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April 12, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

U.S. Strikes Qaeda Target in Southern Libya, Expanding …

In a statement, the militarys Africa Command said the strike had targeted militants with Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, an affiliate also known as AQIM, and had been carried out in coordination with the United Nations-backed unity government in Tripoli. At this time, we assess no civilians were killed in this strike, the statement said.

The strike came as the Trump administration has been reassessing the American military commitment in North and West Africa after the ambush in Niger last fall that killed four American soldiers. The Pentagon has been preparing to fly armed drone missions from Nigers capital, Niamey, a step that diplomats and analysts say could further widen the Pentagons shadow war in this part of the continent.

In a sign of how the Pentagon has sought to obscure its operations in Libya and other parts of northwestern Africa, the Africa Command did not announce the strike on Saturday.

It responded to questions from The New York Times late Saturday with a terse statement after media reports about the strike circulated in Libya. The statement did not identify where the drone had originated.

Earlier this month, in response to a Times query, the Pentagon acknowledged for the first time that Green Berets working with government forces in Niger had killed 11 Islamic State fighters in a firefight in December. No Americans were hurt in that fight, the Pentagon said.

Ubari is at the intersection of the powerful criminal and jihadist currents that have washed across Libya in recent years. Roughly equidistant from Libyas borders with Niger, Chad and Algeria, the areas seminomadic tribesmen are heavily involved in the smuggling of weapons, drugs and illegal migrants through the lawless deserts of southern Libya.

Some have allied with Islamist militias, including Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, which operates across Algeria, Mali, Niger and Libya.

The area erupted into conflict in 2014 when a century-old peace treaty between the Tuareg and Tebu ethnic groups collapsed over a dispute about control of the fuel smuggling trade. The fighting, which occurred independently of the broader struggle for control of Libya after the 2011 overthrow of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, raged for a year, killing hundreds and leaving many families displaced.

The Tebu and Tuareg eventually struck a peace agreement, and a neutral militia currently keeps the peace in Ubari, but tensions remain. In November, Turkish engineers working at the city power station were kidnapped by unidentified gunmen, as was a Pakistani engineer at the station who went missing this month, according to local news media reports.

While some Tebu groups have allied with the United Nations-backed government in Tripoli, Tuareg factions have allied with Qaeda, which is also believed to have profited from the trade in smuggled fuel.

In the statement on Saturday, Robyn M. Mack, a spokeswoman for the United States Africa Command, said that it was still assessing the results of the strike and that the purpose had been to deny terrorists freedom of action and degrade their ability to reconsolidate.

But the command did not answer several other questions: Who were the two dead militants, and why were they important enough to kill with an airstrike? What role, if any, did France play in a region of Libya in which it has also conducted counterterrorism operations? And, most significantly, to what extent is the attack the start of an escalating campaign against a broad spectrum of extremists in northwestern Africa, or a one-off strike against high-profile Qaeda operatives?

Beginning a concerted strike campaign against AQIM or other AQ elements in the Sahel, akin to what we are doing in Yemen and Somalia, would mark a significant expansion of our counterterrorism efforts, said Luke Hartig, a former senior director for counterterrorism at the National Security Council during the Obama administration.

If this is going to be the start of a broader campaign, it would be helpful to hear more from the administration about the threat posed by AQIM and why it merits putting our people in harms way and conducting strikes, Mr. Hartig said.

A senior French security official said France had played no role in the strike, but added that Paris was very happy of this continued commitment of the U.S. to counterterrorism in Libya.

Questions about whether the American military, under the Trump administration, is seeking to blur the expanding scope of operations in Africa were raised this month when it was revealed that the United States had carried out four airstrikes in Libya between September and January that Africa Command did not disclose at the time. The military has said it will acknowledge such missions if asked about them, even if it does not affirmatively disclose them in a news release.

Ms. Mack said that Saturdays attack was the first airstrike the United States had conducted against Al Qaeda in Libya. In fact, the United States conducted an airstrike in eastern Libya in June 2015 against Mokhtar Belmokhtar, the mastermind of the 2013 terrorist seizure of an Algerian gas plant that left 38 foreign hostages dead. Mr. Belmokhtar was a longtime Qaeda operative with ties to senior Qaeda leadership in Pakistan. Western intelligence officials today remain divided over whether he is dead.

