Carl Winslow would NEVER GIVE UP HIS SOURCES!

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Fug the Show: Hart of Dixie recap, season 4, episode 2

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Lavon Affair | Day’s World

The Lavon Affair refers to a failed Israeli covert operation, code named Operation Susannah, conducted in Egypt in the Summer of 1954. As part of the false flag operation,[1] a group of Egyptian Jews were recruited by Israeli military intelligenceto plant bombs inside Egyptian, American and British-owned civilian targets, cinemas, libraries and American educational centers. The bombs were timed to detonate several hours after closing time. The attacks were to be blamed on the Muslim Brotherhood, Egyptian Communists, unspecified malcontents or local nationalists with the aim of creating a climate of sufficient violence and instability to induce the British government to retain its occupying troops in Egypts Suez Canal zone.[2]The operation caused no casualties, except for those members of the cell who committed suicide after being captured.

The operation ultimately became known as the Lavon Affair after the Israeli defense minister Pinhas Lavon was forced to resign as a consequence of the incident. Before Lavons resignation, the incident had been euphemistically referred to in Israel as the Unfortunate Affair or The Bad Business (Hebrew: , Esek HaBish). After Israel publicly denied any involvement in the incident for 51 years, the surviving agents were officially honored in 2005 by being awarded certificates of appreciation by Israeli President Moshe Katzav.[3]

Operation Susannah and the Lavon Affair turned out to be disastrous for Israel in several ways:

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Jew Watch – Jewish Atrocities – The Lavon Affair – History

