Archive for the ‘Leo Frank’ Category

Keegan Presents Award-Winning Musical PARADE Opening 3/11 – Broadway World

The Keegan Theatre presents PARADE, the Tony Award-winning musical by acclaimed playwright Alfred Uhry and composer Jason Robert Brown. PARADE is a stirring musical about a miscarriage of justice in early 20th-century Georgia, when a Jewish outsider was wrongly accused of murder. A love story emerges thanks to the strength, passion and loyalty of Leo’s wife, Lucille. PARADE runs March 11, 2017, through April 8, 2017, at The Keegan Theatre in Washington, D.C.

PARADE boasts an accomplished artistic team with a rich history of collaboration at Keegan, helmed by directors Christina A. Coakley and Susan Marie Rhea. Rhea, Keegan’s associate artistic director, has a long list of Keegan directing credits, including co-direction of the musicals AMERICAN IDIOT, HAIR and SPRING AWAKENING – all of which received Helen Hayes Award nominations for outstanding resident musical. Coakley, in turn, co-direcTed Keegan’s production of CABARET, which received four Helen Hayes nominations, including outstanding resident musical. Jake Null (2016 Helen Hayes Award winner, Outstanding Music Direction) music directs and five-time Helen Hayes nominee Rachel Leigh Dolan choreographs. PARADE features company member Michael Innocenti (WHAT WE’RE UP AGAINST, AN AMERICAN DAUGHTER, LAUGHTER ON THE 23RD FLOOR) as Leo Frank and Keegan newcomer Eleanor J. Todd as Lucille Frank. The musical also features Chad Wheeler, Malcolm Lee, Cassie Cope, Ricky Drummond, James Finley, Timothy Hayes Lynch, Chris Gillespie, Ava Silva, Harrison Smith, Ashley K. Nicholas, Patrick M. Doneghy, John Loughney, Carl Williams, Molly Janiga, Hillary Thelin, Retta Laumann, Jennifer Lyons Pagnard, and Caroline Wolfson.

“We’ve waited patiently for our chance to do PARADE,” says Mark A. Rhea, Keegan’s founder and artistic director, “and the time has come at last to sink our teeth into this magnificent and sadly still relevant story of hatred rooted in the fear of those who are different. We’ve wanted for years to produce this profoundly moving look at an incredibly tragic story, and to present the triumphs and failures of this moment in human history — Leo’s story, and the story of so many others — with Keegan’s trademark honesty and intimacy.”

The company is thrilled to welcome many artists new to Keegan to this production, performing alongside company members and audience favorites. “Having Michael Innocenti in our back pocket made the project even more attractive to us,” Rhea continues. “This is Michael’s moment, a role he was born to play. When Ellie (Todd) auditioned and we knew we had found our Lucille, the excitement in the room was tangible. This cast is deeply rich with talent, and the more than 50 artists collaborating to bring PARADE to life can’t wait to share it with our Keegan audience at last.”

This is Keegan Theatre’s 20th season performing in Washington, DC. The Keegan Theatre produces powerful productions of classic and modern plays and musicals, offered to the community at affordable prices. Our work is fueled by extraordinary artists in an intimate venue, scripts that put real people out there on the stark edges of life, and an approach to the work that honors clear and authentic storytelling.

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Keegan Presents Award-Winning Musical PARADE Opening 3/11 – Broadway World

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March 1, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Editorial: White House, US must take stand against rising anti-semitism – MU The Parthenon

Is anti-Semitism rising in America? This is a question that is slowly becoming a real issue that many Americans continue to ponder.

With the rise of the Alt-Right and the movement taking on the White Nationalist mentality, does that mean anti-Semitism is truly going to become an issue across the country?

NBC released a story Monday stating bomb threats across the country in 11 states forced evacuations of Jewish community centers.

Just last week, there had been a reported 48 anti-Semitic bomb threats already in 2017. The attacks were aimed at synagogues and Jewish communities. These threats included the vandalizing of Jewish cemeteries in Philadelphia and in St. Louis.

Now, because of this, many in the U.S. worry that since President Donald Trump has taken office that he has given the Alt-Right the power to be more open about their movement.

Recently at a Trump press-conference, Trump was asked by a Hasidic Jew reporter if the president was at all concerned about the spike in anti-Semitism in the U.S. Trump told the reporter to sit down, and that he understood the rest of the question.

So, heres the story, folks. Number one, I am the least anti-Semitic person that youve ever seen in your entire life. Number two, racism, the least racist person, Trump said.

Trumps son-in-law and advisor, Jared Kushner, is Jewish and his daughter, Ivanka Trump, converted to Judaism when she married Kushner. Trump has reiterated that he is not anti-Semitic and cannot be because of his family.

This doesnt mean, though, that Trump hasnt attracted anti-Semites along the destructive, war path of a campaign he ran. Trump didnt necessarily encourage anti-Semitism, but he did encourage to break down the politically correct rules our society has.

Many Trump supporters and conservatives in general have encouraged the sort of idea to toughen up or its a joke. This has also been the main platform of the Alt-Right movement, with leaders like Milo Yiannopoulos preaching for equal free speech and writing what at times bordered hate speech. Yiannopoulos backed his comments by saying its his British humor. (Not very fair to say Great Britain shares his humor.)

