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Conspiracy claims in Nation of Islam member’s death – WOODTV.com

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GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) Minister Louis Farrakhan, the controversial leader of the Nation of Islam, was in downtown Grand Rapids Wednesday as lawyers argued about accusations of a conspiracy in the drowning death of a local member of the organization.

Farrakhan and his entourage were inside the Kent County courthouse to support the family of Robert Dion Muhammad.

Muhammad, who led the Nation of Islams Grand Rapids Study Group, disappeared after officials said he jumped off a sailboat for a swim in Muskegon Lake on Sept. 5, 2014. Crews found his body in 28 feet of water at the Muskegon State Park the day after, which also would have been his 40th birthday.

On Wednesday, lawyers for Muhammads family were trying to amend a wrongful death suit. Defendants range from the people who were on the boat to first responders who searched for and later discovered Muhammads body.

The victims attorney claims there is sufficient evidence to suggest there might have been a conspiracy to cover up a murder, not an accident.He laid out a series of scenarios, pointing out signs of trauma to Muhammads body which experts say is sometimes the result of recovery efforts and the fact that he had been on a boat with white co-workers before the drowning.

It has been alleged multiple times that this (suit) is some political endeavor, as if we caused Robert Mohammads death, the Muhmmads attorney said, as opposed to playing the hand that weve been dealt.

Attorneys for the defendants say the other side is trying to throw whatever it can at the wall and see what sticks.

We really know that the pink elephant in the room is, the defendants attorney said. All they want to do is to make some presentation as to what could of,should of, maybe happened without any facts to support it.

Farrakhan is not one to shy away from controversy, but he declined to talk to reporters at the courthouse.

Were good right now, one of the men with Farrakhan told the 24 Hour News 8 crew who approached him. Its a sensitive case.

The judge turned down some of the motions requested by the plaintiff, but there are other matters to deal with. The hearing continues Thursday. It was not immediately known whether Farrakhan will be in attendance again.

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Conspiracy claims in Nation of Islam member’s death – WOODTV.com

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

The answer, once again, is freedom of speech – Omaha World-Herald

Some 25 years ago I remember watching, on C-SPAN, a convention of American Maoists.

This was before Brian Lambs splendid little kingdom became a citadel of balanced respectability, when C-SPAN was young, carefree and as enamored with novelty as the average American adolescent.

A towering black and red portrait of Chairman Mao dominated the stage, as bereted speakers declared their admiration for a monster who stands condemned before history as the murderer of between 50 million and 70 million Chinese.

I remember walking home from work in New York City almost every weekday from 1983 to 1989, and being several times stopped in my tracks by a group of people with a microphone advocating genocide.

They were black men, and although I no longer remember who they were in the corporate sense, I remember they all impersonated Mr. Ts famous glare as they promised death and slavery to the white man as recompense for historical wrongs.

I recall watching the Nation of Islams Louis Farrakhan preach, again courtesy of C-SPAN, and being impressed. It is politically incorrect, of course, to speak well of Minister Farrakhan, but there he was urging his followers to achieve self-reliance and to build honorable, intact families, and urging the men to take responsibility for leading black America into the bright light of freedom. And then, before my wondering eyes, he denounced the white devil and dirty Jews, and my heart sank.

I suppose it is possible to read that chapter of William Shirers Rise and Fall of the Third Reich titled The New Order and not shed a tear, but it did not prove possible for me. That chapter deals with the attempted annihilation of European Jewry and does not spare scenes of whimpering mothers clutching toddlers as they stand on the edge of mass graves facing some soul-deadened machine gunner.

There are neo-Nazis in this country. I dont know why. Perhaps they have not read Shirer. But they have been around a long time, publishing their little newsletters and handing out slim booklets warning of global Jewish conspiracies.

There are Maoists. There are black radicals, and there are masked, black-uniformed young thugs who for several years now have smashed windows, turned over cars, wielded baseball bats and hurled insults and projectiles at police officers in order to silence speech they would forbid.

The impulse to bully is not foreign to Americans, and given that we are all inflicted with fallen human nature there is no reason why it should be. Yet, so far, the United States has avoided the brutalities that not long ago afflicted Germany, Japan, Russia and a constellation of Soviet satellites from Romania to North Korea. The credit for this belongs to Americas constitutional commitment to freedom of speech. That is the safety valve.

Let them speak, let them rally, let them dream of racial or ideological purity. Let them live, or more likely die, on the battlefield of ideas. Crush them, certainly, the moment they exchange words for violence.

A thousand weeds have withered this way.

Its part of the American genius.

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The answer, once again, is freedom of speech – Omaha World-Herald

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Want Diversity and Tolerance? Stop Demonizing Conservatives – Jewish Exponent

By Jonathan S. Tobin

Many Americans know that the sickness at the heart of our political culture stems from a spirit of intolerance that has become the keynote of discourse. Liberals blame it on President Donald Trump and his supporters. But few of us seem able to recognize this behavior when it comes from those who share our views which means that if you think Dennis Prager must be boycotted or believe Morton Klein is as much of a threat to American Jewry as Islamist terrorists, then dont blame Trump for how bad things have gotten.

Prager, a Los Angeles-based talk radio host and author, is a surprising candidate for this kind of opprobrium. Though hes a conservative who, to the dismay of some of his admirers, believes Trump must be supported against his critics, Prager is far from the prototype of right-wing incendiary. His approach is generally fair-minded and never lacks intellectual rigor. He has also spent much of his career promoting interfaith dialogue and is as interested in helping his audience focus on personal happiness as he is in politics. In other words, hes the polar opposite of the bomb-throwing populists that many on the left think are threatening democracy.

But that didnt spare Prager from being treated as if he were the head of a hate group when he agreed to help raise money for the Santa Monica Symphony by appearing as a guest conductor at a concert. Prager is a music enthusiast/amateur conductor and has often appeared in a similar capacity with other ensembles. But when some of the musicians heard Prager was the attraction at a high-profile event for their organization, they said they would boycott the concert.

A petition started by two UCLA professors who are violinists in the orchestra said the signers would not appear with a right-wing radio host who promotes horribly bigoted positions. To back up that claim, they cherry-picked a few comments Prager has made about Islam and the implications of gay marriage in order to falsely paint him as the moral equivalent of the Ku Klux Klan. One boycotter even said hed play with a North Korean conductor, but not Prager.

Pragers positions can be debated, yet to take them out of context is deeply unfair, especially when you consider it wasnt long ago that both President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton shared his stance on gay marriage. But if you are going to anathematize someone like Prager and render him an untouchable even in a non-political context, youre saying anyone who voices an opposing view must not only be shunned, but also be driven from decent society.

The same spirit animated an op-ed in The Forward by Steven Davidson. The piece was a response to commentary from the right about the lefts willingness to excuse hatemongering from Linda Sarsour, a Palestinian-American anti-Israel activist, because of shared antipathy for Trump. According to Davidson, there are 19 people who are more dangerous to the Jews than Sarsour. But while his list included some who do fit that bill, like Louis Farrakhan, David Duke and the heads of Hamas, Hezbollah and Iran, he couldnt resist including mere political opponents along with terrorists.

It was bad enough that he lumped Trump as well as White House aides Steve Bannon who left last week and Sebastian Gorka together with Farrakhan and Hezbollah, in an unconvincing effort to label them as anti-Semites. But he also listed Klein, the president of the Zionist Organization of America.

Most liberals dont agree with Klein about the peace process and consider him a strident figure. But he is someone who works hard to build support for the Jewish state, and his views are actually more in tune with mainstream Israeli opinion than those of The Forwards editorial board. Treating him as a threat to the Jews rather than just someone to be opposed is a signal that any deviation from liberal orthodoxy will be punished with isolation and demonization.

In a world in which Google can fire an internal critic in the name of diversity, its hardly surprising to see Jewish liberals playing the same game. But those who refuse to listen to or to associate with political opponents are at the core of our societys current political illness, in which we have been divided into two warring camps that have lost the ability to listen to each other. Thats why if you think theres nothing wrong with the treatment given to Prager and Klein, then dont bother the rest of us with hypocritical complaints about Trump.

Jonathan S. Tobin is a former editor of the Jewish Exponent and is the opinion editor of JNS.org, which provided this article.

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Want Diversity and Tolerance? Stop Demonizing Conservatives – Jewish Exponent

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Jews Should Use Charlottesville To Overcome Bigotry And Black People Can, Too – Forward

There is comfort to be taken in some of what emerged from the ugliness of Charlottesville. Despite the horrific events, there is surely solace to be had in the widespread revulsion, for example, that was evoked in so very many Americans, Democrats and Republicans alike, by the marching and chanting white supremacists. And the utter rejection by many conservative media and leading lawmakers from President Trumps own party of his equivocating over the events in Virginia should also bring us a measure of comfort, as well as the accelerated removal of statues lionizing Confederate leaders.

But for me, an Orthodox rabbi, Charlottesville is also an opportunity for something I have long hoped for: a coming together of African Americans and Jews.

Since the days in which Jews marched alongside our black brothers and sisters in Selma for civil rights, there has been a tragic fraying of the relationship between these two American populations. But in truth, the relationship between the two groups has always been fraught, and understandably so.

As many in our community are fond of saying, America has been good to the Jews. From the smattering of Sephardi Jews who came to these shores in colonial times to the German Jews who followed in the nineteenth century to the Eastern European survivors of the Holocaust, the Jews who arrived on Americas shores all found America to be, truly, a land of opportunity, and many found success in business, professions, academics and other fields. They were, particularly the refugees among them, reborn in their new land.

Black people, by contrast, could never be reborn here in the same way because of how they came here. Its hard, one imagines, to conjure the image of a goldeneh medina, the gilded land that was America to European Jews, while bound in the hold of a slave ship. And while subsequent generations of Jews were able to build on their forebears successes, the descendants of American slaves came to be marked not only by the hue of their skin but by the emotional legacy of their ancestors experiences.

And so, even after Jim Crow the man, a white entertainer who performed in blackface, had long been buried, and the laws that came to carry his name undermined by the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the psychological legacy of slavery and the persistence of racial discrimination prevented many black people from economic and social advancement. Add the War on Drugs, the prison industrial complex, and the practice of red-lining that banks used to keep African Americans from being able to purchase their homes and climb into the middle class, we have one of Americas worst moral stains, one which persists to this day.

Unfortunately, my community is not free of discrimination. Many Jews, like other white people, tended to look condescendingly on African Americans, and the latter readily reciprocated with resentment. In some cases, that resentment came from the leadership, like Louis Farrakhan and his followers, with their fantasy-fueled hatred. In others, it came from personal and communal tragedies, like the 1991 race riots in Crown Heights.

My personal experience was different, though. I spent my childhood in an observant Jewish home (my father, of blessed memory, was the rabbi of a small Baltimore shul) and a racially mixed neighborhood; one of my best friends was a black boy a bit older than I. Junie and I would play ball and ride our bikes on the rocky hills near where we lived. It was a mixed-race friendship that seems unthinkable in todays racial climate. In neighborhoods like Crown Heights and Flatbush, you dont often see African American kids playing with Jewish kids.

Baltimore was very much the South, and our domestic help was an African American woman named Lucille Jackson. My mother, of blessed memory, a Polish immigrant, treated her like a part of the family, and Lucille was like a tante to me. When she grew too old to do real work, my mother would have her come over all the same to do some dusting, so that Mama could, as always, serve her lunch and pay her wages, as compensation, not charity. That lesson in kavod habriot, honoring all people, remains with me to this day. Then there was Dhanna, the librarian in Providence, Rhode Island, where my wife and I raised our children, who was so kind to them during their frequent visits to the public library, always encouraging them, helping them find what they were looking for and proudly placing the artwork they regularly produced for her on her desk for all to see. And Desi, our own young daughters friend, who became quite conversant with the laws of kashrut and Shabbat.

I realize that my personal upbringing and experiences may not have been typical for a haredi Jew. There is distrust, if not disdain, in parts of the haredi world in fact, in the larger Jewish one, too for black people. Just as there is animus among some in the African American community for Jews.

I have had unpleasant encounters, too. I wont forget the group of boys who asked my classmates and me if they could join our baseball game. Once their team was at bat, its members decided to turn the Louisville Sluggers on us. No one should ever have to hear the sound of wood hitting skull.

I also wont forget the Heil Hitler that a black teen delighted in shouting at my father and me when we would walk together to shul. Even these days, I come across the occasional anti-Semite of color. One actually greeted me mere months ago on a city bus with a hearty Heil Hitler! of his own.

Of course, I have met more than the occasional pale-faced Jew-baiter, too. There are good and bad people in every population, something whose implications we too often overlook. Mindful of the Talmudic imperative to judge all men favorably (Avot, 1:6) and my parents example, I have never measured any human being by any yardstick other than his own words or deeds, and never prejudged anyone because of his race or the behavior of any of its other members. And my wife and I always sought and I think successfully to instill that same attitude in our children.

