Archive for the ‘Lavon Affair’ Category

Steve Scalise Slams Big Tech Bias at Road to Majority Conference

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA), approaching the one year anniversary of his near fatal wounding by a crazed shooter, addressed the Faith and Freedom Coalition’s “Road to Majority” conference, where he raised concerns over Big Tech bias against conservatives.

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June 9, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Exclusive– Marsha Blackburn: ‘Yes,’ Social Media Companies Need Regulation

Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) told Breitbart News in an exclusive interview on Friday that social media companies need regulation regarding their privacy practices as well as censorship of conservative and alternative voices on the Internet.

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Alleged Deep State Leaker James Wolfe Makes First Court Appearance

James Wolfe, the former Senate Intelligence Committee security director charged with lying about his contacts with a series of journalists – including his former paramour, New York Times reporter Ali Watkins – appeared in court Friday after his arrest late Thursday night.

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The Assassination of Count Bernadotte – Jewish Virtual Library

During the fight for Jewish statehood, extremist military groups sometimes resorted to the use of terrorist tactics. One such instance occurred in 1948 when members of the Jewish underground organization LEHI killed UN Peace Mediator Count Folke Bernadotte to protest his diplomatic efforts to modify the Palestine partition plan.

Bernadotte, a Swede with family ties to the Swedish King, gained international recognition through his work as head of the Swedish Red Cross during World War II. Bernadotte used his position to negotiate with Heinrich Himmler and save thousands of Jews from concentration camps, although many argue that he could have done more had he been less cautious in negotiations.

A diplomat fluent in six languages, Bernadotte was appointed mediator of the UN General Assembly on May 20, 1948, and was immediately faced with the volatile situation in the Middle East. Arabs and Jews had been fighting over Palestine for decades and the conflict escalated after the adoption of the UN partition resolution on November 29, 1947. When Israel declared its independence on May 14, 1948, five Arab armies invaded Israel.

On June 11, Bernadotte succeeded in arranging a 30-day cease-fire. After visiting Cairo, Beirut, Amman and Tel Aviv, he came to the conclusion that the UN partition plan was an unfortunate resolution and proposed his own plan to unite the two feuding peoples. Instead of establishing individual states, he suggested that Arabs and Jews form a union consisting of a small Jewish entity and an enlarged Transjordan. Haifa and Lydda (Lod) airport would become free zones. Israel would receive the Western Galilee and unlimited immigration for two years, after which the UN would take control of the issue. Between 250,000 and 300,000 Arab refugees would be permitted to return to Arab territory with compensation and Transjordan would control the Negev and, despite Israeli claims, Jerusalem.

The Arab world rejected the Bernadotte plan on the grounds that, as Syrian officer Muhammad Nimr al-Khatib said, Most of these mediators are spies for the Jews anyway. The Israeli government, hating the idea of giving up Jerusalem and bent on military victory, quickly followed suit. Fighting resumed on July 8 and the Israeli army gained strength and succeeded in pushing back the Arabs until a second UN cease-fire was declared on July 18, this time with no time limit and a threat of economic sanctions against any country that broke it.

One organization that saw Bernadottes efforts as a threat was LEHI, a Jewish underground group that, under the leadership of Yitzhak Shamir, Dr. Israel Scheib and Nathan Friedman-Yellin, had waged a campaign of personal terror to force the British out of Palestine. LEHI called Bernadotte a British agent who had cooperated with the Nazis in World War II. The organization considered his plan to be a threat to its goal of Israeli independence on both banks of the Jordan River. Commander Yehoshua Zeitler of the Jerusalem branch of LEHI started training four men to kill Bernadotte, and solicited information from two sympathetic journalists about his schedule. LEHI leaders decided to assassinate Bernadotte while he was on his way to a meeting with Dov Joseph, military governor of Jerusalems New City, which was scheduled for either 4:30 p.m. on September 17 or sometime on September 18 (the exact date is disputed).

On September 16, Bernadotte flew to Beirut and spent the day there. At 9:30 a.m. on Friday, September 17, he boarded his UN Dakota plane for the 45 minute flight to Jerusalem. After arriving in Palestine, Bernadottes day started with a shot hitting an armored car in his convoy while he was visiting Ramallah. No one was hurt and, according to army liaison officer Moshe Hillman, Bernadotte was proud of the bullet hole and showed Hillman the UN flag that had saved him.

Bernadottes appointment with Joseph was rescheduled for 6:30 p.m. that day. Bernadotte spent time at the official UN headquarters at the YMCA and at Government House, a potential headquarters for a UN mission. He visited the Jerusalem Agricultural School where he picked up French UN observer Andre Seraut who took the center seat in the UN car, immediately to Bernadottes left. The three car convoy then headed back to the YMCA to pick up a copy of the truce regulations before the meeting with Joseph.

Meanwhile, LEHI terrorists adapted their plans to the new meeting time and an Israeli military jeep carrying a driver named Meshulam Makover and four assassins was dispatched to Palmeh Street in the Jerusalem neighborhood of Old Katamon. At 5:03 p.m., the UN convoy drove up and found the jeep blocking its path. The terrorists, wearing khaki shorts and peaked caps, left their jeep, found Bernadotte in the second car of the convoy and one man, later discovered to be Yehoshua Cohen, fired a Schmeisser automatic pistol into the car, spraying the interior with bullets and killing Seraut and then Bernadotte. The other LEHI members shot the tires of the rest of the convoy and all the terrorists escaped to the religious community of Shaarei Pina where they hid with haredi (ultra-religious) LEHI sympathizers for a few days before fleeing to Tel Aviv in the back of a furniture truck.

Both Seraut and Bernadotte were transported to Hadassah Hospital on Mount Scopus, but were found to have died instantly. Bernadotte had been hit six times. On September 18, his body was flown to Haifa and then to Sweden, where he was buried on his wifes birthday. The Israeli government subsequently cracked down on LEHI, arresting many of its members and confiscating their arms. LEHI disbanded, largely due to public condemnation.

While the world mourned for Bernadotte, some in Israel, such as former Tehiya Member of Knesset and former LEHI radio announcer Geula Cohen, saw it as just another death in war, no more immoral than other killings committed during the long Arab-Israeli conflict. Cohen considers the assassination to have been an effective measure because we prevented the internationalization of Jerusalem. Others, however, such as Hebrew University professor Joseph Heller, argue that the killing actually provoked support for the Bernadotte plan by making its author into a martyr. The plan was never implemented, but whether its failure was due to the assassination or simply because of Israeli military strength and other outside factors is pure speculation.

Yitzhak Shamir reputedly played a role in planning the assassination; however, he was never tried and years later was elected as Israel’s eighth Prime Minister.

Sources: Bell, J. Bowyer. Terror Out Of Zion. NJ: Transaction, 1996; A bullet for the count. Jerusalem Post International Edition . October 10, 1998, p. 16-18; Collins, Larry and Dominique Lapierre. O Jerusalem! NY: Simon and Schuster, 1972 (Amazon.com paperback, Distribooks, 1994); Sachar, Howard. A History of Israel: From the Rise of Zionism to Our Time. NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 1998.

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May 20, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Moshe Dayan – Jewish Virtual Library

Moshe Dayan was an Israeli military leader who later became a crusader for peace. He played a key role in four wars and helped negotiate the Israel-Egypt peace treaty.

Dayan (born May 20, 1915; died October 16, 1981) was born on kibbutz Deganya Alef, near Lake Kinneret, to parents Shemuel and Devorah. The kibbutz was founded in 1910 and called em hakvutzot – the mother of collective settlements.

When he was only 14 years old, Dayan joined the Haganah, an underground organization that defended Jewish settlements from Arab attacks. In the Haganah, Dayan learned guerilla warfare from British Captain Charles Orde Wingate, who was a leader of night patrols organized to fight Arab rebel bands. During the riots of 1936-1939, he served with the special police force in the Jezreel Valley and Galilee. When the British outlawed the Haganah in 1939, Dayan was arrested and imprisoned for two years.

Upon his release in 1941, Dayan joined the British army, where he served with the forces that liberated Lebanon and Syria from Vichy France during World War II. Dayan was wounded in battle in Lebanon and lost his left eye. He began to wear the black eyepatch that later became his trademark. He cooperated with British intelligence to set up a broadcasting network for clandestine operations behind enemy lines in the event that Palestine should fall to the Germans. He remained active in the Haganah until 1948.

Dayan’s activities in the 1948 War of Independence began when he commanded the defense of Jewish settlements in the Jordan Valley. He later commanded the battalion that attacked the city of Lydda and helped halt Egyptian forces on the southern front. In August 1948, he was appointed commander on the Jerusalem front. In 1949, he participated in armistice talks with Jordanian officials at Rhodes. Dayan’s military prowess allowed him to rise to the rank of chief of operations at General Headquarters in 1952, and, in 1953, he was elected Chief of Staff of the armed forces.

Dayan became Chief of Staff during a time of severe Arab belligerence. Despite the military armistice of 1949, the surrounding Arab nations remained hostile, maintaining a maritime blockade, reinforcing an economic boycott, promoting political and propaganda warfare and supporting terrorism in Israel. The Israeli government was unable to contain the terrorist violence. Dayan insisted on strong retaliation operations. His view was that the Arabs saw terrorism as a stage of war, and the longer the terrorist attacks continued, the longer the Arabs had to build up their military strength. He wanted to force the Arabs into open battle before they gained full military power. Under Dayan’s command, the Israeli military launched raids in Gaza and other retaliatory missions, causing heavy casualties to the Egyptians, Syrians, and other Arab populations. On October 29, 1956, Dayan led Israel’s Suez campaign, an invasion of the Sinai Peninsula after Egypt, Syria and Jordan signed a pact stating as their goal the destruction of Israel.

Dayan left the military in 1958 and entered his second career politics. He joined Israel’s Labor Party, Mapai, and was elected to the Knesset in 1959. He served as Minister of Agriculture in the government of David Ben-Gurion from 1959 until 1964. In 1964, Dayan resigned as Minister of Agriculture after an argument with new Prime Minister Levi Eshkol and joined Ben-Gurion in forming a new party called Rafi (Alliance of Israel’s Workers). Dayan did not stay out of the government for long, however. One year later, Dayan was reelected to the Knesset representing Rafi, which later rejoined the Labor Party.

Dayan’s reputation as an effective leader grew when he was appointed Minister of Defense under Levi Eshkol just in time for the Six-Day War in 1967 against Egypt, Jordan and Syria. When the Syrians were shelling Israeli villages in Upper Galilee, Dayan was the one who made the decision to launch a full-scale attack against the Syrians. It was also Dayan who ended the fighting by arranging a cease-fire with Syria through Chief of Staff of the UN Observer Corps, General Odd Bull. Dayan was seen as “a solo performer, partly admired, partly feared for his political stunts.”

After the war, Dayan controlled the territories occupied by the Israeli Army. He opened the borders for Arab residents of the territories to travel to Arab countries, while at the same time maintaining order and security in Israeli-held areas.

Dayan kept his position as Defense Minister when Golda Meir of the Labor Party succeeded Eshkol as Prime Minister in 1969. Ambassador Gideon Rafael wrote about Dayan, “Rocking the boat is his favourite tactic, not to overturn it, but to sway it sufficiently for the helmsman to lose his grip or for some of its unwanted passengers to fall overboard.” One of his most controversial demands, made in 1973, was for the construction of Yamit, a new Israeli port city in Egyptian territory. Fearful of Dayan’s defection from the Labor Party, Meir supported the plan.

Before the Yamit plan could advance, however, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat launched a surprise attack against Israel. On Yom Kippur, October 6, 1973, Egyptian armies crossed the Suez Canal, moved anti-aircraft missiles into the canal area, and waged war on Israel. Israeli losses were high and Israel had too short a supply of equipment to conduct a prolonged war.

On October 22, a cease-fire was declared, but the Israeli public’s confidence had been severely shaken. Israel had been unprepared for the surprise attack and unable to repulse it quickly. The nations lack of preparation was blamed on Defense Minister Dayan and an outraged public demanded his resignation. The president of the Supreme Court set up a commission to investigate the performance of generals during the war. The commission recommended the resignation of the Chief of Staff, but reserved judgement on Dayan. The press and the public, however, condemned him. After attending a military funeral at which bereaved parents had called him a murderer of their sons, Dayan submitted his resignation to Meir in 1974.

Dayan was “loath to close his life story marked by the events of the Yom Kippur War,” and, in 1977, newly elected Likud Prime Minister Menachem Begin gave him a second chance by offering him the post of Minister of Foreign Affairs. Although Dayan was from the opposition Labor Party, he accepted the appointment because he believed, “I could significantly influence Israel’s moves towards achieving a peace arrangement with our neighboring Arab States and with the Palestinian inhabitants of Judea and Samaria and the Gaza Strip.”

In May 1977, Dayan began negotiating with the Egyptians. As lead negotiator, Dayan began with the premise of receiving an Arab acceptance of Israeli rule over Judea, Samaria and Gaza, in exchange for a return of Sinai to Egypt. He negotiated for 18 months, and held secret meetings with officials in India, Iran, England and Morocco. His style is described as acting “alternately with dash and deliberation, advancing and stalling, vacillating between surprising compromises and inexplicable intransigence.” With help from U.S. president and mediator Jimmy Carter, Dayan met with the Egyptians first at Leeds Castle and later at Camp David. Eventually, a peace agreement, the Camp David Accords, was drawn up and signed at 11 p.m. on Sunday September 17, 1978.

In 1979, Dayan resigned as Foreign Minister. Dayan and Begin disagreed about the building of settlements in the territories and Dayan was frustrated by the fact that he was not leading the autonomy talks with the Palestinians. Dayan also felt that he was increasingly being bypassed on foreign policy issues. In 1981, he formed the Telem party, which advocated unilateral disengagement from the territories occupied in 1967. The party received only two mandates in the subsequent elections.

On May 14, 1979, Dayan was diagnosed with colon cancer. He died on October 16, 1981, in Tel Aviv and was buried in Nahalal, the moshav where he was raised.

During his life, Dayan wrote four books: Diary of the Sinai Campaign (1966), Mappah Hadasha-Yahasim Aherim (1969) on problems after the Six-Day War, Moshe Dayan: Story of My Life (1976) and Breakthrough: A Personal Account of the Egypt-Israel Peace Negotiations (1981).

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Zoe Hart | Hart of Dixie Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

Zoe HartBirthdate

October 24, 1982

Dark Brown with Caramel Highlights

Doctor (currently)

Episode 1In the fallout, her boyfriend, who did his residency at the same hospital, New York Hospital, as Zoe (as well as Zoe’s father, previously), dumps her because she would rather talk about work than his day. Also, she fails to get the heart fellowship. To Zoe’s indignation, her Chief of Surgery recommends she spend the next twelve months as a general practitioner and warns her she needs to improve her bedside manner, to see people as people, not puzzles to solve. Unfortunately for Zoe, there are no general practitioner positions available in New York City. Out of viable options, Zoe stumbles across a postcard from Harley Wilkes – who had continually sent her offers for a position at his medical practice over the last four years since his initial offer at her graduation from medical school and decides to accept.

Upon arriving in Bluebell, Alabama, she discovers Dr. Harley Wilkes died four months previously, and that he had mysteriously left his practice to her. But this wasn’t without its complications – Harley had only left Zoe his half of the practice, which he shared with Dr. Brick Breeland, who had long been eager to have the whole practice to himself. After a rough start in Bluebell, rubbing nearly all the residents the wrong way, drunkenly making out with Wade Kinsella after faultily signing off on Old Man Jackson’s eye exam (resulting in his running over George Tucker), and butting heads with the Breeland clan, Zoe is ready to return to New York with her mother, Mrs. Hart, and leave behind Bluebell when Emmeline Hattenbarger reveals the answer to the mystery of why Harley Wilkes would have left Zoe his practice – he was her father.