When reading Yiannopoulos before his resignation from Breitbart.com last week, he often commended the Alt-right for saying the unsayable.

Earlier, we mentioned the pressure to self-censor, Yiannopolous wrote. But whenever such pressure arises in a society, there will always be a young, rebellious contingent who feel a mischievous urge to blaspheme, break all the rules, and say the unsayable. Why? Because its funny!

Well, clearly even he had a line that he crossed. But still, these ideas are out there and now with the Alt-Right at least believing theyre in power, its subscribers have found a way to give reasoning to their movement.

The president did come out and publicly condemn the idea and actions of anti-Semitism, but just like during the campaign, it came out too late and as though it was painful for him to say.

Trump is probably not an anti-Semitic, but what he is, is a campaigner and his biggest fear is losing votes. That was made clear when he had his first rally for the 2020 reelection within less than a month of being in office.

So, like when he took too long to openly condemn David Duke, the former leader of the Ku Klux Klan, he has taken too long to condemn anti-Semitism.

Many people, such as Jonathan Greenblatt of the Anti-Defamation League, have told news outlets such as NBC that he wants to see a real plan from the Trump administration to combat these threats.

The issue with allowing these threats to just linger is that sooner or later something could happen. Its not like anti-Semitism hasnt been a problem in America before. During the 1920s, the KKK saw a resurgence in its membership after the death of Leo Frank, a Jewish business man.

The White House and the U.S. need to take a stand now that religious persecution will not be condoned.

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Editorial: White House, US must take stand against rising anti-semitism – MU The Parthenon

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March 1, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Remembering Leo Frank – ADL

Anti-Semitism in the United States

In 1913, The Jewish community in the United States faced rampant anti-Semitism and overt discrimination. Books, plays and, above all, newspapers, depicted Jews with crude stereotypes. Against this backdrop of bigotry and intolerance, an attorney from Chicago named Sigmund Livingston, put forward a bold ideato create an organization with a mission to stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all The Anti-Defamation League was founded with the clear understanding that the fight against one form of prejudice could not succeed without battling prejudice in all forms.

During this same time, an event in Georgia made the need for the organization painfully clear. Leo Frank, a Jewish businessman who moved to Atlanta to manage his familys pencil factory, was convicted of the rape and murder of a 13-year-old female employee, following a trial that was defined by anti-Semitism. When the Governor reduced Leo Franks death sentence to life in prison, a hate-filled mobwhich included many influential community leadersdragged Frank from his prison cell and lynched him.

It was not until decades later, at ADLs urging, that the State of Georgia issued Frank a posthumous pardon.

A Century Later, Leo Frank Tragedy Still Resonates

Leo Frank and Anti-Semitism in the U.S.

Lessons of the Leo Frank Case Still Relevant

100 Years Later, Anti-Semitism Around Leo Frank Case Abounds

ADL: Anti-Semitism around Leo Frank Case Flourishes on 100th Anniversary

The People v. Leo Frank: Teacher’s Guide

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Remembering Leo Frank – ADL

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February 15, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Orange actor goes from basement to Broadway on Tour | Theater … – Cleveland Jewish News

Orange High School graduate Jordan Matthew Brown has gone from the basement to Broadway on Tour.

Brown is an understudy for the leading role of Elder Arnold Cunningham in The Book of Mormon, a religious satire musical about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Brown made his professional stage debut at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall National Theater Institute run by the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center in Fort Myers, Fla., on Jan. 28. He performed four times in two days.

To be a standby for this role is just a dream come true, Brown said. It was such a surreal experience that I will always remember, to walk onstage as this role in front of an audience for the first time. It was such a thrill to have this happen and with such wonderful people on and off stage.

Brown, a member of Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple in Beachwood and Bnai Jeshurun Congregation in Pepper Pike, describes his character as a well-intentioned puppy trying to please his owner but who keeps having accidents in the house.

Brown, 23, began putting on plays in his basement as a toddler. Inspired by the Wizard of Oz, he fell in love with musical theatre.

I have always loved theater, and I cannot remember a time where I did not want to be an actor, Brown said.

His parents Amy Groedel of Orange and Dan Brown of Orange helped him pursue his passion outside of the house, enrolling him in theater camp and after-school activities with Stagecrafters Youth Theatre in Orange. He found a home on stage, playing Charlie Brown in a version of Youre A Good Man Charlie Brown with his class.

A 2012 graduate of Orange, Brown spent half the day in high school and half the day at the Academy for the Performing Arts in Chagrin Falls.

Through high school and summers away from college at Boston University, Brown was a camp counselor at the Mandel Jewish Community Centers Playmakers Youth Theatre.

Jordan has been awesome to work with from the time he was a little kid to now, said Sheri Gross, former director of Playmakers. I know that he is always going to be humble, down to earth, and a generous actor whether he is working with kids or on a national Broadway tour.

Brown graduated from Boston University in 2016 with a Bachelor in Fine Arts in theater, where he acted in a role that connected him to his Jewish heritage.

I also was lucky enough to play Leo Frank in the musical Parade at BU my last semester there, which was something I will forever remember and it was an amazing way to reconnect with a part of Jewish history that I did not know as much about, he said.

He recently moved to New York City, where he auditioned for The Book of Mormon in March 2016. He found out that he would be joining the cast last April, and kept the news secret for several months.