Israel and Terror in Egypt Pinhas Lavon The Lavon affair (“Esek Habish” – the shameful affair) was one of the most bizarre chapters in Israeli history. In 1954, the Israeli secret service set up a spy ring in Egypt, with the purpose of blowing up US and British targets. The operation was code-named “Susanah.” The terrorist hits were to be blamed on the regime of Egyptian President Gamal Abdul Nasser, with the purpose of alienating the US and Britain from Egypt and Nasser and somehow preventing Egyptian nationalization of the Suez canal. The ring was discovered. Strict censorship ensured that that the Israeli public officially knew little or nothing of the affair for many years. Names were not mentioned, the affair was called “Esek Bish” – the affair of shame, and key protagonists were referred to as “X” and “the third man.” Unofficially and through leaks, most people knew at least the outlines of the affair. No ingredient was omitted that could make this affair a totally morally repugnant fiasco. The affair occurred during a difficult time in Israel. Terrorist raids on Israel and reprisals had provoked a public debate about the efficacy of reprisals. David Ben-Gurion, the founding Prime Minister, had retired to his kibbutz, Sde Boker, in September 1953 claiming fatigue and age. In October 1954, an Israeli reprisal raid in Qibieh, in the West Bank, lead by Ariel Sharon, had miscarried, resulting in the death of 69 civilians. An acrimonious debate was kindled between “activists” who advocated continuing such raids, and doves, led by PM Sharett, who were against them. It was presumed that the “activists,” proteges of Ben Gurion, and in particular Moshe Dayan who was IDF Chief of Staff, initiated the operation on the orders of Ben Gurion. Ben Gurion, on the other hand, disowned Defense Minister Lavon, and claimed that Lavon had given the orders. The left wing of the Labor party adopted the cause of Lavon. The right adopted the cause of Ben Gurion, Shimon Peres and Moshe Dayan. Nothing definite could ever be proven. The prisoners of the Lavon affair remained forgotten in Egyptian jails, and were not exchanged after the Sinai campaign. Since they were mostly Sephardi Jews, their cause became a cause celebre of those who claimed that Israel, and in particular the Mapai party, discriminated against Sephardi Jews. The arrest of the ring resulted in an affair that dominated Israeli politics for over a decade. Israel was embarrassed, as it had been caught trying to harm American and British interests for no reason and in instigating terror attacks against innocent targets. The spies who were not executed were left to rot in Egyptian jails. Meanwhile, a wave of persecution forced the emigration of tens of thousands of Jews from Egypt, leaving behind property, memories and roots. Investigations in Israel led to a trail of forged documents and perjured testimony, as everyone involved tried to implicate others. To all of the above would be added the ignominy of betrayal, as it became evident eventually that Israeli agent Avri Seidenberg (Avri Elad) had probably betrayed the operation to the Egyptians. The spy ring was not run by the Israeli Mossad intelligence service, but rather by unit 131 of AMAN (IDF intelligence). The rationale behind creation of this group was that they would be local sleeper agents, trained in various techniques, who would remain in place and be activated only in case of war. At some point, someone decided, for unknown reasons, to activate the ring without waiting for war. In those days the intelligence services were comparatively inexperienced, under budgeted and unprofessional, though the Mossad was to achieve notable success, mainly through luck, such as obtaining a copy of the twentieth party congress speech of Soviet Premier Krushchev. Israeli intelligence was easy to infiltrate. They had a relatively low opinion of intelligence services of Arab countries and were therefore not on their guard. Their vetting procedures for new agents were poor. Soviet and other intelligence agencies also had no little trouble recruiting agents among new immigrants. The Egyptian spies were poorly compartmentalized. They were not trained to resist torture. The operation was not compartmentalized: the spies knew each other’s identities. Thus, there was a danger that under interrogation, any one of them could betray the entire group. Worse, it is now believed that in fact they were betrayed by the Israeli agent in charge of the operation. The sensational revelations about the spy ring endangered the entire Egyptian Jewish community, which numbered about 50,000, as well as the credibility of Israel. The Egyptian Jews known to have been recruited for the spy ring were: Shmuel Azar Yosef Carmon Victor Levy Dr. Moshe Marzouk Meir Meyuhas Robert Dassa Phillip Nathanson Marcelle Ninio Meir Za’afran There may have been others, including an additional Israeli agent. They were recruited and trained by Avraham Dar, an Israeli agent who went by the name of John Darling, supposedly a British businessman. They were flown to France and then to Israel and trained in use of explosives. Dar’s ring was handed over to Avraham Seidenberg, who had Hebraicized his name to Avri Elad. Elad had a shady past. He had gotten in trouble with the IDF in 1948 for looting a refrigerator from an Arab house, and had been reduced in rank to private. Shimon Peres claims that Elad was a crook even as a young member of Kibbutz Alumot. Peres was then treasurer of the Kibbuts, and he relates that Elad pilfered the contents of Peres’s wallet, which had cash to be used for Kibbutz purchases (Peres, p 104). Elad was nonetheless recruited into the intelligence service owing to lax vetting procedures. He first traveled to Germany, where he posed as a former SS officer named Paul Frank. He apparently managed to discover how wanted Nazi war criminals were able to escape to Arab countries, as well as getting information about Egyptian efforts to recruit former Nazis to help it build an arms industry. However, Israeli intelligence later assessed that at some point Elad became a double agent. The group was activated in July of 1954. The first bombs were placed in post offices on July 15, followed by the USIA libraries in Cairo and Alexandria on July 14. On July 23, more bombs were exploded intwo Cairo cinemas, in the railway terminal and central post office. The entire ring was soon rounded up, either because of information divulged under interrogation or because it had been betrayed. Ostensibly, they were caught when, by chance, incendiary bombs went