All the same, in my experience, the arc of the moral universe, to use abolitionist Theodore Parkers memorable phrase (made famous by Reverend King), has been bending toward justice. While most Orthodox Jews and African Americans tend to live in their own, separate social and cultural milieus, it isnt unusual anymore to see sincerely friendly interactions between members of the two groups.

Its not unusual, but its also not often enough.

What might hopefully advance that happy development is Charlottesville. The ad promoting the Unite the Right rally was designed to evoke a fascist poster, with birds reminiscent of the Nazi eagle soaring through the sky over marchers carrying Confederate flags instead of swastikas.

Ponder that. Nazi eagles and Confederate flags.

White supremacists was the self-definition of choice among the marchers. And as they marched that Jewish Sabbath night, the torches they carried intentionally evocative of those of Klansmen, they chanted, loudly, lustily, Jews shall not replace us! And Blood and soil! an English rendering of the Nazi blut und boden.

This city is run by Jewish communists and criminal n****s, one demonstrator informed a Vice News reporter.

The time has come, in this post-Charlottesville era, for all Jews and all African Americans to reject generalizations born of the worst examples in the others community and recognize that the malevolent drawing of a circle around our two peoples should impel us to understand, despite how dissimilar we may be, how joined, in fact, we are.

Avi Shafran blogs at rabbiavishafran.com and serves as Agudath Israel of Americas director of public affairs.

The views and opinions expressed in this article are the authors own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Forward.

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Jews Should Use Charlottesville To Overcome Bigotry And Black People Can, Too – Forward

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Monday’s Sound Off – The Mercury

President Trump did not say he condoned what happened in Charlottesville. I repeat, did not condone it. He simply stated a fact there were two sides there, both were involved.

Once again you people on the left are totally incapable of accepting the truth. If you listened to what the president said, yes, neo-Nazis, the Klan and white supremacists are bad people, but so are Black Lives Matter, Antifa and those violent thugs from the left. There is equal blame for both sides and neither side has the high ground.

Tea Party

Everyone needs to remember it takes two to tango. Charlottesville was a dance that went horribly wrong.

Sad thing is people today want to claim victimization. I call it the lottery mentality. George Washington was a veteran and the Civil War people were veterans. From 1776 to 1865, all those folks were veterans who fought in those wars. Lets remember what they did and having a statue in their character is a great thing. Remember history.

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After reading the insert about Montgomery County Community College in Wednesdays Mercury, I cant believe that three county commissioners can go and put a tax on all the homeowners and property owners in Montgomery County to support the business and everything else that theyre teaching but theyre also teaching dance and theater. What kind of a college course is dance and theater that all the people in Montgomery County should be paying for?

Im calling about the street construction in the North End of Pottstown. All of our furniture on the porch and all of our cars are full of dirt and the stones are everywhere in the street. Is the borough going to clean up all the stones after all this construction? The construction vehicles are going faster than 25 mph which is the speed limit here in town past our house all day and night. They start at 7 a.m. and stop at 8 or 9 p.m. Whos cleaning up the mess?

Just Wondering

After I get divorced I am never getting married again. Instead Im just going to find a woman I dont like and Im just going to give her a house.

Patriot

There you go again Bonnie talking about things that are not exactly the truth. President Obama does not and never did hate the military. Your president dodged the draft with five deferments, now he surrounds himself with generals that he claims are not as smart as he is. Stick to the facts Bonnie.

Hawaiian Punch Party

Have you noticed all these short messages by Gov. Wolf about small items that are going on in Pennsylvania and then it says Paid for by taxpayers? Its no wonder Pennsylvania has no money if we have to tell everybody how to solve their own commonsense problems.

This is to the person who commented about watching a lot of golf. Apparently you never played the game. Its not a coin that they use to mark where a golf ball lands on the green, its a small brown plastic marker.

James from Pottstown

For the ladies or gentlemen who are calling about numerous calls about credit cards, I got them three or four times a day. Well I got tired of it. I blow a whistle in the phone now and they dont call as much.

Washington and Jefferson owned slaves, fought to create the U.S. government, swore oaths to defend this government. Robert E. Lee owned slaves. He took an oath as an officer to the federal government, then he turned around, broke his oath, fought for slavery and he should be considered a traitor.

Bob from Phoenixville

Why would Donald Trump attack Amazon which is the leading Internet retailer in the world? They also employ thousands and thousands of Americans. Simple, because of the CEOs ownership in the Washington Post. However The Post and Amazon are two different companies. He is a vicious vindictive person for which there is no room in the White House for such a person. He is also a bigot after his third different remark about Virginia.

Clark S. Kent

A big shout-out to nurse Mike on the second floor of Pottstown hospital for holding my hand and getting me through a scary and unknown procedure I had to have done the other day. Thanks again, I really appreciated all your help.

What is the difference between David Duke supporting Donald Trump and the anti-Semite and racist Louis Farrakhan, Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton supporting Obama? There is no difference. The media only wants to call out what goes on with the right. They never want to comp to whats happening on the left. Antifa is exactly the same as the KKK. They burn, they loot, they create violence. Theres no difference.

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Sheriff Clarke ‘proud’ of Trump’s Charlottesville response; Huckabee … – Fox News

This is a rush transcript from “Hannity,” August 14, 2017. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

SEAN HANNITY, HOST: Welcome to “Hannity.” This is a “Fox News Alert.” The president condemning yet again in the strongest possible terms the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, the violence and the mayhem.

Also tonight, we will analyze the horrific politicizing of these events. That’s tonight’s very important breaking news “Opening Monologue.”

All right, what we saw take place in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend — it is disgusting, it is despicable. And it’s really hard to imagine in this day and age that there are actually people out there that could do this to their fellow human beings. It’s hard to imagine that there are people in this country that have these types of hateful, inexcusable, racist, white supremacist views.

And it’s also hard to imagine that there are still some people that have that high level of ignorance that, yes, live amongst us. Now, there’s no place in this country for these neo-Nazi, fascist, white supremacists. And they — what they stand for should be condemned in the widest terms possible by all good people in this country. What they believe in — it’s the complete opposite of what the United States of America stands for, and sadly, we have seen way too much of these kinds of acts over the years.

Now, as far as the groups that were involved, the white supremacists, do they have a constitutional right to free speech, regardless of how disgusting and offensive what they say is? Unfortunately, that’s how our First Amendment works. Even the American Civil Liberties Union, one of Trump’s biggest outspoken critics, they defended the organization this weekend and their right to rally in court. So it’s allowed to happen. And then the other groups down there also have the same right to speak out against these evil people.

Now, make no mistake, this was all provoked by radical, racist extremists. But the violent clashes should never have happened. Where were the police?

Over the last number of years also we have watched extremists on both sides battling it out. We have seen this act too often. It doesn’t solve a thing, and it only gives these radicals on both sides more ammo so they can continue to spread their hatred. And what’s so repulsive in all of this — we have a woman that died, dozens of fellow human beings injured this week, and over what? A bunch of idiots fighting over stupid, ignorant anti-American views and ideas?

Now, instead of covering this horrible situation fairly, openly, honestly, like we’re going to do tonight, over the weekend, we saw the destroy Trump establishment media go into a feeding frenzy, trying to assign blame as quickly as possible, and of course to paint the president, all conservatives, all Republicans as racist and bigots. That’s not true.

These are the exact same tactics we see by the left every two and four years during the election cycles. And we’ll have more on that in just a minute.

President Trump is not a racist. Conservatives, the conservatives I know, like and love, Republicans I know and like — they’re not racist. The country is filled with people that are good, honorable and decent, and that’s most conservatives, if not all that I know.

Now, I’m not saying — nobody’s saying racism doesn’t exist. It does exist in this country. It’s sad. But if we’re going to be fair and honest, this is not exclusive to one particular party. Now, there are racists on both sides in America, but most Americans, what are they? Good, great people. They condemn racism. They get up every morning, they work hard, play by the rules, pay their taxes, create goods and services that others want, need and desire. And you know what? They raise their kids to be good people.

You know, for all the white supremacists out there, you know what? There are others on the left, the Nation of Islam leader, for example, Louis Farrakhan, that are insane. It’s a simple truth. But all we heard all weekend long from the left, the mainstream media, is that these extremists in Charlottesville this weekend somehow represent all conservatives, that the president supports them. He doesn’t. All Republicans. And they attacked the president again and again and again. Don’t believe it? Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

JAMELLE BOUIE, SLATE MAGAZINE, ON “FACE THE NATION”/CBS: And if you’re looking for the roots of why white supremacists and neo-Nazis felt emboldened to march in a college town, you don’t have to look very far from the White House.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE, MSNBC: We have a racist as a president because a man that cannot stand up and condemn the Ku Klux Klan and Nazism is a racist.

ANA NAVARRO, CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: He was a coward. He didn’t have the spine to behave like the leader of the United States, and I feel that to be shameful. He’s not only unfit to be president. In my book, his lack of empathy, his lack of leadership, his lack of courage, he’s unfit to be human!

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

HANNITY: Unbelievable, unfit to be human.

All right, let’s go back, let’s take a look at the president’s original comments on all of this. This all happened before a madman plowed into a group of people with his car. Here’s what President Trump tweeted. Quote, “We all must be united and condemn all that hate stands for. There’s no place for this kind of violence in America. Let’s come together as one.”

The president also said, “We must remember this truth. No matter our color, creed, religion or political party, we are all Americans first.”

And once the protesters — once it turned deadly, President Trump immediately came out and gave a statement. Here’s what the president said. Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, AUG. 12)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides — on many sides.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Now, all weekend long, I, like many of you, watched the media going insane, acting like they didn’t know what the president was talking about. They ran with a false narrative all weekend. Oh, big story, he didn’t mention the groups by name.

Well, it couldn’t be more obvious, more transparent who the president was talking about. He was standing for equal justice under the law, against racism. And the press, what did they do? They used a high-profile act of violence to bludgeon the president and conservatives politically. So predictable.

Now, it was crystal clear what the president was talking about. But the press, they went after him anyway. And the destroy Trump establishment media — they didn’t care about the violence, seemingly, or the racial tensions they’re creating or the civil unrest as much as they cared about using this tragedy as an opportunity to attack people they disagree with, and in particular, the president, to try and inflict as much damage politically as possible. You know what? Just like they have done since November 8! That’s a simple truth.

So President Trump once again, he came out today. He condemned again what happened, and yes, he called out the groups by name. Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP: Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: But you know what? We all know that’s not going to be good enough. The media is never going to be satisfied with anything the president says or does because it’s not part of their ideology and narrative. They want to paint the president, conservatives, Republicans as racist and bigoted by ignoring what he said this weekend, ignoring him over the years again and again and again condemning white supremacists, people like David Duke.

For example — let me give you an example. This is Donald Trump over the years, something the destroy Trump media will never show you, condemning Duke, white supremacists. Look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

CHRIS WALLACE, DEBATE MODERATOR, MARCH 3, 2016: What are your views on the Ku Klux Klan and white supremacists?

TRUMP: I totally disavow the Ku Klux Klan. I totally disavow David Duke. I’ve been doing it now for two weeks. This is — you’re probably about the 18th person that’s asked me the question.

TRUMP, FEB. 26, 2016: I didn’t even know he endorsed me, David Duke endorsed me. OK. All right. I disavow.

CHUCK TODD, MODERATOR, “MEET THE PRESS”/NBC, JULY 23, 2016: David Duke announced his Senate candidacy, claiming your agenda for his own, or essentially saying glad that you spoke out…

TRUMP: Are you ready before you ask the question?

TODD: Newt Gingrich said every Republican should repudiate this guy, not matter what it takes.

TRUMP: I did. And I do. Rebuked. Is that OK? Rebuked.

TODD: Rebuked?

TRUMP: Done.

MATT LAUER, NBC NEWS, FEB. 2000: What do you see as the biggest problem with the Reform Party right now?

TRUMP: Well, you’ve got David Duke just joined, a bigot, a racist, a problem. I mean, this is not exactly the people you want in your party.

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

HANNITY: Bigot, racist, rebuke, repudiate, want nothing to do with. Now, President Trump and the people that voted for him and that support his agenda — they don’t like racists. They don’t like bigots. They do not like what went down in Charlottesville. Conservatives that I have known my whole life, Republicans I have known my whole life, people like me — what was this election about? The forgotten men and women, the people that are out of work, in poverty, on food stamps, the doubling of our national debt.

What was this election about? It was about getting jobs, getting our economy back in shape. It was also about keeping our country safe and secure. That’s what this election was about. But yet every two to four years, the left, the Democrats, the media — they divide Americans by playing the race card every single election!