After confronting her mother about this information, and learning the truth, Zoe decides to stay in Bluebell, living in the carriage house on the Mayor’s Plantation. She’s determined to make the town see that she could be one of them, and so, to hang on to the medical practice her father had for 45 years.

Zoe and father, Ethan Hartwere close, growing up, sharing his dream to become a doctor, and determined to follow in his footsteps and become a cardio-thoracic surgeon – even performing her residency at New York Hospital, the same hospital where he had done his, while her mother, Candice Hart tried to sway her daughter toward another direction.

According to Zoe’s mother, when Zoe was ten she fell off a swing and the doctors believed she would need a blood transfusion- when it turned out Ethan ‘s blood didn’t match Zoe’s, it was revealed (unknowingly to ten-year-old Zoe) he was not her biological father.

Zoe’s mother describes Ethan Hart as a man who can’t handle complications, and though, he tried to stay a part of Zoe’s life, he didn’t feel up to the task. Shortly after the revelation, he left his family.

Later, when Zoe realized Ethan was not her biological father, she would refer to this incident as “why Dad stopped loving me”. (Pilot)

At one point Zoe wanted to change her last name from Hart to Wilkes but Zoe’s father Ethan returned and fixed their relationship, he also offers Zoe to join him at network city with a fellowship which she considers and agrees to but then changes her mind at the airport.

At the age of 28, after moving to Bluebell, Alabama Zoe was given a photograph of Harley Wilkes and her mother together, and discovered her real father was Harley Wilkes, whom her mother, Candice Hart had an affair with on a cruise while engaged to another man.

After living in Bluebell for a time, and with the knowledge that Harley Wilkes was her real father, Zoe discovered she had an uncle – Jacob Wilkes (though deceased)- as well as an aunt – Maureen Wilkes (it is unclear whether Maureen was Harley and Jacob’s sister, or Jacob’s wife), and her grandmother, was named Claire Wilkes. (Claire’s second husband was a French-Canadian named Guy, though it is unclear whether he or Claire’s first husband is Zoe’s grandfather.) Also, Zoe has a living pseudo uncle/second cousin in the form of Olin, who Claire Wilkes took in when he was a child and raised alongside her own children.

(Husband/In Love With/Soulmate/Best Friend)Neighbors, Zoe and Wade have an obvious attraction to one another- an attraction that nearly turned into more during the 2011 heat wave (In Havoc & In Heat). Though Zoe passed him off early on, she’s continually seeing different sides of him she hadn’t expected, and their relationship continues to evolve. Wade was able to make Zoe smile after the incident with Judson and Gigi (Homecoming & Coming Home) and later asks to buy her a drink, to which Zoe smiles and asks for a rain check (Hairdos & Holidays). Wade later discovers Zoe on a date with his estranged brother, Jesse, much to his dismay. However, he tries to deny his feelings for Zoe, and tells his brother he’s free to date her because they’re both snobbish and superior and would be perfect together. Unfortunately, Zoe overheard this exchange and later confronted Wade, asking if this was what he really thought of her. Wade says yes to this, and continues to point out the three men who have caught her eye since her arrival in Bluebell – a veterinarian , a lawyer , and an eco-geologist oceanographer/army hero – all lucrative careers, and takes off in his truck, leaving behind a surprised and hurt Zoe, who then chooses to take a step back from the idea of dating Jesse, telling him “I can’t always stay out of people’s business, but when I can I probably should” (Bachelorettes & Bullets). In Episode 1×22, Zoe and Wade find themselves stranded in a barn during a rainstorm. After saving a baby goat caught in barbwire, they agree that having sex might clear everything up. As they are about to kiss, they are interrupted by an officer who offers to drive them home. They have sex after they get dropped off during the rainstorm (The Big Day). In Season Two, they start dating and Wade seems to be a better man. However, Wade is caught with another woman (Claudette) in 2×15. (The Gambler) Wade finally admits that there was more to it than he initially stated. They break up in 2×16 in the town square after Wanda and Tom’s wedding (Where I Lead Me). In 2×22, Zoe wakes up to realize that she slept with Wade. He believes that they are back tothe casual relationship they had at the beginning of season 2. Zoe immediately regrets it, telling him that it was a mistake. In the end of the episode, Wade tells Zoe that he is in love with her, and she tells him that she is going to New York for the summer. Read more about Zoe and Wade here.

(Ex-Girlfriend)Zoe dated her New York boyfriend for six years- she describes it as “a study group that turned into a hook-up that turned into six years” (The Crush & The Crossbow). Read more about Zoe and New York Boyfriend here.

(Former Attraction/Best Friend)

The first person she met in Bluebell, Alabama, Zoe took in interest in George when she learned he had lived in New York for a time, and the pair connected despite his engagement, bonding over New York and a day spent together in Mobile, even almost sharing a kiss while George was on morphine after shooting himself in the leg with a crossbow (The Crush & The Crossbow). Later, George would admit to Wade Kinsella that there might be a spark between he and Zoe, but that he and Lemon were going to be married, and nothing would stop that – that is, until George broke off the engagement on Lemon and his wedding day. Read more about Zoe and George here.

Smitten with Zoe from the very beginning (Pilot), Tom continues to make his availability known to her, though she’s apparently told him repeatedly that he’s too young for her. On Bluebell, Alabama’s website, Tom’s poetry blog section – The Tom Long and Short of It, featured on the town website- primarily focuses on poems dedicated to Zoe. Zoe later uses his attraction to her to recruit him as a patient in order to reach her thirty percent quota to hang on to her half of the medical practice. Read more about Zoe and Tom here.

A handsome veterinarian from Mobile, Alabama, Dr. Lyons asked Zoe out on a date after being impressed by the subcuticular sutures she performed on Bo the pig in his absence. After her excitement turned to panic and she bailed on their date, Zoe apologized to Judson and asked him out on another date, to which he agreed. Their plans ended, however, after Judson would sleep with Zoe’s best friend Gigi Godfrey at the annual pre-homecoming game party at the Mayor’s Plantation. Later, Zoe called Judson in reference to a veterinary situation after seeing a patient, and the two began speaking again. Judson even sent Zoe flowers, with clear desire to rekindle their not-quite relationship- though Zoe admitted she liked him, she was reluctant to resume anything. Ultimately, to cover for a friend, Zoe publicly kissed Judson at the Rammer Jammer and gave him a key to her carriage house. Read more about Zoe and Judson here.

Zoe Hart and Jesse met when she patched up his sprained wrist. The two hit it off quickly, and she agreed to a lunch date later that day. However, events ensued and it was quickly discovered that Jesse was in fact, Wade Kinsella ‘s brother- which led to an incident where Zoe overheard a stinging conversation between Wade and Jesse, where Wade revealed a few harsh thoughts on Zoe. After Zoe and Wade talked, Jesse clearly still retained his interest in Zoe while Zoe took a step back, remarking “I can’t always stay out of people’s business, but when I can I probably should” (Bachelorettes & Bullets). Read more about Zoe and Jesse here.

Zoe and Jonahmet at the store when a patient gave him a wine bottle they were about to give Zoe (Take Me Home, Country Roads). When Zoe and Wade break up, he offers to comfort her. He suggests that a breakup is better with mind-blowing sex with a sexy doctor. Zoe was threatened because townspeople trusted him more than her since they knew Jonah his entire life. In an attempt to get over her breakup, Zoe went partying with him over spring break, but nothing happened. Although Jonah thought it was implied that they were going to sleep together. When Zoe is on her plane for New York, a pilot has health issues and they ask for any doctors on board (On The Road Again). Jonah is also on board, and they connect while saving the pilot’s life. After recommendations by Jonah, Zoe decides to spend the next 3 months in New York, with him. She goes to a wedding reception and agrees to let Jonah be her date if he agrees to pretend to be mute the entire night. Read more about Zoe and Jonah here.

(Ex-Boyfriend/Close Friend)While taking a summer trip to New York, Zoe starts dating a writer named Joel and they eventually decide to buy a house together. His career takes off and the realization of them having conflicting jobs comes to a head (small-town Alabama doctor vs. LA or London screenwriter).They break up in 3×17. Read more about Zoe and Joel here.

While she is getting over Joel, Zoe dates Vince who accidentally rammed into her while she wasn’t where she going. She tries asking AnnaBeth for advice but AnnaBeth is tied up having sex with BlueBell’s enemy mayor’s nephew. She then enlists help from Lemon who’s also having male trouble, trying to see if she wants to date Peter, a journalist who has just come back from a six-month business trip.

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Binyamin Gibli, Lavon Affair figure, dies at 89 – Israel …

binyamin gibli 224.88.(photo credit: Courtesy)

Former IDF Military Intelligence chief and co-architect of the Lavon Affair Binyamin Gibli died in Tel Aviv on Wednesday at the age of 89.In 1954, Col. Gibli was thought by some to set into motion Operation Suzannah, which used nine Egyptian-Jewish undercover agents, members of Unit 131, to bomb British and American targets in Egypt in an effort to reverse Britain’s decision to withdraw from the Suez Canal. It was hoped that the attacks would turn the United States and Britain against Egyptian revolutionary leader (and future president) Gamal Abdul Nasser and wreck his decision to nationalize the Suez canal.In July 1954, post offices in Egypt were bombed, as were an American library, a British-owned cinema and a train station.The operation ended in failure when Egyptian security forces uncovered the unit – some believe it was betrayed by an informer – and arrested the members of Unit 131. One operative was killed in prison, two more were hanged, and others received lengthy prison service.In the political firestorm which followed, Gilbi accused Defense Minister Pinchas Lavon of ordering the bombings, a charge denied by Lavon, who blamed Shimon Peres, then director-general of the Defense Ministry. Prime minister Moshe Sharrett, who is not believed to have known about the operation, ordered a commission of inquiry made up of a Supreme Court justice and the IDF’s first chief of General Staff, Yaakov Dori, which produced inconclusive results.Lavon wound up resigning from office, but the scandal continued to rage, tearing apart the ruling Mapai Party, the predecessor of today’s Labor Party. David Ben-Gurion, who returned to the Prime Minister’s Office after Sharrett’s resignation in 1955, ordered a new committee of inquiry that found that Lavon did not approve Operation Suzannah. Ben-Gurion, who believed Lavon was responsible, quit his post as defense minister in protest. The Lavon-Ben Gurion split divided Mapai, with the party’s Left siding with Lavon, and the rightist stream backing Ben-Gurion and Peres.Col. Avraham Dar, an Israeli intelligence officer who had immigrated to Israel from Britain, traveled to Egypt to recruit members for Unit 131 before its activation. Speaking to The Jerusalem Post on Wednesday, Dar described Gibli as a “wonderful and talented” man, and expressed regret over the Lavon-Gibli feud, which he said had never been properly resolved.”I set this up,” Dar said, referring to Unit 131, but added that he did not wish to speak about the specifics of the unit’s activities. “I wasn’t completely involved,” he said. “I met Gibli in 1948, and in 1951 I came under his command. He had much talent, and was very impressive… He could have headed the army, and that is a tragedy.”Dar said many of Gibli’s friends abandoned him following the fallout from the Lavon Affair.”Two people at the top blamed each other, and it was settled politically, which isn’t right,” Dar said. “No proper commission of inquiry was set up, and that’s the worst aspect of this.”He added that the Lavon Affair formed a blemish on the face of a young State of Israel, but instead of healing it, the feud was left unresolved. “This was something ugly, and it must be understood in the context of the political feud in Mapai in the 1960s,” Dar said.

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Love and Death in Silicon Prairie, Part I: Candy …

Without exception, each man who saw the lifeless body of Betty Gore the night of June 13, 1980, reflexively averted his eyes. Even those who already knew what lay beyond the utility room door were never bold enough to look more than a moment before closing the door. Few looked at the head at allthe sight was too horribleso the early reports as to the manner of death were conflicting, and usually wrong.

It was a small room, no more than twelve feet long by six feet wide, made smaller by the presence of a washer, a dryer, a freezer, and a small cabinet where Betty had kept toys and knickknacks. In one corner were a brand-new toy wagon and a childs training toilet. Closer to the center of the room, where the freezer stood against one wall, were two dog-food dishes and a bruised book of Mother Goose nursery rhymes. The book had a white cover, which stood out in sharp relief because, in the harsh overhead light that glared off the harvest-gold linoleum, it was one of the few objects in the room not coated in blood.

Her left arm was the first thing they noticed after opening the door. It lay in a pool of blood and fluid so thick that the arm appeared to be floating above the linoleum. To get a look at her face, the men had to walk around the ocean of red and black to get closer. What they saw was even more unsettling. Her lips were parted, showing her front teeth, the mouth fashioned into a half-grin. Her hair radiated in all directions, a tangled, soaked mass of glistening black. And Bettys left eye was wide open, staring down at the gaping black craters in her arm. As to her right eyeshe appeared to not have one. The entire right half of her face seemed to be gone.

A few feet from Bettys head and half concealed under the freezer was a heavy, wooden-handled, three-foot-long ax. The police who investigated Betty Gores death at first could not believe that anyone as small as Candy Montgomery had the physical strength to wield that ax so brutally. Even as their suspicions about her grew, they found it hard to believe that this pretty, vivacious, utterly normal suburban housewife could make such a vicious attack. She was a loving mother, a devoted wife, a churchgoer, and everyones friend. And she wasnt putting on a cynical act. She really was as normal and likeable and good as she appearedexcept for one dark corner of her soul that even she did not know about.

It was a church service that first brought Candy Montgomery and Betty Gore together, and it was the church that led them to their times of closeness and, eventually, to their mutual hatred and Bettys brutal death. The Methodist Church of Lucas was, more than most places of worship, an institution controlled by women. The center of Candy Montgomerys universe, almost from the day in 1977 when she moved to her dream house in the country, was the drafty white clapboard building known to its congregants simply as the church. Set back from the roadside, paint peeling, steeple rusted, its floors echoing hollowly under the tread of mens heavy soles, it did not at first resemble a place likely to house the more liberal strains of Methodist theology. The church buildings sat on a slight rise surrounded by fallow blackland wheat fields on three sides and a farm-to-market road on the fourth. When the sky was clear and the wind strong, as it was, the landscape had the feel of a rough and untamed outpost, solitary and a little forbidding, not beautiful but stunning in its brown and gray emptiness.

The country, as the people who settled there liked to call it, was eight to ten amorphous little towns in eastern Collin County, but it really had no name. Most of its residents had come there to escape something: cities, density, routine, fear of crime, overpriced housing, the urban problems their parents had never known. They came in the seventies, just about the time the Dallas developers started buying out the farmers one by one, and they settled on pasture-size lots in homes designed exclusively for them by architects happy to get rich by satisfying their personal whims. They sent their children to a little red schoolhouse, joined a civic club or ran for the town council, and started going to church again when they found the quaint little chapel by the roadside of Lucas. Twenty miles to the southwest were the teeming freeways of Dallas, the huge electronics corporations where many of them worked as engineers and physicists and computer analysts, the endless chain of suburban housing developments and shopping malls and office centers running due north out of the city. But here there was quiet and solitude and control over their lives. Some of them spoke of it proudly. This is the way things were back home, they would say, or Thank God we had enough money to move to the country so kids could get a good education. The country was pure, untroubled, safe, innocent, a vision of regenerate America.

Slicing through the heart of the country was FM Road 1378, a tortuous two-lane blacktop connecting McKinney, the county seat, with Wylie, an old railroad town now given over to tract homes and light industry. Both towns were older and more authentically Western than anything in the twenty miles or so between them, for 1378 had become the main artery for the new subdivisions full of fantasy architecture: houses shaped like Alpine villas, houses dolled up like medieval castles, houses as forbidding as national park pavilions or as secluded as missile bases, hidden in thickets along the shores of Lake Lavon. Juxtaposed to those personal statements were the more familiar examples of prairie architecture: trailer homes, bait shops, window-less lodge halls, an outdoor revival shelter, ghost-town cemeteries. The only connection between past and present was the ubiquitous white horse fences that proliferated along the highway and around many of the brand-new houses, in inverse proportion to the number of horses needing corrals.