American efforts to hunt down Islamists in Libyas vast deserts rely heavily on surveillance and airpower but also on alliances with the armed groups vying for control of Libya. Mohamed El Sallak, a spokesman for the United Nations-backed unity government, said on Twitter that the attack in Ubari on Saturday was part of the strategic cooperation between Libya and the United States in the fight against terrorism.

But in Ubari, armed Tebu and Tuareg groups have sided with different sides in Libyas chaotic struggle, and the unity government is by no means the dominant player.

Some control a stretch of southern border, while others have allied with militias from the coastal cities of Misurata and Benghazi. The rising force now in the south is Field Marshal Khalifa Hifter, the commander of the Libyan National Army based in Benghazi.

Since his forces ousted the last Islamist militias from Benghazi in December, Mr. Hifter has focused on the south, where he exerts influence through his fleet of aging warplanes and alliances with local armed groups.

In Sebha, the largest southern city, Mr. Hifter and the rival United Nations-backed government are vying for control through local proxies. In Ubari, 110 miles to the west, Mr. Hifter has allied with an ethnically mixed militia that is composed of former Qaddafi loyalists and more recent recruits.

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U.S. Strikes Qaeda Target in Southern Libya, Expanding …

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March 26, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Contact Embassy of Libya

Contact Us

Libyan Embassy| Washington, DC.1460 Dahlia Street NWWashington, DC 20012

Please call us on the following numbers if you have any questions:(202) 606-3667(202) 644-2727For all consular inquires pleas email us on:Consular.sec@embassyoflibyadc.orgFor students affairs please call:202-790- 3819For student’s affairs inquires please email us on:Stamps@Ica-edu.usFor all other inquires please email us on:Info@embassyoflibyadc.com

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March 10, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Libya Economy: Population, GDP, Inflation, Business, Trade …

Download PDF Quick Facts

Libya could not be ranked in the 2018 Index because of the lack of reliable comparable data on all facets of the economy. Official government compilations of economic data are inadequate, and data reported by many of the international sources upon which Index grading relies remain incomplete.

Political instability, factional clashes, and security threats from domestic and foreign followers of the Islamic State have made economic recovery and development in Libya fragile and uneven. The government faces the daunting challenges of disarming and demobilizing militias, enforcing the rule of law, and reforming the state-dominated economy. Power outages are widespread. Living conditions, including access to clean drinking water, medical services, and safe housing, have declined as more people have been internally displaced by the civil war. These problems are likely to persist until a permanent government is in place.

Muammar Qadhafi seized power in 1969 and ruled as a dictator until he was overthrown in 2011. Since then, the country has been in political upheaval. In June 2014, Libya held its second parliamentary election since Qadhafis overthrow; in November, the Supreme Constitutional Court ruled that the elected parliament was constitutionally illegitimate. Pro-Islamist militias allied with the Muslim Brotherhood have established parallel institutions. In 2016, the U.N. brokered the establishment of a national unity government to replace the two rival administrations. Oil and natural gas provide about 80 percent of GDP, 95 percent of export revenues, and nearly all government revenues. Extremists have attacked oilfields and seized oil infrastructure, threatening government control of oil and gas revenues.

Arbitrary seizure of property is common in a climate of general instability. While Libyans have the right to own property and can start businesses, regulations and protections are not upheld in practice. Businesses and homes have been confiscated by militants, particularly in Libyas eastern regions and in Benghazi. In the absence of a permanent constitution, the role of the judiciary remains unclear. Corruption is pervasive.

The top income tax rate is 10 percent, but other taxes make the top rate much higher in practice. The overall tax burden equals 21.3 percent of total domestic income. Over the past three years, government spending has amounted to 92.9 percent of total output (GDP), and budget deficits have averaged 60.7 percent of GDP. Public debt is equivalent to 7.4 percent of GDP.

The existing regulatory framework continues to be severely undermined by ongoing political instability and turmoil. The labor market remains destabilized, and the large informal sector is an important source of employment. Libya has an extensive system of subsidies, with food and energy subsidies alone consuming about 16 percent of the budget.

Nontariff barriers significantly impede trade for Libya. Ongoing conflict is a deterrent to trade and investment flows. The financial system is hampered by unstable political and economic conditions, and limited access to financing severely impedes any meaningful development of private business.