Remember 1998, radio ad, Missouri, oh, elect a Republican and black churches are going to burn? Or the James Byrd at in 2000, when George Bush supported the death penalty for the guy that brutally murdered an innocent man by the name of James Burr (ph). For example, take a look throughout history.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

HILLARY CLINTON, THEN-PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE, FEB. 16, 2016: Many Republicans talk in coded racial language about takers and losers. They demonize President Obama and encourage the ugliest impulses of the paranoid fringe.

BARACK OBAMA, THEN-PRESIDENT, NOV. 3, 2016: If you accept the support of Klan sympathizers before you are president, you will accept their support after you’re president.

JOE BIDEN, THEN-VICE PRESIDENT, AUG. 14, 2012: They’re going to put you all back in chains.

AL GORE, THEN-VICE PRESIDENT, JULY 12, 2000: It’s wrong what the leader of the Republican Party and this Congress are doing in blocking an accurate census because they don’t want to count everyone that they don’t think they can count on.

GORE, JULY 16, 1998: Don’t tell me we’ve got a color-blind society!

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

HANNITY: Notice Al Gore changes his voice, his cadence, his tone. Now, in 1998, before a predominantly black audience — he even went as far as to say Republicans know that theirs is the wrong agenda for African-Americans. They don’t even want to count you in the Census. What a lie!

And then there’s President Obama’s book, remember? “Audacity of Hope.” Where was the media? Remember, he recounted a sermon from Reverend Jeremiah Wright from the church of G-d America, white folks’ greed runs a world in need. Was the media outraged over this?

(BEGIN AUDIO CLIP FROM “THE AUDACITY OF HOPE”)

OBAMA: It is this world, a world where cruise ships throw away more food in a day than most residents of Port-au-Prince see in a year, where white folks’ greed runs a world in need, apartheid in one hemisphere, apathy in another hemisphere.

(END AUDIO CLIP)

HANNITY: Oh, you’re so inspired by Reverend Wright, black liberation ideology — he sat in the pews of Wright’s church for 20 years! Remember Reverend Wright? Remember him attacking U.S. KKK of A, and the Sunday after 9/11, “America’s chickens coming home to roost.” Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

REV. JEREMIAH WRIGHT, SEPT. 16, 2001: The stuff we have done overseas is now brought right back into our own front yard! America’s chickens are coming home to roost!

WRIGHT, APRIL 13, 2003: No, no, no! Not God bless America, God damn America that’s in the Bible for killing innocent people! God damn America for treating here citizens as less than human!

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

HANNITY: Twenty-plus years in the church. How many in the media covered Ayers and Dohrn? Well, that’s what President Obama started his political career. What about the Nation of Islam leader, Louis Farrakhan, called white people the devil, the skunk of the planet Earth, and has said many racist, anti-semitic things, too many to count.

Recent report, Daily Caller — well, they’re saying that Farrakhan is claiming — and there’s audio of it — that he met privately with then-Senator Barack Obama in 2008 before he announced his presidential run. And he said that the Nation of Islam supported Barack Obama quietly for president, and when he was a community organizer. Now, of course, as the DailyCaller pointed out, neither Obama or Farrakhan want to talk about that friendship. Has there been any investigation by the media? Pretty shocking.

Well, the media didn’t think it was important for you to know these things. They didn’t cover a lot of those things. Then there’s President Obama’s handling — remember? All the high-profile racial cases when he was president where he jumped to conclusions, rushed to judgment without facts or information? He’s supposed to be a lawyer, too. Watch this.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

OBAMA, JULY 22, 2009: The Cambridge police acted stupidly. There’s a long history in this country of African-Americans and Latinos being stopped by law enforcement disproportionately. Now, that’s just a fact.

OBAMA, JULY 19, 2013: The African- American community is also knowledgeable that there’s a history of racial disparities in the application of our criminal laws.

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

HANNITY: And President Obama also had members from the group — remember? Black Lives Matter, people chanting things like, “Pigs in a blanket, fry ’em like bacon,” talking about cops. Or when they talked about, “What do we want? Dead cops. When do we want them? Now.” Oh, they were invited to the White House, where the president praised that group. Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

OBAMA, FEB. 18, 2016: We’ve also got some young people here who are making history as we speak, people like Britney (ph), who served on our police task force in the wake of Ferguson and has led many of the protests that took place there and shined a light on the injustice that was happening. People like Deray McKesson (ph), who’s done some outstanding work mobilizing in Baltimore around these issues.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Remember Hillary Clinton running for president? She praised Black Lives Matter, the same people. “What do we want? Dead cops. When do we want them? Now.” Watch her.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

CLINTON, AUG. 27, 2015: And we do have to stand up and say loudly and clearly black lives matter.

CLINTON, OCT. 13, 2015: There’s a long list. We need a new New Deal for communities of color and the poor.

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

HANNITY: You ever see the media talk about these things? This is why shows like this, in my opinion, are different from the liberal mainstream media. They’ve ignored these examples for decades.

They also — they don’t seem to care about the threats of violence that have been made repeatedly against our current president, President Trump. Remember? This photo was so graphic, we always have to issue the warning. It shows Kathy Griffin posing, ISIS fighter, bloody severed head of President Trump. Johnny Depp talking about killing a president. Madonna talking about blowing up the Trump White House. Really? Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

JOHNNY DEPP, ACTOR, JUNE 22: When was the last time an actor assassinated a president?

I want to clarify. I’m not an actor.

(LAUGHTER)

I lie for a living. However, it’s been a while, and maybe it’s time.

MADONNA, JAN. 21: Yes, I have thought an awful lot about blowing up the White House.

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

HANNITY: Imagine, God forbid, somebody said that in the Obama years? Then there’s Shakespeare in the park, that performance showing a Trump-like person being brutally stabbed to death.

Also other celebrities, Snoop Dogg, Mickey Rourke advocating for violence against the president. What about — remember the Bernie Sanders supporter, the one that targeted Republicans at baseball practice, leaving Congressman Steve Scalise fighting for his life? Well, was the media blaming Democrats for that? No, and by the way, they shouldn’t have. And I don’t blame Bernie, either.

Now, by the way, the left is totally unhinged at this point. This is, sadly, who they are, the double standard they adopt. And by the way, after all these examples where Democrats line up to condemn those people, where are they condemning all the things we’re playing tonight? You see, they’ve got this separate set of rules for Republicans and Democrats.

Every two to four years, Democrats divide the country. They play identity politics. It’s been a part of this playbook the Democrats used for generations.

So it’s time for the destroy Trump establishment media to start recognizing how they have a massive double standard, that they have an agenda and ideology, because just like, sadly, white supremacists in Charlottesville, hatred of any kind should not be tolerated or ever given a free pass, period, whoever is involved in the hatred, like the hate we saw this weekend.

Joining us with reaction, Salem Radio nationally syndicated host Larry Elder, Milwaukee County sheriff David Clark, Fox News contributor Deroy Murdock.

Sheriff Clark, we’ll start with you. Anything I’m saying here that’s wrong?

DAVID CLARK, MILWAUKEE COUNTY SHERIFF: No, it’s spot on, Sean. You know, and the liberal media couldn’t control themselves. They couldn’t resist the opportunity to somehow turn this on President Trump.

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Sheriff Clarke ‘proud’ of Trump’s Charlottesville response; Huckabee … – Fox News

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‘White supremacists by default’: How ordinary people made Charlottesville possible – CNN

But the tragedy that took place in Charlottesville last weekend could not have occurred without the tacit acceptance of millions of ordinary, law-abiding Americans who helped create such a racially explosive climate, some activists, historians and victims of extremism say.

It’s easy to focus on the angry white men in paramilitary gear who looked like they were mobilizing for a race war in the Virginia college town last Saturday. But it’s the ordinary people — the voters who elected a reality TV star with a record of making racially insensitive comments, the people who move out of the neighborhood when people of color move in, the family members who ignore a relative’s anti-Semitism — who give these type of men room to operate, they say.

That was the twisted formula that made the Holocaust and Rwanda possible and allowed Jim Crow segregation to survive: Nice people looked the other way while those with an appetite for violence did the dirty work, says Mark Naison, a political activist and history professor at Fordham University in New York City.

”You have to have millions of people who are willing to be bystanders, who push aside evidence of racism, Islamophobia or sexism. You can’t have one without the other,” Naison says.

“We are a country with a few million passionate white supremacists — and tens of millions of white supremacists by default,” he says.

Many people prefer to focus on the usual suspects after a Charlottesville happens — the violent racial extremists who are so easy to condemn. Yet there are four types of ordinary people who also play a part in the country’s racial divisions, Naison and others say:

Many of the white racists who marched in Charlottesville were condemned because they openly said they don’t believe in integration or racial equality.

But millions of ordinary white Americans have been sending that message to black and brown people for at least a half a century.

They send it with their actions: They don’t want to live next to or send their children to school with black or brown people, historians say.

Busing, a nationwide campaign to end school segregation by shipping students of color to white schools, collapsed in large part because of fierce opposition by white parents. “White flight” — white families fleeing city neighborhoods after people of color moved in — helped create the modern suburbs.

This isn’t the Jim Crow segregation that one reads about in the history books. It’s the covert or “down-low” segregationist movement that has shaped much of contemporary America since overt racism became taboo in the 1960s, says David Billings, who wrote about growing up white in the segregated South in his memoir, “Deep Denial: The Persistence of White Supremacy in United States History and Life.”

“Across the country, white people withdrew from the ‘public’ sphere and migrated to ‘whites only’ suburbs to evade racial integration,” Billings wrote. “The word ‘public’ preceding words like ‘housing,’ ‘hospital,’ ‘health care,’ ‘transportation,’ ‘defender,’ ‘schools,’ and even ‘swimming pool’ in some parts of the country became code words that meant poor and most often black and Latino. The word ‘private’ began to mean ‘better.”’

Jones polled a complex subject. Many people of color self-segregate as well, and some American neighborhoods are so segregated that residents never come in contact with people of other racial or ethnic groups.

Yet some white Americans are driven by the same impulses that drove some of the white racists in Charlottesville — racial separation.

“We have to work hard to make our social lives reflect our values, because white people do not choose the company of people of color generally,” he says.

Ball once wrote that “unconsciously or inadvertently, all of us white folks participate in forms of supremacist thought and activity.”

The angry white men in Charlottesville were just being open about their white supremacy. Ball says he wasn’t surprised by their boldness.

“Their climate is now better for them,” he says.

President Trump’s critics blasted him for not coming out strong enough against the white racists who marched in Charlottesville. Trump initially denounced the “egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence on many sides.” It was the “many sides” qualifier that infuriated some people. They wanted an unequivocal denunciation of racism from a leader.

Trump’s “many sides” response, though, wasn’t that abnormal in the context of US history. It used to be the norm for white political leaders to draw a moral equivalence between racists and those who suffered from their acts of brutality, historians say.

It’s the “yes, but” rhetorical maneuver — condemn racism but add a qualifier to diminish the sincerity of what you just said.

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. ran into this “yes, but” response so much that he wrote about it in his “Letter from Birmingham Jail.”

He wrote:

“I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizens’ Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate who is more devoted to ‘order’ than to justice; who prefers a negative peace, which is the absence of tension, to a positive peace, which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: ‘I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action…'”

President Dwight Eisenhower took the “yes, but” approach when he complained he couldn’t move too fast to comply with the Supreme Court’s decision to integrate schools because people had to respect the Southern way of life, says Carol Anderson, author of “White Rage” and a professor of African-American studies at Emory University in Atlanta.

“You get that equivocation,” says Anderson, “that trying to make a system that absolutely strips people of their humanity on par with people demanding their humanity.”

That “yes, but” approach is often used today to discredit the grievances of the Black Lives Matter movement, another professor says. Whenever an unarmed black or brown person is shot by police, some deflect the issue by saying, “Yes, but all lives matter.”

“When a police officer shoots an unarmed black person, even then it’s controversial to say racism is a factor,” says Erik Love, a sociologist at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania. “We say, ‘Why don’t we talk about these other issues. What about the crime rate, what police officers need to protect themselves.’ And suddenly we’re not talking about race anymore.”

There’s a famous line from the classic film, “Casablanca.” A police officer is closing down a casino, declaring, “I’m shocked — shocked — to find that gambling is going on in here!” — all while pocketing his casino winnings as they’re being handed to him on the sly.

That line could apply to Trump supporters who say they’re frustrated by the President’s statements on race since Charlottesville erupted.

How could you be shocked?

“This is who he is, this is what he does,” says Anderson, the Emory University professor. “‘Mexicans are rapists and criminals.’ That’s what he said in his first speech. Their complicity comes in the form of self-denial instead of owning it.”

