Archive for the ‘Libya’ Category

Rep. Brat deletes photo of ‘Hillary for US Ambassador to Libya’ sign – CNN

“Sign says it all,” the since-deleted post was captioned.

The sign appeared to be mocking the 2016 Democratic presidential candidate and suggesting that she herself be put in danger now.

Clinton was serving secretary of state during the 2012 attack on the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya. US ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens and three other Americans were killed in the assault. Clinton has faced significant criticism from Republicans who accused her of being personally responsible for security lapses in Benghazi.

A Clinton spokesman did not immediately return a CNN request for comment Monday night. Brat’s office also didn’t immediately return a request for comment.

Still, Brat rejected the idea that the sign in any way suggested Clinton be put in danger.

“No, that’s — that’s laughable, right?” he told the Richmond-based news station.

In a later post to his Instagram account, Brat said he thought the sign has been misinterpreted.

“Dear Instagram friends, an earlier pic today was being misinterpreted so it has been removed,” the post read.

Asked by the new station if the sign bothered him at all, Brat said, “No, I thought the guy was just getting at the Benghazi injustice that everybody knows is a tragedy — it had to do with all these tapes and stuff,” according to the station’s write-up of the interview.

The congressman did not offer a clear explanation as to why the sign said Clinton should be ambassador to Libya.

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Rep. Brat deletes photo of ‘Hillary for US Ambassador to Libya’ sign – CNN

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Libya oil output at 4-year high adds pressure on Opec – Gulf Times

Libyas oil production has climbed to more than 1mn bpd for the first time in four years, further complicating Opecs struggle to regain control of the oil market. The North African country is pumping 1.005mn bpd, according to a person with direct knowledge of the situation, who asked not to be identified because they arent authorised to speak to the media. That would be the highest since June 2013, when Libya pumped 1.13mn bpd, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The increase adds to the challenge that the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and other major producers face after agreeing in May to extend their output-cuts deal to counter a supply glut and slippage in prices. Libya, like Nigeria, is exempted from the cuts deal, though its oil production and exports remain vulnerable to disruptions by armed factions and restive workers. Libyaa output has rebounded from only 690,000 bpd at the start of the year, with Sharara, the countrys largest oil field, resuming production last month. State National Oil Corp chairman Mustafa Sanalla said in April he wanted to boost national output to 1.1mn bpd by August. Given ongoing political risks, however, production will probably fall short of government targets for the third quarter, Jan Edelmann, commodities analyst at HSH Nordbank AG in Hamburg, said on Sunday by email. Libyas output is seen rising 300,000 bpd on average for the third quarter compared with the first quarter, he said. Sharara closed on June 7 for two days due to a protest by workers over a colleagues death at the field, halting about 270,000 bpd, a person familiar with the matter said at the time. Other fields have reopened, most recently the Abu Attifel deposit which resumed production last month and is now pumping about 81,000 bpd, according to the person who gave the latest production figure. The Majid oil field restarted on July 1, with output at 4,500 bpd. Sharara has been also steady at 270,000 bpd, the person said. Libya, with Africas biggest crude reserves, was pumping about 1.6mn bpd before a political uprising in 2011. The ouster and killing that year of former dictator Muammar Gaddafi led to a collapse in central authority, and many foreign investors withdrew as armed groups fought for control of oil facilities.

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Libya oil output at 4-year high adds pressure on Opec – Gulf Times

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Rep. Brat removes online post calling for Hillary Clinton to be sent to Libya – Richmond.com

Rep. Dave Brat, R-7th, removed a post from his Twitter and Instagram accounts in which he endorsed the idea of sending former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to Libya to be the ambassador.

Brat said a new staffer made the post without his approval.

The picture was taken at a gun show in Fredericksburg on Saturday; Brat later posted that he had taken it down.

In the photo, Brat stood smiling next to a man holding a sign that said “Hillary for U.S. ambassador to Libya.”

Brat’s comment read, “Sign says it all.”

Christopher Stevens, the U.S. ambassador to Libya, and three other Americans were killed in a raid on the American diplomatic mission in Benghazi in September 2012. Many conservatives blame then-Secretary of State Clinton for their deaths. The House Select Committee on Benghazi issued an 800-page report following an investigation.

Brat took heat from critics on social media over his post.

Brat said in an interview Monday that a staffer made the post.

“Ive got new staffers on board and theyre constantly putting posts up on Facebook and whatever, so I didnt vet that,” he said.

Brat said he told his staff to remove it because a staffer told him “people are interpreting it in crazy left, far-left-land logic thats going on right now across the web.”

Brat has repeatedly said he strives to not speak ill of anyone. And he said if someone looks at his Facebook page, they’ll learn that it’s the left that’s using the vitriol.

“Who actually is using the vitriolic language? Me or the hard left? And the answer is right now online,” he said.

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Rep. Brat removes online post calling for Hillary Clinton to be sent to Libya – Richmond.com

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Gunmen attack Tripoli-based Minister of Education in south Libya – The Libya Observer

A statement on the Ministry of Education’s official page on Facebook explained the horrific ordeal that struck the convoy of the Minister of Education of the UN-proposed government earlier on Monday.

The convoy of Minister Othman Abdul-Jaleel was subjected to heavy fire at the Checkpoint 17, which is situated at southern entrance to the city of Sabha when the minister was en route to the city of Murzuq.

The attackers were said to have attempted to detain the minister and his deputy, but their guards managed to extract them from the danger zone. Other members of the ministers entourage were detained for about an hour until local elders intervened and helped secure the release of the detained group.

