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Liu Xiaobo and Twitter’s Theater of Radical Cruelty Tablet Magazine – Tablet Magazine

On July 13, the Chinese human-rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo died a prisoner of the regime he had been jailed and tortured for criticizing. Within hours of the news emerging, a former Salon writer named Benjamin Norton had taken to Twitter to register his disapprovalnot of brutal Chinese authoritarianism, but of its victim. This was the latest example of a specious moral equivalence, particularly prevalent on the radical left, that continues tocorrupt our discourse.

Liu Xiaobo wanted China to be a society that afforded its citizens the same rights, freedoms, and protections that Benjamin Norton has always been fortunate enough to enjoy. In pursuit of that cause, he was stripped of the freedom to write or teach and repeatedly incarcerated. He refused to renounce his views in exchange for his release, and so he became the first Nobel Peace laureate to end his life in custody since Carl von Ossietzky died in a Nazi prison hospital 79 years ago.

Nortons curt Twitter obituary acknowledged none of this. Instead, his four interlinked tweets occasioned by Lius passing were devoted to a list of denunciations, which Norton barked out at his 43,000 social-media followers like a charge sheet of crimes against the Party:

Tweet one: Nobel-winning Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo just died. He was a US-funded, hard-right, pro-colonialist warmonger.

Tweet two: Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo loved wardefending US bloodshed in Iraq, Vietnam, Korea, etcand justified Israeli crimes against Palestinians

Tweet three: Nobel-winning dissident Liu Xiaobo loved Western colonialism & hated Chinese culture, calling his own people wimpy, spineless & fucked-up

Tweet four: Warmongering pro-colonialist Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo wanted to privatize everything. His orgs were funded by the US gov, naturally.

And then silence. If Nortons thoroughgoing disdain for Lius political opinions is mitigated by compassion, he did not say so. Nor was he able to muster even perfunctory indignation about the injustice of Lius treatment by the Chinese state.

By way of substantiating his charges, Norton linked to a 900-word Guardian article by Barry Sautman and Yan Hairong from 2010, and attached a screenshot of the relevant paragraphs to each tweet, helpfully highlighting incriminating words or phrases. Back then, the authors argued (wrongly) that Lius politics ought to have precluded him from winning the Nobel Prize. Today, Norton implies, they make him unworthy of commemoration or even pity.

And what were Lius deplorable opinions? Well, the Chinese dissident had supported Americas anti-Communist wars in Korea and Vietnam, and the post-Sept. 11 wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. But for a democratic activist living in a police state, this was hardly unusual. Many prominent former dissidents in Central and Eastern Europeincluding Lech Wasa, Adam Michnik, and Lius hero, Vclav Haveldid likewise. Not because they were champion[s] of war, not peace (as Sautman and Yan would have it) or because they love war (as Norton would have it). They did so because they believed democratization to be both a moral imperative and a necessary precondition to societal peace. Dissident intellectuals who have spent their lives under totalitarian regimes tend to be anti-totalitarian. Having suffered and struggled against the agonies of dictatorship on their own behalf, they felt honor-bound to support its overthrow on behalf of Afghans and Iraqis. One might object that this view of American democracy promotion in the Middle East was hopelessly nave or practically unworkable, but it was hardly ignoble.

What seems to have really excited Nortons disgust, however, is that Liu believed that human rights are indivisible and universal and nowhere better protected than in Western liberal democracies. The Difference between the Western and the Chinese governing system, he remarked in a 1988 interview, is humane versus inhumane, theres no middle ground. Westernization is not a choice of a nation, but a choice for the human race.

In Sautman and Yans telling, this remark becomes to choose Westernization is to choose to be human which doesnt mean quite the same thing, especially when lifted out of context and embedded in an entirely critical article. And as Sautman and Yan must know, Lius attitude changed considerably only a year after he gave that interview. His own travels in the West led him to write a 1989 essay, in which he subjected his previous analysis to unsparing criticism:

My tendency to idealize Western civilization arises from my nationalistic desire to use the West in order to reform China. But this has led me to overlook the flaws of Western culture. I have been obsequious toward Western civilization, exaggerating its merits, and at the same time exaggerating my own merits. I have viewed the West as if it were not only the salvation of China but also the natural and ultimate destination of all humanity. Moreover I have used this delusional idealism to assign myself the role of savior. I now realize that Western civilization, while it can be useful in reforming China in its present stage, cannot save humanity in an overall sense. If we stand back from Western civilization for a moment, we can see that it possesses all the flaws of humanity in general.

Such a passage speaks to Lius intellectual integrity and humility, which is probably why Sautman and Yan decided to overlook it. That Norton was happy to take their article as the last and final word on Lius politics and character speaks to his laziness and credulity. Had he wished to be fair-minded in his assessment of Lius legacy, Norton need only have ventured as far as Wikipedia.

But Norton showed no interest in fairness, or even in the appearance of fairness. He was in too much of a hurry announcing himself as an independent moral mind, undeterred by the hypocrisies of bourgeois sentimentality. To condemn his response as callous would be redundant because callousness was precisely what he wanted to advertise.

It is, of course, galling to see Norton arrogate to himself the right of self-criticism even as he denies that right to Liu, not least because vilification of American democracy costs Norton nothing, while opposition to Chinese authoritarianism cost Liu everything. But as a self-regarding bit of political theater, Nortons petulant tweet-storm counts for little. He is not an especially consequential media voice, and his doctrinaire articles at Alternet have zero bearing on American policy or on the struggles of persecuted democrats in China, or anywhere else. His tweets about Liu are, however, an expression of a profoundly ugly mode of radical thought, which holds pity and fellow feeling in contempt and ruthlessness as a mark of virtue.

This is not an entirely new attitude on the American left. During the Cold War, stone-hearted Western radicals who had never experienced despotism denounced dissidents from the Soviet bloc as liars and quislings of Western imperialism when they testified to the horrors of Communist misrule. In more recent years, this sanctimonious contempt has metastasized to encompass ever-expanding categories of people deemedeither by their political views or their unalterable characteristicsto have forfeited the right to life, liberty, and human charity. Consider three recent examples:

1.When Islamist assassins executed the staff of Charlie Hebdo in January 2015, the atrocity provoked a gruesome arms race on the far-left as radical commentators and bloggers competed to see whose attacks on the stricken magazine and its bereaved staff could be most heartless, most vulgar, and most cruel. The alacrity with which ignorant calumnies were marshaled in the hasty attempt to defame the departed was unnerving. More unnerving still was the evident pride these writers took in subordinating the weaknesses of compassion and decency to their solipsistic rage against France, the West, and other papier-mch piatas. Colonialism! Racism! Neoliberalism and neo-imperialism! The chickens, we were told with palpable satisfaction, had come home to roost (again).

2. In March 2016, the American student Otto Warmbier was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for a petty (and almost certainly trumped-up) transgression by the Stalinist regime in North Koreaand naturally, a noisy contingent of post-colonial social media activists gloated over his misfortune. Pictures of Warmbiers face contorted by anguish and fear were circulated on social media and his white tears were mocked. Salon (in a since deleted post) jeered that Warmbier was Americas biggest idiot frat-boy and, in the Huffington Post, a writer named La Sha from something called the Kinfolk Kollective helpfully instructed her readers in The Revocation of White Privilege in North Korea. All declared themselves unmoved by Warmbiers plight, which was instead an occasion for scornful condescension and delighted schadenfreude. Seventeen months later, the 22-year-old student was returned to his distraught parents in a persistent vegetative state; he died within the week.

3. Days after the shooting of Republican Congressman Steve Scalise, Sha retweeted a post by an anonymous blogger titled Let Them Fucking Die. The author denounced Scalise as a homophobe and a racist before going on to declare himself weary of co-existence with white/cisgender/heterosexuals who subvert, undermine, corrupt, and desecrate the virtues they extol [as a] matter of course by the very nature of what they are. The only ethical course of action, he explained, was for the oppressed to purge themselves of mercy. The merciful have no sway over the merciless. Give their constructions back to them. Turn your compassion inward. And turn your hatred outward. If you see the oppressor in peril, he concluded, Do nothing. Let. Them. Fucking. Die. And smile a bit when you do.

This happy sentiment is echoed across social media by users who openly identify as misandrist or who post tweets enjoining their followers to #killallTERFS. Such tweets are rarely a meaningful incitement to violencethey are better understood as a way of affirming in-group solidarity through squalid expressions of out-group hatred. When angry young Stalinists flick their middle fingers at a memorial to the victims of Communism, its a left-wing Quenellean expression of puerile effrontery for its own sake.

But these theatrics are no less sinister for being theatrical. Dehumanizing ones political adversaries is the sine qua non for their persecution.And it has allowed for the veneration of those for whom pitiless violence and cruelty are not simply a pose. Convicted PFLP terrorist Rasmea Odeh and unrepentant Stalinist Angela Davis are routinely glorified from (and sometimes present on) progressive-rally platforms; genocidal anti-Semitic organizations like Hamas and Hezbollah are romanticized as the foot-soldiers of justice and liberation; the Black Lives Matter movement bends the knee before Castros Cuba and the Black Panthers; social justice activists publicly align themselves with Louis Farrakhan and his openly racist, misogynistic, anti-Semitic cult; and last week, the Womens March blithely tweeted birthday greetings to Joanne Chesimard, also known as Assata Shakur, a convicted cop-killer.

This furious stoking of resentment and rage is invariably justified in the name of retribution. When these writers and activists examine their own societies, the benefits of liberal democracy and free enterprise entirely escape their notice, taken for granted even as they are ferociously denounced. They see only what is wicked and corrupta past of slavery, colonization, and plunder, and a present of exploitation, greed, hypocrisy, and racism, which are held to be the unique inheritance of the West. Anyone who admires such a system, or willingly submits to it, is either ignorant, malevolent, or a moral idiot. Anyone, like Liu Xiaobo, who peacefully agitates to visit this plague upon his own society, must be something considerably worse.

It should not be surprising that dissident intellectuals who have survived or fled tyranny often have a clearer view of the value of free societies and, consequently, little use for radical chic of middle-class radical Western activists. As the Somali dissident Ayaan Hirsi Ali remarked when a Canadian news anchor scoffed at her professed love for the country that gave her refuge:

I dont find myself in the same luxury as you. You grew up in freedom, and you can spit on freedom, because you dont know what it is not to have freedom. I havent.

Liu Xiaobo had also experienced liberty in the West and oppression in his own country, and like Hirsi Ali, he had resolved that the formerfor all its shortcomingsis better. He returned to China in 1989 to participate in the Tiananmen Square demonstrations. When others fled before the Chinese army, Liu remained behind and helped negotiate protesters safe passage out of the square. For this, he was sentenced to two years in prison. Committed thereafter to political and social change through nonviolence, he was rearrested in the 1990s and sentenced to undergo re-education through labor. His final arrest and 11-year jail sentence were for his participation in the drafting of the Charter 08 manifesto, which called for the liberalization of Chinas economy, the democratization of its political model, and steps toward truth through reconciliation.

