Archive for the ‘Louis Farrakhan’ Category

Louis Farrakhan | Biography & Facts | Britannica.com

Alternative Titles: Louis Abdul Farrakhan, Louis Eugene Walcott

Louis Farrakhan

American religious leader

May 11, 1933 (age 84)

New York City, New York

Louis Farrakhan, in full Louis Abdul Farrakhan, original name Louis Eugene Walcott (born May 11, 1933, Bronx, New York, New York, U.S.), leader (from 1978) of the Nation of Islam, an African American movement that combined elements of Islam with black nationalism.

Walcott, as he was then known, was raised in Boston by his mother, Sarah Mae Manning, an immigrant from St. Kitts and Nevis. Deeply religious as a boy, he became active in the St. Cyprians Episcopal Church in his Roxbury neighbourhood. He graduated with honours from the prestigious Boston English High School, where he also played the violin and was a member of the track team. He attended the Winston-Salem Teachers College from 1951 to 1953 but dropped out to pursue a career in music. Known as The Charmer, he performed professionally on the Boston nightclub circuit as a singer of calypso and country songs. In 1953 he married Khadijah, with whom he would have nine children.

In 1955 Walcott joined the Nation of Islam. Following the custom of the Nation, he replaced his surname with an X, a custom among Nation of Islam followers who considered their family names to have originated with white slaveholders. Louis X first proved himself at Temple No. 7 in Harlem, where he emerged as the protg of Malcolm X, the minister of the temple and one of the most prominent members of the Nation of Islam. Louis X was given his Muslim name, Abdul Haleem Farrakhan, by Elijah Muhammad, the leader of the Nation of Islam. Farrakhan was appointed head minister of Boston Temple No. 11, which Malcolm had established earlier.

After Malcolm Xs break with the Nation in 1964 over political and personal differences with Elijah Muhammad, Farrakhan replaced Malcolm as head minister of Harlems Temple No. 7 and as the National Representative of the Nation, the second in command of the organization. Like his predecessor, Farrakhan was a dynamic, charismatic leader and a powerful speaker with the ability to appeal to the African American masses.

When Elijah Muhammad died in February 1975, the Nation of Islam fragmented. Surprisingly, the Nations leadership chose Wallace Muhammad (now known as Warith Deen Mohammed), the fifth of Elijahs six sons, as the new Supreme Minister. Disappointed that he was not named Elijahs successor, Farrakhan led a breakaway group in 1978, which he also called the Nation of Islam and which preserved the original teachings of Elijah Muhammad. Farrakhan disagreed with Wallace Muhammads attempts to move the Nation to orthodox Sunni Islam and to rid it of Elijah Muhammads radical black nationalism and separatist teachings, which stressed the inherent wickedness of whites.

Farrakhan became known to the American public through a series of controversies that began during the 1984 presidential campaign of the Rev. Jesse Jackson, whom Farrakhan supported. Farrakhan withdrew his support after Jewish voters protested his praise of Adolf Hitler, and he has been embroiled in a continuing conflict with the American Jewish community because of his making allegedly anti-Semitic statements; Farrakhan has denied being anti-Semitic. In later speeches he blamed the U.S. government for what he claimed was a conspiracy to destroy black people with AIDS and addictive drugs.

In 1995 the Nation sponsored the Million Man March in Washington, D.C., to promote African American unity and family values. Estimates of the number of marchers, most of whom were men, ranged from 400,000 to nearly 1.1 million, making it, at the time, the largest gathering of its kind in American history. Under Farrakhans leadership, the Nation of Islam established a clinic for AIDS patients in Washington, D.C., and helped to force drug dealers out of public housing projects and private apartment buildings in the city. It also worked with gang members in Los Angeles. Meanwhile, the Nation continued to promote social reform in African American communities in accordance with its traditional goals of self-reliance and economic independence.

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In the early 21st century, the core membership of Farrakhans Nation of Islam was estimated at between 10,000 and 50,000though in the same period Farrakhan was delivering speeches in large cities across the United States that regularly attracted crowds of more than 30,000. Under Farrakhans leadership, the Nation was one of the fastest growing of the various Muslim movements in the country. Foreign branches of the Nation were formed in Ghana, London, Paris, and the Caribbean islands. In order to strengthen the international influence of the Nation, Farrakhan established relations with Muslim countries, and in the late 1980s he cultivated a relationship with the Libyan dictator Muammar al-Qaddafi. After a near-death experience in 2000 resulting from complications from prostate cancer (he was diagnosed with cancer in 1991), Farrakhan toned down his racial rhetoric and attempted to strengthen relations with other minority communities, including Native Americans, Hispanics, and Asians. Farrakhan also moved his group closer to orthodox Sunni Islam in 2000, when he and Imam Warith Deen Mohammed, the leading American orthodox Muslim, recognized each other as fellow Muslims.

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Health issues forced Farrakhan to reduce his role in the Nation of Islam in the early 21st century. He nevertheless maintained a fairly high profile, giving online sermons in addition to his public speeches. In 2010 he publicly embraced Dianetics, a practice of Scientology. Farrakhan also said that he wanted all Nation of Islam members to become auditors, practitioners of Scientologys one-on-one counseling process that is meant to facilitate individuals handling of their engrams, which, according to the practices of Scientology, are mental images of past experiences that produce negative emotional effects in ones life. In 2015 he led a march in Washington, D.C., to mark the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March.

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Louis Farrakhan | Biography & Facts | Britannica.com

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

NRA Host Grant Stinchfield: Hordes of Black Lives Matter Protesters are Coming to Torture and Kill White Americans – The Daily Banter


The Daily Banter
NRA Host Grant Stinchfield: Hordes of Black Lives Matter Protesters are Coming to Torture and Kill White Americans
The Daily Banter
CHUCK HOLTON: Right, you know the parallels between what's happening in South Africa and the blatant racism and violence we're seeing from people like the Black Lives Matter crowd, from people like Louis Farrakhan and his minions, is happening in …

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NRA Host Grant Stinchfield: Hordes of Black Lives Matter Protesters are Coming to Torture and Kill White Americans – The Daily Banter

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Opinion | How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

I grew up in New Jersey when Newark, Plainfield and other cities experienced rioting and later became a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983), for which I covered Newark and Plainfield.

The demise of Newark as a city has always intrigued and concerned me.I come back to Jersey a few times to see how things are going, and actually, things are going in the right direction it would seem.

I also have served in local elected office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and an old traditional town much like the traditional towns I covered in North Jersey. I like to see traditional towns and cities (like mine) thrive.

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In looking back to the 50th anniversary of the Newark riots as this site and other media have done, I find there is something missing in the coverage namely, how the civil disorders, particularly the deadly ones in the long hot summer of 1967 reshaped our country, its politics and where we live and work. I am not an expert, just an observer. Here are just a few observations as I look back 50 years:

Newark had about 400,000 residents at the time of the 67 riots, and had a white population of about 50%, which was dwindling. Today, Newark has about 280,579 residents, which actually represents an increase from the 2000 census, and is about 26% non-Hispanic white. In the 1970s and 80s, the city was giving homes away for nearly nothing.

The amount of population that moved out of American cities following the period of the race riots is staggering. A Detroit TV station reported recently that immediately after the riots White flight was frantic. Sixty-seven-thousand people fled in the summer following the uprising, 80,000 more the following year. Add up the numbers in Newark, Cleveland and other cities rocked by riots and you can see that the riots were not just about 26 who were killed, but about a significant change in our living patters. I would guess the national numbers are in the millions.