For those who say they voted for Trump despite his intolerance, Anderson offers this analogy: Minister Louis Farrakhan.

“If he was running for office and black people voted in droves for him, the narrative would be, ‘They’re supporting a racist,”’ she says.

“As my buddy said, is that what you said to the followers of Louis Farrakhan? No, nobody says that to the followers of Louis Farrakhan. No, they blasted him as an anti-Semite, which he is, and say, ‘how can people follow this bigoted message?’ That’s the ultimate testament — that you could be Donald Trump and be President. There is no black person who could have the kind of vices Donald Trump has and, hell, be governor. Maybe you could be mayor somewhere.”

Many voters knew Trump would bring something else to the Oval Office — chaos. That’s why they chose him. He’s their first reality TV president, one writer says.

“He would say horrible things about people, act out and break the rules, but people weirdly respected it,” she says. “They said he was a winner, and that’s how a winner wins.”

It’s not, however, how many would want a nation’s leader to handle a racial crisis.

Ari Kohen knows something about the cost of hate. When he looked at images of neo-Nazis chanting “Jews will not replace us!” in Charlottesville, he thought of his grandfather, Zalman Kohen. He was living in rural Romania in 1944 when the Nazis rounded him up with the help of his neighbors and sent him to a death camp.

His grandfather survived, moved to the United States and lived until he was 90. But he never returned to Romania, says Kohen, an associate professor of political science at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

“He could never forgive his neighbors,” he says. “These were people who, maybe they didn’t love Jews, but these were people who lived next to each other. They knew his family and he knew their family. The idea that they could all stand by while life was completely and forever changed for large portions of their community — he could never understand it.”

Many scholars have been vexed by the same question. When they examine genocidal events like the Holocaust, many come to the same conclusion:

Never underestimate the ability of ordinary people to look away.

Some do it with family members. Kohen says the hundreds of white racists who descended on Charlottesville must have family or friends who noticed their behavior beforehand. He suspects that some refused to confront them.

“There’s this wink and nod, everyone knows that this person is going down a dangerous path and people passively go along with it,” he says. “They don’t want to rock the boat. This is family or a friend. It’s hard to distance yourself from people you care about.”

This passivity extends to how people react when their country’s leaders become intolerant, others say. Once you see it coming, you have a duty to act, says Naison, the activist and Fordham professor.

“If you don’t speak up when this sort of ideology is being promoted at the highest level, you end up being complicit in the actions taken by its more extreme adherents,” Naison says. “Once the demons are unleashed, you’ve become a co-conspirator.”

Naison says he doesn’t think most Americans realize how dangerous it is in their country right now. He’s warned people who voted for Trump.

“I told these guys, you can’t control this; you’re playing with fire,” Naison says. “Open, violent communal warfare is scary. You can’t control it. Look at what happened in the Balkans, Northern Ireland, Israel.”

There’s also evidence, though, that millions of ordinary Americans from all walks of life don’t want that kind of America. Heather Heyer, the demonstrator who lost her life in Charlottesville, was a young white woman who marched in solidarity with black protesters. Millions of Americans have since taken to the streets or social media to stand against what happened there.

Obama quoted Nelson Mandela, the South African leader who knew something about hate and reconciliation. In his 1994 autobiography “Long Walk to Freedom,” Mandela wrote:

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”

Yet to get to that place Mandela talked about, it may be necessary to not just look at the usual suspects people condemn when racial violence spills into public view.

If you want to know why those white racists now feel so emboldened, it may help to look at all the ordinary people around you, your neighbors, your family members, your leaders.

But first, start by looking at yourself.

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‘White supremacists by default’: How ordinary people made Charlottesville possible – CNN

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August 19, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Left vilifies Trump as world burns – WND.com – WND.com

Ironically, having lived through the Clinton White House years as the founder, chairman and general counsel of Judicial Watch, which I conceived of at the time to be the Peoples Justice Department (Freedom Watch now occupies that mantle), I always said that the medias focus on the Monica Lewinsky scandal, which I never thought that important given the 40-plus other Clinton scandals, allowed Osama bin Laden to plot the September 11 terror attacks as the nation was titillated with an intern and a low-class president. My tag line at the time, was that while Slick Willy was having sex with Monica, it was the nation that was about to get screwed. This same dangerous phenomenon is sadly true today, as the media and the political establishment of both parties have not learned their lesson at the continuing expense of the American people.

The tragic events in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, where scores of people were attacked by radical Islamist terrorists, underscore why our nation cannot afford to be diverted with leftist-generated bogus investigations of so-called Russian collusion and obsessed with whipped up racial clashes over Civil War statues spawned and ginned up by the last eight years of racist words and actions of former President Obama and his equally destructive attorneys general. These latent white haters, with all of their support for Black Lives Matter, Al Sharpton, the New Black Panthers Party and Louis Farrakhan and his evil Nation of Islam, regrettably served as a recruiting tool for white nationalists, Neo-Nazis and the Ku Klux Klan. Ironically, these evil white groups are simply the flip side of these equally evil black nationalist white haters who masquerade as persons and groups seeking racial equality.

My brave African-American client and good friend Dr. Demetrick Pennie, a Dallas police sergeant who was assaulted in the Dallas police massacre over a year ago and for whom I have brought a lawsuit, can teach you better than anyone about these radical black separatists. Indeed, Demetrick earned a Ph.D. in this field of study. And, sure enough, true to predictions, after I filed suit on his behalf for the assault and murder perpetrated by a disciple of Louis Farrakhan, Demetrick was threatened with death, being pummeled with racial epithets by these hateful black separatists, much as one might expect from the Klan.

It is telling and instructive that just days before a Farrakhan black Muslim separatist henchman went on a killing spree in Dallas, this world-class hater of whites and cops was calling for their deaths publicly. This video speaks loud and clear:

Rather than denouncing this anti-white, anti-cop call to death and general hatred, what did our then-president do and say: you guessed it, nothing! Nor did the racially sensitive Eric Holder or Loretta Lynch, his past and then current attorneys general. This virtual silence toward bigotry toward whites and cops, as well as police of any color, was the modus operandi of the Obama administration. While the president was out politically whipping up racial division to further his political and otherwise bigoted interests, he and his comrades could not have cared less about anyone else who was not of his shade.

And that is why all the vitriol and bloodletting by the leftist media and politicians against President Trump for supposedly not commenting in a stronger way about the hateful acts of white supremacists, Neo-Nazis and the Klan after the tragic Charlottesville riots are not only hypocritical but simply dishonest. This drumbeat of attacks, only interrupted last Thursday by the terrorist attack in Barcelona, is designed to finally bring down Donald J. Trump and his presidency.

Where were similar attacks on President Obama and his attorneys general under similar tragic circumstances? They, unlike President Trump, were guilty of whipping up racial divide during their administration, as they also witnessed the equally hateful incitement to violence of Farrakhan, black extortionists like Sharpton and black separatists. These haters not coincidentally had a free visitor pass to the Obama White House.

Yes, President Trump was right to prudently call it evil on both sides before all facts were known, and later single out the white separatists, Neo-Nazis and the Klan when the dust cleared at Charlottesville. He was also right to later call out the sham excuse to sow more racial divide by continuing a contrived fight over Civil War statues. Notwithstanding their historical importance, and I understand this as an adopted Southerner myself, having spent most of my adult life in Dixie, this theatre of the absurd feud is simply a diversionary tactic and smokescreen. Until now, few people, African-Americans included, paid any attention to these statues. Just in the last few days, for instance, the senile House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi claims to have experienced an epiphany that, low and behold, there are statues of Civil War Confederacy heroes lurking in the Capitol Rotunda. Not wasting a cheap opportunistic beat, she called for them to be removed!

But its not just the left and its enablers in the media and the Democratic Party establishment who are fomenting more racial divide and undoubtedly more violence, but establishment Republicans as well who with the likes of Sen. Lindsey Graham have taken this as an opportunity to try to drive him from office. They covet running their establishment presidential candidate in 2020.

While this nation is being pulled apart at the seams over politically motivated Russian collusion investigations, shedding crocodile tears and feigning a nervous breakdown over whether President Trump expressed himself clearly enough in condemning white nationalists post-Charlottesville, let us not forget that the previous president and his followers haters of whites and police, like Black Lives Matter, many of whom were also present at Charlottesville and incited and engaged in violence there had been silent during the Obama years when whites and cops were harmed and killed.

And, while the cowards of the Republican establishment joined in the hateful chorus against President Trump, including many who pretend to be conservative cable news commentators, like Shepard Smith all of whom are petrified of also being called white racists if they do not throw their lot in with the left the nation is being dangerously diverted from focusing on the real threat of more terrorism on our shores, as just occurred in Barcelona. There are also the looming nuclear showdowns with North Korea and its equally evil partner, Iran, as well as other dangerous foreign threats.

Yes, the phenomenon of the nation being fatally distracted during the Monica Lewinsky scandal of the Clinton years is alive and well. But, the real threat is that if this is not put to rest soon, we all might wind up dead. Just ask the thousands of good souls who died on Sept. 11, 2001.

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Left vilifies Trump as world burns – WND.com – WND.com

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Jewish supporters get more critical of Trump – The Philadelphia Tribune

NEW YORK Ivanka Trump’s rabbi denounced President Donald Trump for blaming “both sides” in a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., as the number of American Jewish leaders willing to criticize him grew.

Rabbi Haskel Lookstein of Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun, and other rabbis from the prominent modern Orthodox synagogue in Manhattan, said in a Facebook message late Wednesday that they were “deeply troubled by the moral equivalency and equivocation” of Trump’s reaction. Lookstein oversaw Ivanka Trump’s conversion to Judaism. He has only rarely commented on the president.

Separately, the Republican Jewish Coalition, which has supported Trump through earlier controversies, urged him “to provide greater moral clarity in rejecting racism, bigotry and anti-Semitism.” Among the coalition’s board members is Las Vegas casino magnate and GOP donor Sheldon Adelson, who eventually supported Trump.

“The Nazis, the KKK, and white supremacists are dangerous anti-Semites,” the Republican Jewish Coalition said in a statement Wednesday. “There are no good Nazis and no good members of the Klan.”

The rebukes are the latest from American Jews outraged and frightened not only by Saturday’s march, which drew neo-Nazis and Ku Klux Klan members ostensibly to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. But they were also troubled by Trump’s reaction. At a news conference Tuesday, Trump doubled down on his initial comments on Saturday and said, “I think there is blame on both sides” and “there were very fine people on both sides.” A car driven by an alleged white nationalist plowed into a group of counter-protesters at the march, killing a woman, Heather Heyer, and injuring 19 others.

Rabbi Rick Jacobs, president of the liberal Union for Reform Judaism, the largest American synagogue movement, and an outspoken critic of many Trump policies, said it should have been “incredibly simple and easy and obvious” for the president to denounce white supremacists and neo-Nazis.

A Reform Jewish synagogue in Charlottesville, Congregation Beth Israel, which sits one block from the site of Saturday’s demonstrations, said Nazi websites had called for burning the synagogue, so congregational leaders moved their Torah scrolls out of the building and hired a guard. Marchers passed by carrying flags with swastikas and shouting the Nazi salute “Sieg Heil,” the synagogue president said.

But condemnations of Trump also have come from U.S. Jewish groups that usually avoid commenting directly on the president. The Rabbinical Council of America, which is part of the modern Orthodox movement, said in a statement specifically naming Trump that, “failure to unequivocally reject hatred and bias is a failing of moral leadership and fans the flames of intolerance and chauvinism.”

The American Israel Public Affairs Committee, a powerful pro-Israel source of campaign funds, issued a statement Thursday that did not name the president, but said, “We urge all elected officials to reject moral equivalence between those who promote hate and those who oppose it. There must be no quarter for bigotry in our country.”

American Jews vote overwhelmingly Democratic, but Trump has maintained a solid if comparatively small base of support among American Jews who were angered by President Barack Obama’s policies in the Middle East and viewed Trump as far more friendly to Israel.

Since the Charlottesville march, some of Trump’s U.S. Jewish backers have gone quiet. World Jewish Congress president Ronald Lauder, who has been one of Trump’s most prominent defenders, declined to comment through a spokesman.

However, some have praised how Trump has handled the fallout from the Virginia rally.

Rabbi Yaakov Menken of the Coalition for Jewish Values, an Orthodox Jewish public policy organization based in Baltimore, said the president was right to call out bigotry on “many sides.” Menken said he sees anti-Jewish bigotry coming from the right and the left, including from parts of the Black Lives Matter movement.

“Why this apparent desire of some to mask hatred coming from left-wing groups? David Duke is worse than Louis Farrakhan?” Menken said of the Nation of Islam leader who has blamed Israel and Jews for the Sept. 11 attacks and accused Jews of controlling the American government. “We were not looking for him to single out the hate groups on the right.”

Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, a Holocaust education institution that fights anti-Semitism and other prejudice, said Trump failed when he didn’t single out the white nationalist marchers as “haters and bigots.” Still, Hier said Trump has had some strong accomplishments in office, pointing to the president’s handling of North Korea and Saudi Arabia.

Hier had offered a prayer at Trump’s inauguration and joined faith leaders who cheered Trump at a Rose Garden ceremony in May when the president signed an executive order pledging to expand religious liberty protections. The rabbi lamented that Trump’s remarks on the violence in Virginia “interferes with the good things I think he has done.” – (AP)

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Jewish supporters get more critical of Trump – The Philadelphia Tribune

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Conspiracy claims in Nation of Islam member’s death – WOODTV.com

Related Coverage GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) Minister Louis Farrakhan, the controversial leader of the Nation of Islam, was in downtown Grand Rapids Wednesday as lawyers argued about accusations of a conspiracy in the drowning death of a local member of the organization. Farrakhan and his entourage were inside the Kent County courthouse to support the family of Robert Dion Muhammad. Muhammad, who led the Nation of Islams Grand Rapids Study Group, disappeared after officials said he jumped off a sailboat for a swim in Muskegon Lake on Sept. 5, 2014. Crews found his body in 28 feet of water at the Muskegon State Park the day after, which also would have been his 40th birthday. On Wednesday, lawyers for Muhammads family were trying to amend a wrongful death suit. Defendants range from the people who were on the boat to first responders who searched for and later discovered Muhammads body. The victims attorney claims there is sufficient evidence to suggest there might have been a conspiracy to cover up a murder, not an accident.He laid out a series of scenarios, pointing out signs of trauma to Muhammads body which experts say is sometimes the result of recovery efforts and the fact that he had been on a boat with white co-workers before the drowning. It has been alleged multiple times that this (suit) is some political endeavor, as if we caused Robert Mohammads death, the Muhmmads attorney said, as opposed to playing the hand that weve been dealt. Attorneys for the defendants say the other side is trying to throw whatever it can at the wall and see what sticks. We really know that the pink elephant in the room is, the defendants attorney said. All they want to do is to make some presentation as to what could of,should of, maybe happened without any facts to support it. Farrakhan is not one to shy away from controversy, but he declined to talk to reporters at the courthouse. Were good right now, one of the men with Farrakhan told the 24 Hour News 8 crew who approached him. Its a sensitive case. The judge turned down some of the motions requested by the plaintiff, but there are other matters to deal with. The hearing continues Thursday. It was not immediately known whether Farrakhan will be in attendance again.

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

The answer, once again, is freedom of speech – Omaha World-Herald

Some 25 years ago I remember watching, on C-SPAN, a convention of American Maoists. This was before Brian Lambs splendid little kingdom became a citadel of balanced respectability, when C-SPAN was young, carefree and as enamored with novelty as the average American adolescent. A towering black and red portrait of Chairman Mao dominated the stage, as bereted speakers declared their admiration for a monster who stands condemned before history as the murderer of between 50 million and 70 million Chinese. I remember walking home from work in New York City almost every weekday from 1983 to 1989, and being several times stopped in my tracks by a group of people with a microphone advocating genocide. They were black men, and although I no longer remember who they were in the corporate sense, I remember they all impersonated Mr. Ts famous glare as they promised death and slavery to the white man as recompense for historical wrongs. I recall watching the Nation of Islams Louis Farrakhan preach, again courtesy of C-SPAN, and being impressed. It is politically incorrect, of course, to speak well of Minister Farrakhan, but there he was urging his followers to achieve self-reliance and to build honorable, intact families, and urging the men to take responsibility for leading black America into the bright light of freedom. And then, before my wondering eyes, he denounced the white devil and dirty Jews, and my heart sank. I suppose it is possible to read that chapter of William Shirers Rise and Fall of the Third Reich titled The New Order and not shed a tear, but it did not prove possible for me. That chapter deals with the attempted annihilation of European Jewry and does not spare scenes of whimpering mothers clutching toddlers as they stand on the edge of mass graves facing some soul-deadened machine gunner. There are neo-Nazis in this country. I dont know why. Perhaps they have not read Shirer. But they have been around a long time, publishing their little newsletters and handing out slim booklets warning of global Jewish conspiracies. There are Maoists. There are black radicals, and there are masked, black-uniformed young thugs who for several years now have smashed windows, turned over cars, wielded baseball bats and hurled insults and projectiles at police officers in order to silence speech they would forbid. The impulse to bully is not foreign to Americans, and given that we are all inflicted with fallen human nature there is no reason why it should be. Yet, so far, the United States has avoided the brutalities that not long ago afflicted Germany, Japan, Russia and a constellation of Soviet satellites from Romania to North Korea. The credit for this belongs to Americas constitutional commitment to freedom of speech. That is the safety valve. Let them speak, let them rally, let them dream of racial or ideological purity. Let them live, or more likely die, on the battlefield of ideas. Crush them, certainly, the moment they exchange words for violence. A thousand weeds have withered this way. Its part of the American genius.

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Want Diversity and Tolerance? Stop Demonizing Conservatives – Jewish Exponent

By Jonathan S. Tobin Many Americans know that the sickness at the heart of our political culture stems from a spirit of intolerance that has become the keynote of discourse. Liberals blame it on President Donald Trump and his supporters. But few of us seem able to recognize this behavior when it comes from those who share our views which means that if you think Dennis Prager must be boycotted or believe Morton Klein is as much of a threat to American Jewry as Islamist terrorists, then dont blame Trump for how bad things have gotten. Prager, a Los Angeles-based talk radio host and author, is a surprising candidate for this kind of opprobrium. Though hes a conservative who, to the dismay of some of his admirers, believes Trump must be supported against his critics, Prager is far from the prototype of right-wing incendiary. His approach is generally fair-minded and never lacks intellectual rigor. He has also spent much of his career promoting interfaith dialogue and is as interested in helping his audience focus on personal happiness as he is in politics. In other words, hes the polar opposite of the bomb-throwing populists that many on the left think are threatening democracy. But that didnt spare Prager from being treated as if he were the head of a hate group when he agreed to help raise money for the Santa Monica Symphony by appearing as a guest conductor at a concert. Prager is a music enthusiast/amateur conductor and has often appeared in a similar capacity with other ensembles. But when some of the musicians heard Prager was the attraction at a high-profile event for their organization, they said they would boycott the concert. A petition started by two UCLA professors who are violinists in the orchestra said the signers would not appear with a right-wing radio host who promotes horribly bigoted positions. To back up that claim, they cherry-picked a few comments Prager has made about Islam and the implications of gay marriage in order to falsely paint him as the moral equivalent of the Ku Klux Klan. One boycotter even said hed play with a North Korean conductor, but not Prager. Pragers positions can be debated, yet to take them out of context is deeply unfair, especially when you consider it wasnt long ago that both President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton shared his stance on gay marriage. But if you are going to anathematize someone like Prager and render him an untouchable even in a non-political context, youre saying anyone who voices an opposing view must not only be shunned, but also be driven from decent society. The same spirit animated an op-ed in The Forward by Steven Davidson. The piece was a response to commentary from the right about the lefts willingness to excuse hatemongering from Linda Sarsour, a Palestinian-American anti-Israel activist, because of shared antipathy for Trump. According to Davidson, there are 19 people who are more dangerous to the Jews than Sarsour. But while his list included some who do fit that bill, like Louis Farrakhan, David Duke and the heads of Hamas, Hezbollah and Iran, he couldnt resist including mere political opponents along with terrorists. It was bad enough that he lumped Trump as well as White House aides Steve Bannon who left last week and Sebastian Gorka together with Farrakhan and Hezbollah, in an unconvincing effort to label them as anti-Semites. But he also listed Klein, the president of the Zionist Organization of America. Most liberals dont agree with Klein about the peace process and consider him a strident figure. But he is someone who works hard to build support for the Jewish state, and his views are actually more in tune with mainstream Israeli opinion than those of The Forwards editorial board. Treating him as a threat to the Jews rather than just someone to be opposed is a signal that any deviation from liberal orthodoxy will be punished with isolation and demonization. In a world in which Google can fire an internal critic in the name of diversity, its hardly surprising to see Jewish liberals playing the same game. But those who refuse to listen to or to associate with political opponents are at the core of our societys current political illness, in which we have been divided into two warring camps that have lost the ability to listen to each other. Thats why if you think theres nothing wrong with the treatment given to Prager and Klein, then dont bother the rest of us with hypocritical complaints about Trump. Jonathan S. Tobin is a former editor of the Jewish Exponent and is the opinion editor of JNS.org, which provided this article.

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August 23, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Jews Should Use Charlottesville To Overcome Bigotry And Black People Can, Too – Forward

There is comfort to be taken in some of what emerged from the ugliness of Charlottesville. Despite the horrific events, there is surely solace to be had in the widespread revulsion, for example, that was evoked in so very many Americans, Democrats and Republicans alike, by the marching and chanting white supremacists. And the utter rejection by many conservative media and leading lawmakers from President Trumps own party of his equivocating over the events in Virginia should also bring us a measure of comfort, as well as the accelerated removal of statues lionizing Confederate leaders. But for me, an Orthodox rabbi, Charlottesville is also an opportunity for something I have long hoped for: a coming together of African Americans and Jews. Since the days in which Jews marched alongside our black brothers and sisters in Selma for civil rights, there has been a tragic fraying of the relationship between these two American populations. But in truth, the relationship between the two groups has always been fraught, and understandably so. As many in our community are fond of saying, America has been good to the Jews. From the smattering of Sephardi Jews who came to these shores in colonial times to the German Jews who followed in the nineteenth century to the Eastern European survivors of the Holocaust, the Jews who arrived on Americas shores all found America to be, truly, a land of opportunity, and many found success in business, professions, academics and other fields. They were, particularly the refugees among them, reborn in their new land. Black people, by contrast, could never be reborn here in the same way because of how they came here. Its hard, one imagines, to conjure the image of a goldeneh medina, the gilded land that was America to European Jews, while bound in the hold of a slave ship. And while subsequent generations of Jews were able to build on their forebears successes, the descendants of American slaves came to be marked not only by the hue of their skin but by the emotional legacy of their ancestors experiences. And so, even after Jim Crow the man, a white entertainer who performed in blackface, had long been buried, and the laws that came to carry his name undermined by the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the psychological legacy of slavery and the persistence of racial discrimination prevented many black people from economic and social advancement. Add the War on Drugs, the prison industrial complex, and the practice of red-lining that banks used to keep African Americans from being able to purchase their homes and climb into the middle class, we have one of Americas worst moral stains, one which persists to this day. Unfortunately, my community is not free of discrimination. Many Jews, like other white people, tended to look condescendingly on African Americans, and the latter readily reciprocated with resentment. In some cases, that resentment came from the leadership, like Louis Farrakhan and his followers, with their fantasy-fueled hatred. In others, it came from personal and communal tragedies, like the 1991 race riots in Crown Heights. My personal experience was different, though. I spent my childhood in an observant Jewish home (my father, of blessed memory, was the rabbi of a small Baltimore shul) and a racially mixed neighborhood; one of my best friends was a black boy a bit older than I. Junie and I would play ball and ride our bikes on the rocky hills near where we lived. It was a mixed-race friendship that seems unthinkable in todays racial climate. In neighborhoods like Crown Heights and Flatbush, you dont often see African American kids playing with Jewish kids. Baltimore was very much the South, and our domestic help was an African American woman named Lucille Jackson. My mother, of blessed memory, a Polish immigrant, treated her like a part of the family, and Lucille was like a tante to me. When she grew too old to do real work, my mother would have her come over all the same to do some dusting, so that Mama could, as always, serve her lunch and pay her wages, as compensation, not charity. That lesson in kavod habriot, honoring all people, remains with me to this day. Then there was Dhanna, the librarian in Providence, Rhode Island, where my wife and I raised our children, who was so kind to them during their frequent visits to the public library, always encouraging them, helping them find what they were looking for and proudly placing the artwork they regularly produced for her on her desk for all to see. And Desi, our own young daughters friend, who became quite conversant with the laws of kashrut and Shabbat. I realize that my personal upbringing and experiences may not have been typical for a haredi Jew. There is distrust, if not disdain, in parts of the haredi world in fact, in the larger Jewish one, too for black people. Just as there is animus among some in the African American community for Jews. I have had unpleasant encounters, too. I wont forget the group of boys who asked my classmates and me if they could join our baseball game. Once their team was at bat, its members decided to turn the Louisville Sluggers on us. No one should ever have to hear the sound of wood hitting skull. I also wont forget the Heil Hitler that a black teen delighted in shouting at my father and me when we would walk together to shul. Even these days, I come across the occasional anti-Semite of color. One actually greeted me mere months ago on a city bus with a hearty Heil Hitler! of his own. Of course, I have met more than the occasional pale-faced Jew-baiter, too. There are good and bad people in every population, something whose implications we too often overlook. Mindful of the Talmudic imperative to judge all men favorably (Avot, 1:6) and my parents example, I have never measured any human being by any yardstick other than his own words or deeds, and never prejudged anyone because of his race or the behavior of any of its other members. And my wife and I always sought and I think successfully to instill that same attitude in our children. All the same, in my experience, the arc of the moral universe, to use abolitionist Theodore Parkers memorable phrase (made famous by Reverend King), has been bending toward justice. While most Orthodox Jews and African Americans tend to live in their own, separate social and cultural milieus, it isnt unusual anymore to see sincerely friendly interactions between members of the two groups. Its not unusual, but its also not often enough. What might hopefully advance that happy development is Charlottesville. The ad promoting the Unite the Right rally was designed to evoke a fascist poster, with birds reminiscent of the Nazi eagle soaring through the sky over marchers carrying Confederate flags instead of swastikas. Ponder that. Nazi eagles and Confederate flags. White supremacists was the self-definition of choice among the marchers. And as they marched that Jewish Sabbath night, the torches they carried intentionally evocative of those of Klansmen, they chanted, loudly, lustily, Jews shall not replace us! And Blood and soil! an English rendering of the Nazi blut und boden. This city is run by Jewish communists and criminal n****s, one demonstrator informed a Vice News reporter. The time has come, in this post-Charlottesville era, for all Jews and all African Americans to reject generalizations born of the worst examples in the others community and recognize that the malevolent drawing of a circle around our two peoples should impel us to understand, despite how dissimilar we may be, how joined, in fact, we are. Avi Shafran blogs at rabbiavishafran.com and serves as Agudath Israel of Americas director of public affairs. The views and opinions expressed in this article are the authors own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Forward.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Monday’s Sound Off – The Mercury

