Archive for the ‘Leo Frank’ Category

Why a classic rock song is wrong – Religion News Service

One of the things that I have bequeathed to my sons is a love for the rock group, the Band.

Except, one of their classic songs is simply wrong.

I am talking about The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down.

The song stars Virgil Caine, who worked on the Danville train, until Stonemans calvary came, and tore up the tracks again.

Back with my wife in Tennessee, when one day she called to me, Virgil, quick, come see, there goes Robert E. Lee! Now I dont mind choppin wood, and I dontcare if the moneys no good. Ya take what ya need and ya leave the rest, But they should never have taken the very best.

Like my father before me, I will work the land.

Like my brother above me, who took a rebel stand. He was just eighteen, proud and brave, but a Yankee laid him in his grave, I swear by the mud below my feet, You cant raise a Caine back up when hes in defeat.

I remember my father grousing about the song.

What the hell are we doing, mourning the defeat of the South in the Civil War? They were traitors! (Check out this video of the song, just so you understand how some have used it).

I understand why the Band (most of whom were Canadians) wrote the song.

Its about loss. Its about remembering that war is hell for everyone.

Except: the cause that they died for was a foul cause.

I have some Southern street cred. For more than a decade, I lived in the old Dixie.

I liked it a lot. I liked the people that I served as a rabbi. They were smart, kind, and loving. There really is nothing like Southern hospitality. I cherish the friendships that I made during those years.

But, during my Southern sojourn, I could hardly ignore the ubiquitous reminders of the Civil War:

And then, there isStone Mountain.

It is the Mount Rushmore of the Confederacy. It is also the place where, in the wake of the Leo Frank blood libel, the Ku Klux Klan met to re-organize itself.

I will never forget the time when I gathered with a bunch of Jewish Southerners to watch the movie The Help, which is about the experience of black domestics in the South in the 1960s.

At first, there was a lot of denial about the truths portrayed in that film.

That domestics could not use the bathrooms inside the houses: many in the audience refused to believe it.

Until someone stood up and asked: Havent yall ever wondered why so many of our houses have bathrooms in the garage?

Which got me wondering: The first Atlanta house that I lived in had a bathroom in the garage. I always figured that it was because when you gotta go, you gotta go.

Apparently not.

And then, another person stood up and said: Lets all be honest with ourselves. During the civil rights era, we remained silent. We were told to stay quiet, because if we spoke up it would be bad for business or worse.

What we choose to remember, and what we choose to commemorate, is never a neutral act.

As my teacher, Yehuda Kurtzer, writes in his book,Shuva:

Memory is selective, deliberate, literary, constructed, and oriented toward the lessons we take from the past; history, in this binary, is scientific and empirical.

So, what should be done about statues of Confederate statues?

First, of all, we should welcome the debate about the fate of Confederate statues, and those that portray Southern luminaries. This conversation is one of the most intellectually invigorating in recent American memory.

Second, the conversation has to incorporate the nuances of memory.

Some historical figures, like Confederate generals, are most famous for the war in which they fought, and for the cause (slavery), for which they fought.

Others, like Washington, Jefferson, and many other noteworthy Americans, owned slaves.

But, this is neither what they are known for, nor the source of their distinctiveness. There needs to be some kind of larger and deeper moral calculus.

I believe that the statues of Confederate generals belong in museums (the place of history), and not the public square (the place of memory).

Here is why: the public square, the place of memory, is also the place of active memory.

Those statues are iconic to white supremacists, and spur on their hateful rhetoric.

Some think that America is heading for a second civil war.

The question is: how do we avoid that?

RNS columns are direct-published opinion pieces. They are not always edited and reflect the views only of the author.

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Why a classic rock song is wrong – Religion News Service

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

The new look of white supremacy | Talk of the Town – MyAJC (blog)

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA AUGUST 12: White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the alt-right exchange insults with counter-protesters as they enter Emancipation Park during the Unite the Right rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. After clashes with anti-fascist protesters and police the rally was declared an unlawful gathering and people were forced out of Emancipation Park, where a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is slated to be removed. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

For decades, the style of white supremacists had a predominant image a conical hood with cutout eyes and a long robe, most often in white, but sometimes in black or other colors. This costume, the widely recognized robes of the second Ku Klux Klan, dominated the early 20th century.

Before 1915, while some Klan members did wear hoods and robes, their uniform wasnt consistent. Klan members also relied on folk traditions to guide their mode of dress wearing fake beards, animal horns, blackface or cross dressing when rallying or intimidating victims.

Not having a set uniform made it easier to explain away their brutal acts as boyhood shenanigans and with the broad political and public support they enjoyed at the time, there was no need to dress up, said Alison Kinney, author of Hood (Bloomsbury, $15). Back then, every single member of the community showed up for public lynchings dressed as if it were just another day in the park.

Last weekend, when supporters of neo-Nazi, White nationalist and Ku Klux Klan ideology descended on Charlottesville, Va. for the Unite the Right rally, they appeared to be taking a sartorial trip back to the 19th Century. By holding loosely to a uniform of knit polo shirts and khaki pants, they aspired to look more like everyday people than the horned, hooded figures of yesterday.

They have been emboldened by Trump, said Kinney. It reminds me of the way that white supremacy in the U.S. since the Reconstruction Era has enabled people to go and be photographed in the everyday public.

But even in the old days, the hoods and robes werent used to hide. The hood wasnt there so much as to help them hide their identity, as to make them feel as if they were members of a fraternity or a boys club, Kinney said.

The look went mainstream when Hollywood intervened, most notably in D.W. Griffiths 1915 film Birth of a Nation, Kinney said.Around the time of the movies Atlanta premiere, the same year Leo Frank was lynched by a mob of angry whites, a former Georgia minister, William J. Simmons, kicked off the second Ku Klux Klan with a cross burning at Stone Mountain.

Related:KKKs request to burn cross on Stone Mountain denied

In 1921, the Klan opened Gates City Manufacturing Company in Atlanta to mass-produce designs featured in Birth of a Nation including robes and banners that were available through mail-order.

STONE MOUNTAIN, GA Klansmen light a cross and march at a Stone Mountain rally. (1979) (Nancy Mangiafico / AJC staff)

While hoods and robes will always have a place among Klan members, its just as likely today that the fascist in the crowd is wearing Fred Perry, New Balance or maybe even Gucci.

The new look of white nationalism has brought a fresh problem for brands. What do you do when your product becomes the gear of choice for promoters of hate?

For many years, Fred Perry polos have been the preferred shirt for white nationalists. Its a play that Americans took from their European comrades who began wearing the brand in the 1960s as a dig on British elitism. The brand became so enmeshed with hate groups that the Southern Poverty Law Center includes Fred Perry in its Racist Skinhead glossary. Dr. Martens, the brand of German work boots founded in 1947, are also on that list.

In July, John Flynn, chairman of Fred Perry gave a statement to a Canadian radio outlet about the matter. No, we dont support the ideals or the group that you speak of. It is counter to our beliefs and the people we work with, he said.