The tour will visit 14 locations across the United States and Canada before coming to the State Theatre at Playhouse Square in Cleveland from Sept. 12-17.

Reagan Anthony is the Yoda Newton Editorial Intern.

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Orange actor goes from basement to Broadway on Tour | Theater … – Cleveland Jewish News

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February 8, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Jewish Theater Ensemble winter mainstage reimagines century-old crime story – The Daily Northwestern

The cast of Parade reopens the case of Leo Frank in a historical musical. The Jewish Theater Ensemble’s winter main stage production opens Friday in the Louis Room in Norris.

Claire Pak/The Daily Northwestern

Claire Pak/The Daily Northwestern

The cast of Parade reopens the case of Leo Frank in a historical musical. The Jewish Theater Ensemble’s winter main stage production opens Friday in the Louis Room in Norris.

Amelia Beck, Reporter February 2, 2017

The Jewish Theater Ensemble will revisit a historic murder trial for its winter musical this weekend.

Parade, which opens Thursday in the Norris University Center Louis Room, centers around a true story about the 1913 rape and murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan in Atlanta, Georgia. The musical follows the life of Leo Frank, the towns Jewish factory superintendent, after he is accused of the crime and must fight for his innocence.

The musical is in part a murder mystery, a courtroom drama and a love story, said director Michael Herwitz.

Producer Casey Watson said the musical was chosen for its powerful dialogue, relevant messages and faith-based storyline. The story touches on themes ranging from populism to marital conflicts, making it widely relatable, the Communication sophomore said.

Its going to touch every single person who walks in and watches it in some kind of different way, Watson said. We hope that people come in and find something for themselves.

Julie Busch, who plays Franks wife, Lucille, said she felt a sense of responsibility in accurately portraying a historical figure. Over winter break, Busch, Herwitz and Communication junior Adam Brody, who plays Frank, visited a Leo Frank exhibit at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Manhattan.

Seeing the photos of (Lucille and Leo Frank) and the letters that (Lucille) wrote to the governor to get him to reexamine her husbands case, theres a pressure but in a good way, the Communication senior said. You feel a sense of responsibility to tell the story in a respectful and appropriate way.

Though the production deals with difficult topics, the musical aspect provides an additional layer of emotion that aids in storytelling, Busch said.

In my duet with my husband, you have these beautiful legato lines that I think reflect the love growing between them, she said. Ultimately its a story of love and hope, at least, from my characters perspective.

As the story focuses on Franks fight for innocence, the intense, dissonant group numbers help convey the feelings of hostility and suspicion, which are brewing in Frank and his wifes community, Busch said.

Because the Louis Room is not a traditional theater, outfitting the venue to fit the needs of the musical was also an obstacle, Watson said. A fully functioning stage had to be constructed in addition to props, costumes and other basic production needs, she said. This responsibility fell was helmed by SESP junior Prateek Singh, the shows co-producer.

(Singh) was really passionate about creating a world in the Louis Room for people to walk into and feel like they were a part of, Watson said. Its a very atmospheric show.

Although it is about a century-old case, Herwitz said the show aims to emphasize universal themes of diversity and otherness, which have become especially relevant in the wake of the presidential election.

I hope people let themselves be taken away with the story, he said. I hope when they leave, theyll think about the world, how it stands right now and what their place in that is.

Correction: A previous version of this story misstated the opening date of Parade. The musical opensFriday.The Daily regrets the error.

Email: ameliabeck2020@u.northwestern.edu

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Jewish Theater Ensemble winter mainstage reimagines century-old crime story – The Daily Northwestern

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February 7, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

What to See at NYC’s Museum of Jewish Heritage – City Guide Magazine

February 7, 2017 – by Chelsey Grasso

The Museum of Jewish Heritage is one of New York Citys most intriguing museums, holding centuries of Jewish history within its walls. Highlighted below are four of the museums must-see exhibitions for early 2017 (two permanent and two temporary). If you find yourself in lower Manhattan, be sure to stop by the Museum of Jewish Heritage and take in the many stories of the Jewish people and their history.

Kloster Indersdorf, a convent near Dachau, became a temporary home for hundreds of Jewish (and non-Jewish) children following World War II. These displaced children arrived in 1945, hoping to find relatives following their separation from their families during the war. Each child had his or her photograph taken upon arriving (to be used in circulating search notices), and My Name IsThe Lost Children of Kloster Indersdorf will be exhibiting these precious images, along with each childs individual story. Beyond inspiring with the resilience of children, the exhibit illuminates the process of forming new lives after the devastating losses of World War II. On View through April 30, 2017.

Seeking Justice: The Leo Frank Case Revisited explores the century-old murder case of Mary Phagan, a 13-year-old girl. The Georgia case was racially charged and Leo Frank, a Jewish factory superintendent, was convicted of the murder. However, this exhibition brings new evidence to light, drawing on multiple interviews of descendants and bringing authoritative insights to the events that led up to the infamous murder. Leo Frank was granted a posthumous pardon in 1986. On view through March, 2017.

The Museum of Jewish Heritages Core Exhibition is one that tells the story of Jewish life during the 1900s and early 2000s. Told from the perspective of those who lived it, this collection is made up of 25,000 rotating pieces of history. From artifacts and photographs to documentary films and historical footage, the Core Exhibition is filled with remarkable pieces ofdocumentation. The exhibit is housed in the Museum of Jewish Heritage’s original six-sided building, representing the Star of David and the six million Jews who lost their lives during the Holocaust.

