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The Lavon Affair Jewish Terror – Video



The Lavon Affair Jewish Terror
The Lavon Affair Jewish Terror.

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Israel Shoots Down Drone Lesbian Kiss Bangladesh 300 DEAD – Video



Israel Shoots Down Drone Lesbian Kiss Bangladesh 300 DEAD
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By: Frederick Williams

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PROPHECY ALERT Archaeologists Find King David s Palace – Video



PROPHECY ALERT Archaeologists Find King David s Palace
More at : https://www.youtube.com/user/WayToWor… Bolshevism, Gaza, Genocide, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jew World Order, Jews, Libya, Max Igan, middle east, Neocons, Palestine, Syria, USA, War,…

By: Ray Davies

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Lavon Affair FREE Lavon Affair information …

1960s political crisis in israel sparked by the security “mishap” of 1954.

The Lavon Affair was a dramatic and divisive political crisis that shook the entire Israeli political system, led to the resignation of prime minister David Ben-Gurion in July 1963, and caused major shifts in political alignments in the state. Its roots lay in what the Israeli press nicknamed Esek ha-Bish (the “Mishap”). A dormant group of Israeli-trained Egyptian Jews who were prepared for missions of espionage and sabotage in the event of war were ill-advisedly activated in June 1954 under orders from Colonel Benjamin Gibli (Givly), the head of the Intelligence Division of the Israeli Defense Forces. They were instructed to detonate firebombs in a few U.S. and British cultural institutions in Cairo and Alexandria in order to disrupt the negotiations, which were nearing conclusion, on the evacuation of British troops from bases along the Suez Canal. The group was captured by Egyptian security services. Two of the leading saboteurs were sentenced and hanged, an Israeli spy committed suicide in prison, and the others were sentenced to long terms of imprisonment.

Colonel Gibli maintained that he had received orders from Pinhas Lavon, who at the time was replacing Ben-Gurion as minister of defense. A secret inquiry committee appointed by the government of Moshe Sharett could not reach a clear judgment, and both Gibli and Lavon were obliged to resign their respective posts.

Four years later the commander of the special unit in charge of the operation in Egypt disclosed that one of the documents presented to the 1954 cabinet inquiry committee was forged. The attorney general was asked by Ben-Gurion to look into these allegations. Colonel Gibli admitted the forgery but continued to claim that he had received the order orally from Lavon, and that he had been compelled to forge the document when he realized that Lavon was trying to put all the blame on him. Lavon, who was then serving as secretary-general of the Histadrut, Israel’s powerful trade-union umbrella organization, demanded a public exoneration from Ben-Gurion, who declined to give it, insisting that the affair had to be subjected to a judicial investigation.

Despite strict censorship, the incident became known under different euphemisms and code names to the general public, stirring up a political crisis within and outside of the Labor Party. The entire country was divided between those who supported Ben-Gurion’s position and those who opposed him. The aging prime minister had angered the second generation of party leaders by promoting a group of still younger people such as Moshe Dayan and Shimon Peres to important posts in the government, jumping over the heads of his erstwhile loyal lieutenants. For his part, Ben-Gurion was enraged that Lavon had brought his grievances to different forums outside of the party and had mobilized pressure by parties and newspapers that sought to weaken Labor’s long-standing political dominance.

In order to quiet things down, the minister of finance, Levi Eshkol, by then the most powerful political figure besides Ben-Gurion, asked the minister of justice, Pinhas Rosen, to lead a ministerial committee of seven to determine how to deal with Lavon’s demand for exhonoration and to bring the crisis to an end. This committee ruled that Lavon had not given the order for the sabotage action and that the document was indeed a forgery. But BenGurion was indignant and threatened to resign if Lavon did not quit his post at the Histadrut. Ben-Gurion, the “Old Man,” was still powerful enough to impose his will on the party’s central committee, but the entire affair weakened his standing among most of his party’s elite. Eshkol refused to retract the committee’s exonerating verdict and Ben-Gurion continued to demand a judicial inquiry. Additional friction ensued between BenGurion and the party elite, led by Golda Meir, minister of foreign affairs, who until then had been a long-time loyal supporter of Ben-Gurion. These frictions included a bitter controversy over Israel’s relations with West Germany and over the development of the Israeli nuclear option.

The tired and embittered seventy-seven-year-old Ben-Gurion resigned in June 1963. Levi Eshkol replaced him as prime minister and minister of defense. In the 1965 elections Ben-Gurion and some of his supporters in the Lavon Affair split from the Labor Party and formed a new party, Rafi (List of Israeli Workers). This effectively marked the end of Ben-Gurion’s political career.

see also ben-gurion, david; israel: political parties in; lavon, pinhas.

Lucas, Noah. The Modern History of Israel. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1974.

Sachar, Howard. A History of Israel from the Rise of Zionism to Our Time. New York: Knopf, 1988.

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Lynn Burkhead Texoma Outdoors: Hooked on fishing, Bobo aims to give back

(Editors Note: This is the first in a series of stories profiling some of the leading men and women in the outdoors world across Texomaland.)

Fishing is a way of life for Denison resident Chris Bobo.

For starters, its how the 27-year old husband and father of one makes his weekly paycheck.