off in the pocket of Phillip Nathanson while he was waiting in line outside the British owned Rio theater in Alexandria on July 23 (according to Melman and Haber). However, police who arrested Nathanson said they had been tipped off according to some versions. Max (Meir) Binett (or Benett), another member of unit 131, IDF intelligence, was in Egypt on other business. He had previously been an agent in Tehran and Baghdad. In 1952 he was sent to Egypt as a German businessman. Unfortunately, Marcelle Ninio knew at least the license plate number of his automobile, though probably not his name, and either she, or Elad had given him away to the Egyptians. As soon as the group was arrested, Moshe Dayan, then Chief of Staff of the IDF, fired Mordechai Ben Tzur, who had headed unit 131, replacing him with Major Yossi Harel (Hamburger) who was recalled from studies in the United States. Harel may be familiar to readers in another role – he was the commander of the immigrant ship, Exodus, in 1947. Harel ordered the withdrawal of all unit 131 agents operating in Arab countries from the field, until it could be ascertained that nobody was compromised by the arrests. They were only returned in 1956. The Egyptians had announced the arrest of a “13 man spy ring” on October 5, 1954 (Hirst, 1977). The trial in Egypt began on December 11. The Egyptians apparently somehow concluded that the operation was ordered by the Israeli Secretary of Defense, Pinchas Lavon, though they could not possibly have had evidence from the prisoners that proved this claim. It was nonetheless a reasonable assumption. Of the thirteen defendants, two were acquitted. Max Binnet could not risk revealing his identity as an Israeli agent and committed suicide on arrest. Yosef Carmon committed suicide in prison. . Dr. Moshe Marzouk of Cairo and Shmuel Azar of Alexandria, were sentenced to death and hanged in a Cairo prison. Marzouk claimed that he had organized the ring and took full responsibility, apparently to reduce the guilt of the others. Victor Levy and Philip Nathanson, got life sentences. .Marcelle Ninio, a woman, and Robert Dassa, were both sentenced to 15 years in jail. Meir Meyuhas and Meir Za’afran, served seven year jail sentences, were released in 1962 and made their way to Israel, where they lived in obscurity. Israel did not even try to exchange any of the prisoners for Egyptian prisoners of war after the 1956 Suez campaign. In 1968 however, following the 6 day war, they were finally released, on the insistence of Meir Amit, then head of AMAN. The Israeli cabinet had not seen fit to discuss the incident at all until the trial concluded in Egypt. The Israeli press was outraged by the allegations of the Egyptians, and alleged that it was a frame up. Perhaps the truth was not brought to the attention of the cabinet immediately. The details of the affair had remained top secret for many years. However, a version of the affair had been leaked by the army to poet Nathan Alterman, who published a poem that hinted about it esoterically in his column in Davar, the Mapai party newspaper. When the government reviewed the case after the trial, both Pinchas Lavon, who had been minister of defense, and Benjamin Gibli, who headed AMAN, resigned or were forced out. Lavon’s resignation was also influenced by his tendency to order retaliatory attacks without the approval of PM Moshe Sharett. Lavon was replaced by Ben Gurion, who returned from retirement in Sde Boker, and Gibli was replaced by Yehoshafat Harkavi, his deputy. Before his resignation, Gibli sent Elad back to Germany, perhaps to keep him from testifying. A committee of two, composed of Yitzhak Olshan, president of the Supreme court, and Yaakov Dori, first IDF chief of staff, was appointed to investigate the affair. They were unable to answer the question, “who gave the order” because people involved lied systematically and forged documents. Isser Harel, head of the Mossad and the Sherut Bitachon Klali (Shin Bet – the General Security Services, responsible for internal security) in the 1950s, had been suspicious of Elad, because he had gotten out of the affair unscathed. The evidence was suggestive. However, Harel had no proof and he had no real influence in AMAN, which was part of the IDF, or in unit 131. Without proof, he could do little. In January 1955, Elad was ordered back to Israel to testify. Givli tried to travel to Germany and suborn Elad, but the plan was discovered by Dayan, who blocked the trip. Givli managed to send a message by special courier. He also met Elad at the airport and “guided” his testimony. Elad perjured himself and supported Givli’s version, giving a date for the order supposedly issued by Ben Tzur that corresponded with the date given in a letter that had been forged on Givli’s orders. In a book he wrote long after the event, Elad admitted he had lied on the orders of his superiors, claiming that he did it in order to save the image of the IDF. Elad’s perjured testimony was probably crucial in preventing the Olshan-Dori committee from discovering who had given the order for the operation. The committee reported on January 13, 1955: “We were not convinced beyond reasonable doubt that the head of military intelligence [Givli] did not receive the order from the Minister of Defense [Lavon]. At the same time, we are not sure that the Minister of Defense did give the order attributed to him.” (Peres, pp 103-104). Elad was apparently no longer working for military intelligence. However, returned to Germany, ostensibly to care for his father, who was very ill. At the beginning of 1956, he was ordered back to Israel and questioned again by Yossi Harel, but to no avail. Elad again returned to Germany. Apparently without getting permission from his former superiors in AMAN, Elad contacted Colonel Othman Nuri, who was deputy-commander of Egyptian intelligence. In 1957, David Kimche, then a junior Mossad agent, tried to recruit a former Wehrmacht intelligence officer, Robert Jensen. Kimche claimed he was working for a “European intelligence service.” Jensen told Kimche that he knew that he must come from Nuri. An Egyptian agent had told him to tell Nuri that “Wagner sent him.” The name of this “Egyptian agent” according to Jensen, was Paul Frank. Kimche was aghast. Paul Frank was Elad’s cover name. This information reached David Ben-Gurion, now Prime Minister again, the next day. He ordered IDF field security to investigate. Elad was an Israeli hero and had to be treated with kid gloves. Versions differ on how Elad was enticed to come back to Israel. He was offered