Last year, New Balance took a similar strategy after a popular neo-Nazi website declared New Balance the shoes of white people. And this week, in response to the Tiki torch wielding protesters in Charlottesville, Tiki Brand did the same. TIKI Brand is not associated in any way with the events that took place in Charlottesville and are deeply saddened and disappointed. We do not support their message or the use of our products in this way, wrote the company in a post on Facebook.

Gucci had a problem of another sort when a Twitter user posted an image of allegedGucci employees in Trump Tower holding signs that read, Hate has no home here. When the image appeared online at Jezebel.com, Gucci sent urgent emails to the website denying that the individuals were employees.

This new look of the alt-right has a purpose to offer up a clean-cut, normalized image of white supremacy, leaving the hoods and robes of the Klan feeling more like museum ready artifacts.

In a 2014 interview, Richard Bondira, owner of an online retailer of Klan gear who hoped to open a Klanmuseum, said the demand for hoods and robes isnt what it used to be.

The overseas market is dead and most of his orders come around Halloween, he said. While the traditional hoods and robes can still be spotted during ceremonies or protests, Bondira said he tells the various Klan groups who contact him that such grand public rallies are a thing of the past.

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The new look of white supremacy | Talk of the Town – MyAJC (blog)

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August 20, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

THIS DATE IN HISTORY, Aug. 17: Deadly storm slams Mississippi … – StarNewsOnline.com

Associated Press

Today is Thursday, Aug. 17, the 229th day of 2017. There are 136 days left in the year.

On August 17, 1863, Federal batteries and ships began bombarding Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor during the Civil War, but the Confederates managed to hold on despite several days of pounding.

In 1915, a mob in Cobb County, Georgia, lynched Jewish businessman Leo Frank, 31, whose death sentence for the murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan had been commuted to life imprisonment. (Frank, who’d maintained his innocence, was pardoned by the state of Georgia in 1986.)

In 1943, the Allied conquest of Sicily during World War II was completed as U.S. and British forces entered Messina.

In 1945, the George Orwell novel “Animal Farm,” an allegorical satire of Soviet Communism, was first published in London by Martin Secker & Warburg.

In 1962, East German border guards shot and killed 18-year-old Peter Fechter, who had attempted to cross the Berlin Wall into the western sector.

In 1969, Hurricane Camille slammed into the Mississippi coast as a Category 5 storm that was blamed for 256 U.S. deaths, three in Cuba.

In 1978, the first successful trans-Atlantic balloon flight ended as Maxie Anderson, Ben Abruzzo and Larry Newman landed their Double Eagle II outside Paris.

In 1982, the first commercially produced compact discs, a recording of ABBA’s “The Visitors,” were pressed at a Philips factory near Hanover, West Germany.

In 1985, more than 1,400 meatpackers walked off the job at the Geo. A. Hormel and Co.’s main plant in Austin, Minnesota, in a bitter strike that lasted just over a year.

In 1987, Rudolf Hess, the last member of Adolf Hitler’s inner circle, died at Spandau Prison at age 93, an apparent suicide. The musical drama “Dirty Dancing,” starring Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze, premiered in New York.

In 1996, the Reform Party announced Ross Perot had been selected to be its first-ever presidential nominee, opting for the third-party’s founder over challenger Richard Lamm.

In 1999, more than 17,000 people were killed when a magnitude 7.4 earthquake struck Turkey.

In 2007, Hurricane Dean roared into the eastern Caribbean, tearing away roofs, flooding streets and causing at least three deaths on small islands as the powerful storm headed on a collision course with Jamaica and Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula.

In 2016, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump announced a shake-up of his campaign leadership, naming Stephen Bannon of the conservative Breitbart News website as chief executive officer and promoting pollster Kellyanne Conway to campaign manager.

Today’s Birthdays: Author V.S. Naipaul is 85. Former MLB All-Star Boog Powell is 76. Actor Robert DeNiro is 74. Movie director Martha Coolidge is 71. Actor-screenwriter-producer Julian Fellowes is 68. Singer Belinda Carlisle is 59. Author Jonathan Franzen is 58. Actor Sean Penn is 57. Rock musician Steve Gorman (The Black Crowes) is 52. College Basketball Hall of Famer Christian Laettner is 48.

Thought for Today: “There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle, or the mirror that reflects it.” — Edith Wharton, American author (1862-1937).

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THIS DATE IN HISTORY, Aug. 17: Deadly storm slams Mississippi … – StarNewsOnline.com

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After Charlottesville, ADL and mayors launch plan to combat hate – The Jerusalem Post

Two people stop to comfort Joseph Culver (C) of Charlottesville as he kneels at a late night vigil to pay his respect for a friend injured in a car attack on counter protesters after the “Unite the Right” rally organized by white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. . (photo credit:JIM BOURG / REUTERS)

The US Conference of Mayors and The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) announced Friday a joint plan to fight extremism and bigotry and promote justice and equality in response to the violence protests which rocked Charlottesville, Virginia, last week.

More than 200 mayors from across the country representing the Conference of Mayors have so far have pledged to implement the plan in partnership with ADL. These include both Republicans and Democrats.

Under the 10-point Compact to Combat Hate, Extremism and Bigotry, mayors commit to: vigorously speak out against all acts of hate; ensure public safety while protecting free speech and other basic constitutional rights; punish bias-motivated violence to the fullest extent of the law; encourage more anti-bias and anti-hate education in schools and police forces; support targeted communities and bring together civic and community leaders to build trust; encourage community activities that celebrate their populations cultural and ethnic diversity; encourage residents in their communities to report hate incidents and crimes; and ensure civil rights laws are aggressively enforced and hate crimes laws are as strong as possible.

What happened in Charlottesville last weekend reminds us all that violent hate and racism are very much alive in America in 2017, said Tom Cochran, CEO and Executive Director of the US Conference of Mayors. For decades, Americas mayors have taken a strong position in support of civil rights and in opposition to racism and discrimination of all kinds. At this critical time mayors are doing so again through this compact in an effort to combat hate, extremism and bigotry in their cities and in our nation.

Charlottesville made clear that we have a lot more work to do in our communities and we cant wait a minute longer to step up our efforts, said Jonathan Greenblatt, ADL CEO and National Director.

In a conference call with mayors and reporters, Greenblatt drew parallels between the lynching of American Jew Leo Frank in 1915 and recent events in Charlottesville, describing the similarities as “eery.”

“Events in Charlottesville once again showed us we have much to do to bring Americans together,” he said, stressing that his organization is ready to “redouble our efforts.”

“In the past week we have seen hatred at its ugliest,” said Mayor Shane Bemis of Gresham, Oregon. As a Republican mayor, I can tell you right now that President Trumps actions, and inactions, have consequences…” he continued, charging that “Trump has divided us to nearly historic proportions and doesnt seem to be bothered by that.”

Terrorism by white supremacists, like what took place in Charlottesville, is a clear and present danger to Americas cities, said Austin Mayor Steve Adler. Mayors are eager to join with the Anti-Defamation League to fight hate, and Im honored that Mayor Landrieu asked me to help lead a coordinated campaign across this country to promote the Mayors Compact to Combat Hate, Extremism and Bigotry. Only the Statue of Liberty should be carrying a torch these days, and her message of respect must echo in Americas cities where this battle is being fought.