I have been working in outdoors retail for nearly 10 years now and currently Im the hunting and fishing manager at Academy Sports and Outdoors, said Bobo, who grew up in Sherman and went to Texoma Christian School.

Believe it or not, I actually began (my career) over at Gander Mountain a number of years ago as a part-time fishing associate. I had previously worked as a waiter at a local restaurant but I could not pass up working with my passion and surrounding myself with fishing on a daily basis.

When hes not stocking and selling rods, reels, line, and lures, youll often find Bobo on a local lake in his bass boat.

Thats where the Denison man fishes for fun, helps introduce others to the sport, and competes in local and regional tournaments.

Bobos love affair with fishing began a quarter of a century ago on trips to various North Texas water bodies with his dad Steve Bobo.

I was lucky to grow up with a father that was passionate about the outdoors, said Chris. He got me involved at a young age and helped fuel my love of the outdoors. I owe any success Ive had in bass fishing to him.

Trips with his grandfather Freddy Covington didnt hurt either.

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February 21, 2014   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

The Lavon Affair – MidEastWeb

Israel and Terror in Egypt

The Lavon affair (“Esek Habish” – the shameful affair) was one of the most bizarre chapters in Israeli history. In 1954, the Israeli secret service set up a spy ring in Egypt, with the purpose of blowing up US and British targets. The operation was code-named “Susanah.” The terrorist hits were to be blamed on the regime of Egyptian President Gamal Abdul Nasser, with the purpose of alienating the US and Britain from Egypt and Nasser and somehow preventing Egyptian nationalization of the Suez canal. The ring was discovered. Strict censorship ensured that that the Israeli public officially knew little or nothing of the affair for many years. Names were not mentioned, the affair was called “Esek Bish” – the affair of shame, and key protagonists were referred to as “X” and “the third man.” Unofficially and through leaks, most people knew at least the outlines of the affair.

No ingredient was omitted that could make this affair a totally morally repugnant fiasco. The affair occurred during a difficult time in Israel. Terrorist raids on Israel and reprisals had provoked a public debate about the efficacy of reprisals. David Ben-Gurion, the founding Prime Minister, had retired to his kibbutz, Sde Boker, in September 1953 claiming fatigue and age. In October 1954, an Israeli reprisal raid in Qibieh, in the West Bank, lead by Ariel Sharon, had miscarried, resulting in the death of 69 civilians. An acrimonious debate was kindled between “activists” who advocated continuing such raids, and doves, led by PM Sharett, who were against them. It was presumed that the “activists,” proteges of Ben Gurion, and in particular Moshe Dayan who was IDF Chief of Staff, initiated the operation on the orders of Ben Gurion. Ben Gurion, on the other hand, disowned Defense Minister Lavon, and claimed that Lavon had given the orders. The left wing of the Labor party adopted the cause of Lavon. The right adopted the cause of Ben Gurion, Shimon Peres and Moshe Dayan. Nothing definite could ever be proven.

The prisoners of the Lavon affair remained forgotten in Egyptian jails, and were not exchanged after the Sinai campaign. Since they were mostly Sephardi Jews, their cause became a cause celebre of those who claimed that Israel, and in particular the Mapai party, discriminated against Sephardi Jews.

The arrest of the ring resulted in an affair that dominated Israeli politics for over a decade. Israel was embarrassed, as it had been caught trying to harm American and British interests for no reason and in instigating terror attacks against innocent targets. The spies who were not executed were left to rot in Egyptian jails. Meanwhile, a wave of persecution forced the emigration of tens of thousands of Jews from Egypt, leaving behind property, memories and roots. Investigations in Israel led to a trail of forged documents and perjured testimony, as everyone involved tried to implicate others. To all of the above would be added the ignominy of betrayal, as it became evident eventually that Israeli agent Avri Seidenberg (Avri Elad) had probably betrayed the operation to the Egyptians.

The spy ring was not run by the Israeli Mossad intelligence service, but rather by unit 131 of AMAN (IDF intelligence). The rationale behind creation of this group was that they would be local sleeper agents, trained in various techniques, who would remain in place and be activated only in case of war. At some point, someone decided, for unknown reasons, to activate the ring without waiting for war.

In those days the intelligence services were comparatively inexperienced, under budgeted and unprofessional, though the Mossad was to achieve notable success, mainly through luck, such as obtaining a copy of the twentieth party congress speech of Soviet Premier Krushchev. Israeli intelligence was easy to infiltrate. They had a relatively low opinion of intelligence services of Arab countries and were therefore not on their guard. Their vetting procedures for new agents were poor. Soviet and other intelligence agencies also had no little trouble recruiting agents among new immigrants.

The Egyptian spies were poorly compartmentalized. They were not trained to resist torture. The operation was not compartmentalized: the spies knew each other’s identities. Thus, there was a danger that under interrogation, any one of them could betray the entire group. Worse, it is now believed that in fact they were betrayed by the Israeli agent in charge of the operation. The sensational revelations about the spy ring endangered the entire Egyptian Jewish community, which numbered about 50,000, as well as the credibility of Israel.