Originally opened on September 17, 2003, Garden of Stones is Andy Goldsworthys first permanent commission in New York City. This garden serves as a living memorial, inspiring spectators with its collection of trees growing from stones. Planted by Holocaust survivors and their families, this space is a contemplative one that is meant to be revisited time and time again. The citys different seasons also play a vital role, presenting a different type of landscape with each changing month.

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What to See at NYC’s Museum of Jewish Heritage – City Guide Magazine

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Audiobook: Anti-Semite U.S. Senator from Georgia, Tom Watson, Wrote Five Major Articles About the Leo Frank Trial

Listen to these five impressive articles about the murder of Little Mary Phagan and Leo Frank case originally published in Watson’s Magazine by future U.S. Senator from Georgia, Tom Watson

1. January,

2. March,

3. August,

4. September and

5. October of 1915

Rebooted by Omniphi Media in 2015 — the centennial — into audio-books. Check Out — Omniphi Media on www.Archive.org The Internet Archive (Click Here WWW):

https://archive.org/details/4.September1915WatsonsMagazineOfficialRecordLeoFrankCaseJewPervert

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January 1, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, Anti-Defamation League, Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Leo Frank Case | New Georgia Encyclopedia

The Leo Frank case is one of the most notorious and highly publicized cases in the legal annals of Georgia. A Jewish man in Atlanta was placed on trial and convicted of raping and murdering a thirteen-year-old girl who worked for the National Pencil Company, which he managed. Before the lynching of Frank two years later, the case became known throughout the nation. The degree of anti-Semitism involved in Frank’s conviction and subsequent lynching is difficult to assess, but it was enough of a factor to have inspired Jews, and others, throughout the country to protest the conviction of an innocent man. The Murder

OnApril 26, 1913, Mary Phagan, the child of tenant farmers who had moved to Atlanta for financial gain, went to the pencil factory to pick up her $1.20 pay for the twelve hours she had worked that week. Leo Frank, the superintendent of the factory, paid her. He was the last person to acknowledge having seen Phagan alive. In the middle of the night the factory watchman found her bruised and bloodied body in the cellar and called the police. The city was aghast when it heard the news. A young factory girl had been brutally murdered; rumors spread that she had been sexually assaulted before her death. The public demanded quick action and swift justice.

On the basis of this evidence Frank was arrested. The police thereafter collected more “evidence” before deciding to put Frank on trial. The state’s main witness, Jim Conley, a black janitor who was arrested when he was seen washing red stains from a shirt, later gave at least four contradictory affidavits explaining how he had helped Frank dispose of the body.

Atlantans hoped for a conviction. They surrounded the courthouse, cheered the prosecutor as he entered and exited the building each day, and celebrated wildly when the jurors, after twenty-five days of trial, found Frank guilty.

Slaton reviewed more than 10,000 pages of documents, visited the pencil factory where the murder had taken place, and finally decided that Frank was innocent. He commuted the sentence, however, to life imprisonment, assuming that Frank’s innocence would eventually be fully established and he would be set free.

The Frank case not only was a miscarriage of justice but also symbolized many of the South’s fears at that time. Workers resented being exploited by northern factory owners who had come south to reorganize a declining agrarian economy. Frank’s Jewish identity compounded southern resentment toward him, as latent anti-Semitic sentiments, inflamed by Tom Watson, became more pronounced. Editorials and commentaries in newspapers all over the United States supporting a new trial for Frank and/or claiming his innocence reinforced the beliefs of many outraged Georgians, who saw in them the attempt of Jews to use their money and influence to undermine justice.

In 1986 the Georgia State Board of Pardons and Paroles pardoned Frank, stating:

Without attempting to address the question of guilt or innocence, and in recognition of the State’s failure to protect the person of Leo M. Frank and thereby preserve his opportunity for continued legal appeal of his conviction, and in recognition of the State’s failure to bring his killers to justice, and as an effort to heal old wounds, the State Board of Pardons and Paroles, in compliance with its Constitutional and statutory authority, hereby grants to Leo M. Frank a Pardon.

The pardon was inspired in part by the 1982 testimony of eighty-three-year-old Alonzo Mann, who as an office boy had seen Jim Conley carrying Mary Phagan’s body to the basement on the day of her death. Conley had threatened to kill Mann if he said anything, and the boy’s mother advised him to keep silent. For those who thought Frank innocent, this provided confirmation; for those who believed him guilty, this was insufficient evidence to change their views.

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Leo Frank Case | New Georgia Encyclopedia

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Leo Frank Lynching | Today In Georgia History

One of the darkest episodes in Georgia history, the lynching of Leo Frank in Marietta, occurred on this day in 1915. Frank was convicted in 1913 of murdering Mary Phagan, a 15 year old employed by Frank at the National Pencil Factory in Atlanta.

Police immediately suspected Frank, a New York Jew, despite strong evidence against a Black employee, Jim Conley. Conley testified that he helped Frank dispose of Phagans body. Female employees further testified that Frank had made unwanted sexual advances.

Frank was convicted and sentenced to die, but two years later Governor John Slaton commuted Franks sentence to life in prison. An influential publisher and lawyer, Tom Watson urged outraged Georgians to take justice into their own hands.