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Libya Economy: Population, GDP, Inflation, Business, Trade …

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February 4, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Where is Libya? / Where is Libya Located in The World …

Located in the continent of Africa, Libya covers 1,759,540 square kilometers of land, making it the 17th largest nation in terms of land area.

Libya became an independent state in 1951, after gaining its sovereignty from Turkey. The population of Libya is 6,733,620 (2012) and the nation has a density of 4 people per square kilometer.

The currency of Libya is the Libyan Dinar (LYD). As well, the people of Libya are refered to as Libyan.

The dialing code for the country is 218 and the top level internet domain for Libyan sites is .ly.

Libya shares land borders with 6 countries: Chad, Sudan, Egypt, Algeria, Niger, Tunisia.

To learn more, visit our detailed Libya section.

Tripoli is the capital city of Libya. It has a population of 1,150,989, and is located on a latitue of 32.88 and longitude of 13.19.

Tripoli is also the political center of Libya, which is considered a Republic, and home to its Ceremonial head of state.

This page was last updated on October 2, 2015.

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Where is Libya? / Where is Libya Located in The World …

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January 31, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Libya – Telegraph

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Libya – Telegraph

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January 29, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

2018 Libya Humanitarian Response Plan Overview – Libya …

THE HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE PLAN AT A GLANCE

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1Protect peoples rights in accordance with IHL and IHRL

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2Support inclusive, safe and dignified access to basic services for vulnerable households and communities

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3Strengthen the humanitarian response by increasing accountability and capacity

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

Under the 2018 Libya humanitarian response plan, humanitarian partners aim to respond to the most basic needs of 940,000 people out of an estimated 1.1 million in need of life-saving humanitarian assistance and protection across Libya.

The Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) has identified three core strategic objectives to guide a principled, focused, prioritised and better coordinated humanitarian response in 2018. These were informed by enhanced assessments and analysis and operational considerations.

Achieving these objectives, through humanitarian activities under this plan, is contingent upon the availability of sufficient resources and the existence of an enabling operational environment.

The plan was developed in complementarity with United Nations Country Teams Strategic Framework, which includes efforts to build resilience and strengthen basic services, with every effort made to eliminate duplication and ensure maximum synergies between the plans.

Many development and stabilisation interventions in Libya are directly relevant to humanitarian work, as they often provide longer-term and sustainable solutions that reduce humanitarian needs over time. Thus, the HCT commits to coordinating and sequencing humanitarian response projects with existing and planned stabilisation and development programmes. In line with this approach, sector response strategies identified linkages between humanitarian aid and development and stabilisation support (e.g. in specific geographical locations or for targeted population groups), including opportunities to phase out humanitarian assistance towards longer term support, where appropriate.

1 Protect peoples rights in accordance with international humanitarian law (IHL) and international human rights law (IHRL)

Acknowledging the international human rights and humanitarian law violations, and in line with the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) guidance note on the centrality of protection, humanitarian actors aim to protect the rights and uphold the dignity of the most vulnerable. They will focus on mainstreaming and promoting the centrality of protection across all elements of the response, through a solid articulation of protection concerns, trends monitoring and analysis, as well as the establishment of preventative and response measures. Humanitarian actors will also increase advocacy efforts with duty bearers and all relevant stakeholders to protect affected civilians and promote respect for and adherence to IHL and IHRL.

2 Support inclusive, safe and dignified access to basic services for vulnerable households and communities

This objective stresses the importance of peoples ability to access humanitarian assistance, basic services and protection in safety and dignity, particularly in areas with the most severe needs. Response interventions in the various sectors will be focused on the most vulnerable groups and communities who face limited access to basic goods, and services. Examples of interventions include but are not limited to supporting access to formal and nonformal education, providing psychosocial support, improving access to preventive and curative health services, ensuring timely and dignified access to WASH services, providing cash assistance and addressing the threat of explosive hazards.

3 Strengthen the humanitarian response by increasing accountability and capacity

This objective encapsulates humanitarian partners commitment to good programming, gender and conflictsensitivity, scaling up capacity, improved coordination, and upholding the core principle of do no harm, including through meaningful two-way communication with communities affected by the crisis. It also includes efforts to strengthen the local and national emergency capacity and response mechanisms.