The Egyptian Jews known to have been recruited for the spy ring were:

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‘Hart Of Dixie’ winter premiere recap

Tonight on The CW The Hart of Dixie aired its Season 3 Episode 9 episode titled, “Something to Talk About,” which was a great start to the new year. Rose Hattenbarger is back. The episode started with Zoe, Zoe’s cousin Vivian Wilkes, and Zoe’s boyfriend Joel walking in the town of Bluebell after a tennis match. Wade walks by and Vivian looks at him. It is obvious that both Vivian and Wade like each other, from the way they are staring at each other, to the way that both thinks of dating the other. This leads to Zoe trying to set Vivian up with anyone but Wade.

Zoe walks with Rose listening to Rose wonder what she should do seeing as her other classmates have accomplished more things than she has that will get them into college. Zoe tells her about internships, which Rose agrees with. Rose then gets an internship with Dash DeWitt.

Meanwhile Lavon and George meet with the Mayor of Fillmore, Tod Gainey, and his lawyer Scooter McGreevey to discuss Bluebell and Fillmore merging together to become one big city. Gainey is for it, while Lavon is not. George and Lavon with the help of Tansy, go to a luau party held by Mayor Gainey to find information that could help them find a reason as to why Mayor Gainey would want to merge Fillmore with Bluebell. Hoping to find that Fillmore is bankrupt as the reason, they are shocked to find that the real reason is because Mayor Gainey wants to take over Bluebell and put a “Gainey Shopping Mall” in Bluebell’s town square.

Back in Bluebell to stop Dash DeWitt and Rose from questioning the merger, Zoe, Joel, Wade, and Annabeth plan to spread a rumor. Wade leaves ignoring Zoe to go on his date with Vivian Wilkes. Annabeth and Zoe decide on Annabeth and Joel having a fake affair. In phase 1 of the plan Zoe talks of Joel and Annabeth “kissing.” Annabeth then sends them anonymously to dash. Going their separate ways Joel and Zoe go to the Rammer Jammed where everyone goes silent as phase 2 of their plan has started. Dash published the photos and Zoe ends up throwing water on Joel twice.

Outside Zoe runs into Vivian, who was walking. She had a great time with Wade, Vivian says “I heard all the rumors about Wade. I grew up two towns over, but the Wade I was with tonight, he was not that guy.” Vivian, knowing that Zoe had dated Wade, asks Zoe what she thinks. Zoe pleads the fifth, deciding it’s best not to say anything, that she is Switzerland, neutral. Zoe is sure that Vivian doesn’t understand her.

The next day Rose sees Lavon and Annabeth kissing. She calls Dash. Then we see her at the RammerJammer with Zoe and tells Zoe that she told Dash about the whole affair and it must have been made up to keep them from asking about the merger. Zoe tells Rose she has to tell Lavon.

Wade confronts Zoe about Vivian as she is walking. Zoe explains, but Wade basically says that not saying anything is worse than saying something, that Zoe can never forgive him for what he did, but that he wasn’t the only one that ended their relationship.

Rose is able to get to Lavon and George before the town meeting, however, it is already too late. Dash posted the truth on his blog. Everyone at the town is angry at Lavon for hiding the truth about the merger. Admitting that the merger with Fillmore is still a threat, he tells the people of Bluebell not to panic, but they do.

Zoe speaks with Vivian. She tells her she is happy with Joel and admits that the break up was just as much as her fault as it was Wade’s, that Wade can be a great person if he’s with the right person. Zoe leaves and meets Joel at the Rammer Jammer.

At the Rammer Jammer Zoe and Joel are sitting at a table. Rose comes in with good news about an article she pitched to the editor of the Huffington Post about the “Murky ethics of journalism.” She sits with them. Wade passes by happily giving them drinks on the house. Rose asks for white wine as well because it’s something journalists drink. She takes Zoe’s drink when she’s not looking. Zoe than takes it back and the episode ends.

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‘Hart Of Dixie’ winter premiere recap

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‘Hart of Dixie’ recap: Zoe’s level of denial about her feelings for Wade reaches epic proportions

We knew that with the introduction of Wade and Vivian’s relationship, “Zade” would hit a major roadblock for a while on “Hart of Dixie.” But oh my god, I have never wanted to reach through my TV and strangle a character more than I did watching Monday (Jan. 13) night’s midseason premiere, “Something to Talk About,” when Zoe’s level of denial about her feelings for Wade reached epic proportions.

We all know how she feels about her ex: she’s still in love with Wade. Wade knows it. Annabeth now knows it. Joel finally got an inkling of it. Vivian even touched on it when she was talking to Zoe. And yet … Zoe continues to deny having any kind of feelings for Wade. At all. And that’s just dumb.

So how did we even get to this point? Zoe sees that there’s something brewing between Vivian and Wade, and she tries to nip it in the butt before anything actually happens between her cousin and her ex. But of course she denies the real reason why she’s so against it. She claims over and over again that she wants to “save Vivian from getting hurt by Wade and his mistakes.” I mean. This is just the flimsiest excuse ever, but let’s roll with it, because it’s only going to get more ridiculous from here on out.

Too bad Joel doesn’t get the memo that he’s supposed to be nixing any relationship between Wade and Vivian, and encourages Wade to ask her out, despite the fact that Zoe worked so hard at setting up a date for Vivian with eligible bachelor Carter Covington. Zoe marches straight to the Rammer Jammer to tell Wade that it’s a bad idea to date Vivian, but Wade knew Zoe wouldn’t approve — for the real reason, not her lame excuse that she’s sticking to — and just laughs in her face at her claim to want to save Vivian when she confronts him. Oh honey, nice try. But the date is a go.