African-Americans gained political power in the cities, but with whites departing, so did business (notably, retailers), jobs and a tax base. This left major urban areas in a fiscal crisis in the 1970s with heavy dependence on federal and state aid and government-initiated programs, much of which was not very successful in my view.

Whites who left cities became resentful about losing their old communities, especially blue collar whites. They started voting increasingly Republican, or for conservative Democrats like George Wallace. These folks became the Reagan Democrats of the 1980s and Trump voters of 2016. Deindustrialization led to millions of Americans moving to The Sun Belt, too.

While the number of black office holders jumped and grew in influence in the Democratic Party, culminating in the historic election of Barack Obama in 2008, their ability to get realistic economic growth for their communities dwindled, as Republicans moved to the far right and Democrats to the far left. The consensus was not there.Key African-American groups also started to be led by more aggressive and polarizing leaders (i.e. Ben Chavis at the NAACP and Louis Farrakhan, Nation of Islam).

The loss of jobs and middle class residents created a bigger black underclass in the cities and with that an increased drug trade and gang violence.Despite welfare reform in the 1990s, young women who come from broken homes and are led by a single mother have a good chance of getting pregnant out of wedlock and becoming a ward of the state. If youre male in the same situation, you may join a gang or get involved in the illicit drug trade and wind up a victim of a shooting.

Black flight became the norm in the 1990s and cities started to eye gentrification, concert halls, new convention centers and minor league baseball stadiums as a means to bring life back to their urban core. These efforts did not really help the black underclass that much.

Both parties ignored the cities in the 1980s and looked more to policies favoring suburban voters, for example, the soccer moms that propelled Bill Clinton into the White House twice. As a result, by the 1990 census, most of the nations population lived in suburbs, not cities.

Despite the rhetoric about race relations the last few years, one could not argue that blacks, whites, Latinos and others in the middle class live quite harmoniously and integrated in todays suburbs.What divides the nation today is politics.

While the suburbs have become more racially mixed and are largely harmonious places to live, the reality is that much of the urban underclass — not just in the cities, but in rural America like Coal Country — has largely been ignored by our ever growing middle and upper classes.

We have become indifferent to the problems of the inner cities and feel that throwing money at it or using government action is the solution. It sort of gets the guilt off our backs while we invest our money in the burbs or overseas.

How do we end indifference? Well first, I would hope President Trump would make good on his campaign promise to restore our urban areas.Trump has held a number of weekly issue-based press conferences and media events — infrastructure week energy week border security week. When will be see urban revitalization week?

We can look to Trump or other government leaders for answers, but what the cities lost due to the riots was their economic vitality and tax base. Blacks gained political power only to see economic power dwindle.Thankfully, Newark seems to be rebounding due in large part because millennials and developers see good cheap land and building deals there.The free market is working.

And that is a good thing as we look back on the 50th anniversary of those seminal events in 1967.

Ken Reid grew up in Princeton and graduated from Rutgers University in 1980. He was a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983) and has lived in the Washington D.C.,area since 1986. In 2006, he was elected to local government office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and has a background in planning and economic development and a great interest in seeing U.S. cities revived (primarily Newark).

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Opinion | How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

I grew up in New Jersey when Newark, Plainfield and other cities experienced rioting and later became a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983), for which I covered Newark and Plainfield.

The demise of Newark as a city has always intrigued and concerned me.I come back to Jersey a few times to see how things are going, and actually, things are going in the right direction it would seem.

I also have served in local elected office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and an old traditional town much like the traditional towns I covered in North Jersey. I like to see traditional towns and cities (like mine) thrive.

Sign Up for E-News

In looking back to the 50th anniversary of the Newark riots as this site and other media have done, I find there is something missing in the coverage namely, how the civil disorders, particularly the deadly ones in the long hot summer of 1967 reshaped our country, its politics and where we live and work. I am not an expert, just an observer. Here are just a few observations as I look back 50 years:

Newark had about 400,000 residents at the time of the 67 riots, and had a white population of about 50%, which was dwindling. Today, Newark has about 280,579 residents, which actually represents an increase from the 2000 census, and is about 26% non-Hispanic white. In the 1970s and 80s, the city was giving homes away for nearly nothing.

The amount of population that moved out of American cities following the period of the race riots is staggering. A Detroit TV station reported recently that immediately after the riots White flight was frantic. Sixty-seven-thousand people fled in the summer following the uprising, 80,000 more the following year. Add up the numbers in Newark, Cleveland and other cities rocked by riots and you can see that the riots were not just about 26 who were killed, but about a significant change in our living patters. I would guess the national numbers are in the millions.

African-Americans gained political power in the cities, but with whites departing, so did business (notably, retailers), jobs and a tax base. This left major urban areas in a fiscal crisis in the 1970s with heavy dependence on federal and state aid and government-initiated programs, much of which was not very successful in my view.

Whites who left cities became resentful about losing their old communities, especially blue collar whites. They started voting increasingly Republican, or for conservative Democrats like George Wallace. These folks became the Reagan Democrats of the 1980s and Trump voters of 2016. Deindustrialization led to millions of Americans moving to The Sun Belt, too.

While the number of black office holders jumped and grew in influence in the Democratic Party, culminating in the historic election of Barack Obama in 2008, their ability to get realistic economic growth for their communities dwindled, as Republicans moved to the far right and Democrats to the far left. The consensus was not there.Key African-American groups also started to be led by more aggressive and polarizing leaders (i.e. Ben Chavis at the NAACP and Louis Farrakhan, Nation of Islam).

The loss of jobs and middle class residents created a bigger black underclass in the cities and with that an increased drug trade and gang violence.Despite welfare reform in the 1990s, young women who come from broken homes and are led by a single mother have a good chance of getting pregnant out of wedlock and becoming a ward of the state. If youre male in the same situation, you may join a gang or get involved in the illicit drug trade and wind up a victim of a shooting.

Black flight became the norm in the 1990s and cities started to eye gentrification, concert halls, new convention centers and minor league baseball stadiums as a means to bring life back to their urban core. These efforts did not really help the black underclass that much.

Both parties ignored the cities in the 1980s and looked more to policies favoring suburban voters, for example, the soccer moms that propelled Bill Clinton into the White House twice. As a result, by the 1990 census, most of the nations population lived in suburbs, not cities.

Despite the rhetoric about race relations the last few years, one could not argue that blacks, whites, Latinos and others in the middle class live quite harmoniously and integrated in todays suburbs.What divides the nation today is politics.

While the suburbs have become more racially mixed and are largely harmonious places to live, the reality is that much of the urban underclass — not just in the cities, but in rural America like Coal Country — has largely been ignored by our ever growing middle and upper classes.

We have become indifferent to the problems of the inner cities and feel that throwing money at it or using government action is the solution. It sort of gets the guilt off our backs while we invest our money in the burbs or overseas.

How do we end indifference? Well first, I would hope President Trump would make good on his campaign promise to restore our urban areas.Trump has held a number of weekly issue-based press conferences and media events — infrastructure week energy week border security week. When will be see urban revitalization week?

We can look to Trump or other government leaders for answers, but what the cities lost due to the riots was their economic vitality and tax base. Blacks gained political power only to see economic power dwindle.Thankfully, Newark seems to be rebounding due in large part because millennials and developers see good cheap land and building deals there.The free market is working.

And that is a good thing as we look back on the 50th anniversary of those seminal events in 1967.