Candy Montgomery would always be able to remember the precise moment when she decided she would go to bed with Bettys husband, Allan Gore. It happened on the church volleyball court, on a late-summer day in 1978. Candy and Allan both tried to make a play on the same balland collided. It was a harmless bump, really, and went unnoticed by everyone else on the court, but for Candy it brought a revelation: Allan Gore smelled sexy. For several weeks she had been talking abstractly to friends about having an affair. Candy wanted something to shake up her very boring life with Pat. She was explicit about the kind of affair she was interested in: transcendent sex. As she put it, I want fireworks.

Then she bumped into Allan Gore and wondered to herself, Could a man like that make the earth move? At first glance he didnt look like it. Allan had a receding hairline and the beginnings of a paunchy midsection, and he dressed blandly, to say the least. But in other ways he was the kind of man she might be able to have a good time with. She had known Allan for only nine months, but it seemed much longer. He was a lot like her: active in the church, a lover of kids, the outgoing, personable half of a mismatched couple. Allan sang in the choir, helped organize the sports teams, he did all the things that Betty never seemed to want to get involved in. he had a sense of humor. It was only natural that he and Candy would see a lot of each other. More to the point, a tiny, insistent voice in the back of Candys brain kept telling her that Allan Gore was as anxious to go to bed with her as she was with him.

It had begun with little things. Allan seemed to joke with her more than he joked with the other women at church. He teased her about her volleyball skills, and every once in a while hed give her a sly wink, as though they shared some little secret. After choir practice the two of them would occasionally chat a little longer than necessary or loiter in the parking lot while the others were getting into their cars. The flirting was subtle. Sometimes it was so much like Allans natural friendliness with everyone that Candy doubted it was a real flirtation. But then Allan would do something that was unmistakably designed to get her attention, and she would start wondering all over again. As the weeks went by, she started fantasizing about sex with the man who smelled so nice. Candy was almost 29 years old and sexually frustrated. She was totally honest with herself about that. How many more years did she have to find out what she was missing? Not many. She decided to do something about it.

She got her chance one night after choir practice. Allan was already getting into his car when Candy spotted him. She strode up to the passenger side and opened the door. Allan, she said, leaning into the car, I want to talk to you sometime, about something that has been bothering me.

Oh? he said. How about right now? Candy slid into the seat beside him. She didnt even look at him.

Ive been thinking about you a lot and its really bothering me and I dont know whether I want you to do anything about it or not. Allan, a little confused, said nothing. Im very attracted to you and Im tired of thinking about it and so I wanted to tell you. And with that, she jumped out of the car, slammed the door, and hurried across the parking lot.

Allan felt shocked and flattered and a little ridiculous. He wasnt shocked by Candys directnesshe had known her long enough to realize that she spoke exactly what was on her mindbut he was nonplussed that another woman was interested in him sexually. He was also surprised, and secretly pleased, that it was Candy. Even though she wasnt what you would call a classic beauty, she was one of the most attractive women in the church, in his opinion, and she was certainly the most fun to be with. Then a wave of doubt overtook him: maybe Candy was just flirting, in her own way, because all she had really said was that she had been thinking about him. But such an odd way to say it.

Allan thought about Candy a lot over the next few days, and he wondered whether she would say anything else the next time they were together. He thought about calling her but then felt silly and awkward. He also thought, a little guiltily, of how different Candy was from his wife. Betty was as dour as ever; Candy was always up, always busy, self-confident, easygoing, warm.

Betty Pomeroy had been one of those girls whose conventionality made her the frequent center of attention. She was pretty; she had an innocence about her and a wide Hollywood smile that had made her one of the most popular girls in her tiny hometown of Norwich, Kansas. In college Betty fell in love with her math teacher, and when she and Allan Gore decided to get married, her family and friends were surprised. They couldnt see what she saw in him. Allan was a small, plain man with horn-rim glasses and puffy cheeks and, even at a young age, signs of a receding hairline. He was also shy, which often made him come across as stern or aloof or even snobbish.

Betty and Allan were married in January 1970 and they eventually settled in the suburbs of Dallas. When their first child was born, Allan was working for Rockwell International, an electronics conglomerate and major defense contractor. In 1976 Betty took a job teaching at an elementary school in the small town of Wylie, about ten miles east of Plano, but she didnt enjoy her work for very long. She couldnt control her unruly students, and at the same time she couldnt bear to be left alone at home when Allan had to travel.

In spite of her unhappiness, though, Betty had decided, as a new school year began in the fall of 1978, that they should go ahead and have their next child, but this time she wanted the pregnancy planned down to the exact week so that the baby would be born in midsummer and she wouldnt have to take any time off from teaching. This was especially difficult, since the Gores sex life had dwindled to almost nothing, and when they did have sex, it was completely mechanical. Now Allan was required to have clinical sex with Betty every night during her estimated fertility period, in the name of family planning. He felt a little resentful; he had the distinct feeling that he was being used. That, combined with Bettys usual complaints about minor illnesses, made Allans marital future look bleak indeed when compared with the bright, happy-go-lucky face of Candy Montgomery, full of promise and, he had to admit, allure. That didnt mean he didnt love Betty or that he would never do anything to hurt her. It just pleased Allan that a woman like Candy would feel those emotions for a man like him.

A week or so after the choir practice, Allan saw Candy again. It was after another church volleyball game. Allan and Candy stayed to clean up the gymnasium, and afterward they walked out to the parking lot together. When they reached her car, Allan said, Now what was it you had in mind?

Get in, said Candy.

Allan slid into the passenger seat.

Would you be interested in having an affair? she asked.

Despite all his mental preparation, Allan wasnt prepared for something that direct. I dont know what to say, he said.

Its just something Ive been thinking about and I wanted to say it so I dont have to think about it anymore.

I dont think I could, Candy. I dont think it would be a wise thing to do, because I love Betty. Once when we were living in New Mexico she had an affair that hurt me a lot, and I wouldnt want to do that to her.

Candy was surprised to realize how much Allan had thought about his answer. Thats fine, Allan. I love Pat, too. I wouldnt want to hurt him, either.

Betty just got pregnant again, too, and it would be unfair to her, especially since I dont feel the same way about you that I do about her. So I probably couldnt do something like that.

Okay, Allan, I was just putting the option out there because of how I felt and its up to you to decide. I dont want to hurt your marriage. All I wanted to do was go to bed. I wont mention it again.

Allan leaned across the seat and softly kissed Candys lips. Then he quickly got out of the car.

One thing Allan Gore always believed in was that marriages are forever. Thats why, when his sexual relations with Betty started to become routine and unimaginative, he cast about for explanations. He enjoyed sex, and he knew that Betty did, too, and there was nothing wrong with them when they were happy and untroubled together. But lately there was not much enthusiasm in the bedroom. Allan was working hard, even though he didnt travel any longer because Betty had a deep-seated fear of being alone. She frequently came home from school full of tension, and she would sometimes use most of the evening grading papers for the next days classes. When you dont spend a lot of time together in the evening, Allan thought, theres usually not much interest in spending a lot of time in bed, either. Allan was afraid they were in danger of falling victim to complete boredom.

One solution Allan considered briefly was a program called Marriage Encounter. Some friends of his from church, JoAnn and Richard Garlington, had gone to a Dallas motel one weekend for a special Marriage Encounter session in which several couples talked about their marriages and tried to strengthen their commitment. Allan didnt understand exactly what went on, but he knew that the Garlingtons came back beaming and almost absurdly joyous. They said they were hooked on Marriage Encounter and immediately set about trying to get other couples to join. If it had been anyone else but Richard and JoAnn, Allan would have mistrusted it, especially since Richard wouldnt tell him exactly what happened during the Marriage Encounter weekend. You wont understand it unless you go experience it for yourself, Richard said. Allan had to admit that the Garlingtons had seemed to be happier in the months since they were encountered, as they put it. One thing the Gores did need was something positive and revitalizing in their marriage, so one evening Allan tentatively suggested to Betty that they give Marriage Encounter a try.

Why do we need something like that? she said. I have so much to do already. You dont think theres something wrong with us, do you?

He could tell she would be upset if he said yes, and so he dropped the subject.

When Pat Montgomery married Candy Wheeler in the early seventies, he was one of the brightest young electrical engineers at Texas instruments. Candy had been working as a secretary; she was petite and blond and a little impish, with a thin, pointed nose and a contagious high-pitched laugh. She was an Army brat, the daughter of a radar technician who had spent the twenty years after World War II bouncing with his family from base to base. Candy seemed born to the wandering life, though, blessed with an easy rapport with strangers and a coquettish exuberance that taught her at an early age what power women could exert over men.

Candy and Pat moved to the country in 1977 with a son and a daughter; by then, their marriage had settled into a routine. Pat was providing everything Candy had ever expected from him, including a $70,000 income from his work on sophisticated military radar systems at Texas Instruments. Candy did not mind taking care of the children and their house, but she was bored crazy. That was why, on her twenty-ninth birthday, the highlight of her day was a phone call that came completely out of the blue.

Hi, this is Allan. I have to go to McKinney tomorrow to get some tires checked on the new truck I bought up there. I wondered if youd like to have lunch, you know, to talk a little more about what we talked about before.

It had been two or three weeks since the last time they had talked, in the parking lot outside the gym. Those weeks hadnt been easy for Candy. She felt foolish after throwing herself at him and then being so calmly rejected. Besides being embarrassed, she was afraid that Allan would think less of her. She wanted to put the whole incident out of her mind, and the only reason she couldnt was the kiss. If Allan were so dead set against the idea, why had he given her that enigmatic kiss on the lips just before he left? It was not what she would call a passionate kiss, but it was not a brotherly kiss either. And it didnt help Candys peace of mind that she and Pat had been arguing more than usual lately. She had brought home some A+ papers from the writing class she was enrolled in, but all Pat would do was glance at them and pretend to understand. His insensitivity infuriated her and led to harsh words. To Pat they were arguments over nothing, but to her they represented everything wrong with their marriage.

Allan and Candy met at an auto repair shop in McKinney, the venerable county seat a few miles north of Candys house. Allan broke the ice right away by surprising her with a birthday card. On the front, it read, For the Last of the Red Hot Lovers. She opened it to find a small plastic bag of Red Hots inside. It was the kind of hokey gag card that Candy loved, and she was instantly touched. They got into her car and drove to a quaint little teahouse, where they talked about everything except themselves for the better part of an hour. Allan talked about Betty. Candy talked about Pat. They compared notes on their children, chatted about church matters. Candy got Allan to talk about his work for a while, and he in turn seemed interested when she discussed her creative writing course. Then, after the meal was cleared away and they began to sip their coffee, Allan said, Ive never done anything like an affair before.

I havent either, said Candy.

I would never be able to forgive myself if Betty ever found out about something like that. I think it would just be devastating to her.

I feel the same way. I wouldnt want to see anyone hurt by this, Pat or Betty. We would have to be so careful that no one would ever know except us.

Ive been thinking a lot about what you said, about not wanting to get emotionally involved. That would be very important for me.

Me, too, Allan. I just want to enjoy myself without hurting myself or anyone else.

Well, lets think about it some more, and maybe we should think about the hazards some more and whether we want to take that risk.

Fine. I think we should.

Little else was said that day, but within a week Allan called Candy again while Pat was at work. They chatted more about Pat was at work. They chatted more about the risks of having an affair, their fears of doing something that would ruin their marriages, but they also talked about their mutual attraction and were obviously excited by the prospect of a tryst.

You know, if you dont go to bed with me pretty soon, Allan, then youll never be able to live up to the expectation I have of you in bed, Candy said, giggling.

I know, he said, not laughing. Ive thought of that.

The next month consisted of strategy sessions for what must have been the most meticulously planned love affair in the history of romance. It began with tentative phone calls from Allan, asking about this or that. When would we do it? What if somebody saw us? Soon after the lunch at the teahouse in McKinney, they arranged to meet for lunch again, this time at the parking lot of Allans office in Richardson, from which they drove to a nearby restaurant. Allan was accustomed to making his own hours at work, so a long lunch break was no problem, but they could save time if Candy picked him up. From talking about the hazards of the affair, they moved quickly to a consideration of ways they could possibly avoid those hazards. They talked a great deal about emotional involvement. They agreed that there would be none of that; it was too dangerous. As long as they limited the affair to sex, they were safe.

Allan started looking forward to his daily call to Candy from work. Candy, just as starved for affection, looked forward to it as well. Allan was growing much more comfortable with the idea of an affair, mainly because he discovered, to his surprise, that he could go to lunch with Candy, talk with her intimately on the phone, and then go home to Betty and always be completely normal. Candy always felt completely normal around Pat, perhaps because she was confident he would never suspect a thing. Still, Allan and Candy hesitated to take the plunge.

At the end of November Candy came up with the best stratagem of all: she invited Allan to her house for lunch. She fixed her famous lasagna for the occasion. She also decided, before Allan arrived, that if nothing happened soon, she wouldnt spend any more time on this. She had done what she could to make it happen. It was really Allans decision to make. He was so damned indecisive that she was starting to think he wasnt aggressive enough to do this anyway.

As soon as Allan walked into the Montgomery house that day, he broke into laughter, for the first thing he saw, hanging above the room, was a huge piece of butcher paper. On it, in Magic Marker, Candy had made two columns. The column on the left was headed WHYS. The column on the right said, WHY-NOTS. When she said she was inviting him over to discuss the pros and cons, she wasnt kidding. She also knew, from their last few phone conversations, that Allan was leaning toward a decision not to have an affair. The cute little sign eased the tension.

After eating, they sat in the living room and went over the list an item at a time. They took the why-nots first, beginning with the most important one: fear of getting caught.

But that really shouldnt be a problem, said Candy, if were careful.

Allan was much more concerned about one of the why-nots farther down the list: the possibility that they would become emotionally involved. We need to think about what were getting into, said Allan.

Allan, as far as Im concerned, this is just for fun. Im not serious about it. Its just a companionship thing, and we shouldnt be afraid of it. Whatever happens, well do it for a while and then it will be over.

Im afraid that I might get emotionally involved.

We just wont let that happen.

The whys on the list were a good deal easier: a sense of adventure, a need for companionship. Candy hadnt gone so far as to put sex on the list, but they discussed that one, too.

Well always wonder if we dont do it, she said.

I know, said Allan.

Its up to you, Allan. I know I can do it. I know I can act in an adult fashion and not take necessary risks. Ive made up my mind, so just tell me if you want to do it.

They didnt make the final decision that day, but after Allan left, Candy thought to herself, How much farther can you go? They had already made too big a deal of something that should have been more natural. It wasnt as though Allan Gore was her fantasy man or anything.

A few days later Allan called again.

Ive decided I want to go ahead with it, he said.

Still, it didnt happen right away. There were ground rules to be established, logistical problems to be worked out. This affair was to be conducted properly. Candy even made a list of rules one day so they could discuss them on the phone:

If either one of them ever wanted to end the affair, for whatever reason, it would end. No questions asked.If either one became too emotionally involved, the affair would end.If they ever started taking risks that shouldnt be taken, the affair would end.All expensesfood, motel room, gasolinewould be shared equally.They would meet only on weekdays, while their spouses were at work.Candy would be in charge of fixing lunch on the days they met, so that they could have more time. They figured they would need all of Allans two-hour lunch.Candy would be in charge of getting a motel room, for the same reason.They would meet on a Tuesday or a Thursday, once every two weeks. That was because Candy was free only on days when her little boy attended the Play Day Preschool at Allan Methodist Church. She took him each Tuesday and Thursday, from nine to two, but she figured that she would need three out of four of those school days for all the other errands and church and school duties in her hectic schedule.