In other rocky relationship news, Tansy has brought some major trouble for George and Lynly’s relationship (Wooo!). Lavon notices that George has been avoiding eating out at restaurants with Lynly for the past week (ahem, because Tansy now works at the Rammer Jammer), and mistakenly pushes George into taking Lynly out to breakfast, even though he was trying to avoid Tansy and be noble and stay true to his girlfriend and all that. This isn’t going to end well, especially since even though he takes Lynly to Buttersticks to avoid the Rammer Jammer, Tansy was there getting coffee anyways. Oops. Lynly seems to accept George’s reasoning for avoiding Tansy, but she can sense there’s something still going on between the two exes.

Unfortunately, George’s romantic life isn’t the only thing giving him trouble these days. It turns out, the governor of Alabama believes that if less populated towns merge with their neighbors, it would save the state some money. At the meeting with Fillmore’s Mayor Gainey and his lawyer (and Tansy’s new boyfriend) Scooter McGreavy, Fillmore surprisingly supports the merger — fast tracking it — but Lavon and George are staunchly against it. They approach Tansy for help figuring out why Bluebell’s enemy town is pro-merging, since she has a foot in both towns — you know, because she’s dating Fillmore’s lawyer but lives in Bluebell.

Tansy spills all she knows about what Scooter’s been up to, and George puts it together that Fillmore is bankrupt and that’s why they’re so gung-ho for the merger — they can use Bluebell’s funds if they’re the same town. Lavon and George use Tansy as a distraction to sneak into Scooter’s office to go through his files to confirm that Fillmore’s bankrupt, and Lavon realizes during the mission that pushing Tansy and George together was probably not smart when it comes to his cousin Lynly’s heart. The chemistry between George and Tansy is just off the charts. But he puts his misgivings on hold when they figure out that Fillmore is far from bankrupt. Turns out, Fillmore just wants to take over Bluebell entirely — not merge with them — and put up a giant mall smack dab in the middle of Blubell’s town square. There’s more at stake in this merger than they previously thought.

In order to distract the town from finding out about the merger and panicking, Annabeth and Zoe have the idea to introduce a new (fake) scandal instead. They enlist the help of Wade of Joel, and decide to spread the rumor that AB and Joel had an affair. Wade opts out due to his date with Vivian (and his quota for fake relationships had already been filled), and Joel and AB notice how irrational Zoe is acting about their date. Everyone else can see why Zoe is really against Wade and Vivian, so how long will it take her to admit it?

Apparently, quite a long time. Vivian gushes to Zoe that she had a blast with Wade on their date and he seems more mature than the rumors she heard about him. She really likes him, but since she’s a single mother going through a divorce she can’t jump into a new relationship with no hesitation, so she asks Zoe if she should invest her time and emotions in Wade. Zoe, realizing she’s biased, refuses to take a side — though Vivian takes her neutrality as a warning not to date Wade.

Wade confronts Zoe after Vivian rejects him because he knew the pint-sized doc had something to do with it, and he drops some major truth bombs on her: everyone else in town has realized Wade has changed since he hurt Zoe, but Zoe still insists on punishing Wade for hurting her. He then finally says what we’ve all been thinking all season long: Zoe needs to take a long and hard look in the mirror and think about why she doesn’t want Wade dating someone so close to her, even though they had a great time together and both like each other.

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The Lavon Affair – ARI Watch

The year is 1954, the place Egypt. Gamul Abdul-Nasser, an army officer, overthrew the monarchy of King Farouk two years before. After ages of religious rule Nassers regime is secular, though socialist, and he has the support of the Egyptian people. The United States government, ever unwilling to mind its own business, supports Nasser with foreign aid.

Israel fears a strong Egypt. David Ben-Gurion, now retired at his kibbutz (collective farm) after serving as the first prime minister of Israel, and Israeli military intelligence conceive a plan to turn the United States against Egypt.[*] Israeli military intelligence has already laid the groundwork: Israeli agents have infiltrated Egyptian society and recruited a dozen or so Egyptian Jews. These have been trained in Israel and deployed back in Egypt, the original idea being to create a fifth column in a future war against Egypt. But Ben-Gurion has another use for the spies: bomb American and British buildings and plant evidence implicating Egyptians, specifically a group called the Muslim Brotherhood which opposes Nassers regime. The stupid Americans will think the Egyptians did it. In response the Americans will temper their support for Nasser.

Why would the Americans respond that way? that is, why would the Israelis think the Americans would respond that way is a matter for conjecture. Perhaps the Israelis believe that the Americans will think American support of Nasser is tearing Egypt apart, or perhaps that such a chaotic country ought never have control of the Suez Canal. In any case, Israeli military intelligence believes in this chain of events: terrorize the West disguised as Egyptians, let Egyptians be held responsible, sour the U.S. on Egypt.

A false flag operation. Run up someone elses flag and what you do gets blamed on them.[**]

Though the U.S. has no business propping up Nasser it being neither in its interest nor the proper province of its government Israels proposed method of persuasion is deplorable. But at this point there is no one to deplore it.