The minister and his team continued their journey to Murzuq after the ordeal.

Five Presidential Council ministers embarked in a tour to south Libya early this week to attend a ceremony to mark the handover of to the Security Directorate of Sabha, in addition to other visits to government institutions.

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Gunmen attack Tripoli-based Minister of Education in south Libya – The Libya Observer

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Refugee and migrant flows through Libya on the rise report – UNHCR

A group of people gather inside a detention facility holding refugees and migrants in Tripoli, May 2017. UNHCR/Iason Foounten

TRIPOLI, Libya Fleeing death threats in his native Rwanda, 54-year-old Mihigo and his family embarked on an epic journey that took them to Burkina Faso, Mauritania, Morocco and Niger, before eventually reaching Libya four years ago.

Working from time to time in construction jobs in the capital, Tripoli, he has struggled to find a regular work. In his search he has been robbed, assaulted and racially abused, while his wife and daughters suffered sexual abuse.

I have faced all the problems: theft, bad treatment, discrimination, exploitation (and the) rape attempt of my wife and daughters, he says.

The familys desperate plight is unfortunately increasingly common among a growing number of refugees and migrants fleeing wars and hardship in Africa and reaching the North African country.

Among those arriving in Libya is Somali fisherman Hodan, 33, who slipped overland into the countrys southwest from Sudan with a smuggler, after an overland trek that took him through Ethiopia and Djibouti.

Once in the desert town of Rebyana, he was detained by unknown authorities for five days. In desperate need of both food and decent accommodation, he sees no alternative but to continue on his quest to reach Europe.

I cannot go back home because of the war in Somalia and the absence of the government.”

I cannot go back home because of the war in Somalia and the absence of the government for over two decades, he said in interview in the town.

Mihigo and Hodan are among scores of voices in a new study on mixed migration trends through Libya, published today by UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, which examines the rising flows of refugees and migrants passing through the North African country, and the multiple hazards they face.

Libya has for decades drawn people from neighbouring countries, as it offered the best employment opportunities and highest salaries in the region although it has been increasingly roiled by instability and insecurity since the ouster of Muammur Gaddafi in 2011.

The study found that around half of those travelling to Libya do so believing they can find jobs there, but end up fleeing onwards to Europe to escape life-threatening dangers and difficult economic conditions plus widespread exploitation and abuse.

The foreign nationals going to Libya are part of mixed migration flows, meaning that people with different backgrounds and motivations travel together along the same routes. They include refugees, asylum seekers, economic migrants, unaccompanied minors, environmental migrants, victims of trafficking and stranded migrants.

In recent years, the number of people crossing the Mediterranean Sea from North Africa to southern Europe has increased. The indications are that this trend is likely to continue, along with the deadly risks.

This year alone, at least 2,030 people have died or gone missing on the voyage, with the greatest number of fatalities occurring along the so-called Central Mediterranean Route, through Libya.

A group of migrants and refugees drift in a rubber boat in the Mediterranean Sea, in November 2016. They were intercepted by a Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) vessel, the Phoenix. UNHCR/Giuseppe Carotenuto

To reach Libya, the report found most refugees and migrants arrive irregularly overland. Those setting off from East Africa travel through Sudan, while those from West and Central Africa travelthrough Niger. To a lesser extent, those from West Africa pass through Algeria.

In a measure of the danger facing migrants and refugees crossing the Sahara Desert, reports emerged last month of 44 desperate travellers, including women and children, who perished after the truck carrying them broke down in northern Niger.

To reach its findings, the new study drew on interviews with hundreds of refugees and migrants themselves, as well as government officials, NGO workers and smugglers in Chad, Niger, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Italy.

Of particular concern, it found that almost all refugees and migrants coming to Libya irregularly seek the help of smugglers or criminal networks, who now charge fees of around US$5,000, just to reach the country.

With higher fees and greater volume, the smuggling industry has grown increasingly professional, transnational in reach, and hazardous, with armed groups playing an increasingly dominant role.

I have faced all the problems:theft, bad treatment, discrimination, exploitation.

Countries of origin and profiles of refugees and migrants have also evolved, it found. Many of those on the move are young men. In particular, flows from West Africa have increased, involving individuals usually travelling step-by-step, in a series of journeys often organized by the travellers themselves.

As a consequence of this evolving dynamic, the report found that refugees and migrants making the journey are ever more vulnerable, while support services have decreased and the security situation has deteriorated.

Trafficking for sexual exploitation seems to be increasing, affecting Nigerian and Cameroonian women in particular. The number of unaccompanied and separated children travelling alone in Libya is rising, now representing some 14 per cent of total arrivals in Europe via the Central Mediterranean Route, mainly from Eritrea, The Gambia and Nigeria.

To mitigate the growing risks for refugees and migrants passing to and through Libya, recommendations in the report for UNHCR and other organizations include providing direct relief in the form of mobile joint interventions in key hubs in the South — such as Bani Walid, Rebyana, Tazerbu, and Kufra.

Other recommendations include accompanying border monitoring and rescue operations to provide support to refugees and migrants stranded in the desert.

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Refugee and migrant flows through Libya on the rise report – UNHCR

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Insecurity, economic crisis, abuse and exploitation in Libya push refugees and migrants to Europe, new study reveals. – UNHCR

A group of migrants and refugees drift in a rubber boat in the Mediterranean Sea, in November 2016. They were intercepted by a Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) vessel, the Phoenix. UNHCR/Giuseppe Carotenuto

A study of mixed refugee and migrant flows by UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, has found that around half of those travelling to Libya do so believing they can find jobs there, but end up fleeing onwards to Europe to escape life-threatening insecurity, instability, difficult economic conditions plus widespread exploitation and abuse.