When Liu stood trial in December 2009, accused of inciting subversion of state power he prepared a final statement, which would be the last words anyone heard from him. The court did not permit him to deliver his remarks, but at his Nobel ceremony the following year, Swedish actress Liv Ullman delivered them on his behalf. Lius statement spoke movingly of his optimism for the opening and reform of China. It reaffirmed his belief that freedom of expression is the foundation of human rights, the source of humanity, and the mother of truth. And it concluded with a beautiful paean to his wife, whom he would never see again. But his statements most humbling passages were those devoted to the subject of hatred:

I have no enemies and no hatred. None of the police who monitored, arrested, and interrogated me, none of the prosecutors who indicted me, and none of the judges who judged me are my enemies. Although there is no way I can accept your monitoring, arrests, indictments, and verdicts, I respect your professions and your integrity

Hatred can rot away at a persons intelligence and conscience. The enemy mentality will poison the spirit of a nation, incite cruel mortal struggles, destroy a societys tolerance and humanity, and hinder a nations progress toward freedom and democracy. That is why I hope to be able to transcend my personal experiences as I look upon our nations development and social change, to counter the regimes hostility with utmost goodwill, and to dispel hatred with love.

Can the nobility of these words simply be swept aside with the spiteful epithet warmonger? It cannot.

Surrendering to bitterness and hatred is easy. Humanity in the face of inhumanity is not. The dignity and fortitude with which Liu bore his persecution were a demonstration of moral courage, the likes of which only exceptional human beings are capable. It stands as an indictment of his totalitarian tormentors and of all those who scorn the liberties he could never afford to take for granted. His enemies know this, and it is why they despise him.

***

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Jamie Palmer is a freelance writer and independent filmmaker. His twitter feed is @j4mi3p.

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July 26, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Attacking Black Lives Matter and Selling Fear: Guns and Racism on NRATV – Truth-Out

Demonstrators gather to protest the National Rifle Association on December 21, 2012. (Photo: Joshlopezphoto)BILL BERKOWITZ FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT

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Without the drummed-up fear that a black president would take guns away from law-abiding citizens, the National Rifle Association is turning toward vilifying and pillorying the Black Lives Matter movement against police brutality in order to drum up gun sales. One of the platforms it now has at its disposal is NRATV. While the fledging network may not yet be among the choices in your cable television package, or available through existing streaming services, given the power of the gun lobbying organization, NRATV may soon be coming to screen near you.

Launched in October of last year, NRATV’s declared mission is to provide “The most comprehensive video coverage of Second Amendment issues, events and culture anywhere in the world.” The network offers such programing as NRANEWs, presented by Ruger, NRAWOMEN, presented by Smith & Wesson, NRACOUNTRY and NRAHUNTING, as well as an array of commentators.

Grant Stinchfield is a host of a program called Stinchfield. During a recent broadcast, Stinchfield let go a broadside against Black Lives Matter, claiming that “racist violence” in South Africa, “where white families are being tortured and killed almost every day in racist violence. is a warning for the United States.” And because of the liberal media, “you will never hear [about this] from the mainstream media in this country.”

Stinchfield interviewed Chuck Holton, a veteranArmyRanger, and co-host — alongside Iran-Contra figure and NRA board member Oliver North — of the NRATV series Frontlines. Holton who appears to be a master of alternative facts and seems to have a hate/hate relationship with African Americans, maintained that “the blatant racism and violence we’re seeing from people like the Black Lives Matter crowd, from people like Louis Farrakhan and his minions,is happening in spades in South Africa.”

The Daily Banter’s Justin Rosario declared that Holton’s words were not just “a racist dog whistle,” they were “an open call to violence against Black Lives Matter.”

“Pair this with the recent ‘liberals are the enemy of freedom’ ad that effectively calls on NRA members to get ready to kill anti-Trump protesters and you have a very stark picture of the NRA’s agenda,” Rosario noted. “No longer content to just sell guns and fear, the gun industry’s mouthpiece is actively inciting violence against the left, using both political and racial tensions as a justification.

When Obama welcomed, and shook hands with, then-president-elect Donald Trump at the White House, Holton tweeted: “Photo finally surfaces of Trump grabbing a pussy.” And two days after Trump’s inauguration, Holton tweeted “Okay! Party’s over. Let’s get busy scrubbing Obama’s mocacchino stain off of America!”

According to Media Matters for America, last August on the NRA’s radio show Cam & Company, “Holton talked about gangs, absent fathers, and welfare, before saying, ‘And you hear college students complain about white privilege. You know my definition of white privilege? It’s just simply the culture that we have created, that our fathers and grandfathers have worked hard to create.’ Holton went on describe white privilege as ‘a culture of individual responsibility, where you take responsibility for your own actions, a culture that respects authority.’ He also positively cited a video about ‘white privilege’ released by ‘alt right’ blogger Stefan Molyneux.”

Immediately after the attack in Manchester, England, which left 22 dead and dozens injured, Holton told Stinchfield that England “has had this coming,” due to the country’s firearms regulations, open bordersfor refugees, “multiculturalism” and “gender-bending.” At the end of the segment, Stinchfield stated that European countries have “disarmed their citizens, so terrorists operate with impunity.”

After the January 21st Women’s March on Washington, commentator Bill Whittle had Holton, who also works with Pat Robertson’s Christian Broadcasting Network, as his guest. Together they blamed the Women’s March “for vandalism and property damage that took place on Inauguration Day, January 20,” Raw Story reported. Whittle and Holton confidently predicted that a Women’s March on the NRA scheduled for July 14 will “certainly not be peaceful.”

“Well, they’re certainly not peaceful. And they’re certainly not even protests. What they are is sort of temper tantrums by spoiled children, is the best way I can describe them,” Holton said.

The July 14 and 15 protests against the NRA which included a nearly 18-mile walk from NRA headquarters to the U.S. Department of Justice was carried out peacefully. The events were in part a response to an incendiary one-minute NRA recruitment video, which featured NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch, who in the video argues that demonstrators “bully and terrorize the law-abiding until the only option left is for the police to do their jobs and stop the madness.”

“They use their media to assassinate real news,” The Blaze’s Dana Loesch said in the ad. “They use their schools to teach children that their president is another Hitler. They use their movie stars and singers and comedy shows and award shows to repeat their narrative over and over again.”

Women’s March co-president Tamika Mallory called the ad is “direct endorsement of violence” against protesters. “We haven’t taken a position that people shouldn’t have guns, we don’t want to prohibit folks from exercising their second amendment rights,” Mallory told CNN ahead of the march. “But the NRA ad puts our First Amendment rights in jeopardy, it puts the lives of people who are exercising their right to protest in the middle of danger.We are looking for a change in NRA’s behavior and its policies and practices.”

The event’s Facebook page urged the NRA to “take down the recent irresponsible and dangerous advertisement videos from all social platforms immediately; issue an apology to the American people for the video that suggests armed violence against communities of color, progressives and anyone who does not agree with this Administration’s policies; and make a statement to defend Philando Castile’s Second Amendment right to own a firearm and demand the Department of Justice indict the police officer who killed him for exercising his Second Amendment.”

Attacks on Black Lives Matter are nothing new. Since the inception of the movement, conservatives have been gunning for the organization. Recently, Jacob Grandstaff, writing for the conservative Capital Research Center website, argued that the Women’s March against the NRA “show that the group is primarily concerned withLeft-wing coalition-building and notwomen’s issues.”

Grandstaff added: “The Women’s March characterizes itself as a feminist movement organized in opposition to President Donald Trump and his supposedly anti-women comments and political stances. The anti-NRA demonstration, however, appears to have little to do with women; andinstead meshes morewiththe greater Left’s accusations of racism against the NRA.”

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July 25, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

New Yorker Profiles Sadiq Khan: From Madrassa to Mayor, via Sectarian, Muslim Politics – Breitbart News

Author Sam Knight writes of Khans opposition to Brexit, his stardust qualities, his diminutive stature, his (intentionally) comedic demeanour, and his history in sectarian, Muslim politics.

The piece reflects on how Khan represented terror suspects and Islamist radicals, although it leaves out the mans connection to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, who has described white people as devils and Jews as bloodsuckers.

The magazine holds up Khans election as another stride in Londons giant, unstopping swagger, lauding the multiculturalist wave that Khan rode into office. The 10,000-word feature starts by hailing Khans work after the Grenfell tower fire, as well as detailing his affinity towards former U.S. president John F. Kennedy.

But it also includes information about Khans religious adherence, something the London mayor has been less keen to trumpet during his time in office:

He will quote passages from the Quran and the Hadith, the sayings of the Prophet, when discussing terrorism. When I asked him how to say his name (Urdu speakers pronounce it Saadik; English speakers tend to say Sadeek), Khan spelled out his name in Arabicsawd alif daal kaafand explained that it means truthful. In 2009, when he was sworn in as a member of the Privy Council, an ancient body of senior politicians, Khan brought his own Quran to Buckingham Palace and left it there, because the palace did not have a copy. Sometimes it is as if he were leading a one-man religious-education exercise. Many people in positions of power and influence, they have not broken bread with a Muslim, Khan said. Part of it is reassuring them: The sky is not going to fall in. You are in safe hands. All the stuff that you worry about, I worry about as well. All the dreams you have got, I have got as well.

Khan has made a concerted effort since being elected as mayor to appear alongside other faith leaders in the United Kingdom, but has also previously been caught progressing the agendas of Islamic sects who engage in acts such as female genital mutilation.

Raised in South London, the article recalls the mayors memories from growing up:

After classes, Khan went to a madrassa, for instruction in Islam. He would cross the road to avoid skinheads in bomber jackets, members of the National Front, a far-right organization that had a strong presence in Tooting and Earlsfield. People shouted Paki! at his father on the bus. There is a very good reason why all my brothers joined the boxing club, Khan said. In our area, on our estate, there were certain things you couldnt say and get away with. So, if somebody called you the P-word, that means there is a fight. Thats it. Were having a fight. You couldnt allow that to be tolerated.

His initial foray into the legal world was at a firm called Christian Fisher, which allegedly frequently represented suspected I.R.A. members.

There is a slight duality about Sadiq, his former colleague Matt Foot told the New Yorker. I think his strong Labour working-class roots are a big part of what he is. I think he has also been very efficient.

The piece notes how Khan represented terror suspects such as the former Islamist-turned-LBC host Maajid Nawaz, and terror suspect Babar Ahmed, as well as the Mayors previous racial slurs in labelling moderate Muslims as uncle Toms a phrase he has since recanted.

It also details how Khan became embroiled in sectarian politics in London in his re-election bid for Parliament in 2010:

The Liberal Democrats, meanwhile, put up an antiwar South Asian candidate named Nasser Butt, who had the potential to split the Labour vote in the constituency.

I became an immediate threat to Sadiqs Muslim-vote bank, Butt told me. However, Butt belonged to an Islamic sect, the Ahmadiyya, that holds theological beliefs different from those of mainstream Sunni Islam, the predominant branch in the U.K. During the campaign, Liberal Democrat posters were torn down and Butt suffered anti-Ahmadi abuse. At an election event at the Tooting Islamic Centre, the Conservative candidate, Mark Clarke, who is mixed race, had to be locked in a room for his own protection, after being mistaken for Butt; Butt was advised to stay away altogether. Although he blamed activists from the center, which is attached to the Balham Mosque, for the discrimination during the election, Butt was convinced that Khan was also involved. He was part of it, he said. I was quite sure he was directing it.