The Israeli agents in Egypt are notified, and ten or so Egyptian Jews who had been recruited and trained (henceforth also called Israeli agents) are furnished with nitroglycerin bombs and phosphorus incendiary bombs. The Israeli commanders code-name the operation Shoshana, that is, Susannah, after the fiance of one of them. They agree that they will begin to strike when they hear Stephen Fosters eminently American song Oh, Susannah played on Israeli radio.

It happens the summer of 1954. On July 2 the Israeli agents explode bombs inside the Alexandria post office. On July 14 in both Alexandria and Cairo they explode bombs inside the U.S. Consulate libraries, and would have done so inside a British-owned movie theater in Alexandria except a wheel comes off the plan.

One of the Israeli commanders is Avri Elad. Originally from Germany, he had emigrated to what was then Palestine, which later became Israel. At the time of the Lavon Affair he is an Israeli military intelligence officer, working undercover as an Egyptian businessman. After helping set up the false flag operation, he betrays it to the Egyptian police (at least some evidence suggests this), and soon flees to Europe. His motivations appears to have been money rather than ideals.

Thus the Egyptian government had gotten wind of the Israeli terrorists before July 14 one of their own handlers having betrayed them. A fire engine waits in front of the movie theater in Alexandria as an unrecognized Israeli agent approaches it. Now a bit of good luck or bad luck depending on your point of view. The firebomb he is carrying in his pocket detonates, nearly killing him. The Egyptians arrest him and he eventually leads them to the other Israeli agents. On July 23 the Israeli agents still at large set off firebombs inside two Cairo movie theaters and in Cairos central post office and railway station. By July 27 all the agents are apprehended. One (or two, depending on accounts) commits suicide. Two Israeli commanders escape and flee back to Israel.

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The Lavon Affair Jewish Terror – Video




The Lavon Affair Jewish Terror The Lavon Affair Jewish Terror. By: JohnDoe Backup

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Israel Shoots Down Drone Lesbian Kiss Bangladesh 300 DEAD – Video




Israel Shoots Down Drone Lesbian Kiss Bangladesh 300 DEAD More at : https://www.youtube.com/user/WayToWor… Bolshevism, Gaza, Genocide, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jew World Order, Jews, Libya, Max Igan, middle east, Neocons, Palestine, Syria, USA, War,… By: Frederick Williams

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PROPHECY ALERT Archaeologists Find King David s Palace – Video




PROPHECY ALERT Archaeologists Find King David s Palace More at : https://www.youtube.com/user/WayToWor… Bolshevism, Gaza, Genocide, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jew World Order, Jews, Libya, Max Igan, middle east, Neocons, Palestine, Syria, USA, War,… By: Ray Davies

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Lavon Affair FREE Lavon Affair information …

1960s political crisis in israel sparked by the security “mishap” of 1954. The Lavon Affair was a dramatic and divisive political crisis that shook the entire Israeli political system, led to the resignation of prime minister David Ben-Gurion in July 1963, and caused major shifts in political alignments in the state. Its roots lay in what the Israeli press nicknamed Esek ha-Bish (the “Mishap”). A dormant group of Israeli-trained Egyptian Jews who were prepared for missions of espionage and sabotage in the event of war were ill-advisedly activated in June 1954 under orders from Colonel Benjamin Gibli (Givly), the head of the Intelligence Division of the Israeli Defense Forces. They were instructed to detonate firebombs in a few U.S. and British cultural institutions in Cairo and Alexandria in order to disrupt the negotiations, which were nearing conclusion, on the evacuation of British troops from bases along the Suez Canal. The group was captured by Egyptian security services. Two of the leading saboteurs were sentenced and hanged, an Israeli spy committed suicide in prison, and the others were sentenced to long terms of imprisonment. Colonel Gibli maintained that he had received orders from Pinhas Lavon, who at the time was replacing Ben-Gurion as minister of defense. A secret inquiry committee appointed by the government of Moshe Sharett could not reach a clear judgment, and both Gibli and Lavon were obliged to resign their respective posts. Four years later the commander of the special unit in charge of the operation in Egypt disclosed that one of the documents presented to the 1954 cabinet inquiry committee was forged. The attorney general was asked by Ben-Gurion to look into these allegations. Colonel Gibli admitted the forgery but continued to claim that he had received the order orally from Lavon, and that he had been compelled to forge the document when he realized that Lavon was trying to put all the blame on him. Lavon, who was then serving as secretary-general of the Histadrut, Israel’s powerful trade-union umbrella organization, demanded a public exoneration from Ben-Gurion, who declined to give it, insisting that the affair had to be subjected to a judicial investigation. Despite strict censorship, the incident became known under different euphemisms and code names to the general public, stirring up a political crisis within and outside of the Labor Party. The entire country was divided between those who supported Ben-Gurion’s position and those who opposed him. The aging prime minister had angered the second generation of party leaders by promoting a group of still younger people such as Moshe Dayan and Shimon Peres to important posts in the government, jumping over the heads of his erstwhile loyal lieutenants. For his part, Ben-Gurion was enraged that Lavon had brought his grievances to different forums outside of the party and had mobilized pressure by parties and newspapers that sought to weaken Labor’s long-standing political dominance. In order to quiet things down, the minister of finance, Levi Eshkol, by then the most powerful political figure besides Ben-Gurion, asked the minister of justice, Pinhas Rosen, to lead a ministerial committee of seven to determine how to deal with Lavon’s demand for exhonoration and to bring the crisis to an end. This committee ruled that Lavon had not given the order for the sabotage action and that the document was indeed a forgery. But BenGurion was indignant and threatened to resign if Lavon did not quit his post at the Histadrut. Ben-Gurion, the “Old Man,” was still powerful enough to impose his will on the party’s central committee, but the entire affair weakened his standing among most of his party’s elite. Eshkol refused to retract the committee’s exonerating verdict and Ben-Gurion continued to demand a judicial inquiry. Additional friction ensued between BenGurion and the party elite, led by Golda Meir, minister of foreign affairs, who until then had been a long-time loyal supporter of Ben-Gurion. These frictions included a bitter controversy over Israel’s relations with West Germany and over the development of the Israeli nuclear option. The tired and embittered seventy-seven-year-old Ben-Gurion resigned in June 1963. Levi Eshkol replaced him as prime minister and minister of defense. In the 1965 elections Ben-Gurion and some of his supporters in the Lavon Affair split from the Labor Party and formed a new party, Rafi (List of Israeli Workers). This effectively marked the end of Ben-Gurion’s political career. see also ben-gurion, david; israel: political parties in; lavon, pinhas. Lucas, Noah. The Modern History of Israel. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1974. Sachar, Howard. A History of Israel from the Rise of Zionism to Our Time. New York: Knopf, 1988.