President Trump did not say he condoned what happened in Charlottesville. I repeat, did not condone it. He simply stated a fact there were two sides there, both were involved. Once again you people on the left are totally incapable of accepting the truth. If you listened to what the president said, yes, neo-Nazis, the Klan and white supremacists are bad people, but so are Black Lives Matter, Antifa and those violent thugs from the left. There is equal blame for both sides and neither side has the high ground. Tea Party Everyone needs to remember it takes two to tango. Charlottesville was a dance that went horribly wrong. Sad thing is people today want to claim victimization. I call it the lottery mentality. George Washington was a veteran and the Civil War people were veterans. From 1776 to 1865, all those folks were veterans who fought in those wars. Lets remember what they did and having a statue in their character is a great thing. Remember history. Advertisement After reading the insert about Montgomery County Community College in Wednesdays Mercury, I cant believe that three county commissioners can go and put a tax on all the homeowners and property owners in Montgomery County to support the business and everything else that theyre teaching but theyre also teaching dance and theater. What kind of a college course is dance and theater that all the people in Montgomery County should be paying for? Im calling about the street construction in the North End of Pottstown. All of our furniture on the porch and all of our cars are full of dirt and the stones are everywhere in the street. Is the borough going to clean up all the stones after all this construction? The construction vehicles are going faster than 25 mph which is the speed limit here in town past our house all day and night. They start at 7 a.m. and stop at 8 or 9 p.m. Whos cleaning up the mess? Just Wondering After I get divorced I am never getting married again. Instead Im just going to find a woman I dont like and Im just going to give her a house. Patriot There you go again Bonnie talking about things that are not exactly the truth. President Obama does not and never did hate the military. Your president dodged the draft with five deferments, now he surrounds himself with generals that he claims are not as smart as he is. Stick to the facts Bonnie. Hawaiian Punch Party Have you noticed all these short messages by Gov. Wolf about small items that are going on in Pennsylvania and then it says Paid for by taxpayers? Its no wonder Pennsylvania has no money if we have to tell everybody how to solve their own commonsense problems. This is to the person who commented about watching a lot of golf. Apparently you never played the game. Its not a coin that they use to mark where a golf ball lands on the green, its a small brown plastic marker. James from Pottstown For the ladies or gentlemen who are calling about numerous calls about credit cards, I got them three or four times a day. Well I got tired of it. I blow a whistle in the phone now and they dont call as much. Washington and Jefferson owned slaves, fought to create the U.S. government, swore oaths to defend this government. Robert E. Lee owned slaves. He took an oath as an officer to the federal government, then he turned around, broke his oath, fought for slavery and he should be considered a traitor. Bob from Phoenixville Why would Donald Trump attack Amazon which is the leading Internet retailer in the world? They also employ thousands and thousands of Americans. Simple, because of the CEOs ownership in the Washington Post. However The Post and Amazon are two different companies. He is a vicious vindictive person for which there is no room in the White House for such a person. He is also a bigot after his third different remark about Virginia. Clark S. Kent A big shout-out to nurse Mike on the second floor of Pottstown hospital for holding my hand and getting me through a scary and unknown procedure I had to have done the other day. Thanks again, I really appreciated all your help. What is the difference between David Duke supporting Donald Trump and the anti-Semite and racist Louis Farrakhan, Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton supporting Obama? There is no difference. The media only wants to call out what goes on with the right. They never want to comp to whats happening on the left. Antifa is exactly the same as the KKK. They burn, they loot, they create violence. Theres no difference. Sound Off is a forum to spur dialogue from residents of the communities we serve on topics of interest in those communities. Fair game are comments that raise issues of note or amplify ongoing debates. We will not publish comments that are potentially libelous, slanderous, mean-spirited, vulgar or inappropriate. Publications of Sound Off comments are at the sole discretion of the publisher.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Sheriff Clarke ‘proud’ of Trump’s Charlottesville response; Huckabee … – Fox News