Ken Reid grew up in Princeton and graduated from Rutgers University in 1980. He was a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983) and has lived in the Washington D.C.,area since 1986. In 2006, he was elected to local government office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and has a background in planning and economic development and a great interest in seeing U.S. cities revived (primarily Newark).

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How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

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July 20, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Family, Friends Celebrate the Life of Martha Rivera Chavis – Lasentinel

The Chavis-Rivera family gather for a photograph during the Celebration of Life for Martha Rivera Chavis at Martins Home for Service Inc., in Montclair, N.J. on June 11. (Travis Riddick/NNPA)

Family and friends from across the globe, gathered to celebrate the life and legacy of Martha Rivera Chavis in a multicultural service, just a few blocks from her Montclair, N.J. home.

This has been very sorrowful and painful for our family, said Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., Marthas husband and president and CEO of the National Newspaper Publishers Association. While we cry for the loss of our beloved, were also here tonight, to celebrate Marthas life.

Dr. Chavis continued: Knowing my wife, as I did for the last 30 years, she would want me to say to you, enjoy this day that the Lord has made and celebrate what God has blessed us with through her spirit and through her presence.

Martha died at the age of 53 of natural causes in her home on July 6, due to complications of heart failure.

The Chavis-Rivera family hosted Marthas memorial at Martins Home for Service, Inc. on Tuesday, July 11; the printed program featured her obituary in English and Spanish.

Dr. Chavis thanked Jim Farmer of General Motors; the Murphy, Falcon and Murphy law firm in Baltimore, Md.; hip-hop and business mogul Russell Simmons; the President of the Detroit branch of NAACP Rev. Dr. Wendell Anthony and many others for their contributions and generosity.

Many of the speakers during the memorial service met Martha and Dr. Chavis in the late 80s, when Dr. Chavis served as the executive director for the United Church of Christs Commission for Racial Justice (CRJ) in New York City.

Newark, New Jersey Mayor Ras Baraka, who was a student at the time, offered his condolences.

Baraka said that the couple did a lot for the Black community in the United States and for Black people around the world, especially those who were oppressed and struggling.

You and your wife worked together as a unit, which is an example for many of us. Sometimes we work, but our wives are not present, said Baraka. Martha was very present and ensured that she was present all the time.

Baraka continued: Martha is an example, for many women out here of all nationalities; Martha was an internationalist and a very conscious and very brilliant woman. Today, we just dont get that; you get one or the other. Martha was the whole package.

Author and activist Sister Soulja also said that she met Dr. Chavis, when she worked at CRJbefore he met Martha.

When Martha came, I knew she was the one, said Sister Soulja. I knew she was the one that would become his wife and I knew that she was in Dr. Chavis heart. When she used to come to the office, her face used to light up.

Sister Soulja added: I knew that she was intelligent and that she was a translator and that she spoke different languages and I respected and loved her for that, but I really just liked the woman in her. I just thought that she was a lovely lady.

Sister Soulja described Martha as jovial, jubilant, energetic and very, very loyal.

Its very nice when you see a woman who is just 1000 percent behind her man; that was one of the most beautiful things about her, Sister Soulja said.

Minister Abdul Hafeez Muhammad, New York representative of the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam, said that he met Martha when Dr. Chavis served as the east coast regional minister of the Nation of Islam.

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. (far left) sits in the front row with his children and a family friend (far right) at the Celebration of Life for Martha Rivera Chavis at Martins Home for Service Inc., in Montclair, N.J. on June 11. (Travis Riddick/NNPA)

When death comes, it is a time to celebrate life and to thank God for the life that has been given, for whatever time it was given, said Muhammad. Every day with the Lord is like a thousand years, so for these 53 years of our beloved sisters life, celebrate it and honor it.

Min. Abdul Hafeez Muhammad also noted the importance of women in society and in the work of the Hon. Elijah Muhammad.

Where there are no decent women, there will be no decent girls; a nation can rise no higher than its women, said Min. Abdul Hafeez Muhammad then, speaking directly to the Chavis children seated in the front row, he added, Your mother can never die, because of the work she did from San Pedro to Angola to America and worldwide, she stood by [Dr. Chavis] side, around him, behind him and in front of him and she put you on this planet.

Muhammad continued: Because of her children, Martha Rivera Chavis will live forever, by the grace of God.

Loved ones honored Marthas family and lifes work offering thanks and remembrances in English and Spanish. Dr. Chavis met Martha when she worked as a translator for the Ambassador of Angola; she spoke Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and English.

Ana Jacobo said that Martha was more like an older sister than an aunt.

My family is celebrating her life, said Jacobo. She passed on to be with our grandmother, she passed on to be with our grandfather. Shes just an angel that is watching over us. We are so happy and thankful to have known her.

Rubby Perez, a family friend and world-renowned singer from the Dominican Republic, honored Martha with two songs in Spanish, Amor Mio, and Hay Momentos. Perez wanted to sing Hay Momentos at his fathers funeral, but because he wasnt able to sing that day, he wanted to make sure that he performed it at Marthas service.

Perez said that Martha Rivera Chavis had the unique ability to make people feel good even when she was feeling sad.

After the ceremony, family and friends gathered outside to take pictures as songs like Whitney Houstons I Wanna Dance with Somebody, Faith Evans Love Like This, and Gloria Estefans Rhythm Is Gonna Get You, played through the speakers on the warm, summer day.

She brought happiness to people, Perez said. She was a humble giving person; she was a provider.

John Chavis, one of Martha and Dr. Chavis sons, said that hell always remember his mothers kind heart and willingness to help anyone.

John said that about a week before she died, his mom was looking out of her window and saw an African American woman trudging up Union Street with a heavy basket on her back attached to a leather tumpline. The midday sun was sweltering.

John said that his mother yelled to the woman, Excuse me, do you want a bottle of water, sweetie?

Even though she wasnt feeling well, she came outside in her pajamas, crossed the street and gave the lady a cold bottle of water, John said.

Even when she was sick my mom was still a humanitarian, still looking to help people, said John. Thats one memory that will last with me forever: her legacy of being a humanitarian.

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Family, Friends Celebrate the Life of Martha Rivera Chavis – Lasentinel

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NRA’s media outlet fearmongers about Black Lives Matter committing mass violence against whites – Media Matters for America (blog)


Media Matters for America (blog)
NRA's media outlet fearmongers about Black Lives Matter committing mass violence against whites
Media Matters for America (blog)
CHUCK HOLTON: Right, you know the parallels between what's happening in South Africa and the blatant racism and violence we're seeing from people like the Black Lives Matter crowd, from people like Louis Farrakhan and his minions, is happening in …

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NRA’s media outlet fearmongers about Black Lives Matter committing mass violence against whites – Media Matters for America (blog)

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Dr. Boyce Watkins teaches economic empowerment in Philly – The Philadelphia Tribune

Boyce Watkins is not one to mince words, so while some of the things that come out of his mouth may sound shocking, those familiar with his message of Black financial empowerment are not surprised when he says things like this:

People are used to looking at Black people as sort of their political and economic side chicks, Watkins said. The side chick is somebody you expect loyalty from but you dont owe her no loyalty back. And Black people accept that role. We never say, you should be doing something for us. You owe the community.

This is just a part of the message Watkins delivered when his Black Empowerment Festival rolled into the city earlier this month. For three days ending on July 8 at the University of Pennsylvania, Watkins held forums, delivered speeches and sold books and DVDs geared at building wealth, financial responsibility and entrepreneurship in the African-American community to about 500 attendees.