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After Charlottesville, ADL and mayors launch plan to combat hate – The Jerusalem Post

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August 19, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Talk:Leo Frank – Wikipedia

Leo Frank has been listed as one of the History good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it. Article milestones Date Process Result June 14, 2004 Featured article candidate Not promoted December 12, 2014 Peer review Reviewed May 30, 2015 Good article nominee Not listed October 14, 2015 Good article nominee Listed December 18, 2016 Featured article candidate Not promoted Facts from this article were featured on Wikipedia’s Main Page in the “On this day…” column on August 17, 2007, August 17, 2008, August 17, 2011, and August 17, 2015. Current status: Good article This article is of interest to multiple WikiProjects. Click [show] for further details. This article is within the scope of WikiProject Crime, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Crime on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks. GA This article has been rated as GA-Class on the project’s quality scale. High This article has been rated as High-importance on the project’s importance scale. To-do list:

Here are some tasks you can do to help with WikiProject Crime and Criminal Biography:

Hi,

The title says that he was convicted in murder, it doesn’t add at the same place that later it was found out that it was all a plot against him. Preceding unsigned comment added by 46.117.215.100 (talk) 14:24, 8 March 2017 (UTC)

The statement “Today, the consensus of researchers on the subject is that Frank was wrongly convicted.”, appears to be redundant in the lede. Not all students of the Leo Frank case believe him to be wrongly convicted. Many believe him to be guilty. TonyMorris68 (talk) 01:06, 30 April 2017 (UTC)

While making the last edit, I noticed there was a 2016 RfC that removed the Religion parameter from the infobox. This article formerly had Frank’s religion of Judaism in this box, although it is no longer there. We could do without it, but it seems like it should be considering the importance of Frank’s faith to the Phagan case. Please feel free to weigh in on whether we should leave as is or try to get another template with it back in. Tonystewart14 (talk) 13:37, 2 May 2017 (UTC)

This editor has twice deleted this sentence from the 1st paragraph of the lede:

Today, the consensus of researchers on the subject is that Frank was wrongly convicted.

He/she states it is unsourced. As anyone who follows this article knows, this sentence is more than adequately discussed and sourced in the body of the article. As anyone who has read the entire lede can easily see, there are no footnotes in the lede — a conscious decison made as the article was improved. As WP:LEADCITE states:

The necessity for citations in a lead should be determined on a case-by-case basis by editorial consensus. Complex, current, or controversial subjects may require many citations; others, few or none. The presence of citations in the introduction is neither required in every article nor prohibited in any article.

If Professor feels there should be footnotes in the lede, the case needs to obtain consensus here. It seems that zeroing in on this single sentence is another POV attack similar to the ones that have gone on for years by a number of sock puppets. Tom (North Shoreman) (talk) 16:00, 17 June 2017 (UTC)

The statement should be removed it’s non NPOV and it misleads people about the historical facts surrounding this case. Which those who defend Frank (such as the ADL) conveniently leave out, who are unfamiliar . –Justforthefun17 (talk) 17:59, 25 July 2017 (UTC)

Who are these researchers? Do they have a conflict of interest to this case? Why do they omit the evidential fact Frank’s legal team and his family were caught trying to bribe witnesses and fabricate evidence to frame his two African-American workers? who unlike Frank would of never have gotten a trial for those charges, let alone fair one. If we are going to refer specifically to “racial bias”, why is it never fully scrutinised, the “racial bias” against African Americans in the Dixie South, that Frank tried to exploit by attempting to implicate those men for the Mary Phagan’s murder and rape?

Under normal circumstances anybody who had done what Frank was accused (and found guilty) of doing to Mary Phagan would of been executed. yet somehow he managed to dodge the death penalty. These “researchers” fail to deduct that is perhaps the more likely reason Frank was lynched. Anger from the public that he managed to dodge the maximum sentence that many suspected was due to influence from Frank’s very wealthy and influential family. I’ve seen articles on wiki where people are labelled “supremacist”, “antisemite”, “racist”, “holocaust denier” , “conspiracy theorist” nonchalantly with very little to no rational justification to why that is allowed, to justify those obviously bias introductions. Yet somebody who was convicted (and had a trial) avoiding the maximum penalty for raping, torturing and murdering an innocent child, somehow its “fair” for bias editors and sources be used to portray him as a victim of civil injustice, yet anything else that suggests otherwise is refuted and instantly discredited. –Justforthefun17 (talk) 18:13, 25 July 2017 (UTC)

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Film | Leo Frank Film: People verses Leo Frank, 1913 by Ben Loeterman and Steve Oney

WATCH THE FILM ONLINE

In 1913 Atlanta, a child worker is found dead in the basement of the National Pencil Company. The police soon focus on Mary Phagans boss, a Jewish engineer recently arrived from New York Leo Frank. Franks murder trial becomes a free-for-all of racial stereotypes and contradictions. He is found guilty largely on the say of the states star witness, Jim Conley, a black factory sweeper.

Leo Frank is sentenced to death, but his story is far from over.

Franks lawyers appeal the conviction 13 times, all the way to the US Supreme Court. Meanwhile, The New York Times leads a crusade to exonerate Frank. At the eleventh hour, Georgia Governor John Slaton concludes that Frank had not received a fair trial and commutes his sentence from death to life in prison.

Slatons decision ignites a backlash.

On a hot August afternoon, 25 men in seven cars drive more than 100 miles to the state penitentiary, walk in and -without any resistance- abduct Frank. They drive him to an oak grove near Mary Phagans childhood home. A noose is put around his neck and the small table on which he has been hoisted is kicked out from under him.

THE PEOPLE v LEO FRANK weaves first-rate drama with recollections, commentary, and a rich trove of archival images. Will Janowitz (The Sopranos) is Leo Frank and Seth Gilliam (The Wire) plays Jim Conley with a script drawn directly from the historical record.

DOWNLOAD THE TEACHERS GUIDE To obtain a free Teachers Guide developed by the Anti-Defamation League, please visit www.adl.org/leofrank. To view a sample of the the fully customized clips that accompany the Teachers Guide and are available on the educational version of the DVD, please click here.

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August 17, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Today in history: Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat began heading up the Hudson River on its successful round … – Gaston Gazette

Today’s Highlight in History:

On August 17, 1807, Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat began heading up the Hudson River on its successful round trip between New York and Albany.

On this date:

In 1863, Federal batteries and ships began bombarding Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor during the Civil War, but the Confederates managed to hold on despite several days of pounding.

In 1915, a mob in Cobb County, Georgia, lynched Jewish businessman Leo Frank, 31, whose death sentence for the murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan had been commuted to life imprisonment. (Frank, who’d maintained his innocence, was pardoned by the state of Georgia in 1986.)

In 1943, the Allied conquest of Sicily during World War II was completed as U.S. and British forces entered Messina.

In 1945, Indonesian nationalists declared their independence from the Netherlands. The George Orwell novel “Animal Farm,” an allegorical satire of Soviet Communism, was first published in London by Martin Secker & Warburg.

In 1962, East German border guards shot and killed 18-year-old Peter Fechter, who had attempted to cross the Berlin Wall into the western sector.

In 1969, Hurricane Camille slammed into the Mississippi coast as a Category 5 storm that was blamed for 256 U.S. deaths, three in Cuba.