various business deals according to Ya’akov Hefetz, who had been put in charge of the investigation. Elad claimed in his book that he returned of his own free will to find out the truth in the Lavon affair. In any event, he was invited for interrogation by IDF field security, in the company of Unit 131 commander, Yossi Harel. Yaakov Hefetz, head of IDF field security, interrogated Elad. Microphones broadcast the interrogation to an adjacent room, where Tzvi Aharoni and Victor Cohen, Shin Bet agents, were listening in. Aharoni had been given a special appointment as a senior police officer for this mission. Hefetz, who knew Elad well as a comrade in arms, began by saying, “Avri, I am not speaking to you now as Yankele Hefetz, your friend, but as the head of the IDF Field Security department talking to Captain Avri Seidenberg. Elad cut him off and said, using Yiddish slang mixed with Hebrew, “Never mind the hush hush stuff and get to the point.” Hefetz said, “You do not have to respond, but what you say may be held in evidence against you. Avri, have you ever betrayed your country?” Elad paled, according to Hefetz, and said, most amazingly, “Wait, Wait, let me think about that and remember.” This was enough for Tzvi Aharoni, who cut the interview short, entered the room and said, ” I am arresting you on the grounds of suspicions I hold against you.” Elad was interrogated at length, but denied everything. Victor Cohen, who had known virtually nothing about “operation Sussanah” was amazed, and was also skeptical of Elad’s version of the story. Elad had stayed in Egypt for 12 days after the arrest of the ring. He had sold his De Soto automobile. He even took the trouble to remove the bumper to reduce its tax value. He claimed that he had smuggled out of Egypt film of rockets being developed with the aid of German technicians. All this was incredible. Nonetheless, Elad was still treated with kid gloves. According to Melman and Haber, on the way to his incarceration in Ramle prison, he persuaded his guards to allow him to stop in his apartment. He arranged for a friend, Peter Landesman, to pick up a suitcase from his apartment, and to stop a shipment of personal effects on its way to Hamburg. Landesman put the freight in storage in a locker in Haifa. When he opened the suitcase, he found it was full of top-secret documents and burned them. However, Elad gave his sister, who visited him in jail, a note for Landesman. The note was intercepted by the Shin Bet, and Landesman was interrogated and confessed to burning the documents. The freight originally destined for Hamburg contained Elad’s diary, but there was nothing in it to incriminate him in betrayal of the Israeli spy ring in Egypt. Additional documents, held by his wife in Germany, disappeared. Elad was tried in 1958 and sentenced to ten years in prison for relatively minor offences. The judges noted the strong suspicion that he had betrayed the spy ring, but his role could not be proven. Failure has no fathers. It was time to pass the buck. Ben Gurion insisted that Defense Minister Pinhas Lavon was responsible for the fiasco. Lavon insisted that Colonel Benjamin Givli, a protege of Ben Gurion and head of Aman (Military intelligence) had organized the operation behind his back. Lavon insisted on re-opening the affair. Ben Gurion appointed a committee of three members, Supreme Court Justice Haim Cohen and two army officers. However, Lavon also testified to the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Security Committee. He blamed Givli and accused Givli and others of an elaborate frame-up and cover up. The testimony was leaked, causing a scandal. Lavon claimed Ben-Gurion was persecuting him, and insisted on that his name be cleared. The cabinet backed Lavon. A commission of inquiry consisting of 7 ministers was set up to investigate. They found that Moshe Dayan and Shimon Peres forged a document, apparently the letter giving the order, to incriminate Lavon. On December 24,1960, the Israeli cabinet unanimously exonerated Lavon of all guilt in the ‘disastrous security adventure in Egypt’. According to a New York Times article (New York Times, 10 February 1961) the Attorney General had found ‘conclusive evidence of forgeries as well as false testimony in an earlier inquiry’. This was most likely the testimony of Elad and Givli, and the forged letter that Givli had produced. Ben-Gurion insisted that the committee was politically motivated, and that ministers could not be judges. In the subsequent 1961 elections, Ben-Gurion declared that he would only accept office if Lavon was fired as First Secretary of the Histadrut, Israel’s labor union organization. His demands were met. Lavon was forced to resign, but his supporters organized protest demonstrations. However, in 1964 Ben Gurion claimed there was new evidence and demanded that the government reopen the investigation with a proper judicial commission. According to Shimon Peres, Ben Gurion felt that Lavon had at least ministerial overall responsibility, and that it was unjust for him to place all the blame on Givli, an army officer. However, in the absence of proof, Ben Gurion was content with the ambiguous ruling of Olshan and Drori. When Lavon insisted on exoneration however, Ben-Gurion insisted on some sort of judicial commission. At this time, there was no law regarding judicial investigations in Israel. The procedure for such investigations was established by law only in 1968, as a result of the Lavon Affair. (Peres, pp 110-111). Ben Gurion tried to force his political party Mapai, The Israel Workers Party, to resolve this issue during 1964-1965. Instead, Ben-Gurion was forced to leave the party he had founded. The party cleared and rehabilitated Lavon completely in May 1964. Ben-Gurion founded the Min Hayesod faction with Shimon Peres and Moshe Dayan. This later became the Rafi party which won ten mandates, but then was reduced to four members as the Reshima Mamlachtit party after Dayan and Peres returned to the Labor party in 1967. Ben-Gurion failed to attract a significant number of votes, and retained a permanent enmity to Levy Eshkol, who had replaced him as Prime Minister. In 1967, in part because of this enmity, Ben Gurion and his supporters were able to bring about the enlargement of the Eshkol government just before the 6-Day War. History had passed by the founder of the Israeli state because of this one affair. Ben-Gurion retired to his home in Sde Boker in the Negev, to live in relative obscurity, and influence events from the side lines through his proteges – Moshe Dayan and Shimon