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2018 Libya Humanitarian Response Plan Overview – Libya …

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January 25, 2018   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Libya – Economic Indicators – Actual Data – Historical Charts

GDP in Libya fell to 29.15 USD Billion from 41.14 USD Billion. Inflation Rate went down to 25.70 percent from 26.90 percent in Aug 2017. Interest Rate was reported at 3.00 percent. Population grew to 6.29 million from 6.23 million and Unemployment Rate was recorded at 19.22 percent.

GDP all-time average stands at 42.34 USD Billion and it’s projection for 2016 is 34.1. Inflation Rate averaged 8.10 percent since Jan 2004 and is projected to be 24.3 in Oct 2017. Interest Rate is forecasted to be 3 in 01/31/2018. The Population all-time average stands at 4.03 million and it’s projection for 2017 is 6.36. Unemployment Rate averaged 19.14 percent since 1991 and is projected to be 19.2 in 2017.

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Libya – Economic Indicators – Actual Data – Historical Charts

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January 20, 2018   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Libya Sanctions

Sign up for Libya Sanctions e-mail updates.

Frequently Asked Questions

Interpretive Guidance

Guidance on OFAC Licensing Policy

General Licenses

Executive Orders, Statutes, Rules and Regulations Relating totheLibya Sanctions

TheLibyaSanctionsrepresent the implementation of multiplelegal authorities. Some of these authorities areinthe form of executive ordersissued by thePresident. Other authorities arepublic laws (statutes) passed byThe Congress. Theseauthorities are further codified by OFACinits regulations which are published the Code of Federal Regulations(CFR).Modificationsto these regulationsare posted in the Federal Register.

Executive Orders

Statutes

Code of Federal Regulations

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December 25, 2017   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Carrier

Built on Willis Carriers invention of modern air conditioning in 1902, Carrier is the world leader in heating, air-conditioning and refrigeration solutions. We constantly build upon our history of proven innovation with new products and services that improve global comfort and efficiency. In 1902, Willis Carrier solved one of mankinds most elusive challenges by controlling the indoor environment through modern air conditioning. His invention enabled countless industries, promoting global productivity, health and personal comfort. Learn more …

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April 12, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