Prominent citizens from Marietta, Phagans hometown, kidnapped Frank from the state prison and lynched him. No one was ever charged in Franks death. Without addressing his guilt or innocence, but recognizing its failure to protect him, the state of Georgia Pardoned Frank in 1986, 70 years after the tragedy of August 17, 1915, Today in Georgia History.

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Leo Frank Lynching | Today In Georgia History

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Keegan Presents Award-Winning Musical PARADE Opening 3/11 – Broadway World

The Keegan Theatre presents PARADE, the Tony Award-winning musical by acclaimed playwright Alfred Uhry and composer Jason Robert Brown. PARADE is a stirring musical about a miscarriage of justice in early 20th-century Georgia, when a Jewish outsider was wrongly accused of murder. A love story emerges thanks to the strength, passion and loyalty of Leo’s wife, Lucille. PARADE runs March 11, 2017, through April 8, 2017, at The Keegan Theatre in Washington, D.C. PARADE boasts an accomplished artistic team with a rich history of collaboration at Keegan, helmed by directors Christina A. Coakley and Susan Marie Rhea. Rhea, Keegan’s associate artistic director, has a long list of Keegan directing credits, including co-direction of the musicals AMERICAN IDIOT, HAIR and SPRING AWAKENING – all of which received Helen Hayes Award nominations for outstanding resident musical. Coakley, in turn, co-direcTed Keegan’s production of CABARET, which received four Helen Hayes nominations, including outstanding resident musical. Jake Null (2016 Helen Hayes Award winner, Outstanding Music Direction) music directs and five-time Helen Hayes nominee Rachel Leigh Dolan choreographs. PARADE features company member Michael Innocenti (WHAT WE’RE UP AGAINST, AN AMERICAN DAUGHTER, LAUGHTER ON THE 23RD FLOOR) as Leo Frank and Keegan newcomer Eleanor J. Todd as Lucille Frank. The musical also features Chad Wheeler, Malcolm Lee, Cassie Cope, Ricky Drummond, James Finley, Timothy Hayes Lynch, Chris Gillespie, Ava Silva, Harrison Smith, Ashley K. Nicholas, Patrick M. Doneghy, John Loughney, Carl Williams, Molly Janiga, Hillary Thelin, Retta Laumann, Jennifer Lyons Pagnard, and Caroline Wolfson. “We’ve waited patiently for our chance to do PARADE,” says Mark A. Rhea, Keegan’s founder and artistic director, “and the time has come at last to sink our teeth into this magnificent and sadly still relevant story of hatred rooted in the fear of those who are different. We’ve wanted for years to produce this profoundly moving look at an incredibly tragic story, and to present the triumphs and failures of this moment in human history — Leo’s story, and the story of so many others — with Keegan’s trademark honesty and intimacy.” The company is thrilled to welcome many artists new to Keegan to this production, performing alongside company members and audience favorites. “Having Michael Innocenti in our back pocket made the project even more attractive to us,” Rhea continues. “This is Michael’s moment, a role he was born to play. When Ellie (Todd) auditioned and we knew we had found our Lucille, the excitement in the room was tangible. This cast is deeply rich with talent, and the more than 50 artists collaborating to bring PARADE to life can’t wait to share it with our Keegan audience at last.” This is Keegan Theatre’s 20th season performing in Washington, DC. The Keegan Theatre produces powerful productions of classic and modern plays and musicals, offered to the community at affordable prices. Our work is fueled by extraordinary artists in an intimate venue, scripts that put real people out there on the stark edges of life, and an approach to the work that honors clear and authentic storytelling.

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March 1, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Editorial: White House, US must take stand against rising anti-semitism – MU The Parthenon