Watkins has more than 20 years experience as a finance professor. However, in 2014 he walked away from his teaching position at Syracuse University to practice the entrepreneurship principles he preaches daily on social media platforms such as YouTube (228,173 subscribers), Twitter (69,203 followers) and Instagram (75,800).

Academia is racist, Watkins said. You would think that getting a high level of education would help you to escape some of the nonsense that we experience in the workplace. Youll find that academia is a lot like the prison system in that there is not a lot of oversight there. The problems that exist in the arena can go unchecked for decades. I didnt want to be a part of that.

But Im a scholar and I wasnt going to let any institutions tell me that I couldnt be that, Watkins, on the Black Economic Empowerment Festival for a second year in a row, continued. The purpose of the tour is to get in the faces of the people and let them get in my face. Sometimes on social media you can get caught up in numbers. Its crucial to get out, talk and give instruction.

The tour will hit Brooklyn, N.Y., Houston, Memphis, Tenn., Louisville, Ky., London, England and Oakland, Calif., wrapping up in mid-November. Watkins funds the tour out of pocket through his book sales hes written seven and through the proceeds generated from his widely popular Black Business School. Watkins says that more than 40,000 students are enrolled in online courses, where Watkins gives instruction mostly to entrepreneurs but also to those interested in securing their financial future.

Some of the course offerings are as little as $29.99 a month.

Its like an HBCU (Historically Black Colleges & Universities) online, Watkins says. Ive been in academia for years and I know what it takes to educate. What we do is provide the technological infrastructure and dont add in the high cost of having to take a student loan to attend.

Watkins is part of a growing list of young African Americans who are highly trained in finance but are opting to grow a business teaching other Blacks how to reach their financial goals via the internet and social media outreach.

That list includes people such as Jay Morrison (real estate), Andre C. Hatchett (real estate), and Tiffany The Budgetnista Aliche.

They are currently in this space and doing great things, Watkins said. But I honestly took my cue from people like Minister Louis Farrakhan and Dr. Claude Anderson, he says of the leader of the Nation of Islam and the author.

This past weekend Watkins also got the chance to meet Kenny Gamble, the world-renowned songwriter and founder and chairman of Universal Companies. Watkins was familiar with Gamble as a songwriter. However, he was blown away by what Gamble has done as an entrepreneur in housing and education. Gamble was a panelist on a discussion about the music industry.

I was blown away by everything that he has done, and I have to confess I was totally ignorant of the things hes accomplished, Watkins said. Everyone knows about the music piece. But hes done so much more. Hes an example and a teacher right here in the city.

During one of his addresses, Watkins outlined three tenants of financial literacy, advising those in attendance to develop multiple sources of income, save your money so your money can save you and always own something and understand the value of ownership.

While he did not advise Blacks to join the Republican Party, Watkins believes African Americans are too beholden to the Democratic Party, which he says will talk about Black peoples voting rights but will never talk about Black people building true power because they need you in a position where they can control you.

And while he is a proponent of education, he made it a point to say college is not always the answer for everyone.

Figure out your purpose, Watkins said. If you want to be a doctor, a lawyer or a professor, then yes, you do need college because college will give you a specific skill that will give you a higher earning potential, which will in turn will allow you to pay back those high student loans. But if you are talking about spending $120,000 to study philosophy Im going to look at you kind of funny. I think education is essential; college is not.

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Dr. Boyce Watkins teaches economic empowerment in Philly – The Philadelphia Tribune

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A Mural of Prodigy In Queensbridge Gets Vandalized Twice, Proving Rap Beef Never Truly Dies – Digital Music News

The death of Mobb Deep rapper Prodigy shocked the hip hop community. At his funeral, an elite cast of New York rappers paid their respects, along with community leaders like Louis Farrakhan. But not everyone was such a fan. In fact, the murals may have reignited decades old beef in the neighborhood.

+Prodigy Died of Accidental Asphyxiation, Autopsy to Show

There are actually two artists behind this mural: Jeff Henriquez along with Eli Lazare. They created the mural to commemorate Prodigys life. But almost immediately after its unveiling in early July, vandals splashed buckets of paint on the mural. After Henriquez and Lazare spent an entire day repainting their work, it was quickly vandalized a second time.

Some people blamed beef with Prodigy, with age-old conflicts still festering. In fact, thats the prevailing theory, with people fighting against a mural of an enemy.

Others accused the police of the defacement, though Prodigy wasnt known for being particularly anti-NYPD (at least more than any other rapper).

Whoever the culprits, the piece in New York is probably dead forever. But graffiti and muralists worldwide took note, and started creating their own memorials. Some were already in motion, while other artists were motivated to start new pieces.

Already, were seeing multiple murals popping up in US states, not to mention countries like Germany, France, and even New Zealand (share this one if you see it!) In total, it looks like dozens are popping up on walls, trains, billboards, and construction zones.

Heres a look at the explosion in Prodigy love. We identified the artists we could, but please help us fill in the blanks.

artist: Jerod Dtox Davies

artist: James Lucius Gray @jamesluciusgray

artist: Sad Kinos

Prodigy

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A Mural of Prodigy In Queensbridge Gets Vandalized Twice, Proving Rap Beef Never Truly Dies – Digital Music News

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NRA minions troll Philando Castile supporters after Women’s March protests – Mic

The National Rifle Association attacked Philando Castile demonstrators and activists via social media on Saturday instead of answering their call to join their outrage over the police shooting death of the Minnesota licensed gun owner.

NRA News and NRA TV released new videos on Thursday and Friday attacking the organizers behind the #NRA2DOJ demonstrations that took place on Friday and Saturday.

The demonstrations were planned by Womens March organizers Tamika Mallory, Linda Sarsour, and Carmen Perez to call out the NRA for not speaking out more about Castiles fatal shooting at the hands of former St. Anthony, Minnesota police officer Jeronimo Yanez on July 6, 2016.

About 500 Castile supporters participated in the Friday rally outside NRA headquarters before marching to the U.S. Department of Justices offices on Capitol Hill, according to the organizers.

Another 1,500 people joined a vigil and rally outside the DOJs offices on Saturday, organizers said.

All weve seen is more of the same silence on the issue, protest organizer Tamika Mallory told Mic via text message, and more hateful and divisive rhetoric from their minions.

One of those minions is NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch, who broke a year-long silence from the NRA on July 9, when she told Mallory and CNN that Castiles shooting death was absolutely awful and completely unfortunate.

But Loesch lashed out at Mallory and her co-organizers on Thursday in a video shared via Twitter Saturday morning.

Loesch never mentions Castiles name in the video and doesnt address the Second Amendment issues raised by the #NRA2DOJ protest.

How dare you accuse me of racism and sexism, and homophobia or whatever the hell other ism or obia youve invented to push your radical agenda, Loesch said in the video.

Or should I say, daddy Farrakhans radical agenda, she added, taking issue with the NRA protests feminist organizers and their apparent affiliation with controversial Nation of Islam minister Louis Farrakhan. (Loeschs video shows clips of Mallory praising the minister and Instagram posts of pics she took with him.)

If you want to stop hate, start with daddy Farrakhan.

Meanwhile, NRA TV used its Twitter account Friday and Saturday to flood and attack the #NRA2DOJ hashtag.

Some of the videos it posted featured black gun rights supporters who apparently take issue with progressive demonstrators who they say have rioted in the streets since the election of President Donald Trump.

Castile had told Yanez that he was carrying a gun, for which he had a license, prior to being shot during a traffic stop. Castiles fiancee Diamond Reynolds and her four-year-old daughter were also in the car. Reynolds broadcasted the immediate aftermath of the incident on Facebook Live.