Foreign nationals going to Libya are part of mixed migration flows, meaning that people with different backgrounds and motivations travel together along the same routes, often with the help of ruthless people smugglers and criminal gangs. They include refugees, asylum seekers, economic migrants, unaccompanied minors, environmental migrants, victims of trafficking and stranded migrants, among others.

In recent years, the number of people crossing by sea from North Africa to southern Europe has increased. The indications are that this trend is likely to continue. Of the three main routes used by refugees and migrants to reach Europe the Western Mediterranean route, the Central Mediterranean route and the Eastern Mediterranean route Libya has become the most commonly used one, and also the deadliest.

The study commissioned by UNHCR found that the profiles and nationalities of people arriving in Libya have been evolving over the past few years, with a marked decrease in those originating in East Africa and an increase in those from West Africa, who now represent well over half of all arrivals to Europe through the Central Mediterranean route from Libya to Italy (over 100,000 arrivals in 2016).

According to the study, refugees and migrants in Libya are predominantly young men (80%), aged 22 on average and travelling alone (72%). Women tend to transit towards Europe over a short period of time and many of them, particularly those from West and Central Africa, are victims of trafficking. The number of unaccompanied and separated children travelling alone is rising, and now represents some 14% of all arrivals in Europe via the Central Mediterranean route. These children come mainly from Eritrea, The Gambia and Nigeria.

Refugees and migrants in Libya tend to have a low level of education, with 49% having little or no formal education and only 16% having received vocational training or higher education. They come from diverse backgrounds but can be grouped into four different categories:

Nationals of neighbouring countries (Niger, Chad, Sudan, Egypt and Tunisia). Most of them report travelling to Libya for economic reasons, and many engage in seasonal, circular or repetitive migrations.

Nationals of West and Central Africa countries : mainly from Nigeria, Guinea, Cte dIvoire, The Gambia, Senegal, Ghana, Mali and Cameroon. They report having left largely for economic reasons. Some are victims of trafficking, in particular Nigerian and Cameroonian women, and some might be in need of international protection.

Nationals of Eastern Africa countries: from Eritrea, Somalia, Ethiopia and Sudan. They reported making the journey for a range of reasons, including political persecution, conflict and poverty in their countries of origin.

Individuals from other regions: Syrians, Palestinians, Iraqis, Moroccans, Bangladeshis and others. Some flee conflict and violence while others are looking for livelihood opportunities.

The study examined the changing dynamics and protection challenges affecting mixed migration flows to and within Libya and the evolution of migration trends, smuggling networks and routes. It also mapped out refugee and migrant communities, focusing on the situation in the south of the country.

In addition to Libyas strategic location, the conflict and instability in the country have contributed to create an environment where human smuggling and criminal networks flourish. At the same time, the collapse of the justice system and reigning impunity have led many armed groups, criminal gangs and individuals to participate in the exploitation and abuse of refugees and migrants.

The study was commissioned by UNHCR and done by Altai Consulting, a specialised consulting firm that focuses on research, monitoring and evaluation in fragile states; together with IMPACT Initiatives, a Geneva-based think-tank that assesses, monitors and evaluates aid programmes. The reports findings are primarily based on qualitative data – including interviews with refugees and migrants – collected in Libya, Algeria, Chad, Italy, Niger and Tunisia, between October and December 2016.

UNHCR is seeking to expand its activities in Libya to meet the increased humanitarian and protection needs of refugees, asylum seekers and Libyans affected by the ongoing conflict. It recently issued a funding appeal for US$75.5 million to strengthen protection monitoring and interventions in Libya, as well as advocacy on issues related to respect for human rights, access to basic services, asylum procedures and freedom of movement. UNHCR is also multiplying efforts in Libya and the neighbouring countries to provide credible alternatives, find durable solutions and establish legal pathways for refugees and asylum seekers, as an alternative to dangerous trips to Libya or over the Central Mediterranean Sea to Europe.

Link to the full report: Mixed Migration Trends in Libya: Changing Dynamics and Protection Challenges

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Insecurity, economic crisis, abuse and exploitation in Libya push refugees and migrants to Europe, new study reveals. – UNHCR

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U-12 Libyan chess player ranked number 1 in Africa – The Libya Observer


The Libya Observer
U-12 Libyan chess player ranked number 1 in Africa
The Libya Observer
Libyan chess player Yousef Al-Hassadi has been ranked number 1 under the age of 12 at the African level, according to Chess-DB, a web-based database of chess players around the world. But despite raising the flag of Libya high in international sporting …

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U-12 Libyan chess player ranked number 1 in Africa – The Libya Observer

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Canary Wharf victim reassured by Donaldson on Libya-IRA compensation – Belfast Newsletter

07:59 Monday 03 July 2017

The leader of an English terror victims group has welcomed assurances from the DUP that they will be pressing hard for compensation for victims, despite the issue not being mentioned in the Tory-DUP deal.

Docklands Victims Association chairman Jonathan Ganesh was injured in the IRAs 1996 Canary Wharf bomb, which used Semtex supplied to the IRA by Libya.

Some victims and their representatives expressed disappointment that there was no mention in the Tory-DUP deal of their campaign to secure compensation from Libya for arming the IRA.

But Mr Ganesh has now welcomed assurances given to him by DUP MP Sir Jeffrey Donaldson.