Peres, until they returned to the Labor party. In the 1980s, Benjamin Givli’s secretary, Dalia Goldstein, confessed to forging the letter giving the orders, supposedly sent by Ben Tzur, that had been used to incriminate Lavon. The forged letter to Elad activating the ring, was given an incorrect date. As noted, Givli had also suborned Elad to give false testimony. By that time, Ben Gurion was dead. The Labor party, partly owing to the scandal set in motion by the Lavon affair, was out of power. Elad had moved to California and written his memoirs, protesting his innocence. To this day the truth about who gave the orders in the Lavon affair cannot be ascertained. We do not have all the pieces of the puzzle. Probably we never will. In the absence of real information, the Lavon affair has been fertile grounds for speculation by various interested parties, but none of the theories offered fits all the facts. For many years, Israeli leftist parties sided with Lavon against Ben-Gurion, Dayan and Peres. Peres continues to maintain his innocence, and claims that Lavon had become eccentric and held extremist anti-American and anti-western views. Rumor claims that Lavon was an alcoholic. The affair continues to do damage to this day, because every bigot, crank and eccentric can use it to prove their favorite contention. Most recently, it has been used to “prove” that Israel engineered the Al-Qaida terror attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001. Curiously, the alleged motivation for the operation has not been questioned. Who could really have benefited had it been successful? Shabtai Tevet, Ben Gurion’s biographer, stated that the assignment was “To undermine Western confidence in the existing [Egyptian] regime by generating public insecurity and actions to bring about arrests, demonstrations, and acts of revenge, while totally concealing the Israeli factor. The team was accordingly urged to avoid detection, so that suspicion would fall on the Muslim Brotherhood, the Communists, ‘unspecified malcontents’ or ‘local nationalists’.” (Tevet, p. 81). “The team was.. urged to avoid detection” is an absurd statement. Did Tevet mean to imply that otherwise, Israeli espionage teams are not urged to avoid detection? Of course it is a good idea to avoid detection if you are Israeli agents blowing up public and foreign facilities in an Arab country. The team would hardly need urging on that score. But if secrecy was of the essence, why wasn’t the operation compartmentalized? Why weren’t team members taught to resist torture? These techniques were certainly known to the Israeli intelligence establishment, and had been used in the preparation of paratroopers sent behind Nazi lines in WW II. On examination, the motives offered are far-fetched. The ostensible purpose was to prevent the withdrawal of British occupying forces from Suez, which would supposedly leave Israeli defenses naked to Egyptian attack. Firstly, the British were in no position to stop an Egyptian attack with their small occupation force. Secondly, if, as often claimed, the affair was the work of the Israeli activist faction, it made no sense. The activists wanted decisive action against Egypt. This was not possible as long as the British were in Suez, in close proximity to Sinai and defending the canal. With the British gone, and no longer committed to defense of Egypt and the canal, the way became open to contemplate a large scale military operation such as the Sinai campaign. The possible gains from the bombings carried out by this group would in any case have been minor. There is no reason to assume the US would necessarily have blamed the Egyptian government for activities of opposition as some claim (See for example, Hirst, 1977). On the contrary, Nasser could claim he was carrying out a pro-Western policy against the wishes of the opposition, and that removal of British troops was needed to satisfy anti-Western sentiment. The British pullout was not dependent on the stability of the Egyptian regime. Egypt had just undergone a revolution that was not quite completed, and was known to be unstable anyway. It is a fact that several of the bombs were in fact set off, but American and British policy were totally unaffected. In all, it is extremely doubtful if the operation would have accomplished anything even if the ring had not been caught. Even had they been convinced that Nasser’s regime was unstable, the US and Britain tend to prop up their unstable allies, not abandon them. That could have been easily foreseen Why then, would Israel risk the safety of Egyptian Jews, its relations with the US and Britain and its agents? The argument that Lavon was a scapegoat of “activists” who wanted him out of the way so that they could perform more reprisal raids doesn’t make sense either, because Lavon was apparently an extreme hawk. If Givli acted on the orders of Dayan in forging the letter, then why did Dayan try to stop him from coordinating testimony with Elad, as Melman and Haber claim? If Givli acted on his own, or if in reality Lavon had given the order, what were their motivations? Is it possible that Givli was somehow involved with Elad’s activities as a double agent, that Elad was indeed trying to raise money for his sick father, but selling real secrets instead of fake ones as he claimed? Givli might have been sharing profits with Elad, and may have seen the need to cover his tracks. A foreign power who knew about the ring may have induced Elad or Givli to activate it in order to embarrass Israel or to cause an Egyptian rift with the west, or to provide Egypt for an excuse for stepping up infiltration against Israel. All of these were in fact direct or indirect consequences of the fiasco, and they could have been easily foreseen, especially since whoever instigated it knew about the ring. Given the contempt of Israeli intelligence for Arab intelligence services, and their false sense of security regarding foreign penetration in general, it is doubtful that this possibility was ever investigated. Given the number of espionage fiascos due to penetration by foreign agents in those years, it is a possibility that should have been investigated. Ami Isseroff Sources Hirst, David, The Gun and the Olive Branch, 1977. Melman, Yossi and Haber, Eitan, The Spies: Israel’s Counter Espionage Wars (Hameraglim: Parashot Rigul Bimdinat Yisrael), Miskal – Yediot Ahronot and Chemed Books, Tel-Aviv, 2002, pp 33-50. (Hebrew only) Peres, Shimon, Battling for Peace, Orion, 1995, pp 98-115. Tevet, S. Ben-Gurion’s Spy, Columbia University Press, 1996.