Yanez was found not guilty of manslaughter charges on June 16. He ended his employment with the Village of St. Anthony police in lieu of being fired on July 10 and received $48,500 in a severance agreement.

Mic reached out to the NRA for comment but did not immediately hear back from the group.

Read the original here:

NRA minions troll Philando Castile supporters after Women’s March protests – Mic

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July 17, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Louis Farrakhan | Biography & Facts | Britannica.com

Alternative Titles: Louis Abdul Farrakhan, Louis Eugene Walcott Louis Farrakhan American religious leader May 11, 1933 (age 84) New York City, New York Louis Farrakhan, in full Louis Abdul Farrakhan, original name Louis Eugene Walcott (born May 11, 1933, Bronx, New York, New York, U.S.), leader (from 1978) of the Nation of Islam, an African American movement that combined elements of Islam with black nationalism. Walcott, as he was then known, was raised in Boston by his mother, Sarah Mae Manning, an immigrant from St. Kitts and Nevis. Deeply religious as a boy, he became active in the St. Cyprians Episcopal Church in his Roxbury neighbourhood. He graduated with honours from the prestigious Boston English High School, where he also played the violin and was a member of the track team. He attended the Winston-Salem Teachers College from 1951 to 1953 but dropped out to pursue a career in music. Known as The Charmer, he performed professionally on the Boston nightclub circuit as a singer of calypso and country songs. In 1953 he married Khadijah, with whom he would have nine children. In 1955 Walcott joined the Nation of Islam. Following the custom of the Nation, he replaced his surname with an X, a custom among Nation of Islam followers who considered their family names to have originated with white slaveholders. Louis X first proved himself at Temple No. 7 in Harlem, where he emerged as the protg of Malcolm X, the minister of the temple and one of the most prominent members of the Nation of Islam. Louis X was given his Muslim name, Abdul Haleem Farrakhan, by Elijah Muhammad, the leader of the Nation of Islam. Farrakhan was appointed head minister of Boston Temple No. 11, which Malcolm had established earlier. After Malcolm Xs break with the Nation in 1964 over political and personal differences with Elijah Muhammad, Farrakhan replaced Malcolm as head minister of Harlems Temple No. 7 and as the National Representative of the Nation, the second in command of the organization. Like his predecessor, Farrakhan was a dynamic, charismatic leader and a powerful speaker with the ability to appeal to the African American masses. When Elijah Muhammad died in February 1975, the Nation of Islam fragmented. Surprisingly, the Nations leadership chose Wallace Muhammad (now known as Warith Deen Mohammed), the fifth of Elijahs six sons, as the new Supreme Minister. Disappointed that he was not named Elijahs successor, Farrakhan led a breakaway group in 1978, which he also called the Nation of Islam and which preserved the original teachings of Elijah Muhammad. Farrakhan disagreed with Wallace Muhammads attempts to move the Nation to orthodox Sunni Islam and to rid it of Elijah Muhammads radical black nationalism and separatist teachings, which stressed the inherent wickedness of whites. Farrakhan became known to the American public through a series of controversies that began during the 1984 presidential campaign of the Rev. Jesse Jackson, whom Farrakhan supported. Farrakhan withdrew his support after Jewish voters protested his praise of Adolf Hitler, and he has been embroiled in a continuing conflict with the American Jewish community because of his making allegedly anti-Semitic statements; Farrakhan has denied being anti-Semitic. In later speeches he blamed the U.S. government for what he claimed was a conspiracy to destroy black people with AIDS and addictive drugs. In 1995 the Nation sponsored the Million Man March in Washington, D.C., to promote African American unity and family values. Estimates of the number of marchers, most of whom were men, ranged from 400,000 to nearly 1.1 million, making it, at the time, the largest gathering of its kind in American history. Under Farrakhans leadership, the Nation of Islam established a clinic for AIDS patients in Washington, D.C., and helped to force drug dealers out of public housing projects and private apartment buildings in the city. It also worked with gang members in Los Angeles. Meanwhile, the Nation continued to promote social reform in African American communities in accordance with its traditional goals of self-reliance and economic independence. Test Your Knowledge Word Meanings and Origins In the early 21st century, the core membership of Farrakhans Nation of Islam was estimated at between 10,000 and 50,000though in the same period Farrakhan was delivering speeches in large cities across the United States that regularly attracted crowds of more than 30,000. Under Farrakhans leadership, the Nation was one of the fastest growing of the various Muslim movements in the country. Foreign branches of the Nation were formed in Ghana, London, Paris, and the Caribbean islands. In order to strengthen the international influence of the Nation, Farrakhan established relations with Muslim countries, and in the late 1980s he cultivated a relationship with the Libyan dictator Muammar al-Qaddafi. After a near-death experience in 2000 resulting from complications from prostate cancer (he was diagnosed with cancer in 1991), Farrakhan toned down his racial rhetoric and attempted to strengthen relations with other minority communities, including Native Americans, Hispanics, and Asians. Farrakhan also moved his group closer to orthodox Sunni Islam in 2000, when he and Imam Warith Deen Mohammed, the leading American orthodox Muslim, recognized each other as fellow Muslims. Britannica Lists & Quizzes Pop Culture Quiz Pop Culture List Literature & Language Quiz History List Health issues forced Farrakhan to reduce his role in the Nation of Islam in the early 21st century. He nevertheless maintained a fairly high profile, giving online sermons in addition to his public speeches. In 2010 he publicly embraced Dianetics, a practice of Scientology. Farrakhan also said that he wanted all Nation of Islam members to become auditors, practitioners of Scientologys one-on-one counseling process that is meant to facilitate individuals handling of their engrams, which, according to the practices of Scientology, are mental images of past experiences that produce negative emotional effects in ones life. In 2015 he led a march in Washington, D.C., to mark the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March.

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NRA Host Grant Stinchfield: Hordes of Black Lives Matter Protesters are Coming to Torture and Kill White Americans – The Daily Banter

The Daily Banter NRA Host Grant Stinchfield: Hordes of Black Lives Matter Protesters are Coming to Torture and Kill White Americans The Daily Banter CHUCK HOLTON: Right, you know the parallels between what's happening in South Africa and the blatant racism and violence we're seeing from people like the Black Lives Matter crowd, from people like Louis Farrakhan and his minions, is happening in … and more »

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Opinion | How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