In 1978, the first successful trans-Atlantic balloon flight ended as Maxie Anderson, Ben Abruzzo and Larry Newman landed their Double Eagle II outside Paris.

In 1982, the first commercially produced compact discs, a recording of ABBA’s “The Visitors,” were pressed at a Philips factory near Hanover, West Germany.

In 1985, more than 1,400 meatpackers walked off the job at the Geo. A. Hormel and Co.’s main plant in Austin, Minnesota, in a bitter strike that lasted just over a year.

In 1987, Rudolf Hess, the last member of Adolf Hitler’s inner circle, died at Spandau Prison at age 93, an apparent suicide. The musical drama “Dirty Dancing,” starring Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze, premiered in New York.

In 1996, the Reform Party announced Ross Perot had been selected to be its first-ever presidential nominee, opting for the third-party’s founder over challenger Richard Lamm.

In 1999, more than 17,000 people were killed when a magnitude 7.4 earthquake struck Turkey.

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Today in history: Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat began heading up the Hudson River on its successful round … – Gaston Gazette

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August 17, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

THIS DATE IN HISTORY, Aug. 17: Deadly storm slams Mississippi – Jacksonville Daily News

Associated Press

Today is Thursday, Aug. 17, the 229th day of 2017. There are 136 days left in the year.

On August 17, 1863, Federal batteries and ships began bombarding Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor during the Civil War, but the Confederates managed to hold on despite several days of pounding.

In 1915, a mob in Cobb County, Georgia, lynched Jewish businessman Leo Frank, 31, whose death sentence for the murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan had been commuted to life imprisonment. (Frank, who’d maintained his innocence, was pardoned by the state of Georgia in 1986.)

In 1943, the Allied conquest of Sicily during World War II was completed as U.S. and British forces entered Messina.

In 1945, the George Orwell novel “Animal Farm,” an allegorical satire of Soviet Communism, was first published in London by Martin Secker & Warburg.

In 1962, East German border guards shot and killed 18-year-old Peter Fechter, who had attempted to cross the Berlin Wall into the western sector.

In 1969, Hurricane Camille slammed into the Mississippi coast as a Category 5 storm that was blamed for 256 U.S. deaths, three in Cuba.

In 1978, the first successful trans-Atlantic balloon flight ended as Maxie Anderson, Ben Abruzzo and Larry Newman landed their Double Eagle II outside Paris.

In 1982, the first commercially produced compact discs, a recording of ABBA’s “The Visitors,” were pressed at a Philips factory near Hanover, West Germany.

In 1985, more than 1,400 meatpackers walked off the job at the Geo. A. Hormel and Co.’s main plant in Austin, Minnesota, in a bitter strike that lasted just over a year.

In 1987, Rudolf Hess, the last member of Adolf Hitler’s inner circle, died at Spandau Prison at age 93, an apparent suicide. The musical drama “Dirty Dancing,” starring Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze, premiered in New York.

In 1996, the Reform Party announced Ross Perot had been selected to be its first-ever presidential nominee, opting for the third-party’s founder over challenger Richard Lamm.

In 1999, more than 17,000 people were killed when a magnitude 7.4 earthquake struck Turkey.

In 2007, Hurricane Dean roared into the eastern Caribbean, tearing away roofs, flooding streets and causing at least three deaths on small islands as the powerful storm headed on a collision course with Jamaica and Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula.

In 2016, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump announced a shake-up of his campaign leadership, naming Stephen Bannon of the conservative Breitbart News website as chief executive officer and promoting pollster Kellyanne Conway to campaign manager.

Today’s Birthdays: Author V.S. Naipaul is 85. Former MLB All-Star Boog Powell is 76. Actor Robert DeNiro is 74. Movie director Martha Coolidge is 71. Actor-screenwriter-producer Julian Fellowes is 68. Singer Belinda Carlisle is 59. Author Jonathan Franzen is 58. Actor Sean Penn is 57. Rock musician Steve Gorman (The Black Crowes) is 52. College Basketball Hall of Famer Christian Laettner is 48.

Thought for Today: “There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle, or the mirror that reflects it.” — Edith Wharton, American author (1862-1937).

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THIS DATE IN HISTORY, Aug. 17: Deadly storm slams Mississippi – Jacksonville Daily News

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It’s About Time For A Second Appomattox – HuffPost

Sixteen years ago, the distinguished historian of slavery and anti-slavery movements, David Brion Davis (and my favorite graduate school professor), published a powerful piece in the New York Times Sunday Week in Review entitled,Free at Last: The Enduring Legacy of the Souths Civil War Victory.

The Souths Civil War Victory? Doesnt everyone know the Confederacy surrendered at Appomattox? No, wrote Davis. Though the South lost the battles, for more than a century it attained its goal: that the role of slavery in Americas history be thoroughly diminished, even somehow removed as a cause of the war.

Thats what at stake in the battles over Confederate monuments. And why those battles are so important.

The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw the promotion of the legend of the Lost Cause, a version of the Civil War in which brave, honorable, dignified and cultured Confederates waged a heroic, romantic losing struggle against the greedy, uncouth, money-obsessed Yankees who could not wait to get their hands on southern land.

This fantasy retelling of the war over slavery became celebrated in hundreds of Confederate monuments, including the Confederate Mount Rushmore featuring the worlds largest bas-relief sculptures of Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, and Jefferson Davis at Stone Mountain, Georgia. It then provided the narrative for Thomas Dixons popular novel The Clansman: A Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan (1905), and D.W. Griffiths blockbuster film The Birth of a Nation, in which KKK riders rescue the flower of white southern womanhood from the bestial depravity of freed African-American menabetted by unscrupulous Yankee carpetbaggers.

The film, which President Woodrow Wilson screened at the White House, also provided the spark for the founding of the second Ku Klux Klan, as a group of men set fire to a huge cross atop Stone Mountain on Thanksgiving Eve, 1915 to advertise the coming attraction: The Birth of a Nation was coming to Atlanta over Christmas. In that group of KKK founders were several men whod taken part in the lynching of the Jewish factory superintendent Leo Frank several months earlier. (Note the deep connections between anti-Semitism and racism.)

Through most of the 20th century, the Confederates interpretation of their own history dominated textbooks in schools and colleges, even the historical profession, which produced dozens of volumes documenting the benign institution of slavery. It suffused Margaret Mitchells best-selling historical romance Gone with the Wind (1936) and the even more influential film starring Vivien Leigh as the indomitable southern heroine Scarlett OHara and Clark Gable as the dashing Confederate heart throb Rhett Butler.

In all of these cultural constructions dedicated to the Lost Cause, the reason the Civil War was actually foughtthe 4 million enslaved African-Americanseffectively disappeared, except as objects of fear, derision and ridicule. In the meantime, the freed people and their descendants, particularly in the south, lived under the reign of racial terror known as Jim Crow, which didnt just enforce segregated lunch counters, water fountains and bathrooms. The Equal Justice Initiative has documented more than 4,000 lynchings of African-Americans in 12 southern states between 1877 and 1950.

So when you hear people defend these monuments as Southern heritage, you know thats just not true. They are nothing more than propaganda, monuments to a fantasy designed to erase the real history of slavery, the reason for the Civil War, and to prevent African-Americans rights to equality and physical security. Every single minute, they remain monuments to systemic, institutional, often violent racial oppression.