Is anti-Semitism rising in America? This is a question that is slowly becoming a real issue that many Americans continue to ponder. With the rise of the Alt-Right and the movement taking on the White Nationalist mentality, does that mean anti-Semitism is truly going to become an issue across the country? NBC released a story Monday stating bomb threats across the country in 11 states forced evacuations of Jewish community centers. Just last week, there had been a reported 48 anti-Semitic bomb threats already in 2017. The attacks were aimed at synagogues and Jewish communities. These threats included the vandalizing of Jewish cemeteries in Philadelphia and in St. Louis. Now, because of this, many in the U.S. worry that since President Donald Trump has taken office that he has given the Alt-Right the power to be more open about their movement. Recently at a Trump press-conference, Trump was asked by a Hasidic Jew reporter if the president was at all concerned about the spike in anti-Semitism in the U.S. Trump told the reporter to sit down, and that he understood the rest of the question. So, heres the story, folks. Number one, I am the least anti-Semitic person that youve ever seen in your entire life. Number two, racism, the least racist person, Trump said. Trumps son-in-law and advisor, Jared Kushner, is Jewish and his daughter, Ivanka Trump, converted to Judaism when she married Kushner. Trump has reiterated that he is not anti-Semitic and cannot be because of his family. This doesnt mean, though, that Trump hasnt attracted anti-Semites along the destructive, war path of a campaign he ran. Trump didnt necessarily encourage anti-Semitism, but he did encourage to break down the politically correct rules our society has. Many Trump supporters and conservatives in general have encouraged the sort of idea to toughen up or its a joke. This has also been the main platform of the Alt-Right movement, with leaders like Milo Yiannopoulos preaching for equal free speech and writing what at times bordered hate speech. Yiannopoulos backed his comments by saying its his British humor. (Not very fair to say Great Britain shares his humor.) When reading Yiannopoulos before his resignation from Breitbart.com last week, he often commended the Alt-right for saying the unsayable. Earlier, we mentioned the pressure to self-censor, Yiannopolous wrote. But whenever such pressure arises in a society, there will always be a young, rebellious contingent who feel a mischievous urge to blaspheme, break all the rules, and say the unsayable. Why? Because its funny! Well, clearly even he had a line that he crossed. But still, these ideas are out there and now with the Alt-Right at least believing theyre in power, its subscribers have found a way to give reasoning to their movement. The president did come out and publicly condemn the idea and actions of anti-Semitism, but just like during the campaign, it came out too late and as though it was painful for him to say. Trump is probably not an anti-Semitic, but what he is, is a campaigner and his biggest fear is losing votes. That was made clear when he had his first rally for the 2020 reelection within less than a month of being in office. So, like when he took too long to openly condemn David Duke, the former leader of the Ku Klux Klan, he has taken too long to condemn anti-Semitism. Many people, such as Jonathan Greenblatt of the Anti-Defamation League, have told news outlets such as NBC that he wants to see a real plan from the Trump administration to combat these threats. The issue with allowing these threats to just linger is that sooner or later something could happen. Its not like anti-Semitism hasnt been a problem in America before. During the 1920s, the KKK saw a resurgence in its membership after the death of Leo Frank, a Jewish business man. The White House and the U.S. need to take a stand now that religious persecution will not be condoned.

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Remembering Leo Frank – ADL

Anti-Semitism in the United States In 1913, The Jewish community in the United States faced rampant anti-Semitism and overt discrimination. Books, plays and, above all, newspapers, depicted Jews with crude stereotypes. Against this backdrop of bigotry and intolerance, an attorney from Chicago named Sigmund Livingston, put forward a bold ideato create an organization with a mission to stop the defamation of the Jewish people, and to secure justice and fair treatment to all The Anti-Defamation League was founded with the clear understanding that the fight against one form of prejudice could not succeed without battling prejudice in all forms. During this same time, an event in Georgia made the need for the organization painfully clear. Leo Frank, a Jewish businessman who moved to Atlanta to manage his familys pencil factory, was convicted of the rape and murder of a 13-year-old female employee, following a trial that was defined by anti-Semitism. When the Governor reduced Leo Franks death sentence to life in prison, a hate-filled mobwhich included many influential community leadersdragged Frank from his prison cell and lynched him. It was not until decades later, at ADLs urging, that the State of Georgia issued Frank a posthumous pardon. A Century Later, Leo Frank Tragedy Still Resonates Leo Frank and Anti-Semitism in the U.S. Lessons of the Leo Frank Case Still Relevant 100 Years Later, Anti-Semitism Around Leo Frank Case Abounds ADL: Anti-Semitism around Leo Frank Case Flourishes on 100th Anniversary The People v. Leo Frank: Teacher’s Guide

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February 15, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Orange actor goes from basement to Broadway on Tour | Theater … – Cleveland Jewish News

Orange High School graduate Jordan Matthew Brown has gone from the basement to Broadway on Tour. Brown is an understudy for the leading role of Elder Arnold Cunningham in The Book of Mormon, a religious satire musical about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Brown made his professional stage debut at the Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall National Theater Institute run by the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center in Fort Myers, Fla., on Jan. 28. He performed four times in two days. To be a standby for this role is just a dream come true, Brown said. It was such a surreal experience that I will always remember, to walk onstage as this role in front of an audience for the first time. It was such a thrill to have this happen and with such wonderful people on and off stage. Brown, a member of Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple in Beachwood and Bnai Jeshurun Congregation in Pepper Pike, describes his character as a well-intentioned puppy trying to please his owner but who keeps having accidents in the house. Brown, 23, began putting on plays in his basement as a toddler. Inspired by the Wizard of Oz, he fell in love with musical theatre. I have always loved theater, and I cannot remember a time where I did not want to be an actor, Brown said. His parents Amy Groedel of Orange and Dan Brown of Orange helped him pursue his passion outside of the house, enrolling him in theater camp and after-school activities with Stagecrafters Youth Theatre in Orange. He found a home on stage, playing Charlie Brown in a version of Youre A Good Man Charlie Brown with his class. A 2012 graduate of Orange, Brown spent half the day in high school and half the day at the Academy for the Performing Arts in Chagrin Falls. Through high school and summers away from college at Boston University, Brown was a camp counselor at the Mandel Jewish Community Centers Playmakers Youth Theatre. Jordan has been awesome to work with from the time he was a little kid to now, said Sheri Gross, former director of Playmakers. I know that he is always going to be humble, down to earth, and a generous actor whether he is working with kids or on a national Broadway tour. Brown graduated from Boston University in 2016 with a Bachelor in Fine Arts in theater, where he acted in a role that connected him to his Jewish heritage. I also was lucky enough to play Leo Frank in the musical Parade at BU my last semester there, which was something I will forever remember and it was an amazing way to reconnect with a part of Jewish history that I did not know as much about, he said. He recently moved to New York City, where he auditioned for The Book of Mormon in March 2016. He found out that he would be joining the cast last April, and kept the news secret for several months. The tour will visit 14 locations across the United States and Canada before coming to the State Theatre at Playhouse Square in Cleveland from Sept. 12-17. Reagan Anthony is the Yoda Newton Editorial Intern.