Finally having checked off every possible precaution, like astronauts getting ready for a launch, they set the date for the affair to begin: December 12, 1978.

Candy spent the morning getting ready. First she dropped off her daughter at the little red Lovejoy schoolhouse on FM Road 1378, then she went on to Allen and deposited her son at the Play Day Preschool. When she got back to the house, she allowed herself about an hour to fix the special lunch she had planned: marinated chicken, lettuce salad with cherry tomatoes and bacon bits, Thousand Island dressing, white wine, and cheesecake for dessert. She packed everything, including a tablecloth, into a picnic basket and then gathered together a few undergarments and a nightgown and slipped them into her purse. She had everything ready by ten-forty-five. By eleven she was entering Richardson in her station wagon, searching for a motel convenient to Allans office. She found one right on the freeway, just two or three minutes away from Allan, called the Continental Inn.

It took a few minutes to check in because the girl behind the counter insisted on seeing her drivers license and getting the money in advance. Candy paid out $29 of the cash she had gotten at the supermarket the day before and then filled out the registration card with her real name. the girl gave her the key to one of the upstairs rooms set back from the highway. Candy drove the station wagon around to the back and started unpacking.

The room would do nicely. It was about ten by twelve feet, with one of those old televisions about the size of a Buick. The walls were covered with bright yellow fake paneling, which perfectly fit the autumnal dcor: old brown carpet and, on the bed, a spread adorned with leaves and pinecones. Candy went straight to the phone and called Allan at work. Im at the Continental Inn on Central Expressway, she said. Room Two-thirteen.

Be there in a few minutes, he said.

Candy busied herself getting the room ready. First she arranged her marinated chicken feast on the bed. Then she slipped into her favorite peekaboo negligee; it was a soft pink color and almost, but not quite, sheer. It was long, falling all the way to her ankles, and it showed off her body while hiding the slightly too large thighs. She looked at herself in the mirror. For a mother of two, she didnt look bad. Then she sat in a chair by the window and waited.

Suddenly, for the first time since she had propositioned Allan in the church parking lot, Candy started to get nervous. Perhaps it was the coldly impersonal room, perhaps the calculated way they were going about the affair. But she felt herself becoming frightened now that she realized that whatever they did today would be irrevocable. Everything she had done before, no matter how brazen, had been harmless flirtation compared with this. Having sex is not as simple as it seems. It changes people.

On the way to the motel, Allan discovered that he wasnt quite as brave as he had thought, either. He worried that perhaps the only reason he was doing this was to please Candy. He had to admit that Candy was sexually appealing, and yet he didnt want to be full of anxiety all the time. He didnt want to feel the way he was feeling now.

But once he opened the door and saw Candy, smiling and seductive in her pink nightgown, Allan felt a surge of bravado. What the heck, thought Allan. Im here, and Im going to do it.

Ive made lunch, she said, smiling halfheartedly. Allan could tell, much to his surprise, that Candy was even more nervous than he was.

They sat on either side of the bed and made small talk. Allan dug into the chicken and quickly drank a glass of wine. Candy poked at her chicken, tearing off one little sliver at a time. I feel like what were eating, she said. Allan smiled.

They finished off the dessert and then busied themselves with putting aside the paper plates and containers, as though neither wanted to make the first move. When there was nothing left to do, Candy sat quietly in the chair by the window. There was a moment of strained silence.

Well, said Allan, are you just going to sit there?

Candy smiled. Yes.

Allan walked around the bed and gently touched her on the shoulder. All of her nervousness dissolved.

The sex was gentle and conventional and satisfying. It was also brief. Candy was amazed at first by Allans navet as a lover. When she stuck her tongue into his mouth, it was apparent that he had never had a French kiss before. The good news was that he was a quick learner. For his part, Allan was positively transported. Candy was so responsive and energeticshe moved so muchthat Allan found it more exciting than any sexual experience he had ever had. It was good for him because it seemed so good for her. He couldnt keep going very long, but he remembered the feeling for days.

Afterward Candy insisted they both take showers before leaving. So you wont smell like me, she said.

Candy felt well pleased. Despite Allans apparent inexperience, she hadnt had to fake her responses much at all. And he did show great promise as a lover. Allan was just as satisfied by the lunchtime rendezvous and was looking forward to the next one. When he want back to work, he felt weak the rest of the afternoon.

After the first meeting at the Continental Inn, it was obvious that both of them would want more. So a week later, just before the Christmas holidays, they arranged by phone for a repeat performance. This time Candy spent the morning preparing teriyaki beef strips and cheese blintzes. She did change one other detail. When she got to Richardson, she noticed a smallerand sleaziermotel across the freeway from the Continental. Always the practical shopper, she figured a motel room was a motel room, so why not get something cheaper than $29?

The Como Motel was quite a comedown, even by the less-than-luxurious standards of the Continental. Candy got the impression that the Como didnt have a lot of overnight visitors when she walked into the office and came face to face with a clerk standing behind a Plexiglas screen, like a bank tellers window or, perhaps more appropriate, a jailers. The manager wanted $23.50 cash in advance plus a $2 deposit for the key. Candy put her money in the trough under the window, and he passed her a key. She drove around to the asphalt lot in the back.

In the months to come Allan and Candy would joke about their room at the Como. Candy always said it smelled like old money. The sleaziness of the place was what made it so illicitand so much fun. The room was little more than a cubicle, ten by ten at the most, done in a tattered harvest gold. The curtains were drooping and frayed. The shag carpet was matted like dirty hair. The bathroom had fake terrazzo flooring, the faucet leaked, and the only furnishings other than the bed were a tiny vanity, a TV set, and two captains chairs with imitation leather cushions.

Here, for the last days of 1978 and the first three months of 1979, Allan and Candy made glorious love every other week, dined on taco salad and homemade lasagna, and sipped cheap red wine out of plastic cups supplied by the management. (They came wrapped in cellophane bags with Walt Disney cartoons on them.) Afterward they would recline on the bedspread and rest their heads on tiny foam-rubber pillows and talk about their lives and their spouses and their children and their mutual love for their church. They would talk until it was time for Allan to go back to work or for Candy to pick up her son, and then go stand in the tub and turn on the faulty shower attachment and wash off the smell of each other. Finally, they would gather up their belongings, kiss each other lightly on the lips, and go back to their normal lives, closing the door behind them.

Later, when Allan looked back on his whirlwind lunch hours with Candy Montgomery, he would think less of the sex than of the relaxation he took there. Those two hours with Candy were often the only time he didnt feel responsibility for other peoples emotions, the awful burden of making Betty happy. In the confines of a room at the Como Motel, Allan was a man with no past and no future, able to accept Candys unconditional affectionshe showered him with itin a way that was simple and guiltless. Allan had never been with any other woman except Betty in his life. This experience was revitalizing in a way that his life with Betty hadnt been for a long time.

The affair made Candy feel alive again too. She was excited about the sex and the intrigue and the adventure of it all, and she continued to see Allan every two weeks, like clockwork. Unfortunately, after the third or fourth time at the Como, she started to have second thoughts. Her doubts werent spurred by any feelings of guilt. They started, in fact, when she realized that sex with Allan Gore probably wasnt going to get much better than it already was. The first two or three times it had felt good, but there had been virtually no improvement, and she suspected that the man was not capable of fireworks, no matter how much she coached him. The more serious problem was that Candy feared she was beginning to like Allan too much. Sometimes she even thought she loved him. That was too risky.

In retrospect, she would see that it had been inevitable. Sex or no sex, she and Allan had both come to look forward to their daily conversations, their shared confidences, their joint dependence. Lately they had been exchanging funny little greeting cards, and whenever Candy had to drive into Richardson on an errand, she would stop at Allans office and place gifts under his windshield wiper. Sometimes Allan would go out to check his car even when he was staying for lunch, just to see if he had any brownies or homemade candy waiting for him. Once he found a small ceramic statue of a boy and a girl kissing. The inscription on the base read, Practice Makes Perfect. As time went on they seemed less like lovers and more like best friends. During one rendezvous, they decided to forgo sex altogether because they wanted to spend lunchtime talking. Candy could even talk to Allan about Pat; he was that understanding.

By February, after only two and a half months, she was more than a little anxious that the relationship was turning serious all of a sudden. One day at a lunch she tentatively broached the subject with Allan. I think Im getting in too deep, she said.

What do you mean?

I dont want to fall in love with you. Were getting serious, and I know this is a temporary thing. I dont want to have to deal with myself later if we go too far.

How do you know this is getting too serious? asked Allan.

I think of you too much.

But I thought you were the one who said youve got to plow into life and see what happens.

Thats right, I did say that.

Well?

Excerpt from:

Love and Death in Silicon Prairie, Part I: Candy …

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April 21, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Colony Sites – Atomic Rockets – projectrho.com

(ed note: A pantropy ship of the Colonization Council crashes on the planet Hydrot around Tau Ceti. They decide to create colonists for the planet even though the colonists will be unaware of their origins. Ordinarily the ship crew would educate the colonists, but the crew will be dead in a month, the FTL radio is broken, and the Colonization Council has no idea they are there.

Since the ship lost its germ cell banks, they will have to use germ cells from the crew. This means that some of the created colonists will look like and have the same personalities as the crew. Dr. Chatvieux will have a corresponding colonist named “Shar”, pilot la Ventura will be “Lavon”, communication officer Strasvogel will be “Stravol”.

The fun part is there is no suitable place for colonization except for the tiny ponds. So the colonists will be microscopic. In the story they interact with the local equivalent of parameciums, diatoms, and the dreaded rotifers. The colonist call the latter “Eaters” because they prey on men.

After conquering their pond, the colonists build a “spaceship.” This is a huge (2 inch long) wooden tracked vehicle, driven by diadoms harnessed to a wooden gear transmission. It holds water so the crew can breath in the waterless space between ponds, and can downshift gears to have the power to penetrate the surface tension of the pond roof.

In the next pond they find other colonists who are dying out because they cannot cope with the rotifers. However the spaceship crew is armed with underwater crossbows and quickly give the rotifers what for.

This would be fun background in a role-playing game, in the spirit of Bunnies & Burrows. For one thing, you can use an elementary school textbook about protozoan of pond water as the Monster Manual.

The story was selected in 1970 by the Science Fiction Writers of America as one of the best science fiction short stories published before the creation of the Nebula Awards. It can be found in many collections. But don’t get the one in The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One, that version is abridged.)

The sea is about the same, Eunice said. Ive found some of the larger simple metazoansjellyfish and so onand some crayfish almost as big as lobsters. But its normal to find salt-water species running larger than fresh-water. Ana theres the usual plankton and nannoplankton population.Chatvieux turned to Saltonstall, Martin, what would you think of our taking to the sea? We came out of it once, long ago; maybe we could come out of it again on Hydrot.No good, Saltonstall said immediately. I like the idea, but I dont think this planet ever heard of Swinburne, or Homer, either. Looking at it as a colonization problem alone, as if we werent involved in it ourselves, I wouldnt give you an Oc dollar for epi oinopa ponton. The evolutionary pressure there is too high, the competition from other species is prohibitive; seeding the sea should be the last thing we attempt, not the first. The colonists wouldnt have a chance to learn a thing before theyd be gobbled up.Why? la Ventura said. Once more, the death in his stomach was becoming hard to placate.Eunice, do your sea-going Coelenterates include anything like the Portuguese man-of-war?The ecologist nodded.Theres your answer, Paul, Saltonstall said. The sea is out. Its got to be fresh water, where the competing creatures are less formidable and there are more places to hide.We cant compete with a jellyfish? la Ventura asked, swallowing.No, Paul, Chatvieux said. Not with one that dangerous. The pantropes make adaptations, not gods. They take human germ-cellsin this case, our own, since our bank was wiped out in the crashand modify them genetically toward those of creatures who can live in any reasonable environment. The result will be manlike, and intelligent. It usually shows the donors personality patterns, too, since the modifications are usually made mostly in the morphology, not so much in the mind, of the resulting individual.But we cant transmit memory. The adapted man is worse than a child in the new environment. He has no history, no techniques, no precedents, not even a language. In the usual colonization project, like the Tellura affair, the seeding teams more or less take him through elementary school before they leave the planet to him, but we wont survive long enough to give such instruction. Well have to design our colonists with plenty of built-in protections and locate them in the most favorable environment possible, so that at least some of them will survive learning by experience alone.

Saltonstall, what would you recommend as a form?The pantropist pulled reflectively at his nose. Webbed extremities, of course, with thumbs and big toes heavy and thorn-like for defense until the creature has had a chance to learn. Smaller external ears, and the eardrum larger and closer to the outer end of the ear-canal. Were going to have to reorganize the water-conservation system, I think; the glomerular kidney is perfectly suitable for living in fresh water, but the business of living immersed, inside and out, for a creature with a salty inside means that the osmotic pressure inside is going to be higher than outside, so that the kidneys are going to have to be pumping virtually all the time. Under the circumstances wed best step up production of urine, and that means the antidiuretic function of the pituitary gland is going to have to be abrogated, for all practical purposes.What about respiration?Hm, Saltonstall said. I suppose book-lungs (trigger warning: spiders), like some of the arachnids have. They can be supplied by intercostal spiracles. Theyre gradually adaptable to atmosphere-breathing, if our colonist ever decides to come out of the water. Just to provide for that possibility. Id suggest that the nose be retained, maintaining the nasal cavity as a part of the otological system, but cutting off the cavity from the larynx with a membrane of cells that are supplied with oxygen by direct irrigation, rather than by the circulatory system. Such a membrane wouldnt survive for many generations, once the creature took to living out of the water even for part of its life-time; itd go through two or three generations as an amphibian, and then one day itd suddenly find itself breathing through its larynx again.Also, Dr. Chatvieux, Id suggest that we have it adopt sporulation. As an aquatic animal, our colonist is going to have an indefinite life-span, but well have to give it a breeding cycle of about six weeks to keep up its numbers during the learning period; so therell have to be a definite break of some duration in its active year. Otherwise itll hit the population problem before its learned enough to cope with it.And itd be better if our colonists could winter over inside a good, hard shell, Eunice Wagner added in agreement.

(ed note: The colonists are created by pantropy and seeded in the ponds. The crew dies. In one of the ponds, over several generations, the colonists use cooperation and tactics to eventually rid their pond of the rotifer menace. A colonist name Lavon tries to explore “space” by crawling up a plant stalk which pierces the surface tension. The experience almost kills him because in Air nobody can hear your liquid scream. He recovers by creating an out-of-season spore. Then he talks with the “scientist” Shar.)

The slapping of the endless belts and the squeaking and groaning of the gears and axles grew louder as the slope steepened. The ship continued to climb, lurching. Around it, squadrons of men and Protos dipped and wheeled, escorting it toward the sky.Gradually the sky lowered and pressed down toward the top of the ship.A little more work from your diatoms, Tanol, Lavon said. Boulder ahead. The ship swung ponderously. All right, slow them up again. Give us a shove from your side, Tolno, thats too muchthere, thats it. Back to normal; youre still turning us I Tanol, give us one burst to line us up again. Good. All right, steady drive on all sides. It shouldnt be long now.

(ed note: my slide rule says if the colonists are 0.25mm long, and the 2 inch ship is 50.8mm long, then the ship is about 203 man-lengths long. So if you were 1.77 meters tall, the equivalent ship would be 1.77203 = 359 meters long, a quarter of a mile or a bit more than 3 NFL football fields long.

As a retcon, I personally think a 2 centimeter ship is less outrageous. That would only be 141 meters long, about one and a third NFL football fields.)

The ship rested on the Bottom of the canyon for the rest of the night. The great square doors were unsealed and thrown open to admit the raw, irradiated, life-giving water from outsideand the wriggling bacteria which were fresh food. No other creatures approached them, either out of curiosity or for hunting, while they slept, although Lavon had posted guards at the doors just in case. Evidently, even up here on the very floor of space, highly organized creatures were quiescent at night.But when the first flush of light filtered through the water, trouble threatened.