U.S. Strikes Qaeda Target in Southern Libya, Expanding …

In a statement, the militarys Africa Command said the strike had targeted militants with Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, an affiliate also known as AQIM, and had been carried out in coordination with the United Nations-backed unity government in Tripoli. At this time, we assess no civilians were killed in this strike, the statement said. The strike came as the Trump administration has been reassessing the American military commitment in North and West Africa after the ambush in Niger last fall that killed four American soldiers. The Pentagon has been preparing to fly armed drone missions from Nigers capital, Niamey, a step that diplomats and analysts say could further widen the Pentagons shadow war in this part of the continent. In a sign of how the Pentagon has sought to obscure its operations in Libya and other parts of northwestern Africa, the Africa Command did not announce the strike on Saturday. It responded to questions from The New York Times late Saturday with a terse statement after media reports about the strike circulated in Libya. The statement did not identify where the drone had originated. Earlier this month, in response to a Times query, the Pentagon acknowledged for the first time that Green Berets working with government forces in Niger had killed 11 Islamic State fighters in a firefight in December. No Americans were hurt in that fight, the Pentagon said. Ubari is at the intersection of the powerful criminal and jihadist currents that have washed across Libya in recent years. Roughly equidistant from Libyas borders with Niger, Chad and Algeria, the areas seminomadic tribesmen are heavily involved in the smuggling of weapons, drugs and illegal migrants through the lawless deserts of southern Libya. Some have allied with Islamist militias, including Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, which operates across Algeria, Mali, Niger and Libya. The area erupted into conflict in 2014 when a century-old peace treaty between the Tuareg and Tebu ethnic groups collapsed over a dispute about control of the fuel smuggling trade. The fighting, which occurred independently of the broader struggle for control of Libya after the 2011 overthrow of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, raged for a year, killing hundreds and leaving many families displaced. The Tebu and Tuareg eventually struck a peace agreement, and a neutral militia currently keeps the peace in Ubari, but tensions remain. In November, Turkish engineers working at the city power station were kidnapped by unidentified gunmen, as was a Pakistani engineer at the station who went missing this month, according to local news media reports. While some Tebu groups have allied with the United Nations-backed government in Tripoli, Tuareg factions have allied with Qaeda, which is also believed to have profited from the trade in smuggled fuel. In the statement on Saturday, Robyn M. Mack, a spokeswoman for the United States Africa Command, said that it was still assessing the results of the strike and that the purpose had been to deny terrorists freedom of action and degrade their ability to reconsolidate. But the command did not answer several other questions: Who were the two dead militants, and why were they important enough to kill with an airstrike? What role, if any, did France play in a region of Libya in which it has also conducted counterterrorism operations? And, most significantly, to what extent is the attack the start of an escalating campaign against a broad spectrum of extremists in northwestern Africa, or a one-off strike against high-profile Qaeda operatives? Beginning a concerted strike campaign against AQIM or other AQ elements in the Sahel, akin to what we are doing in Yemen and Somalia, would mark a significant expansion of our counterterrorism efforts, said Luke Hartig, a former senior director for counterterrorism at the National Security Council during the Obama administration. If this is going to be the start of a broader campaign, it would be helpful to hear more from the administration about the threat posed by AQIM and why it merits putting our people in harms way and conducting strikes, Mr. Hartig said. A senior French security official said France had played no role in the strike, but added that Paris was very happy of this continued commitment of the U.S. to counterterrorism in Libya. Questions about whether the American military, under the Trump administration, is seeking to blur the expanding scope of operations in Africa were raised this month when it was revealed that the United States had carried out four airstrikes in Libya between September and January that Africa Command did not disclose at the time. The military has said it will acknowledge such missions if asked about them, even if it does not affirmatively disclose them in a news release. Ms. Mack said that Saturdays attack was the first airstrike the United States had conducted against Al Qaeda in Libya. In fact, the United States conducted an airstrike in eastern Libya in June 2015 against Mokhtar Belmokhtar, the mastermind of the 2013 terrorist seizure of an Algerian gas plant that left 38 foreign hostages dead. Mr. Belmokhtar was a longtime Qaeda operative with ties to senior Qaeda leadership in Pakistan. Western intelligence officials today remain divided over whether he is dead. American efforts to hunt down Islamists in Libyas vast deserts rely heavily on surveillance and airpower but also on alliances with the armed groups vying for control of Libya. Mohamed El Sallak, a spokesman for the United Nations-backed unity government, said on Twitter that the attack in Ubari on Saturday was part of the strategic cooperation between Libya and the United States in the fight against terrorism. But in Ubari, armed Tebu and Tuareg groups have sided with different sides in Libyas chaotic struggle, and the unity government is by no means the dominant player. Some control a stretch of southern border, while others have allied with militias from the coastal cities of Misurata and Benghazi. The rising force now in the south is Field Marshal Khalifa Hifter, the commander of the Libyan National Army based in Benghazi. Since his forces ousted the last Islamist militias from Benghazi in December, Mr. Hifter has focused on the south, where he exerts influence through his fleet of aging warplanes and alliances with local armed groups. In Sebha, the largest southern city, Mr. Hifter and the rival United Nations-backed government are vying for control through local proxies. In Ubari, 110 miles to the west, Mr. Hifter has allied with an ethnically mixed militia that is composed of former Qaddafi loyalists and more recent recruits.

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March 26, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Contact Embassy of Libya

Contact Us Libyan Embassy| Washington, DC.1460 Dahlia Street NWWashington, DC 20012 Please call us on the following numbers if you have any questions:(202) 606-3667(202) 644-2727For all consular inquires pleas email us on:Consular.sec@embassyoflibyadc.orgFor students affairs please call:202-790- 3819For student’s affairs inquires please email us on:Stamps@Ica-edu.usFor all other inquires please email us on:Info@embassyoflibyadc.com

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March 10, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Libya Economy: Population, GDP, Inflation, Business, Trade …