The MP said in an email that the DUP has many members that are themselves innocent victims of terrorism from the Troubles: This includes our party leader Arlene Foster who not only was injured in an IRA bomb attack on her school bus but also witnessed her father having been shot by the IRA.

The suggestion from some that the DUP would abandon innocent victims is deeply offensive to us and is completely and utterly wrong.

His party has supported compensation from the outset and he and Nigel Dodds have visited Libya and met government frequently about the issue, he said.

He added: In our current discussions with the government, we have raised in two separate meetings the need for this issue to be addressed in the current parliamentary term.

We have secured a commitment from the government to convene a further meeting involving the relevant minister(s) to discuss how we might take the matter forward, including on the issue of frozen Libyan assets in the UK.

We are establishing a coordination committee between our two parties that will enable this type of issue to be addressed at ministerial level.

The reason this matter is not explicitly mentioned in the agreement between the DUP and the government is because we have not yet reached an agreed position or established the legal basis for accessing Libyan assets given that these are the subject of international sanctions and covered by international law.

We remain committed to supporting the wider campaign by innocent victims to secure recompense and reparation from Libya and will seek to use our influence to secure a positive outcome.

Mr Ganesh said he felt reassured.

I have been working closely with Jeffrey and Nigel for 10 years and feel good that they have put this in writing, he said.

Lawyer Matt Jury, who is acting for Libya-IRA victims, initially expressed disappointment with the deal.

The DUP has assured us that the issue of compensation to the variety of victims of Libyan-sponsored IRA terrorism throughout the UK is very much on the agenda and that the government has agreed a mechanism through which discussions will be taken forward at a ministerial level on how a resolution with Libya can be best negotiated, he said.

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With Funds From Home Cut off, a Libyan Student Turns to Fundraising to Cover Kent State Tuition – WKSU News

Paying for school is a challenge for most every college student, but for students in the U.S. from Libya, many have the money but can’t access it.Libya has become increasingly unstable and it’s harder for citizens to get money to the U.S.

WOSU’s Esther Honig reports on one student from Kent State University who is doing all he can to complete his degree before he’s forced to drop out.

Libyan student’s struggles

A few blocks from the Kent State University campus, IbrahimAlbadrishares a small apartment with a roommate and his orange tabby namedZena.The living room is sparsely furnished: Theres a couch, a dining room table and a few fold-out chairs. In the corner, the red and green Libya flag hangs on the wall.

Albadris just come from his job at the schools IT departmentaccording to his student visa, hes only permitted to work for the school — and for no more than 20 hours a week. He folds open his laptop to check on his online fundraising campaign.

Bad but how bad? He says school administrators suggested the idea to him when it became evident his money for tuition would not arrive on time.

I knew Libya was bad, Albadri says. I just didnt know it was that bad.

Paying for college is a challenge for nearly any student. In his case,Albedri has the money, he just cant access it. As Albadri’s home country devolves into increasing instability, it has become all but impossible for citizens living abroad to access their money held in Libyan banks.

In the first few days, Albadri’sGoFundMe campaigndid receive several donations. A month later, though, he’s still tens of thousands of dollars away from his goal of $50,000.

It may seem farfetched, but this is Albadris last option, and hes determined to continue school in the fall. He still hasnt considered what hell do with his cat if hes forced to leave in August.

Limits on currency leaving the country Albadri came to the U.S. in 2014 to study computer engineering. At the time the conflict in Libya had subsided, but as Albadri finished his sophomore year, fighting resumed. The county started to limit the amount of currency leaving its borders.

Administrators at Kent State say theyve seen this issue before. Right now, both their Iraqi and Libyan students face a similar struggle. Theyve managed to put some in touch with emergency loans or allowed them to enroll in good faith, hoping the money will eventually arrive.

Of course, theres not much else the school can do.

Doesn’t look like the money’s going to come from Libya, because it’s just getting worse and worse, Albadri says.

Threats back home At this point, Albadri owes the university tuition for two semesters. In March, his inability to pay meant he was forced to drop his classes. If by August he is still unable to produce the necessary funds, he won’t be allowed to enroll and will subsequently lose his student visa.

Libya is not an ideal destination for a young person trying to get an education. Albadri says in the city where he lives, people dont leave their homes at night. There have been kidnappings and the local law enforcement is unresponsive.

Albadri says his cousin was kidnapped; a fisherman found his body chopped into small pieces.

Any of my friends that I call, they tell me dont come back,” Albadri says.

Libya no longer hosts an American embassy, and the Trump administration has complicated travel from Muslim-majority countries including Libya.

JonathanWiner, a former special envoy for Libya, says if Albadri loses his student visa, theres a good chance he wont be able to get another one.

If I was a Libyan student who had the right to be here, I would try and make it work, too, Winer says.

A meltdown for the Arab spring Its been several years since the country had an effective government, Winer says. In 2011, Arab-Spring protests led to the ouster of former dictatorMuammer Gaddafi and two subsequent civil wars. The intense conflicts have subsided, but basic services like healthcare, education and electricity are crumbling.

Winer says the collapse of the oil industry has led to an economic crisis. The country has spent more money than it is able to generate, and the government is afraid of running out of hard currency.

If they run out of dollars, the country goes into immediate humanitarian catastrophe,Winer says.

Helping back home About 1,500 students from Libya go to school in the U.S., and their education is critical to the countys future. Winer says that if more young people are able to earn their degrees — whether in the States, the European Union or Canada — they can return to their country and help rebuild it.

I would like to see as many Libyan students as possible to complete educations here, Winer says.