Khan has always denied any wrongdoing. But on May 3, 2010, two days before the election, Butt sent his son to secretly record a meeting at the Islamic center. Butt gave me a copy of the recording. On it, a speaker identified as Harris Bokhari, the son of Khans old head teacher and mentor, addresses the room. The majority of Muslims in this area are voting Lib Dem, because they think Nasser Butt is a Muslim, Bokhari says. You need to go into the community and take these posters down. One man at the meeting asks Bokhari how to fill in his ballot papers. All you need to do is just look for Sadiq Khan, Labour Party, and just tick it, he says. Whatever else you vote is up to you. Bokhari told me that he does not remember the meeting. Khan held his seat by less than three thousand votes.

Khans rise to Mayor has not been meteoric, and according to those around him, the man has designs on a higher office: that of Prime Minister.

It is this ambition that keeps him from making sweeping political statements on a regular basis, even about Brexit, which Khan campaigned against. One source told the New Yorker: If he becomes Remainer-in-Chief, that is a big problem when he wants England to vote for him.

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July 25, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Louis Farrakhan | Biography & Facts | Britannica.com

Alternative Titles: Louis Abdul Farrakhan, Louis Eugene Walcott

Louis Farrakhan

American religious leader

May 11, 1933 (age 84)

New York City, New York

Louis Farrakhan, in full Louis Abdul Farrakhan, original name Louis Eugene Walcott (born May 11, 1933, Bronx, New York, New York, U.S.), leader (from 1978) of the Nation of Islam, an African American movement that combined elements of Islam with black nationalism.

Walcott, as he was then known, was raised in Boston by his mother, Sarah Mae Manning, an immigrant from St. Kitts and Nevis. Deeply religious as a boy, he became active in the St. Cyprians Episcopal Church in his Roxbury neighbourhood. He graduated with honours from the prestigious Boston English High School, where he also played the violin and was a member of the track team. He attended the Winston-Salem Teachers College from 1951 to 1953 but dropped out to pursue a career in music. Known as The Charmer, he performed professionally on the Boston nightclub circuit as a singer of calypso and country songs. In 1953 he married Khadijah, with whom he would have nine children.

In 1955 Walcott joined the Nation of Islam. Following the custom of the Nation, he replaced his surname with an X, a custom among Nation of Islam followers who considered their family names to have originated with white slaveholders. Louis X first proved himself at Temple No. 7 in Harlem, where he emerged as the protg of Malcolm X, the minister of the temple and one of the most prominent members of the Nation of Islam. Louis X was given his Muslim name, Abdul Haleem Farrakhan, by Elijah Muhammad, the leader of the Nation of Islam. Farrakhan was appointed head minister of Boston Temple No. 11, which Malcolm had established earlier.

After Malcolm Xs break with the Nation in 1964 over political and personal differences with Elijah Muhammad, Farrakhan replaced Malcolm as head minister of Harlems Temple No. 7 and as the National Representative of the Nation, the second in command of the organization. Like his predecessor, Farrakhan was a dynamic, charismatic leader and a powerful speaker with the ability to appeal to the African American masses.

When Elijah Muhammad died in February 1975, the Nation of Islam fragmented. Surprisingly, the Nations leadership chose Wallace Muhammad (now known as Warith Deen Mohammed), the fifth of Elijahs six sons, as the new Supreme Minister. Disappointed that he was not named Elijahs successor, Farrakhan led a breakaway group in 1978, which he also called the Nation of Islam and which preserved the original teachings of Elijah Muhammad. Farrakhan disagreed with Wallace Muhammads attempts to move the Nation to orthodox Sunni Islam and to rid it of Elijah Muhammads radical black nationalism and separatist teachings, which stressed the inherent wickedness of whites.

Farrakhan became known to the American public through a series of controversies that began during the 1984 presidential campaign of the Rev. Jesse Jackson, whom Farrakhan supported. Farrakhan withdrew his support after Jewish voters protested his praise of Adolf Hitler, and he has been embroiled in a continuing conflict with the American Jewish community because of his making allegedly anti-Semitic statements; Farrakhan has denied being anti-Semitic. In later speeches he blamed the U.S. government for what he claimed was a conspiracy to destroy black people with AIDS and addictive drugs.

In 1995 the Nation sponsored the Million Man March in Washington, D.C., to promote African American unity and family values. Estimates of the number of marchers, most of whom were men, ranged from 400,000 to nearly 1.1 million, making it, at the time, the largest gathering of its kind in American history. Under Farrakhans leadership, the Nation of Islam established a clinic for AIDS patients in Washington, D.C., and helped to force drug dealers out of public housing projects and private apartment buildings in the city. It also worked with gang members in Los Angeles. Meanwhile, the Nation continued to promote social reform in African American communities in accordance with its traditional goals of self-reliance and economic independence.

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In the early 21st century, the core membership of Farrakhans Nation of Islam was estimated at between 10,000 and 50,000though in the same period Farrakhan was delivering speeches in large cities across the United States that regularly attracted crowds of more than 30,000. Under Farrakhans leadership, the Nation was one of the fastest growing of the various Muslim movements in the country. Foreign branches of the Nation were formed in Ghana, London, Paris, and the Caribbean islands. In order to strengthen the international influence of the Nation, Farrakhan established relations with Muslim countries, and in the late 1980s he cultivated a relationship with the Libyan dictator Muammar al-Qaddafi. After a near-death experience in 2000 resulting from complications from prostate cancer (he was diagnosed with cancer in 1991), Farrakhan toned down his racial rhetoric and attempted to strengthen relations with other minority communities, including Native Americans, Hispanics, and Asians. Farrakhan also moved his group closer to orthodox Sunni Islam in 2000, when he and Imam Warith Deen Mohammed, the leading American orthodox Muslim, recognized each other as fellow Muslims.

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Health issues forced Farrakhan to reduce his role in the Nation of Islam in the early 21st century. He nevertheless maintained a fairly high profile, giving online sermons in addition to his public speeches. In 2010 he publicly embraced Dianetics, a practice of Scientology. Farrakhan also said that he wanted all Nation of Islam members to become auditors, practitioners of Scientologys one-on-one counseling process that is meant to facilitate individuals handling of their engrams, which, according to the practices of Scientology, are mental images of past experiences that produce negative emotional effects in ones life. In 2015 he led a march in Washington, D.C., to mark the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March.

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

NRA Host Grant Stinchfield: Hordes of Black Lives Matter Protesters are Coming to Torture and Kill White Americans – The Daily Banter


The Daily Banter
NRA Host Grant Stinchfield: Hordes of Black Lives Matter Protesters are Coming to Torture and Kill White Americans
The Daily Banter
CHUCK HOLTON: Right, you know the parallels between what's happening in South Africa and the blatant racism and violence we're seeing from people like the Black Lives Matter crowd, from people like Louis Farrakhan and his minions, is happening in …

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NRA Host Grant Stinchfield: Hordes of Black Lives Matter Protesters are Coming to Torture and Kill White Americans – The Daily Banter

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Opinion | How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

I grew up in New Jersey when Newark, Plainfield and other cities experienced rioting and later became a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983), for which I covered Newark and Plainfield.

The demise of Newark as a city has always intrigued and concerned me.I come back to Jersey a few times to see how things are going, and actually, things are going in the right direction it would seem.

I also have served in local elected office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and an old traditional town much like the traditional towns I covered in North Jersey. I like to see traditional towns and cities (like mine) thrive.

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In looking back to the 50th anniversary of the Newark riots as this site and other media have done, I find there is something missing in the coverage namely, how the civil disorders, particularly the deadly ones in the long hot summer of 1967 reshaped our country, its politics and where we live and work. I am not an expert, just an observer. Here are just a few observations as I look back 50 years:

Newark had about 400,000 residents at the time of the 67 riots, and had a white population of about 50%, which was dwindling. Today, Newark has about 280,579 residents, which actually represents an increase from the 2000 census, and is about 26% non-Hispanic white. In the 1970s and 80s, the city was giving homes away for nearly nothing.

The amount of population that moved out of American cities following the period of the race riots is staggering. A Detroit TV station reported recently that immediately after the riots White flight was frantic. Sixty-seven-thousand people fled in the summer following the uprising, 80,000 more the following year. Add up the numbers in Newark, Cleveland and other cities rocked by riots and you can see that the riots were not just about 26 who were killed, but about a significant change in our living patters. I would guess the national numbers are in the millions.

African-Americans gained political power in the cities, but with whites departing, so did business (notably, retailers), jobs and a tax base. This left major urban areas in a fiscal crisis in the 1970s with heavy dependence on federal and state aid and government-initiated programs, much of which was not very successful in my view.

Whites who left cities became resentful about losing their old communities, especially blue collar whites. They started voting increasingly Republican, or for conservative Democrats like George Wallace. These folks became the Reagan Democrats of the 1980s and Trump voters of 2016. Deindustrialization led to millions of Americans moving to The Sun Belt, too.

While the number of black office holders jumped and grew in influence in the Democratic Party, culminating in the historic election of Barack Obama in 2008, their ability to get realistic economic growth for their communities dwindled, as Republicans moved to the far right and Democrats to the far left. The consensus was not there.Key African-American groups also started to be led by more aggressive and polarizing leaders (i.e. Ben Chavis at the NAACP and Louis Farrakhan, Nation of Islam).

The loss of jobs and middle class residents created a bigger black underclass in the cities and with that an increased drug trade and gang violence.Despite welfare reform in the 1990s, young women who come from broken homes and are led by a single mother have a good chance of getting pregnant out of wedlock and becoming a ward of the state. If youre male in the same situation, you may join a gang or get involved in the illicit drug trade and wind up a victim of a shooting.

Black flight became the norm in the 1990s and cities started to eye gentrification, concert halls, new convention centers and minor league baseball stadiums as a means to bring life back to their urban core. These efforts did not really help the black underclass that much.

Both parties ignored the cities in the 1980s and looked more to policies favoring suburban voters, for example, the soccer moms that propelled Bill Clinton into the White House twice. As a result, by the 1990 census, most of the nations population lived in suburbs, not cities.

Despite the rhetoric about race relations the last few years, one could not argue that blacks, whites, Latinos and others in the middle class live quite harmoniously and integrated in todays suburbs.What divides the nation today is politics.

While the suburbs have become more racially mixed and are largely harmonious places to live, the reality is that much of the urban underclass — not just in the cities, but in rural America like Coal Country — has largely been ignored by our ever growing middle and upper classes.

We have become indifferent to the problems of the inner cities and feel that throwing money at it or using government action is the solution. It sort of gets the guilt off our backs while we invest our money in the burbs or overseas.

How do we end indifference? Well first, I would hope President Trump would make good on his campaign promise to restore our urban areas.Trump has held a number of weekly issue-based press conferences and media events — infrastructure week energy week border security week. When will be see urban revitalization week?

We can look to Trump or other government leaders for answers, but what the cities lost due to the riots was their economic vitality and tax base. Blacks gained political power only to see economic power dwindle.Thankfully, Newark seems to be rebounding due in large part because millennials and developers see good cheap land and building deals there.The free market is working.

And that is a good thing as we look back on the 50th anniversary of those seminal events in 1967.