Millions of Germans joined the Nazi party during the 1930s. Where are the monuments to Nazi heritage in Germany? How many swastikas adorn German flags?

Its time for them all to go. Its time for a real Appomattox. Its time to defeat the Confederacy, once and for all.

Read the original:
It’s About Time For A Second Appomattox – HuffPost

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August 16, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Why a classic rock song is wrong – Religion News Service

One of the things that I have bequeathed to my sons is a love for the rock group, the Band. Except, one of their classic songs is simply wrong. I am talking about The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down. The song stars Virgil Caine, who worked on the Danville train, until Stonemans calvary came, and tore up the tracks again. Back with my wife in Tennessee, when one day she called to me, Virgil, quick, come see, there goes Robert E. Lee! Now I dont mind choppin wood, and I dontcare if the moneys no good. Ya take what ya need and ya leave the rest, But they should never have taken the very best. Like my father before me, I will work the land. Like my brother above me, who took a rebel stand. He was just eighteen, proud and brave, but a Yankee laid him in his grave, I swear by the mud below my feet, You cant raise a Caine back up when hes in defeat. I remember my father grousing about the song. What the hell are we doing, mourning the defeat of the South in the Civil War? They were traitors! (Check out this video of the song, just so you understand how some have used it). I understand why the Band (most of whom were Canadians) wrote the song. Its about loss. Its about remembering that war is hell for everyone. Except: the cause that they died for was a foul cause. I have some Southern street cred. For more than a decade, I lived in the old Dixie. I liked it a lot. I liked the people that I served as a rabbi. They were smart, kind, and loving. There really is nothing like Southern hospitality. I cherish the friendships that I made during those years. But, during my Southern sojourn, I could hardly ignore the ubiquitous reminders of the Civil War: And then, there isStone Mountain. It is the Mount Rushmore of the Confederacy. It is also the place where, in the wake of the Leo Frank blood libel, the Ku Klux Klan met to re-organize itself. I will never forget the time when I gathered with a bunch of Jewish Southerners to watch the movie The Help, which is about the experience of black domestics in the South in the 1960s. At first, there was a lot of denial about the truths portrayed in that film. That domestics could not use the bathrooms inside the houses: many in the audience refused to believe it. Until someone stood up and asked: Havent yall ever wondered why so many of our houses have bathrooms in the garage? Which got me wondering: The first Atlanta house that I lived in had a bathroom in the garage. I always figured that it was because when you gotta go, you gotta go. Apparently not. And then, another person stood up and said: Lets all be honest with ourselves. During the civil rights era, we remained silent. We were told to stay quiet, because if we spoke up it would be bad for business or worse. What we choose to remember, and what we choose to commemorate, is never a neutral act. As my teacher, Yehuda Kurtzer, writes in his book,Shuva: Memory is selective, deliberate, literary, constructed, and oriented toward the lessons we take from the past; history, in this binary, is scientific and empirical. So, what should be done about statues of Confederate statues? First, of all, we should welcome the debate about the fate of Confederate statues, and those that portray Southern luminaries. This conversation is one of the most intellectually invigorating in recent American memory. Second, the conversation has to incorporate the nuances of memory. Some historical figures, like Confederate generals, are most famous for the war in which they fought, and for the cause (slavery), for which they fought. Others, like Washington, Jefferson, and many other noteworthy Americans, owned slaves. But, this is neither what they are known for, nor the source of their distinctiveness. There needs to be some kind of larger and deeper moral calculus. I believe that the statues of Confederate generals belong in museums (the place of history), and not the public square (the place of memory). Here is why: the public square, the place of memory, is also the place of active memory. Those statues are iconic to white supremacists, and spur on their hateful rhetoric. Some think that America is heading for a second civil war. The question is: how do we avoid that? RNS columns are direct-published opinion pieces. They are not always edited and reflect the views only of the author.

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The new look of white supremacy | Talk of the Town – MyAJC (blog)

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA AUGUST 12: White nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the alt-right exchange insults with counter-protesters as they enter Emancipation Park during the Unite the Right rally August 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. After clashes with anti-fascist protesters and police the rally was declared an unlawful gathering and people were forced out of Emancipation Park, where a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is slated to be removed. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) For decades, the style of white supremacists had a predominant image a conical hood with cutout eyes and a long robe, most often in white, but sometimes in black or other colors. This costume, the widely recognized robes of the second Ku Klux Klan, dominated the early 20th century. Before 1915, while some Klan members did wear hoods and robes, their uniform wasnt consistent. Klan members also relied on folk traditions to guide their mode of dress wearing fake beards, animal horns, blackface or cross dressing when rallying or intimidating victims. Not having a set uniform made it easier to explain away their brutal acts as boyhood shenanigans and with the broad political and public support they enjoyed at the time, there was no need to dress up, said Alison Kinney, author of Hood (Bloomsbury, $15). Back then, every single member of the community showed up for public lynchings dressed as if it were just another day in the park. Last weekend, when supporters of neo-Nazi, White nationalist and Ku Klux Klan ideology descended on Charlottesville, Va. for the Unite the Right rally, they appeared to be taking a sartorial trip back to the 19th Century. By holding loosely to a uniform of knit polo shirts and khaki pants, they aspired to look more like everyday people than the horned, hooded figures of yesterday. They have been emboldened by Trump, said Kinney. It reminds me of the way that white supremacy in the U.S. since the Reconstruction Era has enabled people to go and be photographed in the everyday public. But even in the old days, the hoods and robes werent used to hide. The hood wasnt there so much as to help them hide their identity, as to make them feel as if they were members of a fraternity or a boys club, Kinney said. The look went mainstream when Hollywood intervened, most notably in D.W. Griffiths 1915 film Birth of a Nation, Kinney said.Around the time of the movies Atlanta premiere, the same year Leo Frank was lynched by a mob of angry whites, a former Georgia minister, William J. Simmons, kicked off the second Ku Klux Klan with a cross burning at Stone Mountain. Related:KKKs request to burn cross on Stone Mountain denied In 1921, the Klan opened Gates City Manufacturing Company in Atlanta to mass-produce designs featured in Birth of a Nation including robes and banners that were available through mail-order. STONE MOUNTAIN, GA Klansmen light a cross and march at a Stone Mountain rally. (1979) (Nancy Mangiafico / AJC staff) While hoods and robes will always have a place among Klan members, its just as likely today that the fascist in the crowd is wearing Fred Perry, New Balance or maybe even Gucci. The new look of white nationalism has brought a fresh problem for brands. What do you do when your product becomes the gear of choice for promoters of hate? For many years, Fred Perry polos have been the preferred shirt for white nationalists. Its a play that Americans took from their European comrades who began wearing the brand in the 1960s as a dig on British elitism. The brand became so enmeshed with hate groups that the Southern Poverty Law Center includes Fred Perry in its Racist Skinhead glossary. Dr. Martens, the brand of German work boots founded in 1947, are also on that list. In July, John Flynn, chairman of Fred Perry gave a statement to a Canadian radio outlet about the matter. No, we dont support the ideals or the group that you speak of. It is counter to our beliefs and the people we work with, he said. Last year, New Balance took a similar strategy after a popular neo-Nazi website declared New Balance the shoes of white people. And this week, in response to the Tiki torch wielding protesters in Charlottesville, Tiki Brand did the same. TIKI Brand is not associated in any way with the events that took place in Charlottesville and are deeply saddened and disappointed. We do not support their message or the use of our products in this way, wrote the company in a post on Facebook. Gucci had a problem of another sort when a Twitter user posted an image of allegedGucci employees in Trump Tower holding signs that read, Hate has no home here. When the image appeared online at Jezebel.com, Gucci sent urgent emails to the website denying that the individuals were employees. This new look of the alt-right has a purpose to offer up a clean-cut, normalized image of white supremacy, leaving the hoods and robes of the Klan feeling more like museum ready artifacts. In a 2014 interview, Richard Bondira, owner of an online retailer of Klan gear who hoped to open a Klanmuseum, said the demand for hoods and robes isnt what it used to be. The overseas market is dead and most of his orders come around Halloween, he said. While the traditional hoods and robes can still be spotted during ceremonies or protests, Bondira said he tells the various Klan groups who contact him that such grand public rallies are a thing of the past.