I grew up in New Jersey when Newark, Plainfield and other cities experienced rioting and later became a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983), for which I covered Newark and Plainfield. The demise of Newark as a city has always intrigued and concerned me.I come back to Jersey a few times to see how things are going, and actually, things are going in the right direction it would seem. I also have served in local elected office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and an old traditional town much like the traditional towns I covered in North Jersey. I like to see traditional towns and cities (like mine) thrive. Sign Up for E-News In looking back to the 50th anniversary of the Newark riots as this site and other media have done, I find there is something missing in the coverage namely, how the civil disorders, particularly the deadly ones in the long hot summer of 1967 reshaped our country, its politics and where we live and work. I am not an expert, just an observer. Here are just a few observations as I look back 50 years: Newark had about 400,000 residents at the time of the 67 riots, and had a white population of about 50%, which was dwindling. Today, Newark has about 280,579 residents, which actually represents an increase from the 2000 census, and is about 26% non-Hispanic white. In the 1970s and 80s, the city was giving homes away for nearly nothing. The amount of population that moved out of American cities following the period of the race riots is staggering. A Detroit TV station reported recently that immediately after the riots White flight was frantic. Sixty-seven-thousand people fled in the summer following the uprising, 80,000 more the following year. Add up the numbers in Newark, Cleveland and other cities rocked by riots and you can see that the riots were not just about 26 who were killed, but about a significant change in our living patters. I would guess the national numbers are in the millions. African-Americans gained political power in the cities, but with whites departing, so did business (notably, retailers), jobs and a tax base. This left major urban areas in a fiscal crisis in the 1970s with heavy dependence on federal and state aid and government-initiated programs, much of which was not very successful in my view. Whites who left cities became resentful about losing their old communities, especially blue collar whites. They started voting increasingly Republican, or for conservative Democrats like George Wallace. These folks became the Reagan Democrats of the 1980s and Trump voters of 2016. Deindustrialization led to millions of Americans moving to The Sun Belt, too. While the number of black office holders jumped and grew in influence in the Democratic Party, culminating in the historic election of Barack Obama in 2008, their ability to get realistic economic growth for their communities dwindled, as Republicans moved to the far right and Democrats to the far left. The consensus was not there.Key African-American groups also started to be led by more aggressive and polarizing leaders (i.e. Ben Chavis at the NAACP and Louis Farrakhan, Nation of Islam). The loss of jobs and middle class residents created a bigger black underclass in the cities and with that an increased drug trade and gang violence.Despite welfare reform in the 1990s, young women who come from broken homes and are led by a single mother have a good chance of getting pregnant out of wedlock and becoming a ward of the state. If youre male in the same situation, you may join a gang or get involved in the illicit drug trade and wind up a victim of a shooting. Black flight became the norm in the 1990s and cities started to eye gentrification, concert halls, new convention centers and minor league baseball stadiums as a means to bring life back to their urban core. These efforts did not really help the black underclass that much. Both parties ignored the cities in the 1980s and looked more to policies favoring suburban voters, for example, the soccer moms that propelled Bill Clinton into the White House twice. As a result, by the 1990 census, most of the nations population lived in suburbs, not cities. Despite the rhetoric about race relations the last few years, one could not argue that blacks, whites, Latinos and others in the middle class live quite harmoniously and integrated in todays suburbs.What divides the nation today is politics. While the suburbs have become more racially mixed and are largely harmonious places to live, the reality is that much of the urban underclass — not just in the cities, but in rural America like Coal Country — has largely been ignored by our ever growing middle and upper classes. We have become indifferent to the problems of the inner cities and feel that throwing money at it or using government action is the solution. It sort of gets the guilt off our backs while we invest our money in the burbs or overseas. How do we end indifference? Well first, I would hope President Trump would make good on his campaign promise to restore our urban areas.Trump has held a number of weekly issue-based press conferences and media events — infrastructure week energy week border security week. When will be see urban revitalization week? We can look to Trump or other government leaders for answers, but what the cities lost due to the riots was their economic vitality and tax base. Blacks gained political power only to see economic power dwindle.Thankfully, Newark seems to be rebounding due in large part because millennials and developers see good cheap land and building deals there.The free market is working. And that is a good thing as we look back on the 50th anniversary of those seminal events in 1967. Ken Reid grew up in Princeton and graduated from Rutgers University in 1980. He was a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983) and has lived in the Washington D.C.,area since 1986. In 2006, he was elected to local government office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and has a background in planning and economic development and a great interest in seeing U.S. cities revived (primarily Newark).

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

I grew up in New Jersey when Newark, Plainfield and other cities experienced rioting and later became a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983), for which I covered Newark and Plainfield. The demise of Newark as a city has always intrigued and concerned me.I come back to Jersey a few times to see how things are going, and actually, things are going in the right direction it would seem. I also have served in local elected office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and an old traditional town much like the traditional towns I covered in North Jersey. I like to see traditional towns and cities (like mine) thrive. Sign Up for E-News In looking back to the 50th anniversary of the Newark riots as this site and other media have done, I find there is something missing in the coverage namely, how the civil disorders, particularly the deadly ones in the long hot summer of 1967 reshaped our country, its politics and where we live and work. I am not an expert, just an observer. Here are just a few observations as I look back 50 years: Newark had about 400,000 residents at the time of the 67 riots, and had a white population of about 50%, which was dwindling. Today, Newark has about 280,579 residents, which actually represents an increase from the 2000 census, and is about 26% non-Hispanic white. In the 1970s and 80s, the city was giving homes away for nearly nothing. The amount of population that moved out of American cities following the period of the race riots is staggering. A Detroit TV station reported recently that immediately after the riots White flight was frantic. Sixty-seven-thousand people fled in the summer following the uprising, 80,000 more the following year. Add up the numbers in Newark, Cleveland and other cities rocked by riots and you can see that the riots were not just about 26 who were killed, but about a significant change in our living patters. I would guess the national numbers are in the millions. African-Americans gained political power in the cities, but with whites departing, so did business (notably, retailers), jobs and a tax base. This left major urban areas in a fiscal crisis in the 1970s with heavy dependence on federal and state aid and government-initiated programs, much of which was not very successful in my view. Whites who left cities became resentful about losing their old communities, especially blue collar whites. They started voting increasingly Republican, or for conservative Democrats like George Wallace. These folks became the Reagan Democrats of the 1980s and Trump voters of 2016. Deindustrialization led to millions of Americans moving to The Sun Belt, too. While the number of black office holders jumped and grew in influence in the Democratic Party, culminating in the historic election of Barack Obama in 2008, their ability to get realistic economic growth for their communities dwindled, as Republicans moved to the far right and Democrats to the far left. The consensus was not there.Key African-American groups also started to be led by more aggressive and polarizing leaders (i.e. Ben Chavis at the NAACP and Louis Farrakhan, Nation of Islam). The loss of jobs and middle class residents created a bigger black underclass in the cities and with that an increased drug trade and gang violence.Despite welfare reform in the 1990s, young women who come from broken homes and are led by a single mother have a good chance of getting pregnant out of wedlock and becoming a ward of the state. If youre male in the same situation, you may join a gang or get involved in the illicit drug trade and wind up a victim of a shooting. Black flight became the norm in the 1990s and cities started to eye gentrification, concert halls, new convention centers and minor league baseball stadiums as a means to bring life back to their urban core. These efforts did not really help the black underclass that much. Both parties ignored the cities in the 1980s and looked more to policies favoring suburban voters, for example, the soccer moms that propelled Bill Clinton into the White House twice. As a result, by the 1990 census, most of the nations population lived in suburbs, not cities. Despite the rhetoric about race relations the last few years, one could not argue that blacks, whites, Latinos and others in the middle class live quite harmoniously and integrated in todays suburbs.What divides the nation today is politics. While the suburbs have become more racially mixed and are largely harmonious places to live, the reality is that much of the urban underclass — not just in the cities, but in rural America like Coal Country — has largely been ignored by our ever growing middle and upper classes. We have become indifferent to the problems of the inner cities and feel that throwing money at it or using government action is the solution. It sort of gets the guilt off our backs while we invest our money in the burbs or overseas. How do we end indifference? Well first, I would hope President Trump would make good on his campaign promise to restore our urban areas.Trump has held a number of weekly issue-based press conferences and media events — infrastructure week energy week border security week. When will be see urban revitalization week? We can look to Trump or other government leaders for answers, but what the cities lost due to the riots was their economic vitality and tax base. Blacks gained political power only to see economic power dwindle.Thankfully, Newark seems to be rebounding due in large part because millennials and developers see good cheap land and building deals there.The free market is working. And that is a good thing as we look back on the 50th anniversary of those seminal events in 1967. Ken Reid grew up in Princeton and graduated from Rutgers University in 1980. He was a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983) and has lived in the Washington D.C.,area since 1986. In 2006, he was elected to local government office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and has a background in planning and economic development and a great interest in seeing U.S. cities revived (primarily Newark).