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February 8, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Jewish Theater Ensemble winter mainstage reimagines century-old crime story – The Daily Northwestern

The cast of Parade reopens the case of Leo Frank in a historical musical. The Jewish Theater Ensemble’s winter main stage production opens Friday in the Louis Room in Norris. Claire Pak/The Daily Northwestern Claire Pak/The Daily Northwestern The cast of Parade reopens the case of Leo Frank in a historical musical. The Jewish Theater Ensemble’s winter main stage production opens Friday in the Louis Room in Norris. Amelia Beck, Reporter February 2, 2017 The Jewish Theater Ensemble will revisit a historic murder trial for its winter musical this weekend. Parade, which opens Thursday in the Norris University Center Louis Room, centers around a true story about the 1913 rape and murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan in Atlanta, Georgia. The musical follows the life of Leo Frank, the towns Jewish factory superintendent, after he is accused of the crime and must fight for his innocence. The musical is in part a murder mystery, a courtroom drama and a love story, said director Michael Herwitz. Producer Casey Watson said the musical was chosen for its powerful dialogue, relevant messages and faith-based storyline. The story touches on themes ranging from populism to marital conflicts, making it widely relatable, the Communication sophomore said. Its going to touch every single person who walks in and watches it in some kind of different way, Watson said. We hope that people come in and find something for themselves. Julie Busch, who plays Franks wife, Lucille, said she felt a sense of responsibility in accurately portraying a historical figure. Over winter break, Busch, Herwitz and Communication junior Adam Brody, who plays Frank, visited a Leo Frank exhibit at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Manhattan. Seeing the photos of (Lucille and Leo Frank) and the letters that (Lucille) wrote to the governor to get him to reexamine her husbands case, theres a pressure but in a good way, the Communication senior said. You feel a sense of responsibility to tell the story in a respectful and appropriate way. Though the production deals with difficult topics, the musical aspect provides an additional layer of emotion that aids in storytelling, Busch said. In my duet with my husband, you have these beautiful legato lines that I think reflect the love growing between them, she said. Ultimately its a story of love and hope, at least, from my characters perspective. As the story focuses on Franks fight for innocence, the intense, dissonant group numbers help convey the feelings of hostility and suspicion, which are brewing in Frank and his wifes community, Busch said. Because the Louis Room is not a traditional theater, outfitting the venue to fit the needs of the musical was also an obstacle, Watson said. A fully functioning stage had to be constructed in addition to props, costumes and other basic production needs, she said. This responsibility fell was helmed by SESP junior Prateek Singh, the shows co-producer. (Singh) was really passionate about creating a world in the Louis Room for people to walk into and feel like they were a part of, Watson said. Its a very atmospheric show. Although it is about a century-old case, Herwitz said the show aims to emphasize universal themes of diversity and otherness, which have become especially relevant in the wake of the presidential election. I hope people let themselves be taken away with the story, he said. I hope when they leave, theyll think about the world, how it stands right now and what their place in that is. Correction: A previous version of this story misstated the opening date of Parade. The musical opensFriday.The Daily regrets the error. Email: ameliabeck2020@u.northwestern.edu

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February 7, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

What to See at NYC’s Museum of Jewish Heritage – City Guide Magazine

February 7, 2017 – by Chelsey Grasso The Museum of Jewish Heritage is one of New York Citys most intriguing museums, holding centuries of Jewish history within its walls. Highlighted below are four of the museums must-see exhibitions for early 2017 (two permanent and two temporary). If you find yourself in lower Manhattan, be sure to stop by the Museum of Jewish Heritage and take in the many stories of the Jewish people and their history. Kloster Indersdorf, a convent near Dachau, became a temporary home for hundreds of Jewish (and non-Jewish) children following World War II. These displaced children arrived in 1945, hoping to find relatives following their separation from their families during the war. Each child had his or her photograph taken upon arriving (to be used in circulating search notices), and My Name IsThe Lost Children of Kloster Indersdorf will be exhibiting these precious images, along with each childs individual story. Beyond inspiring with the resilience of children, the exhibit illuminates the process of forming new lives after the devastating losses of World War II. On View through April 30, 2017. Seeking Justice: The Leo Frank Case Revisited explores the century-old murder case of Mary Phagan, a 13-year-old girl. The Georgia case was racially charged and Leo Frank, a Jewish factory superintendent, was convicted of the murder. However, this exhibition brings new evidence to light, drawing on multiple interviews of descendants and bringing authoritative insights to the events that led up to the infamous murder. Leo Frank was granted a posthumous pardon in 1986. On view through March, 2017. The Museum of Jewish Heritages Core Exhibition is one that tells the story of Jewish life during the 1900s and early 2000s. Told from the perspective of those who lived it, this collection is made up of 25,000 rotating pieces of history. From artifacts and photographs to documentary films and historical footage, the Core Exhibition is filled with remarkable pieces ofdocumentation. The exhibit is housed in the Museum of Jewish Heritage’s original six-sided building, representing the Star of David and the six million Jews who lost their lives during the Holocaust. Originally opened on September 17, 2003, Garden of Stones is Andy Goldsworthys first permanent commission in New York City. This garden serves as a living memorial, inspiring spectators with its collection of trees growing from stones. Planted by Holocaust survivors and their families, this space is a contemplative one that is meant to be revisited time and time again. The citys different seasons also play a vital role, presenting a different type of landscape with each changing month.