Ken Reid grew up in Princeton and graduated from Rutgers University in 1980. He was a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983) and has lived in the Washington D.C.,area since 1986. In 2006, he was elected to local government office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and has a background in planning and economic development and a great interest in seeing U.S. cities revived (primarily Newark).

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Opinion | How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

I grew up in New Jersey when Newark, Plainfield and other cities experienced rioting and later became a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983), for which I covered Newark and Plainfield.

The demise of Newark as a city has always intrigued and concerned me.I come back to Jersey a few times to see how things are going, and actually, things are going in the right direction it would seem.

I also have served in local elected office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and an old traditional town much like the traditional towns I covered in North Jersey. I like to see traditional towns and cities (like mine) thrive.

Sign Up for E-News

In looking back to the 50th anniversary of the Newark riots as this site and other media have done, I find there is something missing in the coverage namely, how the civil disorders, particularly the deadly ones in the long hot summer of 1967 reshaped our country, its politics and where we live and work. I am not an expert, just an observer. Here are just a few observations as I look back 50 years:

Newark had about 400,000 residents at the time of the 67 riots, and had a white population of about 50%, which was dwindling. Today, Newark has about 280,579 residents, which actually represents an increase from the 2000 census, and is about 26% non-Hispanic white. In the 1970s and 80s, the city was giving homes away for nearly nothing.

The amount of population that moved out of American cities following the period of the race riots is staggering. A Detroit TV station reported recently that immediately after the riots White flight was frantic. Sixty-seven-thousand people fled in the summer following the uprising, 80,000 more the following year. Add up the numbers in Newark, Cleveland and other cities rocked by riots and you can see that the riots were not just about 26 who were killed, but about a significant change in our living patters. I would guess the national numbers are in the millions.

African-Americans gained political power in the cities, but with whites departing, so did business (notably, retailers), jobs and a tax base. This left major urban areas in a fiscal crisis in the 1970s with heavy dependence on federal and state aid and government-initiated programs, much of which was not very successful in my view.

Whites who left cities became resentful about losing their old communities, especially blue collar whites. They started voting increasingly Republican, or for conservative Democrats like George Wallace. These folks became the Reagan Democrats of the 1980s and Trump voters of 2016. Deindustrialization led to millions of Americans moving to The Sun Belt, too.

While the number of black office holders jumped and grew in influence in the Democratic Party, culminating in the historic election of Barack Obama in 2008, their ability to get realistic economic growth for their communities dwindled, as Republicans moved to the far right and Democrats to the far left. The consensus was not there.Key African-American groups also started to be led by more aggressive and polarizing leaders (i.e. Ben Chavis at the NAACP and Louis Farrakhan, Nation of Islam).

The loss of jobs and middle class residents created a bigger black underclass in the cities and with that an increased drug trade and gang violence.Despite welfare reform in the 1990s, young women who come from broken homes and are led by a single mother have a good chance of getting pregnant out of wedlock and becoming a ward of the state. If youre male in the same situation, you may join a gang or get involved in the illicit drug trade and wind up a victim of a shooting.

Black flight became the norm in the 1990s and cities started to eye gentrification, concert halls, new convention centers and minor league baseball stadiums as a means to bring life back to their urban core. These efforts did not really help the black underclass that much.

Both parties ignored the cities in the 1980s and looked more to policies favoring suburban voters, for example, the soccer moms that propelled Bill Clinton into the White House twice. As a result, by the 1990 census, most of the nations population lived in suburbs, not cities.

Despite the rhetoric about race relations the last few years, one could not argue that blacks, whites, Latinos and others in the middle class live quite harmoniously and integrated in todays suburbs.What divides the nation today is politics.

While the suburbs have become more racially mixed and are largely harmonious places to live, the reality is that much of the urban underclass — not just in the cities, but in rural America like Coal Country — has largely been ignored by our ever growing middle and upper classes.

We have become indifferent to the problems of the inner cities and feel that throwing money at it or using government action is the solution. It sort of gets the guilt off our backs while we invest our money in the burbs or overseas.

How do we end indifference? Well first, I would hope President Trump would make good on his campaign promise to restore our urban areas.Trump has held a number of weekly issue-based press conferences and media events — infrastructure week energy week border security week. When will be see urban revitalization week?

We can look to Trump or other government leaders for answers, but what the cities lost due to the riots was their economic vitality and tax base. Blacks gained political power only to see economic power dwindle.Thankfully, Newark seems to be rebounding due in large part because millennials and developers see good cheap land and building deals there.The free market is working.

And that is a good thing as we look back on the 50th anniversary of those seminal events in 1967.

Ken Reid grew up in Princeton and graduated from Rutgers University in 1980. He was a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983) and has lived in the Washington D.C.,area since 1986. In 2006, he was elected to local government office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and has a background in planning and economic development and a great interest in seeing U.S. cities revived (primarily Newark).

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How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

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July 20, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Family, Friends Celebrate the Life of Martha Rivera Chavis – Lasentinel

The Chavis-Rivera family gather for a photograph during the Celebration of Life for Martha Rivera Chavis at Martins Home for Service Inc., in Montclair, N.J. on June 11. (Travis Riddick/NNPA)

Family and friends from across the globe, gathered to celebrate the life and legacy of Martha Rivera Chavis in a multicultural service, just a few blocks from her Montclair, N.J. home.

This has been very sorrowful and painful for our family, said Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., Marthas husband and president and CEO of the National Newspaper Publishers Association. While we cry for the loss of our beloved, were also here tonight, to celebrate Marthas life.

Dr. Chavis continued: Knowing my wife, as I did for the last 30 years, she would want me to say to you, enjoy this day that the Lord has made and celebrate what God has blessed us with through her spirit and through her presence.

Martha died at the age of 53 of natural causes in her home on July 6, due to complications of heart failure.

The Chavis-Rivera family hosted Marthas memorial at Martins Home for Service, Inc. on Tuesday, July 11; the printed program featured her obituary in English and Spanish.

Dr. Chavis thanked Jim Farmer of General Motors; the Murphy, Falcon and Murphy law firm in Baltimore, Md.; hip-hop and business mogul Russell Simmons; the President of the Detroit branch of NAACP Rev. Dr. Wendell Anthony and many others for their contributions and generosity.

Many of the speakers during the memorial service met Martha and Dr. Chavis in the late 80s, when Dr. Chavis served as the executive director for the United Church of Christs Commission for Racial Justice (CRJ) in New York City.

Newark, New Jersey Mayor Ras Baraka, who was a student at the time, offered his condolences.

Baraka said that the couple did a lot for the Black community in the United States and for Black people around the world, especially those who were oppressed and struggling.

You and your wife worked together as a unit, which is an example for many of us. Sometimes we work, but our wives are not present, said Baraka. Martha was very present and ensured that she was present all the time.

Baraka continued: Martha is an example, for many women out here of all nationalities; Martha was an internationalist and a very conscious and very brilliant woman. Today, we just dont get that; you get one or the other. Martha was the whole package.

Author and activist Sister Soulja also said that she met Dr. Chavis, when she worked at CRJbefore he met Martha.

When Martha came, I knew she was the one, said Sister Soulja. I knew she was the one that would become his wife and I knew that she was in Dr. Chavis heart. When she used to come to the office, her face used to light up.

Sister Soulja added: I knew that she was intelligent and that she was a translator and that she spoke different languages and I respected and loved her for that, but I really just liked the woman in her. I just thought that she was a lovely lady.

Sister Soulja described Martha as jovial, jubilant, energetic and very, very loyal.

Its very nice when you see a woman who is just 1000 percent behind her man; that was one of the most beautiful things about her, Sister Soulja said.

Minister Abdul Hafeez Muhammad, New York representative of the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam, said that he met Martha when Dr. Chavis served as the east coast regional minister of the Nation of Islam.

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. (far left) sits in the front row with his children and a family friend (far right) at the Celebration of Life for Martha Rivera Chavis at Martins Home for Service Inc., in Montclair, N.J. on June 11. (Travis Riddick/NNPA)

When death comes, it is a time to celebrate life and to thank God for the life that has been given, for whatever time it was given, said Muhammad. Every day with the Lord is like a thousand years, so for these 53 years of our beloved sisters life, celebrate it and honor it.

Min. Abdul Hafeez Muhammad also noted the importance of women in society and in the work of the Hon. Elijah Muhammad.

Where there are no decent women, there will be no decent girls; a nation can rise no higher than its women, said Min. Abdul Hafeez Muhammad then, speaking directly to the Chavis children seated in the front row, he added, Your mother can never die, because of the work she did from San Pedro to Angola to America and worldwide, she stood by [Dr. Chavis] side, around him, behind him and in front of him and she put you on this planet.

Muhammad continued: Because of her children, Martha Rivera Chavis will live forever, by the grace of God.

Loved ones honored Marthas family and lifes work offering thanks and remembrances in English and Spanish. Dr. Chavis met Martha when she worked as a translator for the Ambassador of Angola; she spoke Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and English.

Ana Jacobo said that Martha was more like an older sister than an aunt.

My family is celebrating her life, said Jacobo. She passed on to be with our grandmother, she passed on to be with our grandfather. Shes just an angel that is watching over us. We are so happy and thankful to have known her.

Rubby Perez, a family friend and world-renowned singer from the Dominican Republic, honored Martha with two songs in Spanish, Amor Mio, and Hay Momentos. Perez wanted to sing Hay Momentos at his fathers funeral, but because he wasnt able to sing that day, he wanted to make sure that he performed it at Marthas service.

Perez said that Martha Rivera Chavis had the unique ability to make people feel good even when she was feeling sad.

After the ceremony, family and friends gathered outside to take pictures as songs like Whitney Houstons I Wanna Dance with Somebody, Faith Evans Love Like This, and Gloria Estefans Rhythm Is Gonna Get You, played through the speakers on the warm, summer day.

She brought happiness to people, Perez said. She was a humble giving person; she was a provider.

John Chavis, one of Martha and Dr. Chavis sons, said that hell always remember his mothers kind heart and willingness to help anyone.

John said that about a week before she died, his mom was looking out of her window and saw an African American woman trudging up Union Street with a heavy basket on her back attached to a leather tumpline. The midday sun was sweltering.

John said that his mother yelled to the woman, Excuse me, do you want a bottle of water, sweetie?

Even though she wasnt feeling well, she came outside in her pajamas, crossed the street and gave the lady a cold bottle of water, John said.

Even when she was sick my mom was still a humanitarian, still looking to help people, said John. Thats one memory that will last with me forever: her legacy of being a humanitarian.