It may be too late for Albadri, whos only a year away from graduating. Back home, he wont have access to the same level of education. Poor internet, unreliable electricity and lack of computers means students there often learn to code with pen and paper.

“You know when you [have] a dream, and youre halfway through and you wake up from the dream?” Albadri says. “Thats basically what will happen.”

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With Funds From Home Cut off, a Libyan Student Turns to Fundraising to Cover Kent State Tuition – WKSU News

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Rep. Brat deletes photo of ‘Hillary for US Ambassador to Libya’ sign – CNN

“Sign says it all,” the since-deleted post was captioned. The sign appeared to be mocking the 2016 Democratic presidential candidate and suggesting that she herself be put in danger now. Clinton was serving secretary of state during the 2012 attack on the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya. US ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens and three other Americans were killed in the assault. Clinton has faced significant criticism from Republicans who accused her of being personally responsible for security lapses in Benghazi. A Clinton spokesman did not immediately return a CNN request for comment Monday night. Brat’s office also didn’t immediately return a request for comment. Still, Brat rejected the idea that the sign in any way suggested Clinton be put in danger. “No, that’s — that’s laughable, right?” he told the Richmond-based news station. In a later post to his Instagram account, Brat said he thought the sign has been misinterpreted. “Dear Instagram friends, an earlier pic today was being misinterpreted so it has been removed,” the post read. Asked by the new station if the sign bothered him at all, Brat said, “No, I thought the guy was just getting at the Benghazi injustice that everybody knows is a tragedy — it had to do with all these tapes and stuff,” according to the station’s write-up of the interview. The congressman did not offer a clear explanation as to why the sign said Clinton should be ambassador to Libya.

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Libya oil output at 4-year high adds pressure on Opec – Gulf Times

Libyas oil production has climbed to more than 1mn bpd for the first time in four years, further complicating Opecs struggle to regain control of the oil market. The North African country is pumping 1.005mn bpd, according to a person with direct knowledge of the situation, who asked not to be identified because they arent authorised to speak to the media. That would be the highest since June 2013, when Libya pumped 1.13mn bpd, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The increase adds to the challenge that the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and other major producers face after agreeing in May to extend their output-cuts deal to counter a supply glut and slippage in prices. Libya, like Nigeria, is exempted from the cuts deal, though its oil production and exports remain vulnerable to disruptions by armed factions and restive workers. Libyaa output has rebounded from only 690,000 bpd at the start of the year, with Sharara, the countrys largest oil field, resuming production last month. State National Oil Corp chairman Mustafa Sanalla said in April he wanted to boost national output to 1.1mn bpd by August. Given ongoing political risks, however, production will probably fall short of government targets for the third quarter, Jan Edelmann, commodities analyst at HSH Nordbank AG in Hamburg, said on Sunday by email. Libyas output is seen rising 300,000 bpd on average for the third quarter compared with the first quarter, he said. Sharara closed on June 7 for two days due to a protest by workers over a colleagues death at the field, halting about 270,000 bpd, a person familiar with the matter said at the time. Other fields have reopened, most recently the Abu Attifel deposit which resumed production last month and is now pumping about 81,000 bpd, according to the person who gave the latest production figure. The Majid oil field restarted on July 1, with output at 4,500 bpd. Sharara has been also steady at 270,000 bpd, the person said. Libya, with Africas biggest crude reserves, was pumping about 1.6mn bpd before a political uprising in 2011. The ouster and killing that year of former dictator Muammar Gaddafi led to a collapse in central authority, and many foreign investors withdrew as armed groups fought for control of oil facilities.

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Rep. Brat removes online post calling for Hillary Clinton to be sent to Libya – Richmond.com

Rep. Dave Brat, R-7th, removed a post from his Twitter and Instagram accounts in which he endorsed the idea of sending former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to Libya to be the ambassador. Brat said a new staffer made the post without his approval. The picture was taken at a gun show in Fredericksburg on Saturday; Brat later posted that he had taken it down. In the photo, Brat stood smiling next to a man holding a sign that said “Hillary for U.S. ambassador to Libya.” Brat’s comment read, “Sign says it all.” Christopher Stevens, the U.S. ambassador to Libya, and three other Americans were killed in a raid on the American diplomatic mission in Benghazi in September 2012. Many conservatives blame then-Secretary of State Clinton for their deaths. The House Select Committee on Benghazi issued an 800-page report following an investigation. Brat took heat from critics on social media over his post. Brat said in an interview Monday that a staffer made the post. “Ive got new staffers on board and theyre constantly putting posts up on Facebook and whatever, so I didnt vet that,” he said. Brat said he told his staff to remove it because a staffer told him “people are interpreting it in crazy left, far-left-land logic thats going on right now across the web.” Brat has repeatedly said he strives to not speak ill of anyone. And he said if someone looks at his Facebook page, they’ll learn that it’s the left that’s using the vitriol. “Who actually is using the vitriolic language? Me or the hard left? And the answer is right now online,” he said.

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Gunmen attack Tripoli-based Minister of Education in south Libya – The Libya Observer

A statement on the Ministry of Education’s official page on Facebook explained the horrific ordeal that struck the convoy of the Minister of Education of the UN-proposed government earlier on Monday. The convoy of Minister Othman Abdul-Jaleel was subjected to heavy fire at the Checkpoint 17, which is situated at southern entrance to the city of Sabha when the minister was en route to the city of Murzuq. The attackers were said to have attempted to detain the minister and his deputy, but their guards managed to extract them from the danger zone. Other members of the ministers entourage were detained for about an hour until local elders intervened and helped secure the release of the detained group. The minister and his team continued their journey to Murzuq after the ordeal. Five Presidential Council ministers embarked in a tour to south Libya early this week to attend a ceremony to mark the handover of to the Security Directorate of Sabha, in addition to other visits to government institutions.