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THIS DATE IN HISTORY, Aug. 17: Deadly storm slams Mississippi … – StarNewsOnline.com

Associated Press Today is Thursday, Aug. 17, the 229th day of 2017. There are 136 days left in the year. On August 17, 1863, Federal batteries and ships began bombarding Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor during the Civil War, but the Confederates managed to hold on despite several days of pounding. In 1915, a mob in Cobb County, Georgia, lynched Jewish businessman Leo Frank, 31, whose death sentence for the murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan had been commuted to life imprisonment. (Frank, who’d maintained his innocence, was pardoned by the state of Georgia in 1986.) In 1943, the Allied conquest of Sicily during World War II was completed as U.S. and British forces entered Messina. In 1945, the George Orwell novel “Animal Farm,” an allegorical satire of Soviet Communism, was first published in London by Martin Secker & Warburg. In 1962, East German border guards shot and killed 18-year-old Peter Fechter, who had attempted to cross the Berlin Wall into the western sector. In 1969, Hurricane Camille slammed into the Mississippi coast as a Category 5 storm that was blamed for 256 U.S. deaths, three in Cuba. In 1978, the first successful trans-Atlantic balloon flight ended as Maxie Anderson, Ben Abruzzo and Larry Newman landed their Double Eagle II outside Paris. In 1982, the first commercially produced compact discs, a recording of ABBA’s “The Visitors,” were pressed at a Philips factory near Hanover, West Germany. In 1985, more than 1,400 meatpackers walked off the job at the Geo. A. Hormel and Co.’s main plant in Austin, Minnesota, in a bitter strike that lasted just over a year. In 1987, Rudolf Hess, the last member of Adolf Hitler’s inner circle, died at Spandau Prison at age 93, an apparent suicide. The musical drama “Dirty Dancing,” starring Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze, premiered in New York. In 1996, the Reform Party announced Ross Perot had been selected to be its first-ever presidential nominee, opting for the third-party’s founder over challenger Richard Lamm. In 1999, more than 17,000 people were killed when a magnitude 7.4 earthquake struck Turkey. In 2007, Hurricane Dean roared into the eastern Caribbean, tearing away roofs, flooding streets and causing at least three deaths on small islands as the powerful storm headed on a collision course with Jamaica and Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. In 2016, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump announced a shake-up of his campaign leadership, naming Stephen Bannon of the conservative Breitbart News website as chief executive officer and promoting pollster Kellyanne Conway to campaign manager. Today’s Birthdays: Author V.S. Naipaul is 85. Former MLB All-Star Boog Powell is 76. Actor Robert DeNiro is 74. Movie director Martha Coolidge is 71. Actor-screenwriter-producer Julian Fellowes is 68. Singer Belinda Carlisle is 59. Author Jonathan Franzen is 58. Actor Sean Penn is 57. Rock musician Steve Gorman (The Black Crowes) is 52. College Basketball Hall of Famer Christian Laettner is 48. Thought for Today: “There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle, or the mirror that reflects it.” — Edith Wharton, American author (1862-1937).

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After Charlottesville, ADL and mayors launch plan to combat hate – The Jerusalem Post

Two people stop to comfort Joseph Culver (C) of Charlottesville as he kneels at a late night vigil to pay his respect for a friend injured in a car attack on counter protesters after the “Unite the Right” rally organized by white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S., August 12, 2017. . (photo credit:JIM BOURG / REUTERS) The US Conference of Mayors and The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) announced Friday a joint plan to fight extremism and bigotry and promote justice and equality in response to the violence protests which rocked Charlottesville, Virginia, last week. More than 200 mayors from across the country representing the Conference of Mayors have so far have pledged to implement the plan in partnership with ADL. These include both Republicans and Democrats. Under the 10-point Compact to Combat Hate, Extremism and Bigotry, mayors commit to: vigorously speak out against all acts of hate; ensure public safety while protecting free speech and other basic constitutional rights; punish bias-motivated violence to the fullest extent of the law; encourage more anti-bias and anti-hate education in schools and police forces; support targeted communities and bring together civic and community leaders to build trust; encourage community activities that celebrate their populations cultural and ethnic diversity; encourage residents in their communities to report hate incidents and crimes; and ensure civil rights laws are aggressively enforced and hate crimes laws are as strong as possible. What happened in Charlottesville last weekend reminds us all that violent hate and racism are very much alive in America in 2017, said Tom Cochran, CEO and Executive Director of the US Conference of Mayors. For decades, Americas mayors have taken a strong position in support of civil rights and in opposition to racism and discrimination of all kinds. At this critical time mayors are doing so again through this compact in an effort to combat hate, extremism and bigotry in their cities and in our nation. Charlottesville made clear that we have a lot more work to do in our communities and we cant wait a minute longer to step up our efforts, said Jonathan Greenblatt, ADL CEO and National Director. In a conference call with mayors and reporters, Greenblatt drew parallels between the lynching of American Jew Leo Frank in 1915 and recent events in Charlottesville, describing the similarities as “eery.” “Events in Charlottesville once again showed us we have much to do to bring Americans together,” he said, stressing that his organization is ready to “redouble our efforts.” “In the past week we have seen hatred at its ugliest,” said Mayor Shane Bemis of Gresham, Oregon. As a Republican mayor, I can tell you right now that President Trumps actions, and inactions, have consequences…” he continued, charging that “Trump has divided us to nearly historic proportions and doesnt seem to be bothered by that.” Terrorism by white supremacists, like what took place in Charlottesville, is a clear and present danger to Americas cities, said Austin Mayor Steve Adler. Mayors are eager to join with the Anti-Defamation League to fight hate, and Im honored that Mayor Landrieu asked me to help lead a coordinated campaign across this country to promote the Mayors Compact to Combat Hate, Extremism and Bigotry. Only the Statue of Liberty should be carrying a torch these days, and her message of respect must echo in Americas cities where this battle is being fought. Share on facebook

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August 19, 2017   Posted in: Leo Frank  Comments Closed