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Family, Friends Celebrate the Life of Martha Rivera Chavis – Lasentinel

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NRA’s media outlet fearmongers about Black Lives Matter committing mass violence against whites – Media Matters for America (blog)


Media Matters for America (blog)
NRA's media outlet fearmongers about Black Lives Matter committing mass violence against whites
Media Matters for America (blog)
CHUCK HOLTON: Right, you know the parallels between what's happening in South Africa and the blatant racism and violence we're seeing from people like the Black Lives Matter crowd, from people like Louis Farrakhan and his minions, is happening in …

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NRA’s media outlet fearmongers about Black Lives Matter committing mass violence against whites – Media Matters for America (blog)

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July 19, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Liu Xiaobo and Twitter’s Theater of Radical Cruelty Tablet Magazine – Tablet Magazine

On July 13, the Chinese human-rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo died a prisoner of the regime he had been jailed and tortured for criticizing. Within hours of the news emerging, a former Salon writer named Benjamin Norton had taken to Twitter to register his disapprovalnot of brutal Chinese authoritarianism, but of its victim. This was the latest example of a specious moral equivalence, particularly prevalent on the radical left, that continues tocorrupt our discourse. Liu Xiaobo wanted China to be a society that afforded its citizens the same rights, freedoms, and protections that Benjamin Norton has always been fortunate enough to enjoy. In pursuit of that cause, he was stripped of the freedom to write or teach and repeatedly incarcerated. He refused to renounce his views in exchange for his release, and so he became the first Nobel Peace laureate to end his life in custody since Carl von Ossietzky died in a Nazi prison hospital 79 years ago. Nortons curt Twitter obituary acknowledged none of this. Instead, his four interlinked tweets occasioned by Lius passing were devoted to a list of denunciations, which Norton barked out at his 43,000 social-media followers like a charge sheet of crimes against the Party: Tweet one: Nobel-winning Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo just died. He was a US-funded, hard-right, pro-colonialist warmonger. Tweet two: Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo loved wardefending US bloodshed in Iraq, Vietnam, Korea, etcand justified Israeli crimes against Palestinians Tweet three: Nobel-winning dissident Liu Xiaobo loved Western colonialism & hated Chinese culture, calling his own people wimpy, spineless & fucked-up Tweet four: Warmongering pro-colonialist Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo wanted to privatize everything. His orgs were funded by the US gov, naturally. And then silence. If Nortons thoroughgoing disdain for Lius political opinions is mitigated by compassion, he did not say so. Nor was he able to muster even perfunctory indignation about the injustice of Lius treatment by the Chinese state. By way of substantiating his charges, Norton linked to a 900-word Guardian article by Barry Sautman and Yan Hairong from 2010, and attached a screenshot of the relevant paragraphs to each tweet, helpfully highlighting incriminating words or phrases. Back then, the authors argued (wrongly) that Lius politics ought to have precluded him from winning the Nobel Prize. Today, Norton implies, they make him unworthy of commemoration or even pity. And what were Lius deplorable opinions? Well, the Chinese dissident had supported Americas anti-Communist wars in Korea and Vietnam, and the post-Sept. 11 wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. But for a democratic activist living in a police state, this was hardly unusual. Many prominent former dissidents in Central and Eastern Europeincluding Lech Wasa, Adam Michnik, and Lius hero, Vclav Haveldid likewise. Not because they were champion[s] of war, not peace (as Sautman and Yan would have it) or because they love war (as Norton would have it). They did so because they believed democratization to be both a moral imperative and a necessary precondition to societal peace. Dissident intellectuals who have spent their lives under totalitarian regimes tend to be anti-totalitarian. Having suffered and struggled against the agonies of dictatorship on their own behalf, they felt honor-bound to support its overthrow on behalf of Afghans and Iraqis. One might object that this view of American democracy promotion in the Middle East was hopelessly nave or practically unworkable, but it was hardly ignoble. What seems to have really excited Nortons disgust, however, is that Liu believed that human rights are indivisible and universal and nowhere better protected than in Western liberal democracies. The Difference between the Western and the Chinese governing system, he remarked in a 1988 interview, is humane versus inhumane, theres no middle ground. Westernization is not a choice of a nation, but a choice for the human race. In Sautman and Yans telling, this remark becomes to choose Westernization is to choose to be human which doesnt mean quite the same thing, especially when lifted out of context and embedded in an entirely critical article. And as Sautman and Yan must know, Lius attitude changed considerably only a year after he gave that interview. His own travels in the West led him to write a 1989 essay, in which he subjected his previous analysis to unsparing criticism: My tendency to idealize Western civilization arises from my nationalistic desire to use the West in order to reform China. But this has led me to overlook the flaws of Western culture. I have been obsequious toward Western civilization, exaggerating its merits, and at the same time exaggerating my own merits. I have viewed the West as if it were not only the salvation of China but also the natural and ultimate destination of all humanity. Moreover I have used this delusional idealism to assign myself the role of savior. I now realize that Western civilization, while it can be useful in reforming China in its present stage, cannot save humanity in an overall sense. If we stand back from Western civilization for a moment, we can see that it possesses all the flaws of humanity in general. Such a passage speaks to Lius intellectual integrity and humility, which is probably why Sautman and Yan decided to overlook it. That Norton was happy to take their article as the last and final word on Lius politics and character speaks to his laziness and credulity. Had he wished to be fair-minded in his assessment of Lius legacy, Norton need only have ventured as far as Wikipedia. But Norton showed no interest in fairness, or even in the appearance of fairness. He was in too much of a hurry announcing himself as an independent moral mind, undeterred by the hypocrisies of bourgeois sentimentality. To condemn his response as callous would be redundant because callousness was precisely what he wanted to advertise. It is, of course, galling to see Norton arrogate to himself the right of self-criticism even as he denies that right to Liu, not least because vilification of American democracy costs Norton nothing, while opposition to Chinese authoritarianism cost Liu everything. But as a self-regarding bit of political theater, Nortons petulant tweet-storm counts for little. He is not an especially consequential media voice, and his doctrinaire articles at Alternet have zero bearing on American policy or on the struggles of persecuted democrats in China, or anywhere else. His tweets about Liu are, however, an expression of a profoundly ugly mode of radical thought, which holds pity and fellow feeling in contempt and ruthlessness as a mark of virtue. This is not an entirely new attitude on the American left. During the Cold War, stone-hearted Western radicals who had never experienced despotism denounced dissidents from the Soviet bloc as liars and quislings of Western imperialism when they testified to the horrors of Communist misrule. In more recent years, this sanctimonious contempt has metastasized to encompass ever-expanding categories of people deemedeither by their political views or their unalterable characteristicsto have forfeited the right to life, liberty, and human charity. Consider three recent examples: 1.When Islamist assassins executed the staff of Charlie Hebdo in January 2015, the atrocity provoked a gruesome arms race on the far-left as radical commentators and bloggers competed to see whose attacks on the stricken magazine and its bereaved staff could be most heartless, most vulgar, and most cruel. The alacrity with which ignorant calumnies were marshaled in the hasty attempt to defame the departed was unnerving. More unnerving still was the evident pride these writers took in subordinating the weaknesses of compassion and decency to their solipsistic rage against France, the West, and other papier-mch piatas. Colonialism! Racism! Neoliberalism and neo-imperialism! The chickens, we were told with palpable satisfaction, had come home to roost (again). 2. In March 2016, the American student Otto Warmbier was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for a petty (and almost certainly trumped-up) transgression by the Stalinist regime in North Koreaand naturally, a noisy contingent of post-colonial social media activists gloated over his misfortune. Pictures of Warmbiers face contorted by anguish and fear were circulated on social media and his white tears were mocked. Salon (in a since deleted post) jeered that Warmbier was Americas biggest idiot frat-boy and, in the Huffington Post, a writer named La Sha from something called the Kinfolk Kollective helpfully instructed her readers in The Revocation of White Privilege in North Korea. All declared themselves unmoved by Warmbiers plight, which was instead an occasion for scornful condescension and delighted schadenfreude. Seventeen months later, the 22-year-old student was returned to his distraught parents in a persistent vegetative state; he died within the week. 3. Days after the shooting of Republican Congressman Steve Scalise, Sha retweeted a post by an anonymous blogger titled Let Them Fucking Die. The author denounced Scalise as a homophobe and a racist before going on to declare himself weary of co-existence with white/cisgender/heterosexuals who subvert, undermine, corrupt, and desecrate the virtues they extol [as a] matter of course by the very nature of what they are. The only ethical course of action, he explained, was for the oppressed to purge themselves of mercy. The merciful have no sway over the merciless. Give their constructions back to them. Turn your compassion inward. And turn your hatred outward. If you see the oppressor in peril, he concluded, Do nothing. Let. Them. Fucking. Die. And smile a bit when you do. This happy sentiment is echoed across social media by users who openly identify as misandrist or who post tweets enjoining their followers to #killallTERFS. Such tweets are rarely a meaningful incitement to violencethey are better understood as a way of affirming in-group solidarity through squalid expressions of out-group hatred. When angry young Stalinists flick their middle fingers at a memorial to the victims of Communism, its a left-wing Quenellean expression of puerile effrontery for its own sake. But these theatrics are no less sinister for being theatrical. Dehumanizing ones political adversaries is the sine qua non for their persecution.And it has allowed for the veneration of those for whom pitiless violence and cruelty are not simply a pose. Convicted PFLP terrorist Rasmea Odeh and unrepentant Stalinist Angela Davis are routinely glorified from (and sometimes present on) progressive-rally platforms; genocidal anti-Semitic organizations like Hamas and Hezbollah are romanticized as the foot-soldiers of justice and liberation; the Black Lives Matter movement bends the knee before Castros Cuba and the Black Panthers; social justice activists publicly align themselves with Louis Farrakhan and his openly racist, misogynistic, anti-Semitic cult; and last week, the Womens March blithely tweeted birthday greetings to Joanne Chesimard, also known as Assata Shakur, a convicted cop-killer. This furious stoking of resentment and rage is invariably justified in the name of retribution. When these writers and activists examine their own societies, the benefits of liberal democracy and free enterprise entirely escape their notice, taken for granted even as they are ferociously denounced. They see only what is wicked and corrupta past of slavery, colonization, and plunder, and a present of exploitation, greed, hypocrisy, and racism, which are held to be the unique inheritance of the West. Anyone who admires such a system, or willingly submits to it, is either ignorant, malevolent, or a moral idiot. Anyone, like Liu Xiaobo, who peacefully agitates to visit this plague upon his own society, must be something considerably worse. It should not be surprising that dissident intellectuals who have survived or fled tyranny often have a clearer view of the value of free societies and, consequently, little use for radical chic of middle-class radical Western activists. As the Somali dissident Ayaan Hirsi Ali remarked when a Canadian news anchor scoffed at her professed love for the country that gave her refuge: I dont find myself in the same luxury as you. You grew up in freedom, and you can spit on freedom, because you dont know what it is not to have freedom. I havent. Liu Xiaobo had also experienced liberty in the West and oppression in his own country, and like Hirsi Ali, he had resolved that the formerfor all its shortcomingsis better. He returned to China in 1989 to participate in the Tiananmen Square demonstrations. When others fled before the Chinese army, Liu remained behind and helped negotiate protesters safe passage out of the square. For this, he was sentenced to two years in prison. Committed thereafter to political and social change through nonviolence, he was rearrested in the 1990s and sentenced to undergo re-education through labor. His final arrest and 11-year jail sentence were for his participation in the drafting of the Charter 08 manifesto, which called for the liberalization of Chinas economy, the democratization of its political model, and steps toward truth through reconciliation. When Liu stood trial in December 2009, accused of inciting subversion of state power he prepared a final statement, which would be the last words anyone heard from him. The court did not permit him to deliver his remarks, but at his Nobel ceremony the following year, Swedish actress Liv Ullman delivered them on his behalf. Lius statement spoke movingly of his optimism for the opening and reform of China. It reaffirmed his belief that freedom of expression is the foundation of human rights, the source of humanity, and the mother of truth. And it concluded with a beautiful paean to his wife, whom he would never see again. But his statements most humbling passages were those devoted to the subject of hatred: I have no enemies and no hatred. None of the police who monitored, arrested, and interrogated me, none of the prosecutors who indicted me, and none of the judges who judged me are my enemies. Although there is no way I can accept your monitoring, arrests, indictments, and verdicts, I respect your professions and your integrity Hatred can rot away at a persons intelligence and conscience. The enemy mentality will poison the spirit of a nation, incite cruel mortal struggles, destroy a societys tolerance and humanity, and hinder a nations progress toward freedom and democracy. That is why I hope to be able to transcend my personal experiences as I look upon our nations development and social change, to counter the regimes hostility with utmost goodwill, and to dispel hatred with love. Can the nobility of these words simply be swept aside with the spiteful epithet warmonger? It cannot. Surrendering to bitterness and hatred is easy. Humanity in the face of inhumanity is not. The dignity and fortitude with which Liu bore his persecution were a demonstration of moral courage, the likes of which only exceptional human beings are capable. It stands as an indictment of his totalitarian tormentors and of all those who scorn the liberties he could never afford to take for granted. His enemies know this, and it is why they despise him. *** You can help support Tablets unique brand of Jewish journalism. Click here to donate today. Jamie Palmer is a freelance writer and independent filmmaker. His twitter feed is @j4mi3p.