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Lynn Burkhead Texoma Outdoors: Hooked on fishing, Bobo aims to give back

(Editors Note: This is the first in a series of stories profiling some of the leading men and women in the outdoors world across Texomaland.) Fishing is a way of life for Denison resident Chris Bobo. For starters, its how the 27-year old husband and father of one makes his weekly paycheck. I have been working in outdoors retail for nearly 10 years now and currently Im the hunting and fishing manager at Academy Sports and Outdoors, said Bobo, who grew up in Sherman and went to Texoma Christian School. Believe it or not, I actually began (my career) over at Gander Mountain a number of years ago as a part-time fishing associate. I had previously worked as a waiter at a local restaurant but I could not pass up working with my passion and surrounding myself with fishing on a daily basis. When hes not stocking and selling rods, reels, line, and lures, youll often find Bobo on a local lake in his bass boat. Thats where the Denison man fishes for fun, helps introduce others to the sport, and competes in local and regional tournaments. Bobos love affair with fishing began a quarter of a century ago on trips to various North Texas water bodies with his dad Steve Bobo. I was lucky to grow up with a father that was passionate about the outdoors, said Chris. He got me involved at a young age and helped fuel my love of the outdoors. I owe any success Ive had in bass fishing to him. Trips with his grandfather Freddy Covington didnt hurt either.

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February 21, 2014   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

The Lavon Affair – MidEastWeb

Israel and Terror in Egypt The Lavon affair (“Esek Habish” – the shameful affair) was one of the most bizarre chapters in Israeli history. In 1954, the Israeli secret service set up a spy ring in Egypt, with the purpose of blowing up US and British targets. The operation was code-named “Susanah.” The terrorist hits were to be blamed on the regime of Egyptian President Gamal Abdul Nasser, with the purpose of alienating the US and Britain from Egypt and Nasser and somehow preventing Egyptian nationalization of the Suez canal. The ring was discovered. Strict censorship ensured that that the Israeli public officially knew little or nothing of the affair for many years. Names were not mentioned, the affair was called “Esek Bish” – the affair of shame, and key protagonists were referred to as “X” and “the third man.” Unofficially and through leaks, most people knew at least the outlines of the affair. No ingredient was omitted that could make this affair a totally morally repugnant fiasco. The affair occurred during a difficult time in Israel. Terrorist raids on Israel and reprisals had provoked a public debate about the efficacy of reprisals. David Ben-Gurion, the founding Prime Minister, had retired to his kibbutz, Sde Boker, in September 1953 claiming fatigue and age. In October 1954, an Israeli reprisal raid in Qibieh, in the West Bank, lead by Ariel Sharon, had miscarried, resulting in the death of 69 civilians. An acrimonious debate was kindled between “activists” who advocated continuing such raids, and doves, led by PM Sharett, who were against them. It was presumed that the “activists,” proteges of Ben Gurion, and in particular Moshe Dayan who was IDF Chief of Staff, initiated the operation on the orders of Ben Gurion. Ben Gurion, on the other hand, disowned Defense Minister Lavon, and claimed that Lavon had given the orders. The left wing of the Labor party adopted the cause of Lavon. The right adopted the cause of Ben Gurion, Shimon Peres and Moshe Dayan. Nothing definite could ever be proven. The prisoners of the Lavon affair remained forgotten in Egyptian jails, and were not exchanged after the Sinai campaign. Since they were mostly Sephardi Jews, their cause became a cause celebre of those who claimed that Israel, and in particular the Mapai party, discriminated against Sephardi Jews. The arrest of the ring resulted in an affair that dominated Israeli politics for over a decade. Israel was embarrassed, as it had been caught trying to harm American and British interests for no reason and in instigating terror attacks against innocent targets. The spies who were not executed were left to rot in Egyptian jails. Meanwhile, a wave of persecution forced the emigration of tens of thousands of Jews from Egypt, leaving behind property, memories and roots. Investigations in Israel led to a trail of forged documents and perjured testimony, as everyone involved tried to implicate others. To all of the above would be added the ignominy of betrayal, as it became evident eventually that Israeli agent Avri Seidenberg (Avri Elad) had probably betrayed the operation to the Egyptians. The spy ring was not run by the Israeli Mossad intelligence service, but rather by unit 131 of AMAN (IDF intelligence). The rationale behind creation of this group was that they would be local sleeper agents, trained in various techniques, who would remain in place and be activated only in case of war. At some point, someone decided, for unknown reasons, to activate the ring without waiting for war. In those days the intelligence services were comparatively inexperienced, under budgeted and unprofessional, though the Mossad was to achieve notable success, mainly through luck, such as obtaining a copy of the twentieth party congress speech of Soviet Premier Krushchev. Israeli intelligence was easy to infiltrate. They had a relatively low opinion of intelligence services of Arab countries and were therefore not on their guard. Their vetting procedures for new agents were poor. Soviet and other intelligence agencies also had no little trouble recruiting agents among new immigrants. The Egyptian spies were poorly compartmentalized. They were not trained to resist torture. The operation was not compartmentalized: the spies knew each other’s identities. Thus, there was a danger that under interrogation, any one of them could betray the entire group. Worse, it is now believed that in fact they were betrayed by the Israeli agent in charge of the operation. The sensational revelations about the spy ring endangered the entire Egyptian Jewish community, which numbered about 50,000, as well as the credibility of Israel. The Egyptian Jews known to have been recruited for the spy ring were:

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January 16, 2014   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

‘Hart Of Dixie’ winter premiere recap

Tonight on The CW The Hart of Dixie aired its Season 3 Episode 9 episode titled, “Something to Talk About,” which was a great start to the new year. Rose Hattenbarger is back. The episode started with Zoe, Zoe’s cousin Vivian Wilkes, and Zoe’s boyfriend Joel walking in the town of Bluebell after a tennis match. Wade walks by and Vivian looks at him. It is obvious that both Vivian and Wade like each other, from the way they are staring at each other, to the way that both thinks of dating the other. This leads to Zoe trying to set Vivian up with anyone but Wade. Zoe walks with Rose listening to Rose wonder what she should do seeing as her other classmates have accomplished more things than she has that will get them into college. Zoe tells her about internships, which Rose agrees with. Rose then gets an internship with Dash DeWitt. Meanwhile Lavon and George meet with the Mayor of Fillmore, Tod Gainey, and his lawyer Scooter McGreevey to discuss Bluebell and Fillmore merging together to become one big city. Gainey is for it, while Lavon is not. George and Lavon with the help of Tansy, go to a luau party held by Mayor Gainey to find information that could help them find a reason as to why Mayor Gainey would want to merge Fillmore with Bluebell. Hoping to find that Fillmore is bankrupt as the reason, they are shocked to find that the real reason is because Mayor Gainey wants to take over Bluebell and put a “Gainey Shopping Mall” in Bluebell’s town square. Back in Bluebell to stop Dash DeWitt and Rose from questioning the merger, Zoe, Joel, Wade, and Annabeth plan to spread a rumor. Wade leaves ignoring Zoe to go on his date with Vivian Wilkes. Annabeth and Zoe decide on Annabeth and Joel having a fake affair. In phase 1 of the plan Zoe talks of Joel and Annabeth “kissing.” Annabeth then sends them anonymously to dash. Going their separate ways Joel and Zoe go to the Rammer Jammed where everyone goes silent as phase 2 of their plan has started. Dash published the photos and Zoe ends up throwing water on Joel twice. Outside Zoe runs into Vivian, who was walking. She had a great time with Wade, Vivian says “I heard all the rumors about Wade. I grew up two towns over, but the Wade I was with tonight, he was not that guy.” Vivian, knowing that Zoe had dated Wade, asks Zoe what she thinks. Zoe pleads the fifth, deciding it’s best not to say anything, that she is Switzerland, neutral. Zoe is sure that Vivian doesn’t understand her. The next day Rose sees Lavon and Annabeth kissing. She calls Dash. Then we see her at the RammerJammer with Zoe and tells Zoe that she told Dash about the whole affair and it must have been made up to keep them from asking about the merger. Zoe tells Rose she has to tell Lavon. Wade confronts Zoe about Vivian as she is walking. Zoe explains, but Wade basically says that not saying anything is worse than saying something, that Zoe can never forgive him for what he did, but that he wasn’t the only one that ended their relationship. Rose is able to get to Lavon and George before the town meeting, however, it is already too late. Dash posted the truth on his blog. Everyone at the town is angry at Lavon for hiding the truth about the merger. Admitting that the merger with Fillmore is still a threat, he tells the people of Bluebell not to panic, but they do. Zoe speaks with Vivian. She tells her she is happy with Joel and admits that the break up was just as much as her fault as it was Wade’s, that Wade can be a great person if he’s with the right person. Zoe leaves and meets Joel at the Rammer Jammer. At the Rammer Jammer Zoe and Joel are sitting at a table. Rose comes in with good news about an article she pitched to the editor of the Huffington Post about the “Murky ethics of journalism.” She sits with them. Wade passes by happily giving them drinks on the house. Rose asks for white wine as well because it’s something journalists drink. She takes Zoe’s drink when she’s not looking. Zoe than takes it back and the episode ends.