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June 16, 2016   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

FSI | CISAC – The Lavon Affair: How a false-flag operation …

Abstract The Lavon Affair, a failed Israeli covert operation directed against Egypt in 1954, triggered a chain of events that have had profound consequences for power relationships in the Middle East; the affairs effects still reverberate today. Those events included a public trial and conviction of eight Egyptian Jews who carried out the covert operation, two of whom were subsequently executed; a retaliatory military incursion by Israel into Gaza that killed 39 Egyptians; a subsequent EgyptianSoviet arms deal that angered American and British leaders, who then withdrew previously pledged support for the building of the Aswan Dam; the announced nationalization of the Suez Canal by Nasser in retaliation for the withdrawn support; and the subsequent failed invasion of Egypt by Israel, France, and Britain in an attempt to topple Nasser. In the wake of that failed invasion, France expanded and accelerated its ongoing nuclear cooperation with Israel, which eventually enabled the Jewish state to build nuclear weapons.

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May 20, 2015   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

THE LAVON AFFAIR – IS HISTORY REPEATING ITSELF?

In 1954, Israeli agents working in Egypt planted bombs in several buildings, including a United States diplomatic facility, and left evidence behind implicating Egyptian Muslims as the culprits. The ruse would have worked, had not one of the bombs detonated prematurely, allowing the Egyptians to capture and identify one of the bombers, which in turn led to the round up of an Israeli spy ring. Some of the spies were from Israel, while others were recruited from the local Jewish population. Israel responded to the scandal with claims in the media that there was no spy ring, that it was all a hoax perpetrated by “anti-Semites”. But as the public trial progressed, it was evident that Israel had indeed been behind the bombing. Eventually, Israeli’s Defense Minister Pinhas Lavon was brought down by the scandal, although it appears that he was himself the victim of a frame-up by the real authors of the bombing project, code named “Operation Susannah.” It is therefore a fact that Israel has a prior history of setting off bombs with the intent to blame Arabs for them. This is not the only example of a “False Flag” operation designed to trick the United States into attacking Israel’s enemies. According to Victor Ostrovsky, a Mossad defector now living in Canada, Ronald Reagan was tricked into bombing Libya by means of a radio transmitter smuggled into Tripoli by the Mossad, which broadcast messages designed to fool the United States into thinking Libya was about to launch a massive terror attack on the west. On the basis of this fake evidence, the US bombed Libya, killing Khadaffi’s daughter. The Jews of Iraq is a story by a Jewish writer revealing yet another false flag operation where Israelis used bombs and planted the blame on Arabs More recently, Captain Ward Boston, who served as senior legal counsel for the Navy’s Court of Inquiry into the Israeli attack on USS Liberty, has come forward to report that the Court of Inquiry was ORDERED to conclude that the attack was an accident by President Lyndon Johnson. In hindsight, given the use of unmarked aircraft and boats by Israel during the actual attack, it appears that Israel intended to sink the US ship and frame Egypt for the attack, tricking the US into the war against Egypt.

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May 16, 2015   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

lavon affair – Tag Archive | Veterans Today

By Kevin Barrett on August 23, 2013 9-11, 9/11, assad, bollyn, chemical weapons, Ehud Barak, false flag, israel, lavon affair, netanyahu, Syria, uss liberty, zionism Syria After big Israeli false-flags, Israeli leaders incriminate themselves by knowing too much too soon. By Kevin Barrett on March 1, 2013 9/11, chertoff, conspiracy, dancing israelis, israel, lavon affair, mike harari, mossad, netanyahu, Terrorism, Twin Towers Of Interest For more than eleven years, Israel has been wildly celebrating the success of its 9/11 operation against the United States of America. By Dr. Ashraf Ezzat on August 21, 2011 aipac, Dr. Ashraf Ezzat, lavon affair, Muslim Brotherhood, October 1973 War, Sinai, uss liberty Egypt, Israel, World The toppling and the trial of Mubarak has altered scenarios that were already underway and hindered plans for the Middle East that were in the making under the auspices of ardent Zionists in Washington, Cairo and Tel Aviv. By Veterans Today on January 24, 2011 9/11, bush, dancing israelis, freedom flotilla, israel, lavon affair, mossad, netanyahu, uss liberty 9/11, WarZone 9/11Mission Accomplished? By Nila Sagadevan for Veterans Today The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. Edmund Burke Having researched the 9/11 cover-up full-time for several years and done my bit as an activist, I had finally decided to withdraw in utter frustration at my seeming [] By Dr. Ashraf Ezzat on January 12, 2011 Ashraf Ezzat, Culture, Dr. Ashraf Ezzat, Egypt, israel, lavon affair, mossad, Muslim Brotherhood World The terrorist attack was highly planned and professionally executed and the culprits seemed to have worked out a thoroughly detailed operation but they missed out on one vital detail, namely the culture and traditions of Egyptians