Original post:

Colony Sites – Atomic Rockets – projectrho.com

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April 21, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Steve Scalise Slams Big Tech Bias at Road to Majority Conference

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA), approaching the one year anniversary of his near fatal wounding by a crazed shooter, addressed the Faith and Freedom Coalition’s “Road to Majority” conference, where he raised concerns over Big Tech bias against conservatives.

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June 9, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Exclusive– Marsha Blackburn: ‘Yes,’ Social Media Companies Need Regulation

Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) told Breitbart News in an exclusive interview on Friday that social media companies need regulation regarding their privacy practices as well as censorship of conservative and alternative voices on the Internet.

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Alleged Deep State Leaker James Wolfe Makes First Court Appearance

James Wolfe, the former Senate Intelligence Committee security director charged with lying about his contacts with a series of journalists – including his former paramour, New York Times reporter Ali Watkins – appeared in court Friday after his arrest late Thursday night.

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The Assassination of Count Bernadotte – Jewish Virtual Library

During the fight for Jewish statehood, extremist military groups sometimes resorted to the use of terrorist tactics. One such instance occurred in 1948 when members of the Jewish underground organization LEHI killed UN Peace Mediator Count Folke Bernadotte to protest his diplomatic efforts to modify the Palestine partition plan. Bernadotte, a Swede with family ties to the Swedish King, gained international recognition through his work as head of the Swedish Red Cross during World War II. Bernadotte used his position to negotiate with Heinrich Himmler and save thousands of Jews from concentration camps, although many argue that he could have done more had he been less cautious in negotiations. A diplomat fluent in six languages, Bernadotte was appointed mediator of the UN General Assembly on May 20, 1948, and was immediately faced with the volatile situation in the Middle East. Arabs and Jews had been fighting over Palestine for decades and the conflict escalated after the adoption of the UN partition resolution on November 29, 1947. When Israel declared its independence on May 14, 1948, five Arab armies invaded Israel. On June 11, Bernadotte succeeded in arranging a 30-day cease-fire. After visiting Cairo, Beirut, Amman and Tel Aviv, he came to the conclusion that the UN partition plan was an unfortunate resolution and proposed his own plan to unite the two feuding peoples. Instead of establishing individual states, he suggested that Arabs and Jews form a union consisting of a small Jewish entity and an enlarged Transjordan. Haifa and Lydda (Lod) airport would become free zones. Israel would receive the Western Galilee and unlimited immigration for two years, after which the UN would take control of the issue. Between 250,000 and 300,000 Arab refugees would be permitted to return to Arab territory with compensation and Transjordan would control the Negev and, despite Israeli claims, Jerusalem. The Arab world rejected the Bernadotte plan on the grounds that, as Syrian officer Muhammad Nimr al-Khatib said, Most of these mediators are spies for the Jews anyway. The Israeli government, hating the idea of giving up Jerusalem and bent on military victory, quickly followed suit. Fighting resumed on July 8 and the Israeli army gained strength and succeeded in pushing back the Arabs until a second UN cease-fire was declared on July 18, this time with no time limit and a threat of economic sanctions against any country that broke it. One organization that saw Bernadottes efforts as a threat was LEHI, a Jewish underground group that, under the leadership of Yitzhak Shamir, Dr. Israel Scheib and Nathan Friedman-Yellin, had waged a campaign of personal terror to force the British out of Palestine. LEHI called Bernadotte a British agent who had cooperated with the Nazis in World War II. The organization considered his plan to be a threat to its goal of Israeli independence on both banks of the Jordan River. Commander Yehoshua Zeitler of the Jerusalem branch of LEHI started training four men to kill Bernadotte, and solicited information from two sympathetic journalists about his schedule. LEHI leaders decided to assassinate Bernadotte while he was on his way to a meeting with Dov Joseph, military governor of Jerusalems New City, which was scheduled for either 4:30 p.m. on September 17 or sometime on September 18 (the exact date is disputed). On September 16, Bernadotte flew to Beirut and spent the day there. At 9:30 a.m. on Friday, September 17, he boarded his UN Dakota plane for the 45 minute flight to Jerusalem. After arriving in Palestine, Bernadottes day started with a shot hitting an armored car in his convoy while he was visiting Ramallah. No one was hurt and, according to army liaison officer Moshe Hillman, Bernadotte was proud of the bullet hole and showed Hillman the UN flag that had saved him. Bernadottes appointment with Joseph was rescheduled for 6:30 p.m. that day. Bernadotte spent time at the official UN headquarters at the YMCA and at Government House, a potential headquarters for a UN mission. He visited the Jerusalem Agricultural School where he picked up French UN observer Andre Seraut who took the center seat in the UN car, immediately to Bernadottes left. The three car convoy then headed back to the YMCA to pick up a copy of the truce regulations before the meeting with Joseph. Meanwhile, LEHI terrorists adapted their plans to the new meeting time and an Israeli military jeep carrying a driver named Meshulam Makover and four assassins was dispatched to Palmeh Street in the Jerusalem neighborhood of Old Katamon. At 5:03 p.m., the UN convoy drove up and found the jeep blocking its path. The terrorists, wearing khaki shorts and peaked caps, left their jeep, found Bernadotte in the second car of the convoy and one man, later discovered to be Yehoshua Cohen, fired a Schmeisser automatic pistol into the car, spraying the interior with bullets and killing Seraut and then Bernadotte. The other LEHI members shot the tires of the rest of the convoy and all the terrorists escaped to the religious community of Shaarei Pina where they hid with haredi (ultra-religious) LEHI sympathizers for a few days before fleeing to Tel Aviv in the back of a furniture truck. Both Seraut and Bernadotte were transported to Hadassah Hospital on Mount Scopus, but were found to have died instantly. Bernadotte had been hit six times. On September 18, his body was flown to Haifa and then to Sweden, where he was buried on his wifes birthday. The Israeli government subsequently cracked down on LEHI, arresting many of its members and confiscating their arms. LEHI disbanded, largely due to public condemnation. While the world mourned for Bernadotte, some in Israel, such as former Tehiya Member of Knesset and former LEHI radio announcer Geula Cohen, saw it as just another death in war, no more immoral than other killings committed during the long Arab-Israeli conflict. Cohen considers the assassination to have been an effective measure because we prevented the internationalization of Jerusalem. Others, however, such as Hebrew University professor Joseph Heller, argue that the killing actually provoked support for the Bernadotte plan by making its author into a martyr. The plan was never implemented, but whether its failure was due to the assassination or simply because of Israeli military strength and other outside factors is pure speculation. Yitzhak Shamir reputedly played a role in planning the assassination; however, he was never tried and years later was elected as Israel’s eighth Prime Minister. Sources: Bell, J. Bowyer. Terror Out Of Zion. NJ: Transaction, 1996; A bullet for the count. Jerusalem Post International Edition . October 10, 1998, p. 16-18; Collins, Larry and Dominique Lapierre. O Jerusalem! NY: Simon and Schuster, 1972 (Amazon.com paperback, Distribooks, 1994); Sachar, Howard. A History of Israel: From the Rise of Zionism to Our Time. NY: Alfred A. Knopf, 1998.

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May 20, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Moshe Dayan – Jewish Virtual Library

Moshe Dayan was an Israeli military leader who later became a crusader for peace. He played a key role in four wars and helped negotiate the Israel-Egypt peace treaty. Dayan (born May 20, 1915; died October 16, 1981) was born on kibbutz Deganya Alef, near Lake Kinneret, to parents Shemuel and Devorah. The kibbutz was founded in 1910 and called em hakvutzot – the mother of collective settlements. When he was only 14 years old, Dayan joined the Haganah, an underground organization that defended Jewish settlements from Arab attacks. In the Haganah, Dayan learned guerilla warfare from British Captain Charles Orde Wingate, who was a leader of night patrols organized to fight Arab rebel bands. During the riots of 1936-1939, he served with the special police force in the Jezreel Valley and Galilee. When the British outlawed the Haganah in 1939, Dayan was arrested and imprisoned for two years. Upon his release in 1941, Dayan joined the British army, where he served with the forces that liberated Lebanon and Syria from Vichy France during World War II. Dayan was wounded in battle in Lebanon and lost his left eye. He began to wear the black eyepatch that later became his trademark. He cooperated with British intelligence to set up a broadcasting network for clandestine operations behind enemy lines in the event that Palestine should fall to the Germans. He remained active in the Haganah until 1948. Dayan’s activities in the 1948 War of Independence began when he commanded the defense of Jewish settlements in the Jordan Valley. He later commanded the battalion that attacked the city of Lydda and helped halt Egyptian forces on the southern front. In August 1948, he was appointed commander on the Jerusalem front. In 1949, he participated in armistice talks with Jordanian officials at Rhodes. Dayan’s military prowess allowed him to rise to the rank of chief of operations at General Headquarters in 1952, and, in 1953, he was elected Chief of Staff of the armed forces. Dayan became Chief of Staff during a time of severe Arab belligerence. Despite the military armistice of 1949, the surrounding Arab nations remained hostile, maintaining a maritime blockade, reinforcing an economic boycott, promoting political and propaganda warfare and supporting terrorism in Israel. The Israeli government was unable to contain the terrorist violence. Dayan insisted on strong retaliation operations. His view was that the Arabs saw terrorism as a stage of war, and the longer the terrorist attacks continued, the longer the Arabs had to build up their military strength. He wanted to force the Arabs into open battle before they gained full military power. Under Dayan’s command, the Israeli military launched raids in Gaza and other retaliatory missions, causing heavy casualties to the Egyptians, Syrians, and other Arab populations. On October 29, 1956, Dayan led Israel’s Suez campaign, an invasion of the Sinai Peninsula after Egypt, Syria and Jordan signed a pact stating as their goal the destruction of Israel. Dayan left the military in 1958 and entered his second career politics. He joined Israel’s Labor Party, Mapai, and was elected to the Knesset in 1959. He served as Minister of Agriculture in the government of David Ben-Gurion from 1959 until 1964. In 1964, Dayan resigned as Minister of Agriculture after an argument with new Prime Minister Levi Eshkol and joined Ben-Gurion in forming a new party called Rafi (Alliance of Israel’s Workers). Dayan did not stay out of the government for long, however. One year later, Dayan was reelected to the Knesset representing Rafi, which later rejoined the Labor Party. Dayan’s reputation as an effective leader grew when he was appointed Minister of Defense under Levi Eshkol just in time for the Six-Day War in 1967 against Egypt, Jordan and Syria. When the Syrians were shelling Israeli villages in Upper Galilee, Dayan was the one who made the decision to launch a full-scale attack against the Syrians. It was also Dayan who ended the fighting by arranging a cease-fire with Syria through Chief of Staff of the UN Observer Corps, General Odd Bull. Dayan was seen as “a solo performer, partly admired, partly feared for his political stunts.” After the war, Dayan controlled the territories occupied by the Israeli Army. He opened the borders for Arab residents of the territories to travel to Arab countries, while at the same time maintaining order and security in Israeli-held areas. Dayan kept his position as Defense Minister when Golda Meir of the Labor Party succeeded Eshkol as Prime Minister in 1969. Ambassador Gideon Rafael wrote about Dayan, “Rocking the boat is his favourite tactic, not to overturn it, but to sway it sufficiently for the helmsman to lose his grip or for some of its unwanted passengers to fall overboard.” One of his most controversial demands, made in 1973, was for the construction of Yamit, a new Israeli port city in Egyptian territory. Fearful of Dayan’s defection from the Labor Party, Meir supported the plan. Before the Yamit plan could advance, however, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat launched a surprise attack against Israel. On Yom Kippur, October 6, 1973, Egyptian armies crossed the Suez Canal, moved anti-aircraft missiles into the canal area, and waged war on Israel. Israeli losses were high and Israel had too short a supply of equipment to conduct a prolonged war. On October 22, a cease-fire was declared, but the Israeli public’s confidence had been severely shaken. Israel had been unprepared for the surprise attack and unable to repulse it quickly. The nations lack of preparation was blamed on Defense Minister Dayan and an outraged public demanded his resignation. The president of the Supreme Court set up a commission to investigate the performance of generals during the war. The commission recommended the resignation of the Chief of Staff, but reserved judgement on Dayan. The press and the public, however, condemned him. After attending a military funeral at which bereaved parents had called him a murderer of their sons, Dayan submitted his resignation to Meir in 1974. Dayan was “loath to close his life story marked by the events of the Yom Kippur War,” and, in 1977, newly elected Likud Prime Minister Menachem Begin gave him a second chance by offering him the post of Minister of Foreign Affairs. Although Dayan was from the opposition Labor Party, he accepted the appointment because he believed, “I could significantly influence Israel’s moves towards achieving a peace arrangement with our neighboring Arab States and with the Palestinian inhabitants of Judea and Samaria and the Gaza Strip.” In May 1977, Dayan began negotiating with the Egyptians. As lead negotiator, Dayan began with the premise of receiving an Arab acceptance of Israeli rule over Judea, Samaria and Gaza, in exchange for a return of Sinai to Egypt. He negotiated for 18 months, and held secret meetings with officials in India, Iran, England and Morocco. His style is described as acting “alternately with dash and deliberation, advancing and stalling, vacillating between surprising compromises and inexplicable intransigence.” With help from U.S. president and mediator Jimmy Carter, Dayan met with the Egyptians first at Leeds Castle and later at Camp David. Eventually, a peace agreement, the Camp David Accords, was drawn up and signed at 11 p.m. on Sunday September 17, 1978. In 1979, Dayan resigned as Foreign Minister. Dayan and Begin disagreed about the building of settlements in the territories and Dayan was frustrated by the fact that he was not leading the autonomy talks with the Palestinians. Dayan also felt that he was increasingly being bypassed on foreign policy issues. In 1981, he formed the Telem party, which advocated unilateral disengagement from the territories occupied in 1967. The party received only two mandates in the subsequent elections. On May 14, 1979, Dayan was diagnosed with colon cancer. He died on October 16, 1981, in Tel Aviv and was buried in Nahalal, the moshav where he was raised. During his life, Dayan wrote four books: Diary of the Sinai Campaign (1966), Mappah Hadasha-Yahasim Aherim (1969) on problems after the Six-Day War, Moshe Dayan: Story of My Life (1976) and Breakthrough: A Personal Account of the Egypt-Israel Peace Negotiations (1981).