Download PDF Quick Facts Libya could not be ranked in the 2018 Index because of the lack of reliable comparable data on all facets of the economy. Official government compilations of economic data are inadequate, and data reported by many of the international sources upon which Index grading relies remain incomplete. Political instability, factional clashes, and security threats from domestic and foreign followers of the Islamic State have made economic recovery and development in Libya fragile and uneven. The government faces the daunting challenges of disarming and demobilizing militias, enforcing the rule of law, and reforming the state-dominated economy. Power outages are widespread. Living conditions, including access to clean drinking water, medical services, and safe housing, have declined as more people have been internally displaced by the civil war. These problems are likely to persist until a permanent government is in place. Muammar Qadhafi seized power in 1969 and ruled as a dictator until he was overthrown in 2011. Since then, the country has been in political upheaval. In June 2014, Libya held its second parliamentary election since Qadhafis overthrow; in November, the Supreme Constitutional Court ruled that the elected parliament was constitutionally illegitimate. Pro-Islamist militias allied with the Muslim Brotherhood have established parallel institutions. In 2016, the U.N. brokered the establishment of a national unity government to replace the two rival administrations. Oil and natural gas provide about 80 percent of GDP, 95 percent of export revenues, and nearly all government revenues. Extremists have attacked oilfields and seized oil infrastructure, threatening government control of oil and gas revenues. Arbitrary seizure of property is common in a climate of general instability. While Libyans have the right to own property and can start businesses, regulations and protections are not upheld in practice. Businesses and homes have been confiscated by militants, particularly in Libyas eastern regions and in Benghazi. In the absence of a permanent constitution, the role of the judiciary remains unclear. Corruption is pervasive. The top income tax rate is 10 percent, but other taxes make the top rate much higher in practice. The overall tax burden equals 21.3 percent of total domestic income. Over the past three years, government spending has amounted to 92.9 percent of total output (GDP), and budget deficits have averaged 60.7 percent of GDP. Public debt is equivalent to 7.4 percent of GDP. The existing regulatory framework continues to be severely undermined by ongoing political instability and turmoil. The labor market remains destabilized, and the large informal sector is an important source of employment. Libya has an extensive system of subsidies, with food and energy subsidies alone consuming about 16 percent of the budget. Nontariff barriers significantly impede trade for Libya. Ongoing conflict is a deterrent to trade and investment flows. The financial system is hampered by unstable political and economic conditions, and limited access to financing severely impedes any meaningful development of private business.

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February 4, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Where is Libya? / Where is Libya Located in The World …

Located in the continent of Africa, Libya covers 1,759,540 square kilometers of land, making it the 17th largest nation in terms of land area. Libya became an independent state in 1951, after gaining its sovereignty from Turkey. The population of Libya is 6,733,620 (2012) and the nation has a density of 4 people per square kilometer. The currency of Libya is the Libyan Dinar (LYD). As well, the people of Libya are refered to as Libyan. The dialing code for the country is 218 and the top level internet domain for Libyan sites is .ly. Libya shares land borders with 6 countries: Chad, Sudan, Egypt, Algeria, Niger, Tunisia. To learn more, visit our detailed Libya section. Tripoli is the capital city of Libya. It has a population of 1,150,989, and is located on a latitue of 32.88 and longitude of 13.19. Tripoli is also the political center of Libya, which is considered a Republic, and home to its Ceremonial head of state. This page was last updated on October 2, 2015.

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January 31, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Libya – Telegraph

We’ve noticed you’re adblocking. We rely on advertising to help fund our award-winning journalism. We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future. Thank you for your support.

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January 29, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