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Refugee and migrant flows through Libya on the rise report – UNHCR

A group of people gather inside a detention facility holding refugees and migrants in Tripoli, May 2017. UNHCR/Iason Foounten TRIPOLI, Libya Fleeing death threats in his native Rwanda, 54-year-old Mihigo and his family embarked on an epic journey that took them to Burkina Faso, Mauritania, Morocco and Niger, before eventually reaching Libya four years ago. Working from time to time in construction jobs in the capital, Tripoli, he has struggled to find a regular work. In his search he has been robbed, assaulted and racially abused, while his wife and daughters suffered sexual abuse. I have faced all the problems: theft, bad treatment, discrimination, exploitation (and the) rape attempt of my wife and daughters, he says. The familys desperate plight is unfortunately increasingly common among a growing number of refugees and migrants fleeing wars and hardship in Africa and reaching the North African country. Among those arriving in Libya is Somali fisherman Hodan, 33, who slipped overland into the countrys southwest from Sudan with a smuggler, after an overland trek that took him through Ethiopia and Djibouti. Once in the desert town of Rebyana, he was detained by unknown authorities for five days. In desperate need of both food and decent accommodation, he sees no alternative but to continue on his quest to reach Europe. I cannot go back home because of the war in Somalia and the absence of the government.” I cannot go back home because of the war in Somalia and the absence of the government for over two decades, he said in interview in the town. Mihigo and Hodan are among scores of voices in a new study on mixed migration trends through Libya, published today by UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, which examines the rising flows of refugees and migrants passing through the North African country, and the multiple hazards they face. Libya has for decades drawn people from neighbouring countries, as it offered the best employment opportunities and highest salaries in the region although it has been increasingly roiled by instability and insecurity since the ouster of Muammur Gaddafi in 2011. The study found that around half of those travelling to Libya do so believing they can find jobs there, but end up fleeing onwards to Europe to escape life-threatening dangers and difficult economic conditions plus widespread exploitation and abuse. The foreign nationals going to Libya are part of mixed migration flows, meaning that people with different backgrounds and motivations travel together along the same routes. They include refugees, asylum seekers, economic migrants, unaccompanied minors, environmental migrants, victims of trafficking and stranded migrants. In recent years, the number of people crossing the Mediterranean Sea from North Africa to southern Europe has increased. The indications are that this trend is likely to continue, along with the deadly risks. This year alone, at least 2,030 people have died or gone missing on the voyage, with the greatest number of fatalities occurring along the so-called Central Mediterranean Route, through Libya. A group of migrants and refugees drift in a rubber boat in the Mediterranean Sea, in November 2016. They were intercepted by a Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) vessel, the Phoenix. UNHCR/Giuseppe Carotenuto To reach Libya, the report found most refugees and migrants arrive irregularly overland. Those setting off from East Africa travel through Sudan, while those from West and Central Africa travelthrough Niger. To a lesser extent, those from West Africa pass through Algeria. In a measure of the danger facing migrants and refugees crossing the Sahara Desert, reports emerged last month of 44 desperate travellers, including women and children, who perished after the truck carrying them broke down in northern Niger. To reach its findings, the new study drew on interviews with hundreds of refugees and migrants themselves, as well as government officials, NGO workers and smugglers in Chad, Niger, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Italy. Of particular concern, it found that almost all refugees and migrants coming to Libya irregularly seek the help of smugglers or criminal networks, who now charge fees of around US$5,000, just to reach the country. With higher fees and greater volume, the smuggling industry has grown increasingly professional, transnational in reach, and hazardous, with armed groups playing an increasingly dominant role. I have faced all the problems:theft, bad treatment, discrimination, exploitation. Countries of origin and profiles of refugees and migrants have also evolved, it found. Many of those on the move are young men. In particular, flows from West Africa have increased, involving individuals usually travelling step-by-step, in a series of journeys often organized by the travellers themselves. As a consequence of this evolving dynamic, the report found that refugees and migrants making the journey are ever more vulnerable, while support services have decreased and the security situation has deteriorated. Trafficking for sexual exploitation seems to be increasing, affecting Nigerian and Cameroonian women in particular. The number of unaccompanied and separated children travelling alone in Libya is rising, now representing some 14 per cent of total arrivals in Europe via the Central Mediterranean Route, mainly from Eritrea, The Gambia and Nigeria. To mitigate the growing risks for refugees and migrants passing to and through Libya, recommendations in the report for UNHCR and other organizations include providing direct relief in the form of mobile joint interventions in key hubs in the South — such as Bani Walid, Rebyana, Tazerbu, and Kufra. Other recommendations include accompanying border monitoring and rescue operations to provide support to refugees and migrants stranded in the desert.