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July 26, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Attacking Black Lives Matter and Selling Fear: Guns and Racism on NRATV – Truth-Out

Demonstrators gather to protest the National Rifle Association on December 21, 2012. (Photo: Joshlopezphoto)BILL BERKOWITZ FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT If you’re a regular reader of BuzzFlash, why not pledge a small monthly gift to support our work? Just make a tax-deductible donation and choose the “recurring” option at checkout. Without the drummed-up fear that a black president would take guns away from law-abiding citizens, the National Rifle Association is turning toward vilifying and pillorying the Black Lives Matter movement against police brutality in order to drum up gun sales. One of the platforms it now has at its disposal is NRATV. While the fledging network may not yet be among the choices in your cable television package, or available through existing streaming services, given the power of the gun lobbying organization, NRATV may soon be coming to screen near you. Launched in October of last year, NRATV’s declared mission is to provide “The most comprehensive video coverage of Second Amendment issues, events and culture anywhere in the world.” The network offers such programing as NRANEWs, presented by Ruger, NRAWOMEN, presented by Smith & Wesson, NRACOUNTRY and NRAHUNTING, as well as an array of commentators. Grant Stinchfield is a host of a program called Stinchfield. During a recent broadcast, Stinchfield let go a broadside against Black Lives Matter, claiming that “racist violence” in South Africa, “where white families are being tortured and killed almost every day in racist violence. is a warning for the United States.” And because of the liberal media, “you will never hear [about this] from the mainstream media in this country.” Stinchfield interviewed Chuck Holton, a veteranArmyRanger, and co-host — alongside Iran-Contra figure and NRA board member Oliver North — of the NRATV series Frontlines. Holton who appears to be a master of alternative facts and seems to have a hate/hate relationship with African Americans, maintained that “the blatant racism and violence we’re seeing from people like the Black Lives Matter crowd, from people like Louis Farrakhan and his minions,is happening in spades in South Africa.” The Daily Banter’s Justin Rosario declared that Holton’s words were not just “a racist dog whistle,” they were “an open call to violence against Black Lives Matter.” “Pair this with the recent ‘liberals are the enemy of freedom’ ad that effectively calls on NRA members to get ready to kill anti-Trump protesters and you have a very stark picture of the NRA’s agenda,” Rosario noted. “No longer content to just sell guns and fear, the gun industry’s mouthpiece is actively inciting violence against the left, using both political and racial tensions as a justification. When Obama welcomed, and shook hands with, then-president-elect Donald Trump at the White House, Holton tweeted: “Photo finally surfaces of Trump grabbing a pussy.” And two days after Trump’s inauguration, Holton tweeted “Okay! Party’s over. Let’s get busy scrubbing Obama’s mocacchino stain off of America!” According to Media Matters for America, last August on the NRA’s radio show Cam & Company, “Holton talked about gangs, absent fathers, and welfare, before saying, ‘And you hear college students complain about white privilege. You know my definition of white privilege? It’s just simply the culture that we have created, that our fathers and grandfathers have worked hard to create.’ Holton went on describe white privilege as ‘a culture of individual responsibility, where you take responsibility for your own actions, a culture that respects authority.’ He also positively cited a video about ‘white privilege’ released by ‘alt right’ blogger Stefan Molyneux.” Immediately after the attack in Manchester, England, which left 22 dead and dozens injured, Holton told Stinchfield that England “has had this coming,” due to the country’s firearms regulations, open bordersfor refugees, “multiculturalism” and “gender-bending.” At the end of the segment, Stinchfield stated that European countries have “disarmed their citizens, so terrorists operate with impunity.” After the January 21st Women’s March on Washington, commentator Bill Whittle had Holton, who also works with Pat Robertson’s Christian Broadcasting Network, as his guest. Together they blamed the Women’s March “for vandalism and property damage that took place on Inauguration Day, January 20,” Raw Story reported. Whittle and Holton confidently predicted that a Women’s March on the NRA scheduled for July 14 will “certainly not be peaceful.” “Well, they’re certainly not peaceful. And they’re certainly not even protests. What they are is sort of temper tantrums by spoiled children, is the best way I can describe them,” Holton said. The July 14 and 15 protests against the NRA which included a nearly 18-mile walk from NRA headquarters to the U.S. Department of Justice was carried out peacefully. The events were in part a response to an incendiary one-minute NRA recruitment video, which featured NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch, who in the video argues that demonstrators “bully and terrorize the law-abiding until the only option left is for the police to do their jobs and stop the madness.” “They use their media to assassinate real news,” The Blaze’s Dana Loesch said in the ad. “They use their schools to teach children that their president is another Hitler. They use their movie stars and singers and comedy shows and award shows to repeat their narrative over and over again.” Women’s March co-president Tamika Mallory called the ad is “direct endorsement of violence” against protesters. “We haven’t taken a position that people shouldn’t have guns, we don’t want to prohibit folks from exercising their second amendment rights,” Mallory told CNN ahead of the march. “But the NRA ad puts our First Amendment rights in jeopardy, it puts the lives of people who are exercising their right to protest in the middle of danger.We are looking for a change in NRA’s behavior and its policies and practices.” The event’s Facebook page urged the NRA to “take down the recent irresponsible and dangerous advertisement videos from all social platforms immediately; issue an apology to the American people for the video that suggests armed violence against communities of color, progressives and anyone who does not agree with this Administration’s policies; and make a statement to defend Philando Castile’s Second Amendment right to own a firearm and demand the Department of Justice indict the police officer who killed him for exercising his Second Amendment.” Attacks on Black Lives Matter are nothing new. Since the inception of the movement, conservatives have been gunning for the organization. Recently, Jacob Grandstaff, writing for the conservative Capital Research Center website, argued that the Women’s March against the NRA “show that the group is primarily concerned withLeft-wing coalition-building and notwomen’s issues.” Grandstaff added: “The Women’s March characterizes itself as a feminist movement organized in opposition to President Donald Trump and his supposedly anti-women comments and political stances. The anti-NRA demonstration, however, appears to have little to do with women; andinstead meshes morewiththe greater Left’s accusations of racism against the NRA.”

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July 25, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

New Yorker Profiles Sadiq Khan: From Madrassa to Mayor, via Sectarian, Muslim Politics – Breitbart News

Author Sam Knight writes of Khans opposition to Brexit, his stardust qualities, his diminutive stature, his (intentionally) comedic demeanour, and his history in sectarian, Muslim politics. The piece reflects on how Khan represented terror suspects and Islamist radicals, although it leaves out the mans connection to Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, who has described white people as devils and Jews as bloodsuckers. The magazine holds up Khans election as another stride in Londons giant, unstopping swagger, lauding the multiculturalist wave that Khan rode into office. The 10,000-word feature starts by hailing Khans work after the Grenfell tower fire, as well as detailing his affinity towards former U.S. president John F. Kennedy. But it also includes information about Khans religious adherence, something the London mayor has been less keen to trumpet during his time in office: He will quote passages from the Quran and the Hadith, the sayings of the Prophet, when discussing terrorism. When I asked him how to say his name (Urdu speakers pronounce it Saadik; English speakers tend to say Sadeek), Khan spelled out his name in Arabicsawd alif daal kaafand explained that it means truthful. In 2009, when he was sworn in as a member of the Privy Council, an ancient body of senior politicians, Khan brought his own Quran to Buckingham Palace and left it there, because the palace did not have a copy. Sometimes it is as if he were leading a one-man religious-education exercise. Many people in positions of power and influence, they have not broken bread with a Muslim, Khan said. Part of it is reassuring them: The sky is not going to fall in. You are in safe hands. All the stuff that you worry about, I worry about as well. All the dreams you have got, I have got as well. Khan has made a concerted effort since being elected as mayor to appear alongside other faith leaders in the United Kingdom, but has also previously been caught progressing the agendas of Islamic sects who engage in acts such as female genital mutilation. Raised in South London, the article recalls the mayors memories from growing up: After classes, Khan went to a madrassa, for instruction in Islam. He would cross the road to avoid skinheads in bomber jackets, members of the National Front, a far-right organization that had a strong presence in Tooting and Earlsfield. People shouted Paki! at his father on the bus. There is a very good reason why all my brothers joined the boxing club, Khan said. In our area, on our estate, there were certain things you couldnt say and get away with. So, if somebody called you the P-word, that means there is a fight. Thats it. Were having a fight. You couldnt allow that to be tolerated. His initial foray into the legal world was at a firm called Christian Fisher, which allegedly frequently represented suspected I.R.A. members. There is a slight duality about Sadiq, his former colleague Matt Foot told the New Yorker. I think his strong Labour working-class roots are a big part of what he is. I think he has also been very efficient. The piece notes how Khan represented terror suspects such as the former Islamist-turned-LBC host Maajid Nawaz, and terror suspect Babar Ahmed, as well as the Mayors previous racial slurs in labelling moderate Muslims as uncle Toms a phrase he has since recanted. It also details how Khan became embroiled in sectarian politics in London in his re-election bid for Parliament in 2010: The Liberal Democrats, meanwhile, put up an antiwar South Asian candidate named Nasser Butt, who had the potential to split the Labour vote in the constituency. I became an immediate threat to Sadiqs Muslim-vote bank, Butt told me. However, Butt belonged to an Islamic sect, the Ahmadiyya, that holds theological beliefs different from those of mainstream Sunni Islam, the predominant branch in the U.K. During the campaign, Liberal Democrat posters were torn down and Butt suffered anti-Ahmadi abuse. At an election event at the Tooting Islamic Centre, the Conservative candidate, Mark Clarke, who is mixed race, had to be locked in a room for his own protection, after being mistaken for Butt; Butt was advised to stay away altogether. Although he blamed activists from the center, which is attached to the Balham Mosque, for the discrimination during the election, Butt was convinced that Khan was also involved. He was part of it, he said. I was quite sure he was directing it. Khan has always denied any wrongdoing. But on May 3, 2010, two days before the election, Butt sent his son to secretly record a meeting at the Islamic center. Butt gave me a copy of the recording. On it, a speaker identified as Harris Bokhari, the son of Khans old head teacher and mentor, addresses the room. The majority of Muslims in this area are voting Lib Dem, because they think Nasser Butt is a Muslim, Bokhari says. You need to go into the community and take these posters down. One man at the meeting asks Bokhari how to fill in his ballot papers. All you need to do is just look for Sadiq Khan, Labour Party, and just tick it, he says. Whatever else you vote is up to you. Bokhari told me that he does not remember the meeting. Khan held his seat by less than three thousand votes. Khans rise to Mayor has not been meteoric, and according to those around him, the man has designs on a higher office: that of Prime Minister. It is this ambition that keeps him from making sweeping political statements on a regular basis, even about Brexit, which Khan campaigned against. One source told the New Yorker: If he becomes Remainer-in-Chief, that is a big problem when he wants England to vote for him. READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE P.S. DO YOU WANT MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS ONE DELIVERED RIGHT TO YOUR INBOX?SIGN UP FOR THE DAILY BREITBART NEWSLETTER.