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March 16, 2015   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Local playwright premieres new comedy

What happens when you feel the world has left you behind and you’re at a loss with all the changes around you? Lawrence Fox has written a tongue-in-cheek and somewhat autobiographical comedy about “a poor schlepp who has lived in Bethlehem all his life and now is an senior citizen and does not understand what’s happening.” The show, “But I’m Still Slightly Confused,” premieres Friday at the Blast Furnace Room at the ArtsQuest Center in Bethlehem. Fox, an attorney in Bethlehem, says he was seeing humorous things happening in his life and wanted to memorialize them. “There is a little poetic license but most of it is true,” he says. Fox says the play’s nine scenes confront eclectic things unique to the Lehigh Valley, from the video games in the bathroom at Coca-Cola Park to the building of a casino on the site of the former Bethlehem Steel plant. Fox says his third comedy to be produced in the area is his funniest. “I am very proud of it,” he says. For the first time, Fox also acts. He plays Reggy, a senior citizen who feels he is a stranger in an alien world where he is the only person who still drives a car with hand-crank windows, who uses a AAA road map, who pays for gas with cash and sits in line to pay tolls because he doesn’t have an EZPass. The play also includes “a mandatory trial scene,” which he includes in all his plays. The play is directed by Ralph Montesano, who directed Fox’s previous plays. “He’s a genius,” Fox says of Montesano, adding that he also added significant sound effects that have enhanced the play.

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March 12, 2015   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Pinhas Lavon – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pinhas Lavon (Hebrew: , 12 July 1904 24 January 1976) was an Israeli politician, minister and labor leader, best known for the Lavon Affair. Lavon was born as Pinhas Lubianiker in Kopychyntsi in what was previously Galicia in Austria-Hungary (now in Ukraine). He studied law at the University of Lviv, where he organized Histadrut organizations in the region. He made aliyah and moved to Mandate Palestine in 1929. Lavon was elected to the first Knesset in 1949, and served briefly as the leader of the Histadrut in 194950. He was appointed Minister of Agriculture in David Ben-Gurion’s second government. He retained his seat in the 1951 elections, and in 1952 was appointed Minister without Portfolio. Following Ben-Gurion’s resignation, he was appointed Minister of Defense in 1954. However, he resigned from the cabinet after he was accused of authorizing an Israeli false flag operation in Egypt, which came to be known as the Lavon Affair. Nevertheless, he remained an MK following elections in 1955 and 1959 and returned to the leadership of the Histadrut from 1956 to 1961. Lavon was later absolved of any involvement in the Egyptian bombings. He retired from public life in 1964 after a long-standing discord with Ben-Gurion and died in Tel Aviv in 1976.[1] During his tenure, Lavon strained relations with the Chief of Staff of the IDF Moshe Dayan by holding important policy meetings without Dayan being present, directly contacting IDF officers without following the established chain of command and attempting to scuttle Israeli purchases of arms from France. The culmination came when Operation Susannah (as the Lavon affair was officially called) was launched when Dayan was out of the country.

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February 6, 2015   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Operation Himmler? The Reichstag fire? The Lavon Affair …

“If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the guise of fighting a foreign enemy.” – U.S. President James Madison “Terrorism is the best political weapon for nothing drives people harder than a fear of sudden death”. – Adolph Hitler “Why of course the people don’t want war … But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy, or a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship … Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is to tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country.” – Hermann Goering, Nazi leader. Well, as documented by the New York Times, Iranians working for the C.I.A. in the 1950’s posed as Communists and staged bombings in Iran in order to turn the country against its democratically-elected president (see also this essay). And, as confirmed by a former Italian Prime Minister, an Italian judge, and the former head of Italian counterintelligence, NATO, with the help of the Pentagon and CIA, carried out terror bombings in Italy and blamed the communists, in order torally peoples support for their governments in Europe in their fight against communism. As one participant in this formerly-secret program stated: “You had to attack civilians, people, women, children, innocent people, unknown people far removed from any political game. The reason was quite simple. They were supposed to force these people, the Italian public, to turn to the state to ask for greater security.” Moreover,recently declassified documents show that in the 1960’s, the American Joint Chiefs of Staff signed off on a plan to blow up AMERICAN airplanes (using an elaborate plan involving the switching of airplanes), and also to commit terrorist acts on American soil, and then to blame it on the Cubans in order to justify an invasion of Cuba. If you view no other links in this article, please read the following ABC news report; the official documents; and watchthis interview with the former Washington Investigative Producer for ABC’s World News Tonight with Peter Jennings. Return to the top