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July 3, 2017   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

Insecurity, economic crisis, abuse and exploitation in Libya push refugees and migrants to Europe, new study reveals. – UNHCR

A group of migrants and refugees drift in a rubber boat in the Mediterranean Sea, in November 2016. They were intercepted by a Migrant Offshore Aid Station (MOAS) vessel, the Phoenix. UNHCR/Giuseppe Carotenuto A study of mixed refugee and migrant flows by UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, has found that around half of those travelling to Libya do so believing they can find jobs there, but end up fleeing onwards to Europe to escape life-threatening insecurity, instability, difficult economic conditions plus widespread exploitation and abuse. Foreign nationals going to Libya are part of mixed migration flows, meaning that people with different backgrounds and motivations travel together along the same routes, often with the help of ruthless people smugglers and criminal gangs. They include refugees, asylum seekers, economic migrants, unaccompanied minors, environmental migrants, victims of trafficking and stranded migrants, among others. In recent years, the number of people crossing by sea from North Africa to southern Europe has increased. The indications are that this trend is likely to continue. Of the three main routes used by refugees and migrants to reach Europe the Western Mediterranean route, the Central Mediterranean route and the Eastern Mediterranean route Libya has become the most commonly used one, and also the deadliest. The study commissioned by UNHCR found that the profiles and nationalities of people arriving in Libya have been evolving over the past few years, with a marked decrease in those originating in East Africa and an increase in those from West Africa, who now represent well over half of all arrivals to Europe through the Central Mediterranean route from Libya to Italy (over 100,000 arrivals in 2016). According to the study, refugees and migrants in Libya are predominantly young men (80%), aged 22 on average and travelling alone (72%). Women tend to transit towards Europe over a short period of time and many of them, particularly those from West and Central Africa, are victims of trafficking. The number of unaccompanied and separated children travelling alone is rising, and now represents some 14% of all arrivals in Europe via the Central Mediterranean route. These children come mainly from Eritrea, The Gambia and Nigeria. Refugees and migrants in Libya tend to have a low level of education, with 49% having little or no formal education and only 16% having received vocational training or higher education. They come from diverse backgrounds but can be grouped into four different categories: Nationals of neighbouring countries (Niger, Chad, Sudan, Egypt and Tunisia). Most of them report travelling to Libya for economic reasons, and many engage in seasonal, circular or repetitive migrations. Nationals of West and Central Africa countries : mainly from Nigeria, Guinea, Cte dIvoire, The Gambia, Senegal, Ghana, Mali and Cameroon. They report having left largely for economic reasons. Some are victims of trafficking, in particular Nigerian and Cameroonian women, and some might be in need of international protection. Nationals of Eastern Africa countries: from Eritrea, Somalia, Ethiopia and Sudan. They reported making the journey for a range of reasons, including political persecution, conflict and poverty in their countries of origin. Individuals from other regions: Syrians, Palestinians, Iraqis, Moroccans, Bangladeshis and others. Some flee conflict and violence while others are looking for livelihood opportunities. The study examined the changing dynamics and protection challenges affecting mixed migration flows to and within Libya and the evolution of migration trends, smuggling networks and routes. It also mapped out refugee and migrant communities, focusing on the situation in the south of the country. In addition to Libyas strategic location, the conflict and instability in the country have contributed to create an environment where human smuggling and criminal networks flourish. At the same time, the collapse of the justice system and reigning impunity have led many armed groups, criminal gangs and individuals to participate in the exploitation and abuse of refugees and migrants. The study was commissioned by UNHCR and done by Altai Consulting, a specialised consulting firm that focuses on research, monitoring and evaluation in fragile states; together with IMPACT Initiatives, a Geneva-based think-tank that assesses, monitors and evaluates aid programmes. The reports findings are primarily based on qualitative data – including interviews with refugees and migrants – collected in Libya, Algeria, Chad, Italy, Niger and Tunisia, between October and December 2016. UNHCR is seeking to expand its activities in Libya to meet the increased humanitarian and protection needs of refugees, asylum seekers and Libyans affected by the ongoing conflict. It recently issued a funding appeal for US$75.5 million to strengthen protection monitoring and interventions in Libya, as well as advocacy on issues related to respect for human rights, access to basic services, asylum procedures and freedom of movement. UNHCR is also multiplying efforts in Libya and the neighbouring countries to provide credible alternatives, find durable solutions and establish legal pathways for refugees and asylum seekers, as an alternative to dangerous trips to Libya or over the Central Mediterranean Sea to Europe. Link to the full report: Mixed Migration Trends in Libya: Changing Dynamics and Protection Challenges For more information on this topic, please contact:

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July 3, 2017   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed

U-12 Libyan chess player ranked number 1 in Africa – The Libya Observer

The Libya Observer U-12 Libyan chess player ranked number 1 in Africa The Libya Observer Libyan chess player Yousef Al-Hassadi has been ranked number 1 under the age of 12 at the African level, according to Chess-DB, a web-based database of chess players around the world. But despite raising the flag of Libya high in international sporting …

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Canary Wharf victim reassured by Donaldson on Libya-IRA compensation – Belfast Newsletter