Talk:Leo Frank – Wikipedia

Leo Frank has been listed as one of the History good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it. Article milestones Date Process Result June 14, 2004 Featured article candidate Not promoted December 12, 2014 Peer review Reviewed May 30, 2015 Good article nominee Not listed October 14, 2015 Good article nominee Listed December 18, 2016 Featured article candidate Not promoted Facts from this article were featured on Wikipedia’s Main Page in the “On this day…” column on August 17, 2007, August 17, 2008, August 17, 2011, and August 17, 2015. Current status: Good article This article is of interest to multiple WikiProjects. Click [show] for further details. This article is within the scope of WikiProject Crime, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Crime on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks. GA This article has been rated as GA-Class on the project’s quality scale. High This article has been rated as High-importance on the project’s importance scale. To-do list: Here are some tasks you can do to help with WikiProject Crime and Criminal Biography: Hi, The title says that he was convicted in murder, it doesn’t add at the same place that later it was found out that it was all a plot against him. Preceding unsigned comment added by 46.117.215.100 (talk) 14:24, 8 March 2017 (UTC) The statement “Today, the consensus of researchers on the subject is that Frank was wrongly convicted.”, appears to be redundant in the lede. Not all students of the Leo Frank case believe him to be wrongly convicted. Many believe him to be guilty. TonyMorris68 (talk) 01:06, 30 April 2017 (UTC) While making the last edit, I noticed there was a 2016 RfC that removed the Religion parameter from the infobox. This article formerly had Frank’s religion of Judaism in this box, although it is no longer there. We could do without it, but it seems like it should be considering the importance of Frank’s faith to the Phagan case. Please feel free to weigh in on whether we should leave as is or try to get another template with it back in. Tonystewart14 (talk) 13:37, 2 May 2017 (UTC) This editor has twice deleted this sentence from the 1st paragraph of the lede: Today, the consensus of researchers on the subject is that Frank was wrongly convicted. He/she states it is unsourced. As anyone who follows this article knows, this sentence is more than adequately discussed and sourced in the body of the article. As anyone who has read the entire lede can easily see, there are no footnotes in the lede — a conscious decison made as the article was improved. As WP:LEADCITE states: The necessity for citations in a lead should be determined on a case-by-case basis by editorial consensus. Complex, current, or controversial subjects may require many citations; others, few or none. The presence of citations in the introduction is neither required in every article nor prohibited in any article. If Professor feels there should be footnotes in the lede, the case needs to obtain consensus here. It seems that zeroing in on this single sentence is another POV attack similar to the ones that have gone on for years by a number of sock puppets. Tom (North Shoreman) (talk) 16:00, 17 June 2017 (UTC) The statement should be removed it’s non NPOV and it misleads people about the historical facts surrounding this case. Which those who defend Frank (such as the ADL) conveniently leave out, who are unfamiliar . –Justforthefun17 (talk) 17:59, 25 July 2017 (UTC) Who are these researchers? Do they have a conflict of interest to this case? Why do they omit the evidential fact Frank’s legal team and his family were caught trying to bribe witnesses and fabricate evidence to frame his two African-American workers? who unlike Frank would of never have gotten a trial for those charges, let alone fair one. If we are going to refer specifically to “racial bias”, why is it never fully scrutinised, the “racial bias” against African Americans in the Dixie South, that Frank tried to exploit by attempting to implicate those men for the Mary Phagan’s murder and rape? Under normal circumstances anybody who had done what Frank was accused (and found guilty) of doing to Mary Phagan would of been executed. yet somehow he managed to dodge the death penalty. These “researchers” fail to deduct that is perhaps the more likely reason Frank was lynched. Anger from the public that he managed to dodge the maximum sentence that many suspected was due to influence from Frank’s very wealthy and influential family. I’ve seen articles on wiki where people are labelled “supremacist”, “antisemite”, “racist”, “holocaust denier” , “conspiracy theorist” nonchalantly with very little to no rational justification to why that is allowed, to justify those obviously bias introductions. Yet somebody who was convicted (and had a trial) avoiding the maximum penalty for raping, torturing and murdering an innocent child, somehow its “fair” for bias editors and sources be used to portray him as a victim of civil injustice, yet anything else that suggests otherwise is refuted and instantly discredited. –Justforthefun17 (talk) 18:13, 25 July 2017 (UTC)

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Film | Leo Frank Film: People verses Leo Frank, 1913 by Ben Loeterman and Steve Oney

WATCH THE FILM ONLINE In 1913 Atlanta, a child worker is found dead in the basement of the National Pencil Company. The police soon focus on Mary Phagans boss, a Jewish engineer recently arrived from New York Leo Frank. Franks murder trial becomes a free-for-all of racial stereotypes and contradictions. He is found guilty largely on the say of the states star witness, Jim Conley, a black factory sweeper. Leo Frank is sentenced to death, but his story is far from over. Franks lawyers appeal the conviction 13 times, all the way to the US Supreme Court. Meanwhile, The New York Times leads a crusade to exonerate Frank. At the eleventh hour, Georgia Governor John Slaton concludes that Frank had not received a fair trial and commutes his sentence from death to life in prison. Slatons decision ignites a backlash. On a hot August afternoon, 25 men in seven cars drive more than 100 miles to the state penitentiary, walk in and -without any resistance- abduct Frank. They drive him to an oak grove near Mary Phagans childhood home. A noose is put around his neck and the small table on which he has been hoisted is kicked out from under him. THE PEOPLE v LEO FRANK weaves first-rate drama with recollections, commentary, and a rich trove of archival images. Will Janowitz (The Sopranos) is Leo Frank and Seth Gilliam (The Wire) plays Jim Conley with a script drawn directly from the historical record. DOWNLOAD THE TEACHERS GUIDE To obtain a free Teachers Guide developed by the Anti-Defamation League, please visit www.adl.org/leofrank. To view a sample of the the fully customized clips that accompany the Teachers Guide and are available on the educational version of the DVD, please click here.

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Today in history: Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat began heading up the Hudson River on its successful round … – Gaston Gazette

Today’s Highlight in History: On August 17, 1807, Robert Fulton’s North River Steamboat began heading up the Hudson River on its successful round trip between New York and Albany. On this date: In 1863, Federal batteries and ships began bombarding Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor during the Civil War, but the Confederates managed to hold on despite several days of pounding. In 1915, a mob in Cobb County, Georgia, lynched Jewish businessman Leo Frank, 31, whose death sentence for the murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan had been commuted to life imprisonment. (Frank, who’d maintained his innocence, was pardoned by the state of Georgia in 1986.) In 1943, the Allied conquest of Sicily during World War II was completed as U.S. and British forces entered Messina. In 1945, Indonesian nationalists declared their independence from the Netherlands. The George Orwell novel “Animal Farm,” an allegorical satire of Soviet Communism, was first published in London by Martin Secker & Warburg. In 1962, East German border guards shot and killed 18-year-old Peter Fechter, who had attempted to cross the Berlin Wall into the western sector. In 1969, Hurricane Camille slammed into the Mississippi coast as a Category 5 storm that was blamed for 256 U.S. deaths, three in Cuba. In 1978, the first successful trans-Atlantic balloon flight ended as Maxie Anderson, Ben Abruzzo and Larry Newman landed their Double Eagle II outside Paris. In 1982, the first commercially produced compact discs, a recording of ABBA’s “The Visitors,” were pressed at a Philips factory near Hanover, West Germany. In 1985, more than 1,400 meatpackers walked off the job at the Geo. A. Hormel and Co.’s main plant in Austin, Minnesota, in a bitter strike that lasted just over a year. In 1987, Rudolf Hess, the last member of Adolf Hitler’s inner circle, died at Spandau Prison at age 93, an apparent suicide. The musical drama “Dirty Dancing,” starring Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze, premiered in New York. In 1996, the Reform Party announced Ross Perot had been selected to be its first-ever presidential nominee, opting for the third-party’s founder over challenger Richard Lamm. In 1999, more than 17,000 people were killed when a magnitude 7.4 earthquake struck Turkey.