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February 6, 2015   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Fug the Show: Hart of Dixie recap, season 4, episode 2

In which everyone is REALLY REALLY orange again. Did Hart of Dixie get a special deal on bronzer this season? That said: this was a very satisfying episode on many levels. Last week, Zoe told Wade she was having his baby and he drunkenly stumbled home to Lavon and George and told them. Then he drunkenly stumbled BACK over to Zoes and spent the night outside her cottage, trying to get her to come out and talk to him: She did not, because she spent the night at Lavons Mansion of Plentiful Breakfast Items. (George is also there. Maybe George also slept over, because everyone was drunk? Lets not ask WHY Zoe decided to sleep over at Lavons instead of in her own bed, or how it was finagled that she was to sleep there without Wade who, last we saw, was WITH Lavon finding out. Secret text messages? Whatever. This is not important. But this is also why I once spent an hour trying to figure out the configuration of a room in The Royal We to determine where everyone was standing for one extremely minor moment that eventually got cut. I LOVE LOGISTICS. This is also why someone at a former job in my former life once rudely referred to me as the continuity Nazi. PERSONALLY I dont think a careful eye on continuity in storytelling IS A BAD THING BUT ANYWAY.) Lets just bask in the many many many breakfast items on order at The House of Lavon: As we discussed last week, and have done before, this is one of the many reasons that Lavon should not, in any just world, be single ever. He is: handsome, tall, charming, a former football mega-star, the mayor, owner of a glorious home, a snappy dresser, kind, a very good friend, a great cook, and unfailingly generous. (George, while also a decent dude, HAS left a woman at the altar, which might account for some of his romantic roadblocks. Bad PR.) So, anyway, Wade and Zoe of course run into each other over the Breakfast for A Thousand By Mayor Lavon Hayes, and Wade is basically a total idiot, although hes TRYING to have the right response to the news of his forthcoming spawn. George and Lavon make all kinds of humorous faces as Wade does things like offer to teach the baby to fish and noting that although he knows nothing about babies, Zoe is a doctor and she can do all the work. Its like a car crash. I cant look away, Lavon says. Wade says he wants to get back together, and Zoebasically storms off again. And George and Lavon are like, DUDE WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU? And Wade is like, I know. Im the worst. I do think this is slightly insane. We all know theyre getting back together. They love each other, and theyre having a baby. And they love each other. And they live in the same compound. Now, of course, its all about the journey and actually SPOILER the getting back together happens tonight, so thats exciting and the back and forth cant really make me that irked, not really, because at least now its done, and I would have complained if there HADNT been some back and forth, so there you go. Of other import: Lavons monogrammed PJs have taught me that his middle initial is R. What do we think that stands for? Lavon Romeo Hayes? While we ponder this, Lemon is over at the Rammer Jammer berating Carl Winslow to give up his source for the story that blew open the fact that her fake relationship with Hot Henry was in fact fake, but Carl Winslow would NEVER GIVE UP HIS SOURCES!

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January 29, 2015   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Lavon Affair | Day’s World

The Lavon Affair refers to a failed Israeli covert operation, code named Operation Susannah, conducted in Egypt in the Summer of 1954. As part of the false flag operation,[1] a group of Egyptian Jews were recruited by Israeli military intelligenceto plant bombs inside Egyptian, American and British-owned civilian targets, cinemas, libraries and American educational centers. The bombs were timed to detonate several hours after closing time. The attacks were to be blamed on the Muslim Brotherhood, Egyptian Communists, unspecified malcontents or local nationalists with the aim of creating a climate of sufficient violence and instability to induce the British government to retain its occupying troops in Egypts Suez Canal zone.[2]The operation caused no casualties, except for those members of the cell who committed suicide after being captured. The operation ultimately became known as the Lavon Affair after the Israeli defense minister Pinhas Lavon was forced to resign as a consequence of the incident. Before Lavons resignation, the incident had been euphemistically referred to in Israel as the Unfortunate Affair or The Bad Business (Hebrew: , Esek HaBish). After Israel publicly denied any involvement in the incident for 51 years, the surviving agents were officially honored in 2005 by being awarded certificates of appreciation by Israeli President Moshe Katzav.[3] Operation Susannah and the Lavon Affair turned out to be disastrous for Israel in several ways:

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December 2, 2014   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed


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