This is a rush transcript from “Hannity,” August 14, 2017. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated. SEAN HANNITY, HOST: Welcome to “Hannity.” This is a “Fox News Alert.” The president condemning yet again in the strongest possible terms the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, the violence and the mayhem. Also tonight, we will analyze the horrific politicizing of these events. That’s tonight’s very important breaking news “Opening Monologue.” All right, what we saw take place in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend — it is disgusting, it is despicable. And it’s really hard to imagine in this day and age that there are actually people out there that could do this to their fellow human beings. It’s hard to imagine that there are people in this country that have these types of hateful, inexcusable, racist, white supremacist views. And it’s also hard to imagine that there are still some people that have that high level of ignorance that, yes, live amongst us. Now, there’s no place in this country for these neo-Nazi, fascist, white supremacists. And they — what they stand for should be condemned in the widest terms possible by all good people in this country. What they believe in — it’s the complete opposite of what the United States of America stands for, and sadly, we have seen way too much of these kinds of acts over the years. Now, as far as the groups that were involved, the white supremacists, do they have a constitutional right to free speech, regardless of how disgusting and offensive what they say is? Unfortunately, that’s how our First Amendment works. Even the American Civil Liberties Union, one of Trump’s biggest outspoken critics, they defended the organization this weekend and their right to rally in court. So it’s allowed to happen. And then the other groups down there also have the same right to speak out against these evil people. Now, make no mistake, this was all provoked by radical, racist extremists. But the violent clashes should never have happened. Where were the police? Over the last number of years also we have watched extremists on both sides battling it out. We have seen this act too often. It doesn’t solve a thing, and it only gives these radicals on both sides more ammo so they can continue to spread their hatred. And what’s so repulsive in all of this — we have a woman that died, dozens of fellow human beings injured this week, and over what? A bunch of idiots fighting over stupid, ignorant anti-American views and ideas? Now, instead of covering this horrible situation fairly, openly, honestly, like we’re going to do tonight, over the weekend, we saw the destroy Trump establishment media go into a feeding frenzy, trying to assign blame as quickly as possible, and of course to paint the president, all conservatives, all Republicans as racist and bigots. That’s not true. These are the exact same tactics we see by the left every two and four years during the election cycles. And we’ll have more on that in just a minute. President Trump is not a racist. Conservatives, the conservatives I know, like and love, Republicans I know and like — they’re not racist. The country is filled with people that are good, honorable and decent, and that’s most conservatives, if not all that I know. Now, I’m not saying — nobody’s saying racism doesn’t exist. It does exist in this country. It’s sad. But if we’re going to be fair and honest, this is not exclusive to one particular party. Now, there are racists on both sides in America, but most Americans, what are they? Good, great people. They condemn racism. They get up every morning, they work hard, play by the rules, pay their taxes, create goods and services that others want, need and desire. And you know what? They raise their kids to be good people. You know, for all the white supremacists out there, you know what? There are others on the left, the Nation of Islam leader, for example, Louis Farrakhan, that are insane. It’s a simple truth. But all we heard all weekend long from the left, the mainstream media, is that these extremists in Charlottesville this weekend somehow represent all conservatives, that the president supports them. He doesn’t. All Republicans. And they attacked the president again and again and again. Don’t believe it? Take a look. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS) JAMELLE BOUIE, SLATE MAGAZINE, ON “FACE THE NATION”/CBS: And if you’re looking for the roots of why white supremacists and neo-Nazis felt emboldened to march in a college town, you don’t have to look very far from the White House. UNIDENTIFIED MALE, MSNBC: We have a racist as a president because a man that cannot stand up and condemn the Ku Klux Klan and Nazism is a racist. ANA NAVARRO, CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: He was a coward. He didn’t have the spine to behave like the leader of the United States, and I feel that to be shameful. He’s not only unfit to be president. In my book, his lack of empathy, his lack of leadership, his lack of courage, he’s unfit to be human! (END VIDEO CLIPS) HANNITY: Unbelievable, unfit to be human. All right, let’s go back, let’s take a look at the president’s original comments on all of this. This all happened before a madman plowed into a group of people with his car. Here’s what President Trump tweeted. Quote, “We all must be united and condemn all that hate stands for. There’s no place for this kind of violence in America. Let’s come together as one.” The president also said, “We must remember this truth. No matter our color, creed, religion or political party, we are all Americans first.” And once the protesters — once it turned deadly, President Trump immediately came out and gave a statement. Here’s what the president said. Take a look. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, AUG. 12) PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides — on many sides. (END VIDEO CLIP) HANNITY: Now, all weekend long, I, like many of you, watched the media going insane, acting like they didn’t know what the president was talking about. They ran with a false narrative all weekend. Oh, big story, he didn’t mention the groups by name. Well, it couldn’t be more obvious, more transparent who the president was talking about. He was standing for equal justice under the law, against racism. And the press, what did they do? They used a high-profile act of violence to bludgeon the president and conservatives politically. So predictable. Now, it was crystal clear what the president was talking about. But the press, they went after him anyway. And the destroy Trump establishment media — they didn’t care about the violence, seemingly, or the racial tensions they’re creating or the civil unrest as much as they cared about using this tragedy as an opportunity to attack people they disagree with, and in particular, the president, to try and inflict as much damage politically as possible. You know what? Just like they have done since November 8! That’s a simple truth. So President Trump once again, he came out today. He condemned again what happened, and yes, he called out the groups by name. Take a look. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP) TRUMP: Racism is evil. And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans. (END VIDEO CLIP) HANNITY: But you know what? We all know that’s not going to be good enough. The media is never going to be satisfied with anything the president says or does because it’s not part of their ideology and narrative. They want to paint the president, conservatives, Republicans as racist and bigoted by ignoring what he said this weekend, ignoring him over the years again and again and again condemning white supremacists, people like David Duke. For example — let me give you an example. This is Donald Trump over the years, something the destroy Trump media will never show you, condemning Duke, white supremacists. Look. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS) CHRIS WALLACE, DEBATE MODERATOR, MARCH 3, 2016: What are your views on the Ku Klux Klan and white supremacists? TRUMP: I totally disavow the Ku Klux Klan. I totally disavow David Duke. I’ve been doing it now for two weeks. This is — you’re probably about the 18th person that’s asked me the question. TRUMP, FEB. 26, 2016: I didn’t even know he endorsed me, David Duke endorsed me. OK. All right. I disavow. CHUCK TODD, MODERATOR, “MEET THE PRESS”/NBC, JULY 23, 2016: David Duke announced his Senate candidacy, claiming your agenda for his own, or essentially saying glad that you spoke out… TRUMP: Are you ready before you ask the question? TODD: Newt Gingrich said every Republican should repudiate this guy, not matter what it takes. TRUMP: I did. And I do. Rebuked. Is that OK? Rebuked. TODD: Rebuked? TRUMP: Done. MATT LAUER, NBC NEWS, FEB. 2000: What do you see as the biggest problem with the Reform Party right now? TRUMP: Well, you’ve got David Duke just joined, a bigot, a racist, a problem. I mean, this is not exactly the people you want in your party. (END VIDEO CLIPS) HANNITY: Bigot, racist, rebuke, repudiate, want nothing to do with. Now, President Trump and the people that voted for him and that support his agenda — they don’t like racists. They don’t like bigots. They do not like what went down in Charlottesville. Conservatives that I have known my whole life, Republicans I have known my whole life, people like me — what was this election about? The forgotten men and women, the people that are out of work, in poverty, on food stamps, the doubling of our national debt. What was this election about? It was about getting jobs, getting our economy back in shape. It was also about keeping our country safe and secure. That’s what this election was about. But yet every two to four years, the left, the Democrats, the media — they divide Americans by playing the race card every single election! Remember 1998, radio ad, Missouri, oh, elect a Republican and black churches are going to burn? Or the James Byrd at in 2000, when George Bush supported the death penalty for the guy that brutally murdered an innocent man by the name of James Burr (ph). For example, take a look throughout history. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS) HILLARY CLINTON, THEN-PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE, FEB. 16, 2016: Many Republicans talk in coded racial language about takers and losers. They demonize President Obama and encourage the ugliest impulses of the paranoid fringe. BARACK OBAMA, THEN-PRESIDENT, NOV. 3, 2016: If you accept the support of Klan sympathizers before you are president, you will accept their support after you’re president. JOE BIDEN, THEN-VICE PRESIDENT, AUG. 14, 2012: They’re going to put you all back in chains. AL GORE, THEN-VICE PRESIDENT, JULY 12, 2000: It’s wrong what the leader of the Republican Party and this Congress are doing in blocking an accurate census because they don’t want to count everyone that they don’t think they can count on. GORE, JULY 16, 1998: Don’t tell me we’ve got a color-blind society! (END VIDEO CLIPS) HANNITY: Notice Al Gore changes his voice, his cadence, his tone. Now, in 1998, before a predominantly black audience — he even went as far as to say Republicans know that theirs is the wrong agenda for African-Americans. They don’t even want to count you in the Census. What a lie! And then there’s President Obama’s book, remember? “Audacity of Hope.” Where was the media? Remember, he recounted a sermon from Reverend Jeremiah Wright from the church of G-d America, white folks’ greed runs a world in need. Was the media outraged over this? (BEGIN AUDIO CLIP FROM “THE AUDACITY OF HOPE”) OBAMA: It is this world, a world where cruise ships throw away more food in a day than most residents of Port-au-Prince see in a year, where white folks’ greed runs a world in need, apartheid in one hemisphere, apathy in another hemisphere. (END AUDIO CLIP) HANNITY: Oh, you’re so inspired by Reverend Wright, black liberation ideology — he sat in the pews of Wright’s church for 20 years! Remember Reverend Wright? Remember him attacking U.S. KKK of A, and the Sunday after 9/11, “America’s chickens coming home to roost.” Take a look. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS) REV. JEREMIAH WRIGHT, SEPT. 16, 2001: The stuff we have done overseas is now brought right back into our own front yard! America’s chickens are coming home to roost! WRIGHT, APRIL 13, 2003: No, no, no! Not God bless America, God damn America that’s in the Bible for killing innocent people! God damn America for treating here citizens as less than human! (END VIDEO CLIPS) HANNITY: Twenty-plus years in the church. How many in the media covered Ayers and Dohrn? Well, that’s what President Obama started his political career. What about the Nation of Islam leader, Louis Farrakhan, called white people the devil, the skunk of the planet Earth, and has said many racist, anti-semitic things, too many to count. Recent report, Daily Caller — well, they’re saying that Farrakhan is claiming — and there’s audio of it — that he met privately with then-Senator Barack Obama in 2008 before he announced his presidential run. And he said that the Nation of Islam supported Barack Obama quietly for president, and when he was a community organizer. Now, of course, as the DailyCaller pointed out, neither Obama or Farrakhan want to talk about that friendship. Has there been any investigation by the media? Pretty shocking. Well, the media didn’t think it was important for you to know these things. They didn’t cover a lot of those things. Then there’s President Obama’s handling — remember? All the high-profile racial cases when he was president where he jumped to conclusions, rushed to judgment without facts or information? He’s supposed to be a lawyer, too. Watch this. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS) OBAMA, JULY 22, 2009: The Cambridge police acted stupidly. There’s a long history in this country of African-Americans and Latinos being stopped by law enforcement disproportionately. Now, that’s just a fact. OBAMA, JULY 19, 2013: The African- American community is also knowledgeable that there’s a history of racial disparities in the application of our criminal laws. (END VIDEO CLIPS) HANNITY: And President Obama also had members from the group — remember? Black Lives Matter, people chanting things like, “Pigs in a blanket, fry ’em like bacon,” talking about cops. Or when they talked about, “What do we want? Dead cops. When do we want them? Now.” Oh, they were invited to the White House, where the president praised that group. Take a look. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP) OBAMA, FEB. 18, 2016: We’ve also got some young people here who are making history as we speak, people like Britney (ph), who served on our police task force in the wake of Ferguson and has led many of the protests that took place there and shined a light on the injustice that was happening. People like Deray McKesson (ph), who’s done some outstanding work mobilizing in Baltimore around these issues. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIP) HANNITY: Remember Hillary Clinton running for president? She praised Black Lives Matter, the same people. “What do we want? Dead cops. When do we want them? Now.” Watch her. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS) CLINTON, AUG. 27, 2015: And we do have to stand up and say loudly and clearly black lives matter. CLINTON, OCT. 13, 2015: There’s a long list. We need a new New Deal for communities of color and the poor. (END VIDEO CLIPS) HANNITY: You ever see the media talk about these things? This is why shows like this, in my opinion, are different from the liberal mainstream media. They’ve ignored these examples for decades. They also — they don’t seem to care about the threats of violence that have been made repeatedly against our current president, President Trump. Remember? This photo was so graphic, we always have to issue the warning. It shows Kathy Griffin posing, ISIS fighter, bloody severed head of President Trump. Johnny Depp talking about killing a president. Madonna talking about blowing up the Trump White House. Really? Take a look. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS) JOHNNY DEPP, ACTOR, JUNE 22: When was the last time an actor assassinated a president? I want to clarify. I’m not an actor. (LAUGHTER) I lie for a living. However, it’s been a while, and maybe it’s time. MADONNA, JAN. 21: Yes, I have thought an awful lot about blowing up the White House. (END VIDEO CLIPS) HANNITY: Imagine, God forbid, somebody said that in the Obama years? Then there’s Shakespeare in the park, that performance showing a Trump-like person being brutally stabbed to death. Also other celebrities, Snoop Dogg, Mickey Rourke advocating for violence against the president. What about — remember the Bernie Sanders supporter, the one that targeted Republicans at baseball practice, leaving Congressman Steve Scalise fighting for his life? Well, was the media blaming Democrats for that? No, and by the way, they shouldn’t have. And I don’t blame Bernie, either. Now, by the way, the left is totally unhinged at this point. This is, sadly, who they are, the double standard they adopt. And by the way, after all these examples where Democrats line up to condemn those people, where are they condemning all the things we’re playing tonight? You see, they’ve got this separate set of rules for Republicans and Democrats. Every two to four years, Democrats divide the country. They play identity politics. It’s been a part of this playbook the Democrats used for generations. So it’s time for the destroy Trump establishment media to start recognizing how they have a massive double standard, that they have an agenda and ideology, because just like, sadly, white supremacists in Charlottesville, hatred of any kind should not be tolerated or ever given a free pass, period, whoever is involved in the hatred, like the hate we saw this weekend. Joining us with reaction, Salem Radio nationally syndicated host Larry Elder, Milwaukee County sheriff David Clark, Fox News contributor Deroy Murdock. Sheriff Clark, we’ll start with you. Anything I’m saying here that’s wrong? DAVID CLARK, MILWAUKEE COUNTY SHERIFF: No, it’s spot on, Sean. You know, and the liberal media couldn’t control themselves. They couldn’t resist the opportunity to somehow turn this on President Trump.

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August 21, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

‘White supremacists by default’: How ordinary people made Charlottesville possible – CNN

But the tragedy that took place in Charlottesville last weekend could not have occurred without the tacit acceptance of millions of ordinary, law-abiding Americans who helped create such a racially explosive climate, some activists, historians and victims of extremism say. It’s easy to focus on the angry white men in paramilitary gear who looked like they were mobilizing for a race war in the Virginia college town last Saturday. But it’s the ordinary people — the voters who elected a reality TV star with a record of making racially insensitive comments, the people who move out of the neighborhood when people of color move in, the family members who ignore a relative’s anti-Semitism — who give these type of men room to operate, they say. That was the twisted formula that made the Holocaust and Rwanda possible and allowed Jim Crow segregation to survive: Nice people looked the other way while those with an appetite for violence did the dirty work, says Mark Naison, a political activist and history professor at Fordham University in New York City. ”You have to have millions of people who are willing to be bystanders, who push aside evidence of racism, Islamophobia or sexism. You can’t have one without the other,” Naison says. “We are a country with a few million passionate white supremacists — and tens of millions of white supremacists by default,” he says. Many people prefer to focus on the usual suspects after a Charlottesville happens — the violent racial extremists who are so easy to condemn. Yet there are four types of ordinary people who also play a part in the country’s racial divisions, Naison and others say: Many of the white racists who marched in Charlottesville were condemned because they openly said they don’t believe in integration or racial equality. But millions of ordinary white Americans have been sending that message to black and brown people for at least a half a century. They send it with their actions: They don’t want to live next to or send their children to school with black or brown people, historians say. Busing, a nationwide campaign to end school segregation by shipping students of color to white schools, collapsed in large part because of fierce opposition by white parents. “White flight” — white families fleeing city neighborhoods after people of color moved in — helped create the modern suburbs. This isn’t the Jim Crow segregation that one reads about in the history books. It’s the covert or “down-low” segregationist movement that has shaped much of contemporary America since overt racism became taboo in the 1960s, says David Billings, who wrote about growing up white in the segregated South in his memoir, “Deep Denial: The Persistence of White Supremacy in United States History and Life.” “Across the country, white people withdrew from the ‘public’ sphere and migrated to ‘whites only’ suburbs to evade racial integration,” Billings wrote. “The word ‘public’ preceding words like ‘housing,’ ‘hospital,’ ‘health care,’ ‘transportation,’ ‘defender,’ ‘schools,’ and even ‘swimming pool’ in some parts of the country became code words that meant poor and most often black and Latino. The word ‘private’ began to mean ‘better.”’ Jones polled a complex subject. Many people of color self-segregate as well, and some American neighborhoods are so segregated that residents never come in contact with people of other racial or ethnic groups. Yet some white Americans are driven by the same impulses that drove some of the white racists in Charlottesville — racial separation. “We have to work hard to make our social lives reflect our values, because white people do not choose the company of people of color generally,” he says. Ball once wrote that “unconsciously or inadvertently, all of us white folks participate in forms of supremacist thought and activity.” The angry white men in Charlottesville were just being open about their white supremacy. Ball says he wasn’t surprised by their boldness. “Their climate is now better for them,” he says. President Trump’s critics blasted him for not coming out strong enough against the white racists who marched in Charlottesville. Trump initially denounced the “egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence on many sides.” It was the “many sides” qualifier that infuriated some people. They wanted an unequivocal denunciation of racism from a leader. Trump’s “many sides” response, though, wasn’t that abnormal in the context of US history. It used to be the norm for white political leaders to draw a moral equivalence between racists and those who suffered from their acts of brutality, historians say. It’s the “yes, but” rhetorical maneuver — condemn racism but add a qualifier to diminish the sincerity of what you just said. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. ran into this “yes, but” response so much that he wrote about it in his “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” He wrote: “I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizens’ Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate who is more devoted to ‘order’ than to justice; who prefers a negative peace, which is the absence of tension, to a positive peace, which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: ‘I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action…'” President Dwight Eisenhower took the “yes, but” approach when he complained he couldn’t move too fast to comply with the Supreme Court’s decision to integrate schools because people had to respect the Southern way of life, says Carol Anderson, author of “White Rage” and a professor of African-American studies at Emory University in Atlanta. “You get that equivocation,” says Anderson, “that trying to make a system that absolutely strips people of their humanity on par with people demanding their humanity.” That “yes, but” approach is often used today to discredit the grievances of the Black Lives Matter movement, another professor says. Whenever an unarmed black or brown person is shot by police, some deflect the issue by saying, “Yes, but all lives matter.” “When a police officer shoots an unarmed black person, even then it’s controversial to say racism is a factor,” says Erik Love, a sociologist at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania. “We say, ‘Why don’t we talk about these other issues. What about the crime rate, what police officers need to protect themselves.’ And suddenly we’re not talking about race anymore.” There’s a famous line from the classic film, “Casablanca.” A police officer is closing down a casino, declaring, “I’m shocked — shocked — to find that gambling is going on in here!” — all while pocketing his casino winnings as they’re being handed to him on the sly. That line could apply to Trump supporters who say they’re frustrated by the President’s statements on race since Charlottesville erupted. How could you be shocked? “This is who he is, this is what he does,” says Anderson, the Emory University professor. “‘Mexicans are rapists and criminals.’ That’s what he said in his first speech. Their complicity comes in the form of self-denial instead of owning it.” For those who say they voted for Trump despite his intolerance, Anderson offers this analogy: Minister Louis Farrakhan. “If he was running for office and black people voted in droves for him, the narrative would be, ‘They’re supporting a racist,”’ she says. “As my buddy said, is that what you said to the followers of Louis Farrakhan? No, nobody says that to the followers of Louis Farrakhan. No, they blasted him as an anti-Semite, which he is, and say, ‘how can people follow this bigoted message?’ That’s the ultimate testament — that you could be Donald Trump and be President. There is no black person who could have the kind of vices Donald Trump has and, hell, be governor. Maybe you could be mayor somewhere.” Many voters knew Trump would bring something else to the Oval Office — chaos. That’s why they chose him. He’s their first reality TV president, one writer says. “He would say horrible things about people, act out and break the rules, but people weirdly respected it,” she says. “They said he was a winner, and that’s how a winner wins.” It’s not, however, how many would want a nation’s leader to handle a racial crisis. Ari Kohen knows something about the cost of hate. When he looked at images of neo-Nazis chanting “Jews will not replace us!” in Charlottesville, he thought of his grandfather, Zalman Kohen. He was living in rural Romania in 1944 when the Nazis rounded him up with the help of his neighbors and sent him to a death camp. His grandfather survived, moved to the United States and lived until he was 90. But he never returned to Romania, says Kohen, an associate professor of political science at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. “He could never forgive his neighbors,” he says. “These were people who, maybe they didn’t love Jews, but these were people who lived next to each other. They knew his family and he knew their family. The idea that they could all stand by while life was completely and forever changed for large portions of their community — he could never understand it.” Many scholars have been vexed by the same question. When they examine genocidal events like the Holocaust, many come to the same conclusion: Never underestimate the ability of ordinary people to look away. Some do it with family members. Kohen says the hundreds of white racists who descended on Charlottesville must have family or friends who noticed their behavior beforehand. He suspects that some refused to confront them. “There’s this wink and nod, everyone knows that this person is going down a dangerous path and people passively go along with it,” he says. “They don’t want to rock the boat. This is family or a friend. It’s hard to distance yourself from people you care about.” This passivity extends to how people react when their country’s leaders become intolerant, others say. Once you see it coming, you have a duty to act, says Naison, the activist and Fordham professor. “If you don’t speak up when this sort of ideology is being promoted at the highest level, you end up being complicit in the actions taken by its more extreme adherents,” Naison says. “Once the demons are unleashed, you’ve become a co-conspirator.” Naison says he doesn’t think most Americans realize how dangerous it is in their country right now. He’s warned people who voted for Trump. “I told these guys, you can’t control this; you’re playing with fire,” Naison says. “Open, violent communal warfare is scary. You can’t control it. Look at what happened in the Balkans, Northern Ireland, Israel.” There’s also evidence, though, that millions of ordinary Americans from all walks of life don’t want that kind of America. Heather Heyer, the demonstrator who lost her life in Charlottesville, was a young white woman who marched in solidarity with black protesters. Millions of Americans have since taken to the streets or social media to stand against what happened there. Obama quoted Nelson Mandela, the South African leader who knew something about hate and reconciliation. In his 1994 autobiography “Long Walk to Freedom,” Mandela wrote: “No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.” Yet to get to that place Mandela talked about, it may be necessary to not just look at the usual suspects people condemn when racial violence spills into public view. If you want to know why those white racists now feel so emboldened, it may help to look at all the ordinary people around you, your neighbors, your family members, your leaders. But first, start by looking at yourself.