2018 Libya Humanitarian Response Plan Overview – Libya …

THE HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE PLAN AT A GLANCE STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1Protect peoples rights in accordance with IHL and IHRL STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2Support inclusive, safe and dignified access to basic services for vulnerable households and communities STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3Strengthen the humanitarian response by increasing accountability and capacity STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES Under the 2018 Libya humanitarian response plan, humanitarian partners aim to respond to the most basic needs of 940,000 people out of an estimated 1.1 million in need of life-saving humanitarian assistance and protection across Libya. The Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) has identified three core strategic objectives to guide a principled, focused, prioritised and better coordinated humanitarian response in 2018. These were informed by enhanced assessments and analysis and operational considerations. Achieving these objectives, through humanitarian activities under this plan, is contingent upon the availability of sufficient resources and the existence of an enabling operational environment. The plan was developed in complementarity with United Nations Country Teams Strategic Framework, which includes efforts to build resilience and strengthen basic services, with every effort made to eliminate duplication and ensure maximum synergies between the plans. Many development and stabilisation interventions in Libya are directly relevant to humanitarian work, as they often provide longer-term and sustainable solutions that reduce humanitarian needs over time. Thus, the HCT commits to coordinating and sequencing humanitarian response projects with existing and planned stabilisation and development programmes. In line with this approach, sector response strategies identified linkages between humanitarian aid and development and stabilisation support (e.g. in specific geographical locations or for targeted population groups), including opportunities to phase out humanitarian assistance towards longer term support, where appropriate. 1 Protect peoples rights in accordance with international humanitarian law (IHL) and international human rights law (IHRL) Acknowledging the international human rights and humanitarian law violations, and in line with the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) guidance note on the centrality of protection, humanitarian actors aim to protect the rights and uphold the dignity of the most vulnerable. They will focus on mainstreaming and promoting the centrality of protection across all elements of the response, through a solid articulation of protection concerns, trends monitoring and analysis, as well as the establishment of preventative and response measures. Humanitarian actors will also increase advocacy efforts with duty bearers and all relevant stakeholders to protect affected civilians and promote respect for and adherence to IHL and IHRL. 2 Support inclusive, safe and dignified access to basic services for vulnerable households and communities This objective stresses the importance of peoples ability to access humanitarian assistance, basic services and protection in safety and dignity, particularly in areas with the most severe needs. Response interventions in the various sectors will be focused on the most vulnerable groups and communities who face limited access to basic goods, and services. Examples of interventions include but are not limited to supporting access to formal and nonformal education, providing psychosocial support, improving access to preventive and curative health services, ensuring timely and dignified access to WASH services, providing cash assistance and addressing the threat of explosive hazards. 3 Strengthen the humanitarian response by increasing accountability and capacity This objective encapsulates humanitarian partners commitment to good programming, gender and conflictsensitivity, scaling up capacity, improved coordination, and upholding the core principle of do no harm, including through meaningful two-way communication with communities affected by the crisis. It also includes efforts to strengthen the local and national emergency capacity and response mechanisms.

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January 25, 2018   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Libya – Economic Indicators – Actual Data – Historical Charts

GDP in Libya fell to 29.15 USD Billion from 41.14 USD Billion. Inflation Rate went down to 25.70 percent from 26.90 percent in Aug 2017. Interest Rate was reported at 3.00 percent. Population grew to 6.29 million from 6.23 million and Unemployment Rate was recorded at 19.22 percent. GDP all-time average stands at 42.34 USD Billion and it’s projection for 2016 is 34.1. Inflation Rate averaged 8.10 percent since Jan 2004 and is projected to be 24.3 in Oct 2017. Interest Rate is forecasted to be 3 in 01/31/2018. The Population all-time average stands at 4.03 million and it’s projection for 2017 is 6.36. Unemployment Rate averaged 19.14 percent since 1991 and is projected to be 19.2 in 2017.

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January 20, 2018   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Libya Sanctions

Sign up for Libya Sanctions e-mail updates. Frequently Asked Questions Interpretive Guidance Guidance on OFAC Licensing Policy General Licenses Executive Orders, Statutes, Rules and Regulations Relating totheLibya Sanctions TheLibyaSanctionsrepresent the implementation of multiplelegal authorities. Some of these authorities areinthe form of executive ordersissued by thePresident. Other authorities arepublic laws (statutes) passed byThe Congress. Theseauthorities are further codified by OFACinits regulations which are published the Code of Federal Regulations(CFR).Modificationsto these regulationsare posted in the Federal Register. Executive Orders Statutes Code of Federal Regulations Federal Register Notices

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December 25, 2017   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed


Fair Use Disclaimer

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances."

Under the 'fair use' rule of copyright law, an author may make limited use of another author's work without asking permission. Fair use is based on the belief that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted materials for purposes of commentary and criticism. The fair use privilege is perhaps the most significant limitation on a copyright owner's exclusive rights.

Fair use as described at 17 U.S.C. Section 107:

"Notwithstanding the provisions of section 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phono-records or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright.

In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:

  • (1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for or nonprofit educational purposes,
  • (2) the nature of the copyrighted work,
  • (3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole, and
  • (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work."