07:59 Monday 03 July 2017 The leader of an English terror victims group has welcomed assurances from the DUP that they will be pressing hard for compensation for victims, despite the issue not being mentioned in the Tory-DUP deal. Docklands Victims Association chairman Jonathan Ganesh was injured in the IRAs 1996 Canary Wharf bomb, which used Semtex supplied to the IRA by Libya. Some victims and their representatives expressed disappointment that there was no mention in the Tory-DUP deal of their campaign to secure compensation from Libya for arming the IRA. But Mr Ganesh has now welcomed assurances given to him by DUP MP Sir Jeffrey Donaldson. The MP said in an email that the DUP has many members that are themselves innocent victims of terrorism from the Troubles: This includes our party leader Arlene Foster who not only was injured in an IRA bomb attack on her school bus but also witnessed her father having been shot by the IRA. The suggestion from some that the DUP would abandon innocent victims is deeply offensive to us and is completely and utterly wrong. His party has supported compensation from the outset and he and Nigel Dodds have visited Libya and met government frequently about the issue, he said. He added: In our current discussions with the government, we have raised in two separate meetings the need for this issue to be addressed in the current parliamentary term. We have secured a commitment from the government to convene a further meeting involving the relevant minister(s) to discuss how we might take the matter forward, including on the issue of frozen Libyan assets in the UK. We are establishing a coordination committee between our two parties that will enable this type of issue to be addressed at ministerial level. The reason this matter is not explicitly mentioned in the agreement between the DUP and the government is because we have not yet reached an agreed position or established the legal basis for accessing Libyan assets given that these are the subject of international sanctions and covered by international law. We remain committed to supporting the wider campaign by innocent victims to secure recompense and reparation from Libya and will seek to use our influence to secure a positive outcome. Mr Ganesh said he felt reassured. I have been working closely with Jeffrey and Nigel for 10 years and feel good that they have put this in writing, he said. Lawyer Matt Jury, who is acting for Libya-IRA victims, initially expressed disappointment with the deal. The DUP has assured us that the issue of compensation to the variety of victims of Libyan-sponsored IRA terrorism throughout the UK is very much on the agenda and that the government has agreed a mechanism through which discussions will be taken forward at a ministerial level on how a resolution with Libya can be best negotiated, he said.

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With Funds From Home Cut off, a Libyan Student Turns to Fundraising to Cover Kent State Tuition – WKSU News

Paying for school is a challenge for most every college student, but for students in the U.S. from Libya, many have the money but can’t access it.Libya has become increasingly unstable and it’s harder for citizens to get money to the U.S. WOSU’s Esther Honig reports on one student from Kent State University who is doing all he can to complete his degree before he’s forced to drop out. Libyan student’s struggles A few blocks from the Kent State University campus, IbrahimAlbadrishares a small apartment with a roommate and his orange tabby namedZena.The living room is sparsely furnished: Theres a couch, a dining room table and a few fold-out chairs. In the corner, the red and green Libya flag hangs on the wall. Albadris just come from his job at the schools IT departmentaccording to his student visa, hes only permitted to work for the school — and for no more than 20 hours a week. He folds open his laptop to check on his online fundraising campaign. Bad but how bad? He says school administrators suggested the idea to him when it became evident his money for tuition would not arrive on time. I knew Libya was bad, Albadri says. I just didnt know it was that bad. Paying for college is a challenge for nearly any student. In his case,Albedri has the money, he just cant access it. As Albadri’s home country devolves into increasing instability, it has become all but impossible for citizens living abroad to access their money held in Libyan banks. In the first few days, Albadri’sGoFundMe campaigndid receive several donations. A month later, though, he’s still tens of thousands of dollars away from his goal of $50,000. It may seem farfetched, but this is Albadris last option, and hes determined to continue school in the fall. He still hasnt considered what hell do with his cat if hes forced to leave in August. Limits on currency leaving the country Albadri came to the U.S. in 2014 to study computer engineering. At the time the conflict in Libya had subsided, but as Albadri finished his sophomore year, fighting resumed. The county started to limit the amount of currency leaving its borders. Administrators at Kent State say theyve seen this issue before. Right now, both their Iraqi and Libyan students face a similar struggle. Theyve managed to put some in touch with emergency loans or allowed them to enroll in good faith, hoping the money will eventually arrive. Of course, theres not much else the school can do. Doesn’t look like the money’s going to come from Libya, because it’s just getting worse and worse, Albadri says. Threats back home At this point, Albadri owes the university tuition for two semesters. In March, his inability to pay meant he was forced to drop his classes. If by August he is still unable to produce the necessary funds, he won’t be allowed to enroll and will subsequently lose his student visa. Libya is not an ideal destination for a young person trying to get an education. Albadri says in the city where he lives, people dont leave their homes at night. There have been kidnappings and the local law enforcement is unresponsive. Albadri says his cousin was kidnapped; a fisherman found his body chopped into small pieces. Any of my friends that I call, they tell me dont come back,” Albadri says. Libya no longer hosts an American embassy, and the Trump administration has complicated travel from Muslim-majority countries including Libya. JonathanWiner, a former special envoy for Libya, says if Albadri loses his student visa, theres a good chance he wont be able to get another one. If I was a Libyan student who had the right to be here, I would try and make it work, too, Winer says. A meltdown for the Arab spring Its been several years since the country had an effective government, Winer says. In 2011, Arab-Spring protests led to the ouster of former dictatorMuammer Gaddafi and two subsequent civil wars. The intense conflicts have subsided, but basic services like healthcare, education and electricity are crumbling. Winer says the collapse of the oil industry has led to an economic crisis. The country has spent more money than it is able to generate, and the government is afraid of running out of hard currency. If they run out of dollars, the country goes into immediate humanitarian catastrophe,Winer says. Helping back home About 1,500 students from Libya go to school in the U.S., and their education is critical to the countys future. Winer says that if more young people are able to earn their degrees — whether in the States, the European Union or Canada — they can return to their country and help rebuild it. I would like to see as many Libyan students as possible to complete educations here, Winer says. It may be too late for Albadri, whos only a year away from graduating. Back home, he wont have access to the same level of education. Poor internet, unreliable electricity and lack of computers means students there often learn to code with pen and paper. “You know when you [have] a dream, and youre halfway through and you wake up from the dream?” Albadri says. “Thats basically what will happen.”

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July 2, 2017   Posted in: Libya  Comments Closed


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