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May 6, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Zoe Hart | Hart of Dixie Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

Zoe HartBirthdate October 24, 1982 Dark Brown with Caramel Highlights Doctor (currently) Episode 1In the fallout, her boyfriend, who did his residency at the same hospital, New York Hospital, as Zoe (as well as Zoe’s father, previously), dumps her because she would rather talk about work than his day. Also, she fails to get the heart fellowship. To Zoe’s indignation, her Chief of Surgery recommends she spend the next twelve months as a general practitioner and warns her she needs to improve her bedside manner, to see people as people, not puzzles to solve. Unfortunately for Zoe, there are no general practitioner positions available in New York City. Out of viable options, Zoe stumbles across a postcard from Harley Wilkes – who had continually sent her offers for a position at his medical practice over the last four years since his initial offer at her graduation from medical school and decides to accept. Upon arriving in Bluebell, Alabama, she discovers Dr. Harley Wilkes died four months previously, and that he had mysteriously left his practice to her. But this wasn’t without its complications – Harley had only left Zoe his half of the practice, which he shared with Dr. Brick Breeland, who had long been eager to have the whole practice to himself. After a rough start in Bluebell, rubbing nearly all the residents the wrong way, drunkenly making out with Wade Kinsella after faultily signing off on Old Man Jackson’s eye exam (resulting in his running over George Tucker), and butting heads with the Breeland clan, Zoe is ready to return to New York with her mother, Mrs. Hart, and leave behind Bluebell when Emmeline Hattenbarger reveals the answer to the mystery of why Harley Wilkes would have left Zoe his practice – he was her father. After confronting her mother about this information, and learning the truth, Zoe decides to stay in Bluebell, living in the carriage house on the Mayor’s Plantation. She’s determined to make the town see that she could be one of them, and so, to hang on to the medical practice her father had for 45 years. Zoe and father, Ethan Hartwere close, growing up, sharing his dream to become a doctor, and determined to follow in his footsteps and become a cardio-thoracic surgeon – even performing her residency at New York Hospital, the same hospital where he had done his, while her mother, Candice Hart tried to sway her daughter toward another direction. According to Zoe’s mother, when Zoe was ten she fell off a swing and the doctors believed she would need a blood transfusion- when it turned out Ethan ‘s blood didn’t match Zoe’s, it was revealed (unknowingly to ten-year-old Zoe) he was not her biological father. Zoe’s mother describes Ethan Hart as a man who can’t handle complications, and though, he tried to stay a part of Zoe’s life, he didn’t feel up to the task. Shortly after the revelation, he left his family. Later, when Zoe realized Ethan was not her biological father, she would refer to this incident as “why Dad stopped loving me”. (Pilot) At one point Zoe wanted to change her last name from Hart to Wilkes but Zoe’s father Ethan returned and fixed their relationship, he also offers Zoe to join him at network city with a fellowship which she considers and agrees to but then changes her mind at the airport. At the age of 28, after moving to Bluebell, Alabama Zoe was given a photograph of Harley Wilkes and her mother together, and discovered her real father was Harley Wilkes, whom her mother, Candice Hart had an affair with on a cruise while engaged to another man. After living in Bluebell for a time, and with the knowledge that Harley Wilkes was her real father, Zoe discovered she had an uncle – Jacob Wilkes (though deceased)- as well as an aunt – Maureen Wilkes (it is unclear whether Maureen was Harley and Jacob’s sister, or Jacob’s wife), and her grandmother, was named Claire Wilkes. (Claire’s second husband was a French-Canadian named Guy, though it is unclear whether he or Claire’s first husband is Zoe’s grandfather.) Also, Zoe has a living pseudo uncle/second cousin in the form of Olin, who Claire Wilkes took in when he was a child and raised alongside her own children. (Husband/In Love With/Soulmate/Best Friend)Neighbors, Zoe and Wade have an obvious attraction to one another- an attraction that nearly turned into more during the 2011 heat wave (In Havoc & In Heat). Though Zoe passed him off early on, she’s continually seeing different sides of him she hadn’t expected, and their relationship continues to evolve. Wade was able to make Zoe smile after the incident with Judson and Gigi (Homecoming & Coming Home) and later asks to buy her a drink, to which Zoe smiles and asks for a rain check (Hairdos & Holidays). Wade later discovers Zoe on a date with his estranged brother, Jesse, much to his dismay. However, he tries to deny his feelings for Zoe, and tells his brother he’s free to date her because they’re both snobbish and superior and would be perfect together. Unfortunately, Zoe overheard this exchange and later confronted Wade, asking if this was what he really thought of her. Wade says yes to this, and continues to point out the three men who have caught her eye since her arrival in Bluebell – a veterinarian , a lawyer , and an eco-geologist oceanographer/army hero – all lucrative careers, and takes off in his truck, leaving behind a surprised and hurt Zoe, who then chooses to take a step back from the idea of dating Jesse, telling him “I can’t always stay out of people’s business, but when I can I probably should” (Bachelorettes & Bullets). In Episode 1×22, Zoe and Wade find themselves stranded in a barn during a rainstorm. After saving a baby goat caught in barbwire, they agree that having sex might clear everything up. As they are about to kiss, they are interrupted by an officer who offers to drive them home. They have sex after they get dropped off during the rainstorm (The Big Day). In Season Two, they start dating and Wade seems to be a better man. However, Wade is caught with another woman (Claudette) in 2×15. (The Gambler) Wade finally admits that there was more to it than he initially stated. They break up in 2×16 in the town square after Wanda and Tom’s wedding (Where I Lead Me). In 2×22, Zoe wakes up to realize that she slept with Wade. He believes that they are back tothe casual relationship they had at the beginning of season 2. Zoe immediately regrets it, telling him that it was a mistake. In the end of the episode, Wade tells Zoe that he is in love with her, and she tells him that she is going to New York for the summer. Read more about Zoe and Wade here. (Ex-Girlfriend)Zoe dated her New York boyfriend for six years- she describes it as “a study group that turned into a hook-up that turned into six years” (The Crush & The Crossbow). Read more about Zoe and New York Boyfriend here. (Former Attraction/Best Friend) The first person she met in Bluebell, Alabama, Zoe took in interest in George when she learned he had lived in New York for a time, and the pair connected despite his engagement, bonding over New York and a day spent together in Mobile, even almost sharing a kiss while George was on morphine after shooting himself in the leg with a crossbow (The Crush & The Crossbow). Later, George would admit to Wade Kinsella that there might be a spark between he and Zoe, but that he and Lemon were going to be married, and nothing would stop that – that is, until George broke off the engagement on Lemon and his wedding day. Read more about Zoe and George here. Smitten with Zoe from the very beginning (Pilot), Tom continues to make his availability known to her, though she’s apparently told him repeatedly that he’s too young for her. On Bluebell, Alabama’s website, Tom’s poetry blog section – The Tom Long and Short of It, featured on the town website- primarily focuses on poems dedicated to Zoe. Zoe later uses his attraction to her to recruit him as a patient in order to reach her thirty percent quota to hang on to her half of the medical practice. Read more about Zoe and Tom here. A handsome veterinarian from Mobile, Alabama, Dr. Lyons asked Zoe out on a date after being impressed by the subcuticular sutures she performed on Bo the pig in his absence. After her excitement turned to panic and she bailed on their date, Zoe apologized to Judson and asked him out on another date, to which he agreed. Their plans ended, however, after Judson would sleep with Zoe’s best friend Gigi Godfrey at the annual pre-homecoming game party at the Mayor’s Plantation. Later, Zoe called Judson in reference to a veterinary situation after seeing a patient, and the two began speaking again. Judson even sent Zoe flowers, with clear desire to rekindle their not-quite relationship- though Zoe admitted she liked him, she was reluctant to resume anything. Ultimately, to cover for a friend, Zoe publicly kissed Judson at the Rammer Jammer and gave him a key to her carriage house. Read more about Zoe and Judson here. Zoe Hart and Jesse met when she patched up his sprained wrist. The two hit it off quickly, and she agreed to a lunch date later that day. However, events ensued and it was quickly discovered that Jesse was in fact, Wade Kinsella ‘s brother- which led to an incident where Zoe overheard a stinging conversation between Wade and Jesse, where Wade revealed a few harsh thoughts on Zoe. After Zoe and Wade talked, Jesse clearly still retained his interest in Zoe while Zoe took a step back, remarking “I can’t always stay out of people’s business, but when I can I probably should” (Bachelorettes & Bullets). Read more about Zoe and Jesse here. Zoe and Jonahmet at the store when a patient gave him a wine bottle they were about to give Zoe (Take Me Home, Country Roads). When Zoe and Wade break up, he offers to comfort her. He suggests that a breakup is better with mind-blowing sex with a sexy doctor. Zoe was threatened because townspeople trusted him more than her since they knew Jonah his entire life. In an attempt to get over her breakup, Zoe went partying with him over spring break, but nothing happened. Although Jonah thought it was implied that they were going to sleep together. When Zoe is on her plane for New York, a pilot has health issues and they ask for any doctors on board (On The Road Again). Jonah is also on board, and they connect while saving the pilot’s life. After recommendations by Jonah, Zoe decides to spend the next 3 months in New York, with him. She goes to a wedding reception and agrees to let Jonah be her date if he agrees to pretend to be mute the entire night. Read more about Zoe and Jonah here. (Ex-Boyfriend/Close Friend)While taking a summer trip to New York, Zoe starts dating a writer named Joel and they eventually decide to buy a house together. His career takes off and the realization of them having conflicting jobs comes to a head (small-town Alabama doctor vs. LA or London screenwriter).They break up in 3×17. Read more about Zoe and Joel here. While she is getting over Joel, Zoe dates Vince who accidentally rammed into her while she wasn’t where she going. She tries asking AnnaBeth for advice but AnnaBeth is tied up having sex with BlueBell’s enemy mayor’s nephew. She then enlists help from Lemon who’s also having male trouble, trying to see if she wants to date Peter, a journalist who has just come back from a six-month business trip.

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May 3, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Binyamin Gibli, Lavon Affair figure, dies at 89 – Israel …

binyamin gibli 224.88.(photo credit: Courtesy) Former IDF Military Intelligence chief and co-architect of the Lavon Affair Binyamin Gibli died in Tel Aviv on Wednesday at the age of 89.In 1954, Col. Gibli was thought by some to set into motion Operation Suzannah, which used nine Egyptian-Jewish undercover agents, members of Unit 131, to bomb British and American targets in Egypt in an effort to reverse Britain’s decision to withdraw from the Suez Canal. It was hoped that the attacks would turn the United States and Britain against Egyptian revolutionary leader (and future president) Gamal Abdul Nasser and wreck his decision to nationalize the Suez canal.In July 1954, post offices in Egypt were bombed, as were an American library, a British-owned cinema and a train station.The operation ended in failure when Egyptian security forces uncovered the unit – some believe it was betrayed by an informer – and arrested the members of Unit 131. One operative was killed in prison, two more were hanged, and others received lengthy prison service.In the political firestorm which followed, Gilbi accused Defense Minister Pinchas Lavon of ordering the bombings, a charge denied by Lavon, who blamed Shimon Peres, then director-general of the Defense Ministry. Prime minister Moshe Sharrett, who is not believed to have known about the operation, ordered a commission of inquiry made up of a Supreme Court justice and the IDF’s first chief of General Staff, Yaakov Dori, which produced inconclusive results.Lavon wound up resigning from office, but the scandal continued to rage, tearing apart the ruling Mapai Party, the predecessor of today’s Labor Party. David Ben-Gurion, who returned to the Prime Minister’s Office after Sharrett’s resignation in 1955, ordered a new committee of inquiry that found that Lavon did not approve Operation Suzannah. Ben-Gurion, who believed Lavon was responsible, quit his post as defense minister in protest. The Lavon-Ben Gurion split divided Mapai, with the party’s Left siding with Lavon, and the rightist stream backing Ben-Gurion and Peres.Col. Avraham Dar, an Israeli intelligence officer who had immigrated to Israel from Britain, traveled to Egypt to recruit members for Unit 131 before its activation. Speaking to The Jerusalem Post on Wednesday, Dar described Gibli as a “wonderful and talented” man, and expressed regret over the Lavon-Gibli feud, which he said had never been properly resolved.”I set this up,” Dar said, referring to Unit 131, but added that he did not wish to speak about the specifics of the unit’s activities. “I wasn’t completely involved,” he said. “I met Gibli in 1948, and in 1951 I came under his command. He had much talent, and was very impressive… He could have headed the army, and that is a tragedy.”Dar said many of Gibli’s friends abandoned him following the fallout from the Lavon Affair.”Two people at the top blamed each other, and it was settled politically, which isn’t right,” Dar said. “No proper commission of inquiry was set up, and that’s the worst aspect of this.”He added that the Lavon Affair formed a blemish on the face of a young State of Israel, but instead of healing it, the feud was left unresolved. “This was something ugly, and it must be understood in the context of the political feud in Mapai in the 1960s,” Dar said. Share on facebook

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April 24, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed

Love and Death in Silicon Prairie, Part I: Candy …

Without exception, each man who saw the lifeless body of Betty Gore the night of June 13, 1980, reflexively averted his eyes. Even those who already knew what lay beyond the utility room door were never bold enough to look more than a moment before closing the door. Few looked at the head at allthe sight was too horribleso the early reports as to the manner of death were conflicting, and usually wrong. It was a small room, no more than twelve feet long by six feet wide, made smaller by the presence of a washer, a dryer, a freezer, and a small cabinet where Betty had kept toys and knickknacks. In one corner were a brand-new toy wagon and a childs training toilet. Closer to the center of the room, where the freezer stood against one wall, were two dog-food dishes and a bruised book of Mother Goose nursery rhymes. The book had a white cover, which stood out in sharp relief because, in the harsh overhead light that glared off the harvest-gold linoleum, it was one of the few objects in the room not coated in blood. Her left arm was the first thing they noticed after opening the door. It lay in a pool of blood and fluid so thick that the arm appeared to be floating above the linoleum. To get a look at her face, the men had to walk around the ocean of red and black to get closer. What they saw was even more unsettling. Her lips were parted, showing her front teeth, the mouth fashioned into a half-grin. Her hair radiated in all directions, a tangled, soaked mass of glistening black. And Bettys left eye was wide open, staring down at the gaping black craters in her arm. As to her right eyeshe appeared to not have one. The entire right half of her face seemed to be gone. A few feet from Bettys head and half concealed under the freezer was a heavy, wooden-handled, three-foot-long ax. The police who investigated Betty Gores death at first could not believe that anyone as small as Candy Montgomery had the physical strength to wield that ax so brutally. Even as their suspicions about her grew, they found it hard to believe that this pretty, vivacious, utterly normal suburban housewife could make such a vicious attack. She was a loving mother, a devoted wife, a churchgoer, and everyones friend. And she wasnt putting on a cynical act. She really was as normal and likeable and good as she appearedexcept for one dark corner of her soul that even she did not know about. It was a church service that first brought Candy Montgomery and Betty Gore together, and it was the church that led them to their times of closeness and, eventually, to their mutual hatred and Bettys brutal death. The Methodist Church of Lucas was, more than most places of worship, an institution controlled by women. The center of Candy Montgomerys universe, almost from the day in 1977 when she moved to her dream house in the country, was the drafty white clapboard building known to its congregants simply as the church. Set back from the roadside, paint peeling, steeple rusted, its floors echoing hollowly under the tread of mens heavy soles, it did not at first resemble a place likely to house the more liberal strains of Methodist theology. The church buildings sat on a slight rise surrounded by fallow blackland wheat fields on three sides and a farm-to-market road on the fourth. When the sky was clear and the wind strong, as it was, the landscape had the feel of a rough and untamed outpost, solitary and a little forbidding, not beautiful but stunning in its brown and gray emptiness. The country, as the people who settled there liked to call it, was eight to ten amorphous little towns in eastern Collin County, but it really had no name. Most of its residents had come there to escape something: cities, density, routine, fear of crime, overpriced housing, the urban problems their parents had never known. They came in the seventies, just about the time the Dallas developers started buying out the farmers one by one, and they settled on pasture-size lots in homes designed exclusively for them by architects happy to get rich by satisfying their personal whims. They sent their children to a little red schoolhouse, joined a civic club or ran for the town council, and started going to church again when they found the quaint little chapel by the roadside of Lucas. Twenty miles to the southwest were the teeming freeways of Dallas, the huge electronics corporations where many of them worked as engineers and physicists and computer analysts, the endless chain of suburban housing developments and shopping malls and office centers running due north out of the city. But here there was quiet and solitude and control over their lives. Some of them spoke of it proudly. This is the way things were back home, they would say, or Thank God we had enough money to move to the country so kids could get a good education. The country was pure, untroubled, safe, innocent, a vision of regenerate America. Slicing through the heart of the country was FM Road 1378, a tortuous two-lane blacktop connecting McKinney, the county seat, with Wylie, an old railroad town now given over to tract homes and light industry. Both towns were older and more authentically Western than anything in the twenty miles or so between them, for 1378 had become the main artery for the new subdivisions full of fantasy architecture: houses shaped like Alpine villas, houses dolled up like medieval castles, houses as forbidding as national park pavilions or as secluded as missile bases, hidden in thickets along the shores of Lake Lavon. Juxtaposed to those personal statements were the more familiar examples of prairie architecture: trailer homes, bait shops, window-less lodge halls, an outdoor revival shelter, ghost-town cemeteries. The only connection between past and present was the ubiquitous white horse fences that proliferated along the highway and around many of the brand-new houses, in inverse proportion to the number of horses needing corrals. Candy Montgomery would always be able to remember the precise moment when she decided she would go to bed with Bettys husband, Allan Gore. It happened on the church volleyball court, on a late-summer day in 1978. Candy and Allan both tried to make a play on the same balland collided. It was a harmless bump, really, and went unnoticed by everyone else on the court, but for Candy it brought a revelation: Allan Gore smelled sexy. For several weeks she had been talking abstractly to friends about having an affair. Candy wanted something to shake up her very boring life with Pat. She was explicit about the kind of affair she was interested in: transcendent sex. As she put it, I want fireworks. Then she bumped into Allan Gore and wondered to herself, Could a man like that make the earth move? At first glance he didnt look like it. Allan had a receding hairline and the beginnings of a paunchy midsection, and he dressed blandly, to say the least. But in other ways he was the kind of man she might be able to have a good time with. She had known Allan for only nine months, but it seemed much longer. He was a lot like her: active in the church, a lover of kids, the outgoing, personable half of a mismatched couple. Allan sang in the choir, helped organize the sports teams, he did all the things that Betty never seemed to want to get involved in. he had a sense of humor. It was only natural that he and Candy would see a lot of each other. More to the point, a tiny, insistent voice in the back of Candys brain kept telling her that Allan Gore was as anxious to go to bed with her as she was with him. It had begun with little things. Allan seemed to joke with her more than he joked with the other women at church. He teased her about her volleyball skills, and every once in a while hed give her a sly wink, as though they shared some little secret. After choir practice the two of them would occasionally chat a little longer than necessary or loiter in the parking lot while the others were getting into their cars. The flirting was subtle. Sometimes it was so much like Allans natural friendliness with everyone that Candy doubted it was a real flirtation. But then Allan would do something that was unmistakably designed to get her attention, and she would start wondering all over again. As the weeks went by, she started fantasizing about sex with the man who smelled so nice. Candy was almost 29 years old and sexually frustrated. She was totally honest with herself about that. How many more years did she have to find out what she was missing? Not many. She decided to do something about it. She got her chance one night after choir practice. Allan was already getting into his car when Candy spotted him. She strode up to the passenger side and opened the door. Allan, she said, leaning into the car, I want to talk to you sometime, about something that has been bothering me. Oh? he said. How about right now? Candy slid into the seat beside him. She didnt even look at him. Ive been thinking about you a lot and its really bothering me and I dont know whether I want you to do anything about it or not. Allan, a little confused, said nothing. Im very attracted to you and Im tired of thinking about it and so I wanted to tell you. And with that, she jumped out of the car, slammed the door, and hurried across the parking lot. Allan felt shocked and flattered and a little ridiculous. He wasnt shocked by Candys directnesshe had known her long enough to realize that she spoke exactly what was on her mindbut he was nonplussed that another woman was interested in him sexually. He was also surprised, and secretly pleased, that it was Candy. Even though she wasnt what you would call a classic beauty, she was one of the most attractive women in the church, in his opinion, and she was certainly the most fun to be with. Then a wave of doubt overtook him: maybe Candy was just flirting, in her own way, because all she had really said was that she had been thinking about him. But such an odd way to say it. Allan thought about Candy a lot over the next few days, and he wondered whether she would say anything else the next time they were together. He thought about calling her but then felt silly and awkward. He also thought, a little guiltily, of how different Candy was from his wife. Betty was as dour as ever; Candy was always up, always busy, self-confident, easygoing, warm. Betty Pomeroy had been one of those girls whose conventionality made her the frequent center of attention. She was pretty; she had an innocence about her and a wide Hollywood smile that had made her one of the most popular girls in her tiny hometown of Norwich, Kansas. In college Betty fell in love with her math teacher, and when she and Allan Gore decided to get married, her family and friends were surprised. They couldnt see what she saw in him. Allan was a small, plain man with horn-rim glasses and puffy cheeks and, even at a young age, signs of a receding hairline. He was also shy, which often made him come across as stern or aloof or even snobbish. Betty and Allan were married in January 1970 and they eventually settled in the suburbs of Dallas. When their first child was born, Allan was working for Rockwell International, an electronics conglomerate and major defense contractor. In 1976 Betty took a job teaching at an elementary school in the small town of Wylie, about ten miles east of Plano, but she didnt enjoy her work for very long. She couldnt control her unruly students, and at the same time she couldnt bear to be left alone at home when Allan had to travel. In spite of her unhappiness, though, Betty had decided, as a new school year began in the fall of 1978, that they should go ahead and have their next child, but this time she wanted the pregnancy planned down to the exact week so that the baby would be born in midsummer and she wouldnt have to take any time off from teaching. This was especially difficult, since the Gores sex life had dwindled to almost nothing, and when they did have sex, it was completely mechanical. Now Allan was required to have clinical sex with Betty every night during her estimated fertility period, in the name of family planning. He felt a little resentful; he had the distinct feeling that he was being used. That, combined with Bettys usual complaints about minor illnesses, made Allans marital future look bleak indeed when compared with the bright, happy-go-lucky face of Candy Montgomery, full of promise and, he had to admit, allure. That didnt mean he didnt love Betty or that he would never do anything to hurt her. It just pleased Allan that a woman like Candy would feel those emotions for a man like him. A week or so after the choir practice, Allan saw Candy again. It was after another church volleyball game. Allan and Candy stayed to clean up the gymnasium, and afterward they walked out to the parking lot together. When they reached her car, Allan said, Now what was it you had in mind? Get in, said Candy. Allan slid into the passenger seat. Would you be interested in having an affair? she asked. Despite all his mental preparation, Allan wasnt prepared for something that direct. I dont know what to say, he said. Its just something Ive been thinking about and I wanted to say it so I dont have to think about it anymore. I dont think I could, Candy. I dont think it would be a wise thing to do, because I love Betty. Once when we were living in New Mexico she had an affair that hurt me a lot, and I wouldnt want to do that to her. Candy was surprised to realize how much Allan had thought about his answer. Thats fine, Allan. I love Pat, too. I wouldnt want to hurt him, either. Betty just got pregnant again, too, and it would be unfair to her, especially since I dont feel the same way about you that I do about her. So I probably couldnt do something like that. Okay, Allan, I was just putting the option out there because of how I felt and its up to you to decide. I dont want to hurt your marriage. All I wanted to do was go to bed. I wont mention it again. Allan leaned across the seat and softly kissed Candys lips. Then he quickly got out of the car. One thing Allan Gore always believed in was that marriages are forever. Thats why, when his sexual relations with Betty started to become routine and unimaginative, he cast about for explanations. He enjoyed sex, and he knew that Betty did, too, and there was nothing wrong with them when they were happy and untroubled together. But lately there was not much enthusiasm in the bedroom. Allan was working hard, even though he didnt travel any longer because Betty had a deep-seated fear of being alone. She frequently came home from school full of tension, and she would sometimes use most of the evening grading papers for the next days classes. When you dont spend a lot of time together in the evening, Allan thought, theres usually not much interest in spending a lot of time in bed, either. Allan was afraid they were in danger of falling victim to complete boredom. One solution Allan considered briefly was a program called Marriage Encounter. Some friends of his from church, JoAnn and Richard Garlington, had gone to a Dallas motel one weekend for a special Marriage Encounter session in which several couples talked about their marriages and tried to strengthen their commitment. Allan didnt understand exactly what went on, but he knew that the Garlingtons came back beaming and almost absurdly joyous. They said they were hooked on Marriage Encounter and immediately set about trying to get other couples to join. If it had been anyone else but Richard and JoAnn, Allan would have mistrusted it, especially since Richard wouldnt tell him exactly what happened during the Marriage Encounter weekend. You wont understand it unless you go experience it for yourself, Richard said. Allan had to admit that the Garlingtons had seemed to be happier in the months since they were encountered, as they put it. One thing the Gores did need was something positive and revitalizing in their marriage, so one evening Allan tentatively suggested to Betty that they give Marriage Encounter a try. Why do we need something like that? she said. I have so much to do already. You dont think theres something wrong with us, do you? He could tell she would be upset if he said yes, and so he dropped the subject. When Pat Montgomery married Candy Wheeler in the early seventies, he was one of the brightest young electrical engineers at Texas instruments. Candy had been working as a secretary; she was petite and blond and a little impish, with a thin, pointed nose and a contagious high-pitched laugh. She was an Army brat, the daughter of a radar technician who had spent the twenty years after World War II bouncing with his family from base to base. Candy seemed born to the wandering life, though, blessed with an easy rapport with strangers and a coquettish exuberance that taught her at an early age what power women could exert over men. Candy and Pat moved to the country in 1977 with a son and a daughter; by then, their marriage had settled into a routine. Pat was providing everything Candy had ever expected from him, including a $70,000 income from his work on sophisticated military radar systems at Texas Instruments. Candy did not mind taking care of the children and their house, but she was bored crazy. That was why, on her twenty-ninth birthday, the highlight of her day was a phone call that came completely out of the blue. Hi, this is Allan. I have to go to McKinney tomorrow to get some tires checked on the new truck I bought up there. I wondered if youd like to have lunch, you know, to talk a little more about what we talked about before. It had been two or three weeks since the last time they had talked, in the parking lot outside the gym. Those weeks hadnt been easy for Candy. She felt foolish after throwing herself at him and then being so calmly rejected. Besides being embarrassed, she was afraid that Allan would think less of her. She wanted to put the whole incident out of her mind, and the only reason she couldnt was the kiss. If Allan were so dead set against the idea, why had he given her that enigmatic kiss on the lips just before he left? It was not what she would call a passionate kiss, but it was not a brotherly kiss either. And it didnt help Candys peace of mind that she and Pat had been arguing more than usual lately. She had brought home some A+ papers from the writing class she was enrolled in, but all Pat would do was glance at them and pretend to understand. His insensitivity infuriated her and led to harsh words. To Pat they were arguments over nothing, but to her they represented everything wrong with their marriage. Allan and Candy met at an auto repair shop in McKinney, the venerable county seat a few miles north of Candys house. Allan broke the ice right away by surprising her with a birthday card. On the front, it read, For the Last of the Red Hot Lovers. She opened it to find a small plastic bag of Red Hots inside. It was the kind of hokey gag card that Candy loved, and she was instantly touched. They got into her car and drove to a quaint little teahouse, where they talked about everything except themselves for the better part of an hour. Allan talked about Betty. Candy talked about Pat. They compared notes on their children, chatted about church matters. Candy got Allan to talk about his work for a while, and he in turn seemed interested when she discussed her creative writing course. Then, after the meal was cleared away and they began to sip their coffee, Allan said, Ive never done anything like an affair before. I havent either, said Candy. I would never be able to forgive myself if Betty ever found out about something like that. I think it would just be devastating to her. I feel the same way. I wouldnt want to see anyone hurt by this, Pat or Betty. We would have to be so careful that no one would ever know except us. Ive been thinking a lot about what you said, about not wanting to get emotionally involved. That would be very important for me. Me, too, Allan. I just want to enjoy myself without hurting myself or anyone else. Well, lets think about it some more, and maybe we should think about the hazards some more and whether we want to take that risk. Fine. I think we should. Little else was said that day, but within a week Allan called Candy again while Pat was at work. They chatted more about Pat was at work. They chatted more about the risks of having an affair, their fears of doing something that would ruin their marriages, but they also talked about their mutual attraction and were obviously excited by the prospect of a tryst. You know, if you dont go to bed with me pretty soon, Allan, then youll never be able to live up to the expectation I have of you in bed, Candy said, giggling. I know, he said, not laughing. Ive thought of that. The next month consisted of strategy sessions for what must have been the most meticulously planned love affair in the history of romance. It began with tentative phone calls from Allan, asking about this or that. When would we do it? What if somebody saw us? Soon after the lunch at the teahouse in McKinney, they arranged to meet for lunch again, this time at the parking lot of Allans office in Richardson, from which they drove to a nearby restaurant. Allan was accustomed to making his own hours at work, so a long lunch break was no problem, but they could save time if Candy picked him up. From talking about the hazards of the affair, they moved quickly to a consideration of ways they could possibly avoid those hazards. They talked a great deal about emotional involvement. They agreed that there would be none of that; it was too dangerous. As long as they limited the affair to sex, they were safe. Allan started looking forward to his daily call to Candy from work. Candy, just as starved for affection, looked forward to it as well. Allan was growing much more comfortable with the idea of an affair, mainly because he discovered, to his surprise, that he could go to lunch with Candy, talk with her intimately on the phone, and then go home to Betty and always be completely normal. Candy always felt completely normal around Pat, perhaps because she was confident he would never suspect a thing. Still, Allan and Candy hesitated to take the plunge. At the end of November Candy came up with the best stratagem of all: she invited Allan to her house for lunch. She fixed her famous lasagna for the occasion. She also decided, before Allan arrived, that if nothing happened soon, she wouldnt spend any more time on this. She had done what she could to make it happen. It was really Allans decision to make. He was so damned indecisive that she was starting to think he wasnt aggressive enough to do this anyway. As soon as Allan walked into the Montgomery house that day, he broke into laughter, for the first thing he saw, hanging above the room, was a huge piece of butcher paper. On it, in Magic Marker, Candy had made two columns. The column on the left was headed WHYS. The column on the right said, WHY-NOTS. When she said she was inviting him over to discuss the pros and cons, she wasnt kidding. She also knew, from their last few phone conversations, that Allan was leaning toward a decision not to have an affair. The cute little sign eased the tension. After eating, they sat in the living room and went over the list an item at a time. They took the why-nots first, beginning with the most important one: fear of getting caught. But that really shouldnt be a problem, said Candy, if were careful. Allan was much more concerned about one of the why-nots farther down the list: the possibility that they would become emotionally involved. We need to think about what were getting into, said Allan. Allan, as far as Im concerned, this is just for fun. Im not serious about it. Its just a companionship thing, and we shouldnt be afraid of it. Whatever happens, well do it for a while and then it will be over. Im afraid that I might get emotionally involved. We just wont let that happen. The whys on the list were a good deal easier: a sense of adventure, a need for companionship. Candy hadnt gone so far as to put sex on the list, but they discussed that one, too. Well always wonder if we dont do it, she said. I know, said Allan. Its up to you, Allan. I know I can do it. I know I can act in an adult fashion and not take necessary risks. Ive made up my mind, so just tell me if you want to do it. They didnt make the final decision that day, but after Allan left, Candy thought to herself, How much farther can you go? They had already made too big a deal of something that should have been more natural. It wasnt as though Allan Gore was her fantasy man or anything. A few days later Allan called again. Ive decided I want to go ahead with it, he said. Still, it didnt happen right away. There were ground rules to be established, logistical problems to be worked out. This affair was to be conducted properly. Candy even made a list of rules one day so they could discuss them on the phone: If either one of them ever wanted to end the affair, for whatever reason, it would end. No questions asked.If either one became too emotionally involved, the affair would end.If they ever started taking risks that shouldnt be taken, the affair would end.All expensesfood, motel room, gasolinewould be shared equally.They would meet only on weekdays, while their spouses were at work.Candy would be in charge of fixing lunch on the days they met, so that they could have more time. They figured they would need all of Allans two-hour lunch.Candy would be in charge of getting a motel room, for the same reason.They would meet on a Tuesday or a Thursday, once every two weeks. That was because Candy was free only on days when her little boy attended the Play Day Preschool at Allan Methodist Church. She took him each Tuesday and Thursday, from nine to two, but she figured that she would need three out of four of those school days for all the other errands and church and school duties in her hectic schedule. Finally having checked off every possible precaution, like astronauts getting ready for a launch, they set the date for the affair to begin: December 12, 1978. Candy spent the morning getting ready. First she dropped off her daughter at the little red Lovejoy schoolhouse on FM Road 1378, then she went on to Allen and deposited her son at the Play Day Preschool. When she got back to the house, she allowed herself about an hour to fix the special lunch she had planned: marinated chicken, lettuce salad with cherry tomatoes and bacon bits, Thousand Island dressing, white wine, and cheesecake for dessert. She packed everything, including a tablecloth, into a picnic basket and then gathered together a few undergarments and a nightgown and slipped them into her purse. She had everything ready by ten-forty-five. By eleven she was entering Richardson in her station wagon, searching for a motel convenient to Allans office. She found one right on the freeway, just two or three minutes away from Allan, called the Continental Inn. It took a few minutes to check in because the girl behind the counter insisted on seeing her drivers license and getting the money in advance. Candy paid out $29 of the cash she had gotten at the supermarket the day before and then filled out the registration card with her real name. the girl gave her the key to one of the upstairs rooms set back from the highway. Candy drove the station wagon around to the back and started unpacking. The room would do nicely. It was about ten by twelve feet, with one of those old televisions about the size of a Buick. The walls were covered with bright yellow fake paneling, which perfectly fit the autumnal dcor: old brown carpet and, on the bed, a spread adorned with leaves and pinecones. Candy went straight to the phone and called Allan at work. Im at the Continental Inn on Central Expressway, she said. Room Two-thirteen. Be there in a few minutes, he said. Candy busied herself getting the room ready. First she arranged her marinated chicken feast on the bed. Then she slipped into her favorite peekaboo negligee; it was a soft pink color and almost, but not quite, sheer. It was long, falling all the way to her ankles, and it showed off her body while hiding the slightly too large thighs. She looked at herself in the mirror. For a mother of two, she didnt look bad. Then she sat in a chair by the window and waited. Suddenly, for the first time since she had propositioned Allan in the church parking lot, Candy started to get nervous. Perhaps it was the coldly impersonal room, perhaps the calculated way they were going about the affair. But she felt herself becoming frightened now that she realized that whatever they did today would be irrevocable. Everything she had done before, no matter how brazen, had been harmless flirtation compared with this. Having sex is not as simple as it seems. It changes people. On the way to the motel, Allan discovered that he wasnt quite as brave as he had thought, either. He worried that perhaps the only reason he was doing this was to please Candy. He had to admit that Candy was sexually appealing, and yet he didnt want to be full of anxiety all the time. He didnt want to feel the way he was feeling now. But once he opened the door and saw Candy, smiling and seductive in her pink nightgown, Allan felt a surge of bravado. What the heck, thought Allan. Im here, and Im going to do it. Ive made lunch, she said, smiling halfheartedly. Allan could tell, much to his surprise, that Candy was even more nervous than he was. They sat on either side of the bed and made small talk. Allan dug into the chicken and quickly drank a glass of wine. Candy poked at her chicken, tearing off one little sliver at a time. I feel like what were eating, she said. Allan smiled. They finished off the dessert and then busied themselves with putting aside the paper plates and containers, as though neither wanted to make the first move. When there was nothing left to do, Candy sat quietly in the chair by the window. There was a moment of strained silence. Well, said Allan, are you just going to sit there? Candy smiled. Yes. Allan walked around the bed and gently touched her on the shoulder. All of her nervousness dissolved. The sex was gentle and conventional and satisfying. It was also brief. Candy was amazed at first by Allans navet as a lover. When she stuck her tongue into his mouth, it was apparent that he had never had a French kiss before. The good news was that he was a quick learner. For his part, Allan was positively transported. Candy was so responsive and energeticshe moved so muchthat Allan found it more exciting than any sexual experience he had ever had. It was good for him because it seemed so good for her. He couldnt keep going very long, but he remembered the feeling for days. Afterward Candy insisted they both take showers before leaving. So you wont smell like me, she said. Candy felt well pleased. Despite Allans apparent inexperience, she hadnt had to fake her responses much at all. And he did show great promise as a lover. Allan was just as satisfied by the lunchtime rendezvous and was looking forward to the next one. When he want back to work, he felt weak the rest of the afternoon. After the first meeting at the Continental Inn, it was obvious that both of them would want more. So a week later, just before the Christmas holidays, they arranged by phone for a repeat performance. This time Candy spent the morning preparing teriyaki beef strips and cheese blintzes. She did change one other detail. When she got to Richardson, she noticed a smallerand sleaziermotel across the freeway from the Continental. Always the practical shopper, she figured a motel room was a motel room, so why not get something cheaper than $29? The Como Motel was quite a comedown, even by the less-than-luxurious standards of the Continental. Candy got the impression that the Como didnt have a lot of overnight visitors when she walked into the office and came face to face with a clerk standing behind a Plexiglas screen, like a bank tellers window or, perhaps more appropriate, a jailers. The manager wanted $23.50 cash in advance plus a $2 deposit for the key. Candy put her money in the trough under the window, and he passed her a key. She drove around to the asphalt lot in the back. In the months to come Allan and Candy would joke about their room at the Como. Candy always said it smelled like old money. The sleaziness of the place was what made it so illicitand so much fun. The room was little more than a cubicle, ten by ten at the most, done in a tattered harvest gold. The curtains were drooping and frayed. The shag carpet was matted like dirty hair. The bathroom had fake terrazzo flooring, the faucet leaked, and the only furnishings other than the bed were a tiny vanity, a TV set, and two captains chairs with imitation leather cushions. Here, for the last days of 1978 and the first three months of 1979, Allan and Candy made glorious love every other week, dined on taco salad and homemade lasagna, and sipped cheap red wine out of plastic cups supplied by the management. (They came wrapped in cellophane bags with Walt Disney cartoons on them.) Afterward they would recline on the bedspread and rest their heads on tiny foam-rubber pillows and talk about their lives and their spouses and their children and their mutual love for their church. They would talk until it was time for Allan to go back to work or for Candy to pick up her son, and then go stand in the tub and turn on the faulty shower attachment and wash off the smell of each other. Finally, they would gather up their belongings, kiss each other lightly on the lips, and go back to their normal lives, closing the door behind them. Later, when Allan looked back on his whirlwind lunch hours with Candy Montgomery, he would think less of the sex than of the relaxation he took there. Those two hours with Candy were often the only time he didnt feel responsibility for other peoples emotions, the awful burden of making Betty happy. In the confines of a room at the Como Motel, Allan was a man with no past and no future, able to accept Candys unconditional affectionshe showered him with itin a way that was simple and guiltless. Allan had never been with any other woman except Betty in his life. This experience was revitalizing in a way that his life with Betty hadnt been for a long time. The affair made Candy feel alive again too. She was excited about the sex and the intrigue and the adventure of it all, and she continued to see Allan every two weeks, like clockwork. Unfortunately, after the third or fourth time at the Como, she started to have second thoughts. Her doubts werent spurred by any feelings of guilt. They started, in fact, when she realized that sex with Allan Gore probably wasnt going to get much better than it already was. The first two or three times it had felt good, but there had been virtually no improvement, and she suspected that the man was not capable of fireworks, no matter how much she coached him. The more serious problem was that Candy feared she was beginning to like Allan too much. Sometimes she even thought she loved him. That was too risky. In retrospect, she would see that it had been inevitable. Sex or no sex, she and Allan had both come to look forward to their daily conversations, their shared confidences, their joint dependence. Lately they had been exchanging funny little greeting cards, and whenever Candy had to drive into Richardson on an errand, she would stop at Allans office and place gifts under his windshield wiper. Sometimes Allan would go out to check his car even when he was staying for lunch, just to see if he had any brownies or homemade candy waiting for him. Once he found a small ceramic statue of a boy and a girl kissing. The inscription on the base read, Practice Makes Perfect. As time went on they seemed less like lovers and more like best friends. During one rendezvous, they decided to forgo sex altogether because they wanted to spend lunchtime talking. Candy could even talk to Allan about Pat; he was that understanding. By February, after only two and a half months, she was more than a little anxious that the relationship was turning serious all of a sudden. One day at a lunch she tentatively broached the subject with Allan. I think Im getting in too deep, she said. What do you mean? I dont want to fall in love with you. Were getting serious, and I know this is a temporary thing. I dont want to have to deal with myself later if we go too far. How do you know this is getting too serious? asked Allan. I think of you too much. But I thought you were the one who said youve got to plow into life and see what happens. Thats right, I did say that. Well?