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July 20, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Family, Friends Celebrate the Life of Martha Rivera Chavis – Lasentinel

The Chavis-Rivera family gather for a photograph during the Celebration of Life for Martha Rivera Chavis at Martins Home for Service Inc., in Montclair, N.J. on June 11. (Travis Riddick/NNPA) Family and friends from across the globe, gathered to celebrate the life and legacy of Martha Rivera Chavis in a multicultural service, just a few blocks from her Montclair, N.J. home. This has been very sorrowful and painful for our family, said Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., Marthas husband and president and CEO of the National Newspaper Publishers Association. While we cry for the loss of our beloved, were also here tonight, to celebrate Marthas life. Dr. Chavis continued: Knowing my wife, as I did for the last 30 years, she would want me to say to you, enjoy this day that the Lord has made and celebrate what God has blessed us with through her spirit and through her presence. Martha died at the age of 53 of natural causes in her home on July 6, due to complications of heart failure. The Chavis-Rivera family hosted Marthas memorial at Martins Home for Service, Inc. on Tuesday, July 11; the printed program featured her obituary in English and Spanish. Dr. Chavis thanked Jim Farmer of General Motors; the Murphy, Falcon and Murphy law firm in Baltimore, Md.; hip-hop and business mogul Russell Simmons; the President of the Detroit branch of NAACP Rev. Dr. Wendell Anthony and many others for their contributions and generosity. Many of the speakers during the memorial service met Martha and Dr. Chavis in the late 80s, when Dr. Chavis served as the executive director for the United Church of Christs Commission for Racial Justice (CRJ) in New York City. Newark, New Jersey Mayor Ras Baraka, who was a student at the time, offered his condolences. Baraka said that the couple did a lot for the Black community in the United States and for Black people around the world, especially those who were oppressed and struggling. You and your wife worked together as a unit, which is an example for many of us. Sometimes we work, but our wives are not present, said Baraka. Martha was very present and ensured that she was present all the time. Baraka continued: Martha is an example, for many women out here of all nationalities; Martha was an internationalist and a very conscious and very brilliant woman. Today, we just dont get that; you get one or the other. Martha was the whole package. Author and activist Sister Soulja also said that she met Dr. Chavis, when she worked at CRJbefore he met Martha. When Martha came, I knew she was the one, said Sister Soulja. I knew she was the one that would become his wife and I knew that she was in Dr. Chavis heart. When she used to come to the office, her face used to light up. Sister Soulja added: I knew that she was intelligent and that she was a translator and that she spoke different languages and I respected and loved her for that, but I really just liked the woman in her. I just thought that she was a lovely lady. Sister Soulja described Martha as jovial, jubilant, energetic and very, very loyal. Its very nice when you see a woman who is just 1000 percent behind her man; that was one of the most beautiful things about her, Sister Soulja said. Minister Abdul Hafeez Muhammad, New York representative of the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam, said that he met Martha when Dr. Chavis served as the east coast regional minister of the Nation of Islam. Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. (far left) sits in the front row with his children and a family friend (far right) at the Celebration of Life for Martha Rivera Chavis at Martins Home for Service Inc., in Montclair, N.J. on June 11. (Travis Riddick/NNPA) When death comes, it is a time to celebrate life and to thank God for the life that has been given, for whatever time it was given, said Muhammad. Every day with the Lord is like a thousand years, so for these 53 years of our beloved sisters life, celebrate it and honor it. Min. Abdul Hafeez Muhammad also noted the importance of women in society and in the work of the Hon. Elijah Muhammad. Where there are no decent women, there will be no decent girls; a nation can rise no higher than its women, said Min. Abdul Hafeez Muhammad then, speaking directly to the Chavis children seated in the front row, he added, Your mother can never die, because of the work she did from San Pedro to Angola to America and worldwide, she stood by [Dr. Chavis] side, around him, behind him and in front of him and she put you on this planet. Muhammad continued: Because of her children, Martha Rivera Chavis will live forever, by the grace of God. Loved ones honored Marthas family and lifes work offering thanks and remembrances in English and Spanish. Dr. Chavis met Martha when she worked as a translator for the Ambassador of Angola; she spoke Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and English. Ana Jacobo said that Martha was more like an older sister than an aunt. My family is celebrating her life, said Jacobo. She passed on to be with our grandmother, she passed on to be with our grandfather. Shes just an angel that is watching over us. We are so happy and thankful to have known her. Rubby Perez, a family friend and world-renowned singer from the Dominican Republic, honored Martha with two songs in Spanish, Amor Mio, and Hay Momentos. Perez wanted to sing Hay Momentos at his fathers funeral, but because he wasnt able to sing that day, he wanted to make sure that he performed it at Marthas service. Perez said that Martha Rivera Chavis had the unique ability to make people feel good even when she was feeling sad. After the ceremony, family and friends gathered outside to take pictures as songs like Whitney Houstons I Wanna Dance with Somebody, Faith Evans Love Like This, and Gloria Estefans Rhythm Is Gonna Get You, played through the speakers on the warm, summer day. She brought happiness to people, Perez said. She was a humble giving person; she was a provider. John Chavis, one of Martha and Dr. Chavis sons, said that hell always remember his mothers kind heart and willingness to help anyone. John said that about a week before she died, his mom was looking out of her window and saw an African American woman trudging up Union Street with a heavy basket on her back attached to a leather tumpline. The midday sun was sweltering. John said that his mother yelled to the woman, Excuse me, do you want a bottle of water, sweetie? Even though she wasnt feeling well, she came outside in her pajamas, crossed the street and gave the lady a cold bottle of water, John said. Even when she was sick my mom was still a humanitarian, still looking to help people, said John. Thats one memory that will last with me forever: her legacy of being a humanitarian.

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NRA’s media outlet fearmongers about Black Lives Matter committing mass violence against whites – Media Matters for America (blog)

Media Matters for America (blog) NRA's media outlet fearmongers about Black Lives Matter committing mass violence against whites Media Matters for America (blog) CHUCK HOLTON: Right, you know the parallels between what's happening in South Africa and the blatant racism and violence we're seeing from people like the Black Lives Matter crowd, from people like Louis Farrakhan and his minions, is happening in …

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July 19, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Dr. Boyce Watkins teaches economic empowerment in Philly – The Philadelphia Tribune