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January 15, 2014   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

‘Hart of Dixie’ recap: Zoe’s level of denial about her feelings for Wade reaches epic proportions

We knew that with the introduction of Wade and Vivian’s relationship, “Zade” would hit a major roadblock for a while on “Hart of Dixie.” But oh my god, I have never wanted to reach through my TV and strangle a character more than I did watching Monday (Jan. 13) night’s midseason premiere, “Something to Talk About,” when Zoe’s level of denial about her feelings for Wade reached epic proportions. We all know how she feels about her ex: she’s still in love with Wade. Wade knows it. Annabeth now knows it. Joel finally got an inkling of it. Vivian even touched on it when she was talking to Zoe. And yet … Zoe continues to deny having any kind of feelings for Wade. At all. And that’s just dumb. So how did we even get to this point? Zoe sees that there’s something brewing between Vivian and Wade, and she tries to nip it in the butt before anything actually happens between her cousin and her ex. But of course she denies the real reason why she’s so against it. She claims over and over again that she wants to “save Vivian from getting hurt by Wade and his mistakes.” I mean. This is just the flimsiest excuse ever, but let’s roll with it, because it’s only going to get more ridiculous from here on out. Too bad Joel doesn’t get the memo that he’s supposed to be nixing any relationship between Wade and Vivian, and encourages Wade to ask her out, despite the fact that Zoe worked so hard at setting up a date for Vivian with eligible bachelor Carter Covington. Zoe marches straight to the Rammer Jammer to tell Wade that it’s a bad idea to date Vivian, but Wade knew Zoe wouldn’t approve — for the real reason, not her lame excuse that she’s sticking to — and just laughs in her face at her claim to want to save Vivian when she confronts him. Oh honey, nice try. But the date is a go. In other rocky relationship news, Tansy has brought some major trouble for George and Lynly’s relationship (Wooo!). Lavon notices that George has been avoiding eating out at restaurants with Lynly for the past week (ahem, because Tansy now works at the Rammer Jammer), and mistakenly pushes George into taking Lynly out to breakfast, even though he was trying to avoid Tansy and be noble and stay true to his girlfriend and all that. This isn’t going to end well, especially since even though he takes Lynly to Buttersticks to avoid the Rammer Jammer, Tansy was there getting coffee anyways. Oops. Lynly seems to accept George’s reasoning for avoiding Tansy, but she can sense there’s something still going on between the two exes. Unfortunately, George’s romantic life isn’t the only thing giving him trouble these days. It turns out, the governor of Alabama believes that if less populated towns merge with their neighbors, it would save the state some money. At the meeting with Fillmore’s Mayor Gainey and his lawyer (and Tansy’s new boyfriend) Scooter McGreavy, Fillmore surprisingly supports the merger — fast tracking it — but Lavon and George are staunchly against it. They approach Tansy for help figuring out why Bluebell’s enemy town is pro-merging, since she has a foot in both towns — you know, because she’s dating Fillmore’s lawyer but lives in Bluebell. Tansy spills all she knows about what Scooter’s been up to, and George puts it together that Fillmore is bankrupt and that’s why they’re so gung-ho for the merger — they can use Bluebell’s funds if they’re the same town. Lavon and George use Tansy as a distraction to sneak into Scooter’s office to go through his files to confirm that Fillmore’s bankrupt, and Lavon realizes during the mission that pushing Tansy and George together was probably not smart when it comes to his cousin Lynly’s heart. The chemistry between George and Tansy is just off the charts. But he puts his misgivings on hold when they figure out that Fillmore is far from bankrupt. Turns out, Fillmore just wants to take over Bluebell entirely — not merge with them — and put up a giant mall smack dab in the middle of Blubell’s town square. There’s more at stake in this merger than they previously thought. In order to distract the town from finding out about the merger and panicking, Annabeth and Zoe have the idea to introduce a new (fake) scandal instead. They enlist the help of Wade of Joel, and decide to spread the rumor that AB and Joel had an affair. Wade opts out due to his date with Vivian (and his quota for fake relationships had already been filled), and Joel and AB notice how irrational Zoe is acting about their date. Everyone else can see why Zoe is really against Wade and Vivian, so how long will it take her to admit it? Apparently, quite a long time. Vivian gushes to Zoe that she had a blast with Wade on their date and he seems more mature than the rumors she heard about him. She really likes him, but since she’s a single mother going through a divorce she can’t jump into a new relationship with no hesitation, so she asks Zoe if she should invest her time and emotions in Wade. Zoe, realizing she’s biased, refuses to take a side — though Vivian takes her neutrality as a warning not to date Wade. Wade confronts Zoe after Vivian rejects him because he knew the pint-sized doc had something to do with it, and he drops some major truth bombs on her: everyone else in town has realized Wade has changed since he hurt Zoe, but Zoe still insists on punishing Wade for hurting her. He then finally says what we’ve all been thinking all season long: Zoe needs to take a long and hard look in the mirror and think about why she doesn’t want Wade dating someone so close to her, even though they had a great time together and both like each other.

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January 14, 2014   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

The Lavon Affair – ARI Watch

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January 9, 2014   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed


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