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July 25, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Louis Farrakhan | Biography & Facts | Britannica.com

Alternative Titles: Louis Abdul Farrakhan, Louis Eugene Walcott Louis Farrakhan American religious leader May 11, 1933 (age 84) New York City, New York Louis Farrakhan, in full Louis Abdul Farrakhan, original name Louis Eugene Walcott (born May 11, 1933, Bronx, New York, New York, U.S.), leader (from 1978) of the Nation of Islam, an African American movement that combined elements of Islam with black nationalism. Walcott, as he was then known, was raised in Boston by his mother, Sarah Mae Manning, an immigrant from St. Kitts and Nevis. Deeply religious as a boy, he became active in the St. Cyprians Episcopal Church in his Roxbury neighbourhood. He graduated with honours from the prestigious Boston English High School, where he also played the violin and was a member of the track team. He attended the Winston-Salem Teachers College from 1951 to 1953 but dropped out to pursue a career in music. Known as The Charmer, he performed professionally on the Boston nightclub circuit as a singer of calypso and country songs. In 1953 he married Khadijah, with whom he would have nine children. In 1955 Walcott joined the Nation of Islam. Following the custom of the Nation, he replaced his surname with an X, a custom among Nation of Islam followers who considered their family names to have originated with white slaveholders. Louis X first proved himself at Temple No. 7 in Harlem, where he emerged as the protg of Malcolm X, the minister of the temple and one of the most prominent members of the Nation of Islam. Louis X was given his Muslim name, Abdul Haleem Farrakhan, by Elijah Muhammad, the leader of the Nation of Islam. Farrakhan was appointed head minister of Boston Temple No. 11, which Malcolm had established earlier. After Malcolm Xs break with the Nation in 1964 over political and personal differences with Elijah Muhammad, Farrakhan replaced Malcolm as head minister of Harlems Temple No. 7 and as the National Representative of the Nation, the second in command of the organization. Like his predecessor, Farrakhan was a dynamic, charismatic leader and a powerful speaker with the ability to appeal to the African American masses. When Elijah Muhammad died in February 1975, the Nation of Islam fragmented. Surprisingly, the Nations leadership chose Wallace Muhammad (now known as Warith Deen Mohammed), the fifth of Elijahs six sons, as the new Supreme Minister. Disappointed that he was not named Elijahs successor, Farrakhan led a breakaway group in 1978, which he also called the Nation of Islam and which preserved the original teachings of Elijah Muhammad. Farrakhan disagreed with Wallace Muhammads attempts to move the Nation to orthodox Sunni Islam and to rid it of Elijah Muhammads radical black nationalism and separatist teachings, which stressed the inherent wickedness of whites. Farrakhan became known to the American public through a series of controversies that began during the 1984 presidential campaign of the Rev. Jesse Jackson, whom Farrakhan supported. Farrakhan withdrew his support after Jewish voters protested his praise of Adolf Hitler, and he has been embroiled in a continuing conflict with the American Jewish community because of his making allegedly anti-Semitic statements; Farrakhan has denied being anti-Semitic. In later speeches he blamed the U.S. government for what he claimed was a conspiracy to destroy black people with AIDS and addictive drugs. In 1995 the Nation sponsored the Million Man March in Washington, D.C., to promote African American unity and family values. Estimates of the number of marchers, most of whom were men, ranged from 400,000 to nearly 1.1 million, making it, at the time, the largest gathering of its kind in American history. Under Farrakhans leadership, the Nation of Islam established a clinic for AIDS patients in Washington, D.C., and helped to force drug dealers out of public housing projects and private apartment buildings in the city. It also worked with gang members in Los Angeles. Meanwhile, the Nation continued to promote social reform in African American communities in accordance with its traditional goals of self-reliance and economic independence. Test Your Knowledge Word Meanings and Origins In the early 21st century, the core membership of Farrakhans Nation of Islam was estimated at between 10,000 and 50,000though in the same period Farrakhan was delivering speeches in large cities across the United States that regularly attracted crowds of more than 30,000. Under Farrakhans leadership, the Nation was one of the fastest growing of the various Muslim movements in the country. Foreign branches of the Nation were formed in Ghana, London, Paris, and the Caribbean islands. In order to strengthen the international influence of the Nation, Farrakhan established relations with Muslim countries, and in the late 1980s he cultivated a relationship with the Libyan dictator Muammar al-Qaddafi. After a near-death experience in 2000 resulting from complications from prostate cancer (he was diagnosed with cancer in 1991), Farrakhan toned down his racial rhetoric and attempted to strengthen relations with other minority communities, including Native Americans, Hispanics, and Asians. Farrakhan also moved his group closer to orthodox Sunni Islam in 2000, when he and Imam Warith Deen Mohammed, the leading American orthodox Muslim, recognized each other as fellow Muslims. Britannica Lists & Quizzes Pop Culture Quiz Pop Culture List Literature & Language Quiz History List Health issues forced Farrakhan to reduce his role in the Nation of Islam in the early 21st century. He nevertheless maintained a fairly high profile, giving online sermons in addition to his public speeches. In 2010 he publicly embraced Dianetics, a practice of Scientology. Farrakhan also said that he wanted all Nation of Islam members to become auditors, practitioners of Scientologys one-on-one counseling process that is meant to facilitate individuals handling of their engrams, which, according to the practices of Scientology, are mental images of past experiences that produce negative emotional effects in ones life. In 2015 he led a march in Washington, D.C., to mark the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March.

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

NRA Host Grant Stinchfield: Hordes of Black Lives Matter Protesters are Coming to Torture and Kill White Americans – The Daily Banter

The Daily Banter NRA Host Grant Stinchfield: Hordes of Black Lives Matter Protesters are Coming to Torture and Kill White Americans The Daily Banter CHUCK HOLTON: Right, you know the parallels between what's happening in South Africa and the blatant racism and violence we're seeing from people like the Black Lives Matter crowd, from people like Louis Farrakhan and his minions, is happening in … and more »

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Opinion | How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

I grew up in New Jersey when Newark, Plainfield and other cities experienced rioting and later became a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983), for which I covered Newark and Plainfield. The demise of Newark as a city has always intrigued and concerned me.I come back to Jersey a few times to see how things are going, and actually, things are going in the right direction it would seem. I also have served in local elected office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and an old traditional town much like the traditional towns I covered in North Jersey. I like to see traditional towns and cities (like mine) thrive. Sign Up for E-News In looking back to the 50th anniversary of the Newark riots as this site and other media have done, I find there is something missing in the coverage namely, how the civil disorders, particularly the deadly ones in the long hot summer of 1967 reshaped our country, its politics and where we live and work. I am not an expert, just an observer. Here are just a few observations as I look back 50 years: Newark had about 400,000 residents at the time of the 67 riots, and had a white population of about 50%, which was dwindling. Today, Newark has about 280,579 residents, which actually represents an increase from the 2000 census, and is about 26% non-Hispanic white. In the 1970s and 80s, the city was giving homes away for nearly nothing. The amount of population that moved out of American cities following the period of the race riots is staggering. A Detroit TV station reported recently that immediately after the riots White flight was frantic. Sixty-seven-thousand people fled in the summer following the uprising, 80,000 more the following year. Add up the numbers in Newark, Cleveland and other cities rocked by riots and you can see that the riots were not just about 26 who were killed, but about a significant change in our living patters. I would guess the national numbers are in the millions. African-Americans gained political power in the cities, but with whites departing, so did business (notably, retailers), jobs and a tax base. This left major urban areas in a fiscal crisis in the 1970s with heavy dependence on federal and state aid and government-initiated programs, much of which was not very successful in my view. Whites who left cities became resentful about losing their old communities, especially blue collar whites. They started voting increasingly Republican, or for conservative Democrats like George Wallace. These folks became the Reagan Democrats of the 1980s and Trump voters of 2016. Deindustrialization led to millions of Americans moving to The Sun Belt, too. While the number of black office holders jumped and grew in influence in the Democratic Party, culminating in the historic election of Barack Obama in 2008, their ability to get realistic economic growth for their communities dwindled, as Republicans moved to the far right and Democrats to the far left. The consensus was not there.Key African-American groups also started to be led by more aggressive and polarizing leaders (i.e. Ben Chavis at the NAACP and Louis Farrakhan, Nation of Islam). The loss of jobs and middle class residents created a bigger black underclass in the cities and with that an increased drug trade and gang violence.Despite welfare reform in the 1990s, young women who come from broken homes and are led by a single mother have a good chance of getting pregnant out of wedlock and becoming a ward of the state. If youre male in the same situation, you may join a gang or get involved in the illicit drug trade and wind up a victim of a shooting. Black flight became the norm in the 1990s and cities started to eye gentrification, concert halls, new convention centers and minor league baseball stadiums as a means to bring life back to their urban core. These efforts did not really help the black underclass that much. Both parties ignored the cities in the 1980s and looked more to policies favoring suburban voters, for example, the soccer moms that propelled Bill Clinton into the White House twice. As a result, by the 1990 census, most of the nations population lived in suburbs, not cities. Despite the rhetoric about race relations the last few years, one could not argue that blacks, whites, Latinos and others in the middle class live quite harmoniously and integrated in todays suburbs.What divides the nation today is politics. While the suburbs have become more racially mixed and are largely harmonious places to live, the reality is that much of the urban underclass — not just in the cities, but in rural America like Coal Country — has largely been ignored by our ever growing middle and upper classes. We have become indifferent to the problems of the inner cities and feel that throwing money at it or using government action is the solution. It sort of gets the guilt off our backs while we invest our money in the burbs or overseas. How do we end indifference? Well first, I would hope President Trump would make good on his campaign promise to restore our urban areas.Trump has held a number of weekly issue-based press conferences and media events — infrastructure week energy week border security week. When will be see urban revitalization week? We can look to Trump or other government leaders for answers, but what the cities lost due to the riots was their economic vitality and tax base. Blacks gained political power only to see economic power dwindle.Thankfully, Newark seems to be rebounding due in large part because millennials and developers see good cheap land and building deals there.The free market is working. And that is a good thing as we look back on the 50th anniversary of those seminal events in 1967. Ken Reid grew up in Princeton and graduated from Rutgers University in 1980. He was a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983) and has lived in the Washington D.C.,area since 1986. In 2006, he was elected to local government office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and has a background in planning and economic development and a great interest in seeing U.S. cities revived (primarily Newark).