Boyce Watkins is not one to mince words, so while some of the things that come out of his mouth may sound shocking, those familiar with his message of Black financial empowerment are not surprised when he says things like this: People are used to looking at Black people as sort of their political and economic side chicks, Watkins said. The side chick is somebody you expect loyalty from but you dont owe her no loyalty back. And Black people accept that role. We never say, you should be doing something for us. You owe the community. This is just a part of the message Watkins delivered when his Black Empowerment Festival rolled into the city earlier this month. For three days ending on July 8 at the University of Pennsylvania, Watkins held forums, delivered speeches and sold books and DVDs geared at building wealth, financial responsibility and entrepreneurship in the African-American community to about 500 attendees. Watkins has more than 20 years experience as a finance professor. However, in 2014 he walked away from his teaching position at Syracuse University to practice the entrepreneurship principles he preaches daily on social media platforms such as YouTube (228,173 subscribers), Twitter (69,203 followers) and Instagram (75,800). Academia is racist, Watkins said. You would think that getting a high level of education would help you to escape some of the nonsense that we experience in the workplace. Youll find that academia is a lot like the prison system in that there is not a lot of oversight there. The problems that exist in the arena can go unchecked for decades. I didnt want to be a part of that. But Im a scholar and I wasnt going to let any institutions tell me that I couldnt be that, Watkins, on the Black Economic Empowerment Festival for a second year in a row, continued. The purpose of the tour is to get in the faces of the people and let them get in my face. Sometimes on social media you can get caught up in numbers. Its crucial to get out, talk and give instruction. The tour will hit Brooklyn, N.Y., Houston, Memphis, Tenn., Louisville, Ky., London, England and Oakland, Calif., wrapping up in mid-November. Watkins funds the tour out of pocket through his book sales hes written seven and through the proceeds generated from his widely popular Black Business School. Watkins says that more than 40,000 students are enrolled in online courses, where Watkins gives instruction mostly to entrepreneurs but also to those interested in securing their financial future. Some of the course offerings are as little as $29.99 a month. Its like an HBCU (Historically Black Colleges & Universities) online, Watkins says. Ive been in academia for years and I know what it takes to educate. What we do is provide the technological infrastructure and dont add in the high cost of having to take a student loan to attend. Watkins is part of a growing list of young African Americans who are highly trained in finance but are opting to grow a business teaching other Blacks how to reach their financial goals via the internet and social media outreach. That list includes people such as Jay Morrison (real estate), Andre C. Hatchett (real estate), and Tiffany The Budgetnista Aliche. They are currently in this space and doing great things, Watkins said. But I honestly took my cue from people like Minister Louis Farrakhan and Dr. Claude Anderson, he says of the leader of the Nation of Islam and the author. This past weekend Watkins also got the chance to meet Kenny Gamble, the world-renowned songwriter and founder and chairman of Universal Companies. Watkins was familiar with Gamble as a songwriter. However, he was blown away by what Gamble has done as an entrepreneur in housing and education. Gamble was a panelist on a discussion about the music industry. I was blown away by everything that he has done, and I have to confess I was totally ignorant of the things hes accomplished, Watkins said. Everyone knows about the music piece. But hes done so much more. Hes an example and a teacher right here in the city. During one of his addresses, Watkins outlined three tenants of financial literacy, advising those in attendance to develop multiple sources of income, save your money so your money can save you and always own something and understand the value of ownership. While he did not advise Blacks to join the Republican Party, Watkins believes African Americans are too beholden to the Democratic Party, which he says will talk about Black peoples voting rights but will never talk about Black people building true power because they need you in a position where they can control you. And while he is a proponent of education, he made it a point to say college is not always the answer for everyone. Figure out your purpose, Watkins said. If you want to be a doctor, a lawyer or a professor, then yes, you do need college because college will give you a specific skill that will give you a higher earning potential, which will in turn will allow you to pay back those high student loans. But if you are talking about spending $120,000 to study philosophy Im going to look at you kind of funny. I think education is essential; college is not.

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A Mural of Prodigy In Queensbridge Gets Vandalized Twice, Proving Rap Beef Never Truly Dies – Digital Music News

The death of Mobb Deep rapper Prodigy shocked the hip hop community. At his funeral, an elite cast of New York rappers paid their respects, along with community leaders like Louis Farrakhan. But not everyone was such a fan. In fact, the murals may have reignited decades old beef in the neighborhood. +Prodigy Died of Accidental Asphyxiation, Autopsy to Show There are actually two artists behind this mural: Jeff Henriquez along with Eli Lazare. They created the mural to commemorate Prodigys life. But almost immediately after its unveiling in early July, vandals splashed buckets of paint on the mural. After Henriquez and Lazare spent an entire day repainting their work, it was quickly vandalized a second time. Some people blamed beef with Prodigy, with age-old conflicts still festering. In fact, thats the prevailing theory, with people fighting against a mural of an enemy. Others accused the police of the defacement, though Prodigy wasnt known for being particularly anti-NYPD (at least more than any other rapper). Whoever the culprits, the piece in New York is probably dead forever. But graffiti and muralists worldwide took note, and started creating their own memorials. Some were already in motion, while other artists were motivated to start new pieces. Already, were seeing multiple murals popping up in US states, not to mention countries like Germany, France, and even New Zealand (share this one if you see it!) In total, it looks like dozens are popping up on walls, trains, billboards, and construction zones. Heres a look at the explosion in Prodigy love. We identified the artists we could, but please help us fill in the blanks. artist: Jerod Dtox Davies artist: James Lucius Gray @jamesluciusgray artist: Sad Kinos Prodigy

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July 18, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

NRA minions troll Philando Castile supporters after Women’s March protests – Mic

The National Rifle Association attacked Philando Castile demonstrators and activists via social media on Saturday instead of answering their call to join their outrage over the police shooting death of the Minnesota licensed gun owner. NRA News and NRA TV released new videos on Thursday and Friday attacking the organizers behind the #NRA2DOJ demonstrations that took place on Friday and Saturday. The demonstrations were planned by Womens March organizers Tamika Mallory, Linda Sarsour, and Carmen Perez to call out the NRA for not speaking out more about Castiles fatal shooting at the hands of former St. Anthony, Minnesota police officer Jeronimo Yanez on July 6, 2016. About 500 Castile supporters participated in the Friday rally outside NRA headquarters before marching to the U.S. Department of Justices offices on Capitol Hill, according to the organizers. Another 1,500 people joined a vigil and rally outside the DOJs offices on Saturday, organizers said. All weve seen is more of the same silence on the issue, protest organizer Tamika Mallory told Mic via text message, and more hateful and divisive rhetoric from their minions. One of those minions is NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch, who broke a year-long silence from the NRA on July 9, when she told Mallory and CNN that Castiles shooting death was absolutely awful and completely unfortunate. But Loesch lashed out at Mallory and her co-organizers on Thursday in a video shared via Twitter Saturday morning. Loesch never mentions Castiles name in the video and doesnt address the Second Amendment issues raised by the #NRA2DOJ protest. How dare you accuse me of racism and sexism, and homophobia or whatever the hell other ism or obia youve invented to push your radical agenda, Loesch said in the video. Or should I say, daddy Farrakhans radical agenda, she added, taking issue with the NRA protests feminist organizers and their apparent affiliation with controversial Nation of Islam minister Louis Farrakhan. (Loeschs video shows clips of Mallory praising the minister and Instagram posts of pics she took with him.) If you want to stop hate, start with daddy Farrakhan. Meanwhile, NRA TV used its Twitter account Friday and Saturday to flood and attack the #NRA2DOJ hashtag. Some of the videos it posted featured black gun rights supporters who apparently take issue with progressive demonstrators who they say have rioted in the streets since the election of President Donald Trump. Castile had told Yanez that he was carrying a gun, for which he had a license, prior to being shot during a traffic stop. Castiles fiancee Diamond Reynolds and her four-year-old daughter were also in the car. Reynolds broadcasted the immediate aftermath of the incident on Facebook Live. Yanez was found not guilty of manslaughter charges on June 16. He ended his employment with the Village of St. Anthony police in lieu of being fired on July 10 and received $48,500 in a severance agreement. Mic reached out to the NRA for comment but did not immediately hear back from the group.

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July 17, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed


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