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February 7, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Audiobook: Anti-Semite U.S. Senator from Georgia, Tom Watson, Wrote Five Major Articles About the Leo Frank Trial

Listen to these five impressive articles about the murder of Little Mary Phagan and Leo Frank case originally published in Watson’s Magazine by future U.S. Senator from Georgia, Tom Watson1. January,2. March,3. August,4. September and5. October of 1915Rebooted by Omniphi Media in 2015 — the centennial — into audio-books. Check Out — Omniphi Media on […]

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January 1, 2017   Posted in: Abraham Foxman, Anti-Defamation League, Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Leo Frank Case | New Georgia Encyclopedia

The Leo Frank case is one of the most notorious and highly publicized cases in the legal annals of Georgia. A Jewish man in Atlanta was placed on trial and convicted of raping and murdering a thirteen-year-old girl who worked for the National Pencil Company, which he managed. Before the lynching of Frank two years later, the case became known throughout the nation. The degree of anti-Semitism involved in Frank’s conviction and subsequent lynching is difficult to assess, but it was enough of a factor to have inspired Jews, and others, throughout the country to protest the conviction of an innocent man. The Murder OnApril 26, 1913, Mary Phagan, the child of tenant farmers who had moved to Atlanta for financial gain, went to the pencil factory to pick up her $1.20 pay for the twelve hours she had worked that week. Leo Frank, the superintendent of the factory, paid her. He was the last person to acknowledge having seen Phagan alive. In the middle of the night the factory watchman found her bruised and bloodied body in the cellar and called the police. The city was aghast when it heard the news. A young factory girl had been brutally murdered; rumors spread that she had been sexually assaulted before her death. The public demanded quick action and swift justice. On the basis of this evidence Frank was arrested. The police thereafter collected more “evidence” before deciding to put Frank on trial. The state’s main witness, Jim Conley, a black janitor who was arrested when he was seen washing red stains from a shirt, later gave at least four contradictory affidavits explaining how he had helped Frank dispose of the body. Atlantans hoped for a conviction. They surrounded the courthouse, cheered the prosecutor as he entered and exited the building each day, and celebrated wildly when the jurors, after twenty-five days of trial, found Frank guilty. Slaton reviewed more than 10,000 pages of documents, visited the pencil factory where the murder had taken place, and finally decided that Frank was innocent. He commuted the sentence, however, to life imprisonment, assuming that Frank’s innocence would eventually be fully established and he would be set free. The Frank case not only was a miscarriage of justice but also symbolized many of the South’s fears at that time. Workers resented being exploited by northern factory owners who had come south to reorganize a declining agrarian economy. Frank’s Jewish identity compounded southern resentment toward him, as latent anti-Semitic sentiments, inflamed by Tom Watson, became more pronounced. Editorials and commentaries in newspapers all over the United States supporting a new trial for Frank and/or claiming his innocence reinforced the beliefs of many outraged Georgians, who saw in them the attempt of Jews to use their money and influence to undermine justice. In 1986 the Georgia State Board of Pardons and Paroles pardoned Frank, stating: Without attempting to address the question of guilt or innocence, and in recognition of the State’s failure to protect the person of Leo M. Frank and thereby preserve his opportunity for continued legal appeal of his conviction, and in recognition of the State’s failure to bring his killers to justice, and as an effort to heal old wounds, the State Board of Pardons and Paroles, in compliance with its Constitutional and statutory authority, hereby grants to Leo M. Frank a Pardon. The pardon was inspired in part by the 1982 testimony of eighty-three-year-old Alonzo Mann, who as an office boy had seen Jim Conley carrying Mary Phagan’s body to the basement on the day of her death. Conley had threatened to kill Mann if he said anything, and the boy’s mother advised him to keep silent. For those who thought Frank innocent, this provided confirmation; for those who believed him guilty, this was insufficient evidence to change their views.

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October 25, 2016   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Leo Frank Lynching | Today In Georgia History

One of the darkest episodes in Georgia history, the lynching of Leo Frank in Marietta, occurred on this day in 1915. Frank was convicted in 1913 of murdering Mary Phagan, a 15 year old employed by Frank at the National Pencil Factory in Atlanta. Police immediately suspected Frank, a New York Jew, despite strong evidence against a Black employee, Jim Conley. Conley testified that he helped Frank dispose of Phagans body. Female employees further testified that Frank had made unwanted sexual advances. Frank was convicted and sentenced to die, but two years later Governor John Slaton commuted Franks sentence to life in prison. An influential publisher and lawyer, Tom Watson urged outraged Georgians to take justice into their own hands. Prominent citizens from Marietta, Phagans hometown, kidnapped Frank from the state prison and lynched him. No one was ever charged in Franks death. Without addressing his guilt or innocence, but recognizing its failure to protect him, the state of Georgia Pardoned Frank in 1986, 70 years after the tragedy of August 17, 1915, Today in Georgia History.

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October 21, 2016   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed


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