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Colony Sites – Atomic Rockets – projectrho.com

(ed note: A pantropy ship of the Colonization Council crashes on the planet Hydrot around Tau Ceti. They decide to create colonists for the planet even though the colonists will be unaware of their origins. Ordinarily the ship crew would educate the colonists, but the crew will be dead in a month, the FTL radio is broken, and the Colonization Council has no idea they are there. Since the ship lost its germ cell banks, they will have to use germ cells from the crew. This means that some of the created colonists will look like and have the same personalities as the crew. Dr. Chatvieux will have a corresponding colonist named “Shar”, pilot la Ventura will be “Lavon”, communication officer Strasvogel will be “Stravol”. The fun part is there is no suitable place for colonization except for the tiny ponds. So the colonists will be microscopic. In the story they interact with the local equivalent of parameciums, diatoms, and the dreaded rotifers. The colonist call the latter “Eaters” because they prey on men. After conquering their pond, the colonists build a “spaceship.” This is a huge (2 inch long) wooden tracked vehicle, driven by diadoms harnessed to a wooden gear transmission. It holds water so the crew can breath in the waterless space between ponds, and can downshift gears to have the power to penetrate the surface tension of the pond roof. In the next pond they find other colonists who are dying out because they cannot cope with the rotifers. However the spaceship crew is armed with underwater crossbows and quickly give the rotifers what for. This would be fun background in a role-playing game, in the spirit of Bunnies & Burrows. For one thing, you can use an elementary school textbook about protozoan of pond water as the Monster Manual. The story was selected in 1970 by the Science Fiction Writers of America as one of the best science fiction short stories published before the creation of the Nebula Awards. It can be found in many collections. But don’t get the one in The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One, that version is abridged.) The sea is about the same, Eunice said. Ive found some of the larger simple metazoansjellyfish and so onand some crayfish almost as big as lobsters. But its normal to find salt-water species running larger than fresh-water. Ana theres the usual plankton and nannoplankton population.Chatvieux turned to Saltonstall, Martin, what would you think of our taking to the sea? We came out of it once, long ago; maybe we could come out of it again on Hydrot.No good, Saltonstall said immediately. I like the idea, but I dont think this planet ever heard of Swinburne, or Homer, either. Looking at it as a colonization problem alone, as if we werent involved in it ourselves, I wouldnt give you an Oc dollar for epi oinopa ponton. The evolutionary pressure there is too high, the competition from other species is prohibitive; seeding the sea should be the last thing we attempt, not the first. The colonists wouldnt have a chance to learn a thing before theyd be gobbled up.Why? la Ventura said. Once more, the death in his stomach was becoming hard to placate.Eunice, do your sea-going Coelenterates include anything like the Portuguese man-of-war?The ecologist nodded.Theres your answer, Paul, Saltonstall said. The sea is out. Its got to be fresh water, where the competing creatures are less formidable and there are more places to hide.We cant compete with a jellyfish? la Ventura asked, swallowing.No, Paul, Chatvieux said. Not with one that dangerous. The pantropes make adaptations, not gods. They take human germ-cellsin this case, our own, since our bank was wiped out in the crashand modify them genetically toward those of creatures who can live in any reasonable environment. The result will be manlike, and intelligent. It usually shows the donors personality patterns, too, since the modifications are usually made mostly in the morphology, not so much in the mind, of the resulting individual.But we cant transmit memory. The adapted man is worse than a child in the new environment. He has no history, no techniques, no precedents, not even a language. In the usual colonization project, like the Tellura affair, the seeding teams more or less take him through elementary school before they leave the planet to him, but we wont survive long enough to give such instruction. Well have to design our colonists with plenty of built-in protections and locate them in the most favorable environment possible, so that at least some of them will survive learning by experience alone. Saltonstall, what would you recommend as a form?The pantropist pulled reflectively at his nose. Webbed extremities, of course, with thumbs and big toes heavy and thorn-like for defense until the creature has had a chance to learn. Smaller external ears, and the eardrum larger and closer to the outer end of the ear-canal. Were going to have to reorganize the water-conservation system, I think; the glomerular kidney is perfectly suitable for living in fresh water, but the business of living immersed, inside and out, for a creature with a salty inside means that the osmotic pressure inside is going to be higher than outside, so that the kidneys are going to have to be pumping virtually all the time. Under the circumstances wed best step up production of urine, and that means the antidiuretic function of the pituitary gland is going to have to be abrogated, for all practical purposes.What about respiration?Hm, Saltonstall said. I suppose book-lungs (trigger warning: spiders), like some of the arachnids have. They can be supplied by intercostal spiracles. Theyre gradually adaptable to atmosphere-breathing, if our colonist ever decides to come out of the water. Just to provide for that possibility. Id suggest that the nose be retained, maintaining the nasal cavity as a part of the otological system, but cutting off the cavity from the larynx with a membrane of cells that are supplied with oxygen by direct irrigation, rather than by the circulatory system. Such a membrane wouldnt survive for many generations, once the creature took to living out of the water even for part of its life-time; itd go through two or three generations as an amphibian, and then one day itd suddenly find itself breathing through its larynx again.Also, Dr. Chatvieux, Id suggest that we have it adopt sporulation. As an aquatic animal, our colonist is going to have an indefinite life-span, but well have to give it a breeding cycle of about six weeks to keep up its numbers during the learning period; so therell have to be a definite break of some duration in its active year. Otherwise itll hit the population problem before its learned enough to cope with it.And itd be better if our colonists could winter over inside a good, hard shell, Eunice Wagner added in agreement. (ed note: The colonists are created by pantropy and seeded in the ponds. The crew dies. In one of the ponds, over several generations, the colonists use cooperation and tactics to eventually rid their pond of the rotifer menace. A colonist name Lavon tries to explore “space” by crawling up a plant stalk which pierces the surface tension. The experience almost kills him because in Air nobody can hear your liquid scream. He recovers by creating an out-of-season spore. Then he talks with the “scientist” Shar.) The slapping of the endless belts and the squeaking and groaning of the gears and axles grew louder as the slope steepened. The ship continued to climb, lurching. Around it, squadrons of men and Protos dipped and wheeled, escorting it toward the sky.Gradually the sky lowered and pressed down toward the top of the ship.A little more work from your diatoms, Tanol, Lavon said. Boulder ahead. The ship swung ponderously. All right, slow them up again. Give us a shove from your side, Tolno, thats too muchthere, thats it. Back to normal; youre still turning us I Tanol, give us one burst to line us up again. Good. All right, steady drive on all sides. It shouldnt be long now. (ed note: my slide rule says if the colonists are 0.25mm long, and the 2 inch ship is 50.8mm long, then the ship is about 203 man-lengths long. So if you were 1.77 meters tall, the equivalent ship would be 1.77203 = 359 meters long, a quarter of a mile or a bit more than 3 NFL football fields long. As a retcon, I personally think a 2 centimeter ship is less outrageous. That would only be 141 meters long, about one and a third NFL football fields.) The ship rested on the Bottom of the canyon for the rest of the night. The great square doors were unsealed and thrown open to admit the raw, irradiated, life-giving water from outsideand the wriggling bacteria which were fresh food. No other creatures approached them, either out of curiosity or for hunting, while they slept, although Lavon had posted guards at the doors just in case. Evidently, even up here on the very floor of space, highly organized creatures were quiescent at night.But when the first flush of light filtered through the water, trouble threatened.

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April 21, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Lavon Affair  Comments Closed


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