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July 22, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

How the Newark riots and other race riots changed America – TAPinto.net

I grew up in New Jersey when Newark, Plainfield and other cities experienced rioting and later became a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983), for which I covered Newark and Plainfield. The demise of Newark as a city has always intrigued and concerned me.I come back to Jersey a few times to see how things are going, and actually, things are going in the right direction it would seem. I also have served in local elected office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and an old traditional town much like the traditional towns I covered in North Jersey. I like to see traditional towns and cities (like mine) thrive. Sign Up for E-News In looking back to the 50th anniversary of the Newark riots as this site and other media have done, I find there is something missing in the coverage namely, how the civil disorders, particularly the deadly ones in the long hot summer of 1967 reshaped our country, its politics and where we live and work. I am not an expert, just an observer. Here are just a few observations as I look back 50 years: Newark had about 400,000 residents at the time of the 67 riots, and had a white population of about 50%, which was dwindling. Today, Newark has about 280,579 residents, which actually represents an increase from the 2000 census, and is about 26% non-Hispanic white. In the 1970s and 80s, the city was giving homes away for nearly nothing. The amount of population that moved out of American cities following the period of the race riots is staggering. A Detroit TV station reported recently that immediately after the riots White flight was frantic. Sixty-seven-thousand people fled in the summer following the uprising, 80,000 more the following year. Add up the numbers in Newark, Cleveland and other cities rocked by riots and you can see that the riots were not just about 26 who were killed, but about a significant change in our living patters. I would guess the national numbers are in the millions. African-Americans gained political power in the cities, but with whites departing, so did business (notably, retailers), jobs and a tax base. This left major urban areas in a fiscal crisis in the 1970s with heavy dependence on federal and state aid and government-initiated programs, much of which was not very successful in my view. Whites who left cities became resentful about losing their old communities, especially blue collar whites. They started voting increasingly Republican, or for conservative Democrats like George Wallace. These folks became the Reagan Democrats of the 1980s and Trump voters of 2016. Deindustrialization led to millions of Americans moving to The Sun Belt, too. While the number of black office holders jumped and grew in influence in the Democratic Party, culminating in the historic election of Barack Obama in 2008, their ability to get realistic economic growth for their communities dwindled, as Republicans moved to the far right and Democrats to the far left. The consensus was not there.Key African-American groups also started to be led by more aggressive and polarizing leaders (i.e. Ben Chavis at the NAACP and Louis Farrakhan, Nation of Islam). The loss of jobs and middle class residents created a bigger black underclass in the cities and with that an increased drug trade and gang violence.Despite welfare reform in the 1990s, young women who come from broken homes and are led by a single mother have a good chance of getting pregnant out of wedlock and becoming a ward of the state. If youre male in the same situation, you may join a gang or get involved in the illicit drug trade and wind up a victim of a shooting. Black flight became the norm in the 1990s and cities started to eye gentrification, concert halls, new convention centers and minor league baseball stadiums as a means to bring life back to their urban core. These efforts did not really help the black underclass that much. Both parties ignored the cities in the 1980s and looked more to policies favoring suburban voters, for example, the soccer moms that propelled Bill Clinton into the White House twice. As a result, by the 1990 census, most of the nations population lived in suburbs, not cities. Despite the rhetoric about race relations the last few years, one could not argue that blacks, whites, Latinos and others in the middle class live quite harmoniously and integrated in todays suburbs.What divides the nation today is politics. While the suburbs have become more racially mixed and are largely harmonious places to live, the reality is that much of the urban underclass — not just in the cities, but in rural America like Coal Country — has largely been ignored by our ever growing middle and upper classes. We have become indifferent to the problems of the inner cities and feel that throwing money at it or using government action is the solution. It sort of gets the guilt off our backs while we invest our money in the burbs or overseas. How do we end indifference? Well first, I would hope President Trump would make good on his campaign promise to restore our urban areas.Trump has held a number of weekly issue-based press conferences and media events — infrastructure week energy week border security week. When will be see urban revitalization week? We can look to Trump or other government leaders for answers, but what the cities lost due to the riots was their economic vitality and tax base. Blacks gained political power only to see economic power dwindle.Thankfully, Newark seems to be rebounding due in large part because millennials and developers see good cheap land and building deals there.The free market is working. And that is a good thing as we look back on the 50th anniversary of those seminal events in 1967. Ken Reid grew up in Princeton and graduated from Rutgers University in 1980. He was a proofreader and reporter for The Star-Ledger (1978-1983) and has lived in the Washington D.C.,area since 1986. In 2006, he was elected to local government office in the Town of Leesburg, VA, and has a background in planning and economic development and a great interest in seeing U.S. cities revived (primarily Newark).

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July 20, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Family, Friends Celebrate the Life of Martha Rivera Chavis – Lasentinel

The Chavis-Rivera family gather for a photograph during the Celebration of Life for Martha Rivera Chavis at Martins Home for Service Inc., in Montclair, N.J. on June 11. (Travis Riddick/NNPA) Family and friends from across the globe, gathered to celebrate the life and legacy of Martha Rivera Chavis in a multicultural service, just a few blocks from her Montclair, N.J. home. This has been very sorrowful and painful for our family, said Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., Marthas husband and president and CEO of the National Newspaper Publishers Association. While we cry for the loss of our beloved, were also here tonight, to celebrate Marthas life. Dr. Chavis continued: Knowing my wife, as I did for the last 30 years, she would want me to say to you, enjoy this day that the Lord has made and celebrate what God has blessed us with through her spirit and through her presence. Martha died at the age of 53 of natural causes in her home on July 6, due to complications of heart failure. The Chavis-Rivera family hosted Marthas memorial at Martins Home for Service, Inc. on Tuesday, July 11; the printed program featured her obituary in English and Spanish. Dr. Chavis thanked Jim Farmer of General Motors; the Murphy, Falcon and Murphy law firm in Baltimore, Md.; hip-hop and business mogul Russell Simmons; the President of the Detroit branch of NAACP Rev. Dr. Wendell Anthony and many others for their contributions and generosity. Many of the speakers during the memorial service met Martha and Dr. Chavis in the late 80s, when Dr. Chavis served as the executive director for the United Church of Christs Commission for Racial Justice (CRJ) in New York City. Newark, New Jersey Mayor Ras Baraka, who was a student at the time, offered his condolences. Baraka said that the couple did a lot for the Black community in the United States and for Black people around the world, especially those who were oppressed and struggling. You and your wife worked together as a unit, which is an example for many of us. Sometimes we work, but our wives are not present, said Baraka. Martha was very present and ensured that she was present all the time. Baraka continued: Martha is an example, for many women out here of all nationalities; Martha was an internationalist and a very conscious and very brilliant woman. Today, we just dont get that; you get one or the other. Martha was the whole package. Author and activist Sister Soulja also said that she met Dr. Chavis, when she worked at CRJbefore he met Martha. When Martha came, I knew she was the one, said Sister Soulja. I knew she was the one that would become his wife and I knew that she was in Dr. Chavis heart. When she used to come to the office, her face used to light up. Sister Soulja added: I knew that she was intelligent and that she was a translator and that she spoke different languages and I respected and loved her for that, but I really just liked the woman in her. I just thought that she was a lovely lady. Sister Soulja described Martha as jovial, jubilant, energetic and very, very loyal. Its very nice when you see a woman who is just 1000 percent behind her man; that was one of the most beautiful things about her, Sister Soulja said. Minister Abdul Hafeez Muhammad, New York representative of the Honorable Minister Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam, said that he met Martha when Dr. Chavis served as the east coast regional minister of the Nation of Islam. Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. (far left) sits in the front row with his children and a family friend (far right) at the Celebration of Life for Martha Rivera Chavis at Martins Home for Service Inc., in Montclair, N.J. on June 11. (Travis Riddick/NNPA) When death comes, it is a time to celebrate life and to thank God for the life that has been given, for whatever time it was given, said Muhammad. Every day with the Lord is like a thousand years, so for these 53 years of our beloved sisters life, celebrate it and honor it. Min. Abdul Hafeez Muhammad also noted the importance of women in society and in the work of the Hon. Elijah Muhammad. Where there are no decent women, there will be no decent girls; a nation can rise no higher than its women, said Min. Abdul Hafeez Muhammad then, speaking directly to the Chavis children seated in the front row, he added, Your mother can never die, because of the work she did from San Pedro to Angola to America and worldwide, she stood by [Dr. Chavis] side, around him, behind him and in front of him and she put you on this planet. Muhammad continued: Because of her children, Martha Rivera Chavis will live forever, by the grace of God. Loved ones honored Marthas family and lifes work offering thanks and remembrances in English and Spanish. Dr. Chavis met Martha when she worked as a translator for the Ambassador of Angola; she spoke Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and English. Ana Jacobo said that Martha was more like an older sister than an aunt. My family is celebrating her life, said Jacobo. She passed on to be with our grandmother, she passed on to be with our grandfather. Shes just an angel that is watching over us. We are so happy and thankful to have known her. Rubby Perez, a family friend and world-renowned singer from the Dominican Republic, honored Martha with two songs in Spanish, Amor Mio, and Hay Momentos. Perez wanted to sing Hay Momentos at his fathers funeral, but because he wasnt able to sing that day, he wanted to make sure that he performed it at Marthas service. Perez said that Martha Rivera Chavis had the unique ability to make people feel good even when she was feeling sad. After the ceremony, family and friends gathered outside to take pictures as songs like Whitney Houstons I Wanna Dance with Somebody, Faith Evans Love Like This, and Gloria Estefans Rhythm Is Gonna Get You, played through the speakers on the warm, summer day. She brought happiness to people, Perez said. She was a humble giving person; she was a provider. John Chavis, one of Martha and Dr. Chavis sons, said that hell always remember his mothers kind heart and willingness to help anyone. John said that about a week before she died, his mom was looking out of her window and saw an African American woman trudging up Union Street with a heavy basket on her back attached to a leather tumpline. The midday sun was sweltering. John said that his mother yelled to the woman, Excuse me, do you want a bottle of water, sweetie? Even though she wasnt feeling well, she came outside in her pajamas, crossed the street and gave the lady a cold bottle of water, John said. Even when she was sick my mom was still a humanitarian, still looking to help people, said John. Thats one memory that will last with me forever: her legacy of being a humanitarian.

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NRA’s media outlet fearmongers about Black Lives Matter committing mass violence against whites – Media Matters for America (blog)

Media Matters for America (blog) NRA's media outlet fearmongers about Black Lives Matter committing mass violence against whites Media Matters for America (blog) CHUCK HOLTON: Right, you know the parallels between what's happening in South Africa and the blatant racism and violence we're seeing from people like the Black Lives Matter crowd, from people like Louis Farrakhan and his minions, is happening in …

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