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THIS DATE IN HISTORY, Aug. 17: Deadly storm slams Mississippi – Jacksonville Daily News

Associated Press Today is Thursday, Aug. 17, the 229th day of 2017. There are 136 days left in the year. On August 17, 1863, Federal batteries and ships began bombarding Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor during the Civil War, but the Confederates managed to hold on despite several days of pounding. In 1915, a mob in Cobb County, Georgia, lynched Jewish businessman Leo Frank, 31, whose death sentence for the murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan had been commuted to life imprisonment. (Frank, who’d maintained his innocence, was pardoned by the state of Georgia in 1986.) In 1943, the Allied conquest of Sicily during World War II was completed as U.S. and British forces entered Messina. In 1945, the George Orwell novel “Animal Farm,” an allegorical satire of Soviet Communism, was first published in London by Martin Secker & Warburg. In 1962, East German border guards shot and killed 18-year-old Peter Fechter, who had attempted to cross the Berlin Wall into the western sector. In 1969, Hurricane Camille slammed into the Mississippi coast as a Category 5 storm that was blamed for 256 U.S. deaths, three in Cuba. In 1978, the first successful trans-Atlantic balloon flight ended as Maxie Anderson, Ben Abruzzo and Larry Newman landed their Double Eagle II outside Paris. In 1982, the first commercially produced compact discs, a recording of ABBA’s “The Visitors,” were pressed at a Philips factory near Hanover, West Germany. In 1985, more than 1,400 meatpackers walked off the job at the Geo. A. Hormel and Co.’s main plant in Austin, Minnesota, in a bitter strike that lasted just over a year. In 1987, Rudolf Hess, the last member of Adolf Hitler’s inner circle, died at Spandau Prison at age 93, an apparent suicide. The musical drama “Dirty Dancing,” starring Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze, premiered in New York. In 1996, the Reform Party announced Ross Perot had been selected to be its first-ever presidential nominee, opting for the third-party’s founder over challenger Richard Lamm. In 1999, more than 17,000 people were killed when a magnitude 7.4 earthquake struck Turkey. In 2007, Hurricane Dean roared into the eastern Caribbean, tearing away roofs, flooding streets and causing at least three deaths on small islands as the powerful storm headed on a collision course with Jamaica and Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. In 2016, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump announced a shake-up of his campaign leadership, naming Stephen Bannon of the conservative Breitbart News website as chief executive officer and promoting pollster Kellyanne Conway to campaign manager. Today’s Birthdays: Author V.S. Naipaul is 85. Former MLB All-Star Boog Powell is 76. Actor Robert DeNiro is 74. Movie director Martha Coolidge is 71. Actor-screenwriter-producer Julian Fellowes is 68. Singer Belinda Carlisle is 59. Author Jonathan Franzen is 58. Actor Sean Penn is 57. Rock musician Steve Gorman (The Black Crowes) is 52. College Basketball Hall of Famer Christian Laettner is 48. Thought for Today: “There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle, or the mirror that reflects it.” — Edith Wharton, American author (1862-1937).

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It’s About Time For A Second Appomattox – HuffPost

Sixteen years ago, the distinguished historian of slavery and anti-slavery movements, David Brion Davis (and my favorite graduate school professor), published a powerful piece in the New York Times Sunday Week in Review entitled,Free at Last: The Enduring Legacy of the Souths Civil War Victory. The Souths Civil War Victory? Doesnt everyone know the Confederacy surrendered at Appomattox? No, wrote Davis. Though the South lost the battles, for more than a century it attained its goal: that the role of slavery in Americas history be thoroughly diminished, even somehow removed as a cause of the war. Thats what at stake in the battles over Confederate monuments. And why those battles are so important. The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw the promotion of the legend of the Lost Cause, a version of the Civil War in which brave, honorable, dignified and cultured Confederates waged a heroic, romantic losing struggle against the greedy, uncouth, money-obsessed Yankees who could not wait to get their hands on southern land. This fantasy retelling of the war over slavery became celebrated in hundreds of Confederate monuments, including the Confederate Mount Rushmore featuring the worlds largest bas-relief sculptures of Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, and Jefferson Davis at Stone Mountain, Georgia. It then provided the narrative for Thomas Dixons popular novel The Clansman: A Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan (1905), and D.W. Griffiths blockbuster film The Birth of a Nation, in which KKK riders rescue the flower of white southern womanhood from the bestial depravity of freed African-American menabetted by unscrupulous Yankee carpetbaggers. The film, which President Woodrow Wilson screened at the White House, also provided the spark for the founding of the second Ku Klux Klan, as a group of men set fire to a huge cross atop Stone Mountain on Thanksgiving Eve, 1915 to advertise the coming attraction: The Birth of a Nation was coming to Atlanta over Christmas. In that group of KKK founders were several men whod taken part in the lynching of the Jewish factory superintendent Leo Frank several months earlier. (Note the deep connections between anti-Semitism and racism.) Through most of the 20th century, the Confederates interpretation of their own history dominated textbooks in schools and colleges, even the historical profession, which produced dozens of volumes documenting the benign institution of slavery. It suffused Margaret Mitchells best-selling historical romance Gone with the Wind (1936) and the even more influential film starring Vivien Leigh as the indomitable southern heroine Scarlett OHara and Clark Gable as the dashing Confederate heart throb Rhett Butler. In all of these cultural constructions dedicated to the Lost Cause, the reason the Civil War was actually foughtthe 4 million enslaved African-Americanseffectively disappeared, except as objects of fear, derision and ridicule. In the meantime, the freed people and their descendants, particularly in the south, lived under the reign of racial terror known as Jim Crow, which didnt just enforce segregated lunch counters, water fountains and bathrooms. The Equal Justice Initiative has documented more than 4,000 lynchings of African-Americans in 12 southern states between 1877 and 1950. So when you hear people defend these monuments as Southern heritage, you know thats just not true. They are nothing more than propaganda, monuments to a fantasy designed to erase the real history of slavery, the reason for the Civil War, and to prevent African-Americans rights to equality and physical security. Every single minute, they remain monuments to systemic, institutional, often violent racial oppression. Millions of Germans joined the Nazi party during the 1930s. Where are the monuments to Nazi heritage in Germany? How many swastikas adorn German flags? Its time for them all to go. Its time for a real Appomattox. Its time to defeat the Confederacy, once and for all.

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  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."