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August 19, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Left vilifies Trump as world burns – WND.com – WND.com

Ironically, having lived through the Clinton White House years as the founder, chairman and general counsel of Judicial Watch, which I conceived of at the time to be the Peoples Justice Department (Freedom Watch now occupies that mantle), I always said that the medias focus on the Monica Lewinsky scandal, which I never thought that important given the 40-plus other Clinton scandals, allowed Osama bin Laden to plot the September 11 terror attacks as the nation was titillated with an intern and a low-class president. My tag line at the time, was that while Slick Willy was having sex with Monica, it was the nation that was about to get screwed. This same dangerous phenomenon is sadly true today, as the media and the political establishment of both parties have not learned their lesson at the continuing expense of the American people. The tragic events in Barcelona, Spain, Thursday, where scores of people were attacked by radical Islamist terrorists, underscore why our nation cannot afford to be diverted with leftist-generated bogus investigations of so-called Russian collusion and obsessed with whipped up racial clashes over Civil War statues spawned and ginned up by the last eight years of racist words and actions of former President Obama and his equally destructive attorneys general. These latent white haters, with all of their support for Black Lives Matter, Al Sharpton, the New Black Panthers Party and Louis Farrakhan and his evil Nation of Islam, regrettably served as a recruiting tool for white nationalists, Neo-Nazis and the Ku Klux Klan. Ironically, these evil white groups are simply the flip side of these equally evil black nationalist white haters who masquerade as persons and groups seeking racial equality. My brave African-American client and good friend Dr. Demetrick Pennie, a Dallas police sergeant who was assaulted in the Dallas police massacre over a year ago and for whom I have brought a lawsuit, can teach you better than anyone about these radical black separatists. Indeed, Demetrick earned a Ph.D. in this field of study. And, sure enough, true to predictions, after I filed suit on his behalf for the assault and murder perpetrated by a disciple of Louis Farrakhan, Demetrick was threatened with death, being pummeled with racial epithets by these hateful black separatists, much as one might expect from the Klan. It is telling and instructive that just days before a Farrakhan black Muslim separatist henchman went on a killing spree in Dallas, this world-class hater of whites and cops was calling for their deaths publicly. This video speaks loud and clear: Rather than denouncing this anti-white, anti-cop call to death and general hatred, what did our then-president do and say: you guessed it, nothing! Nor did the racially sensitive Eric Holder or Loretta Lynch, his past and then current attorneys general. This virtual silence toward bigotry toward whites and cops, as well as police of any color, was the modus operandi of the Obama administration. While the president was out politically whipping up racial division to further his political and otherwise bigoted interests, he and his comrades could not have cared less about anyone else who was not of his shade. And that is why all the vitriol and bloodletting by the leftist media and politicians against President Trump for supposedly not commenting in a stronger way about the hateful acts of white supremacists, Neo-Nazis and the Klan after the tragic Charlottesville riots are not only hypocritical but simply dishonest. This drumbeat of attacks, only interrupted last Thursday by the terrorist attack in Barcelona, is designed to finally bring down Donald J. Trump and his presidency. Where were similar attacks on President Obama and his attorneys general under similar tragic circumstances? They, unlike President Trump, were guilty of whipping up racial divide during their administration, as they also witnessed the equally hateful incitement to violence of Farrakhan, black extortionists like Sharpton and black separatists. These haters not coincidentally had a free visitor pass to the Obama White House. Yes, President Trump was right to prudently call it evil on both sides before all facts were known, and later single out the white separatists, Neo-Nazis and the Klan when the dust cleared at Charlottesville. He was also right to later call out the sham excuse to sow more racial divide by continuing a contrived fight over Civil War statues. Notwithstanding their historical importance, and I understand this as an adopted Southerner myself, having spent most of my adult life in Dixie, this theatre of the absurd feud is simply a diversionary tactic and smokescreen. Until now, few people, African-Americans included, paid any attention to these statues. Just in the last few days, for instance, the senile House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi claims to have experienced an epiphany that, low and behold, there are statues of Civil War Confederacy heroes lurking in the Capitol Rotunda. Not wasting a cheap opportunistic beat, she called for them to be removed! But its not just the left and its enablers in the media and the Democratic Party establishment who are fomenting more racial divide and undoubtedly more violence, but establishment Republicans as well who with the likes of Sen. Lindsey Graham have taken this as an opportunity to try to drive him from office. They covet running their establishment presidential candidate in 2020. While this nation is being pulled apart at the seams over politically motivated Russian collusion investigations, shedding crocodile tears and feigning a nervous breakdown over whether President Trump expressed himself clearly enough in condemning white nationalists post-Charlottesville, let us not forget that the previous president and his followers haters of whites and police, like Black Lives Matter, many of whom were also present at Charlottesville and incited and engaged in violence there had been silent during the Obama years when whites and cops were harmed and killed. And, while the cowards of the Republican establishment joined in the hateful chorus against President Trump, including many who pretend to be conservative cable news commentators, like Shepard Smith all of whom are petrified of also being called white racists if they do not throw their lot in with the left the nation is being dangerously diverted from focusing on the real threat of more terrorism on our shores, as just occurred in Barcelona. There are also the looming nuclear showdowns with North Korea and its equally evil partner, Iran, as well as other dangerous foreign threats. Yes, the phenomenon of the nation being fatally distracted during the Monica Lewinsky scandal of the Clinton years is alive and well. But, the real threat is that if this is not put to rest soon, we all might wind up dead. Just ask the thousands of good souls who died on Sept. 11, 2001.

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August 19, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed

Jewish supporters get more critical of Trump – The Philadelphia Tribune

NEW YORK Ivanka Trump’s rabbi denounced President Donald Trump for blaming “both sides” in a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Va., as the number of American Jewish leaders willing to criticize him grew. Rabbi Haskel Lookstein of Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun, and other rabbis from the prominent modern Orthodox synagogue in Manhattan, said in a Facebook message late Wednesday that they were “deeply troubled by the moral equivalency and equivocation” of Trump’s reaction. Lookstein oversaw Ivanka Trump’s conversion to Judaism. He has only rarely commented on the president. Separately, the Republican Jewish Coalition, which has supported Trump through earlier controversies, urged him “to provide greater moral clarity in rejecting racism, bigotry and anti-Semitism.” Among the coalition’s board members is Las Vegas casino magnate and GOP donor Sheldon Adelson, who eventually supported Trump. “The Nazis, the KKK, and white supremacists are dangerous anti-Semites,” the Republican Jewish Coalition said in a statement Wednesday. “There are no good Nazis and no good members of the Klan.” The rebukes are the latest from American Jews outraged and frightened not only by Saturday’s march, which drew neo-Nazis and Ku Klux Klan members ostensibly to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. But they were also troubled by Trump’s reaction. At a news conference Tuesday, Trump doubled down on his initial comments on Saturday and said, “I think there is blame on both sides” and “there were very fine people on both sides.” A car driven by an alleged white nationalist plowed into a group of counter-protesters at the march, killing a woman, Heather Heyer, and injuring 19 others. Rabbi Rick Jacobs, president of the liberal Union for Reform Judaism, the largest American synagogue movement, and an outspoken critic of many Trump policies, said it should have been “incredibly simple and easy and obvious” for the president to denounce white supremacists and neo-Nazis. A Reform Jewish synagogue in Charlottesville, Congregation Beth Israel, which sits one block from the site of Saturday’s demonstrations, said Nazi websites had called for burning the synagogue, so congregational leaders moved their Torah scrolls out of the building and hired a guard. Marchers passed by carrying flags with swastikas and shouting the Nazi salute “Sieg Heil,” the synagogue president said. But condemnations of Trump also have come from U.S. Jewish groups that usually avoid commenting directly on the president. The Rabbinical Council of America, which is part of the modern Orthodox movement, said in a statement specifically naming Trump that, “failure to unequivocally reject hatred and bias is a failing of moral leadership and fans the flames of intolerance and chauvinism.” The American Israel Public Affairs Committee, a powerful pro-Israel source of campaign funds, issued a statement Thursday that did not name the president, but said, “We urge all elected officials to reject moral equivalence between those who promote hate and those who oppose it. There must be no quarter for bigotry in our country.” American Jews vote overwhelmingly Democratic, but Trump has maintained a solid if comparatively small base of support among American Jews who were angered by President Barack Obama’s policies in the Middle East and viewed Trump as far more friendly to Israel. Since the Charlottesville march, some of Trump’s U.S. Jewish backers have gone quiet. World Jewish Congress president Ronald Lauder, who has been one of Trump’s most prominent defenders, declined to comment through a spokesman. However, some have praised how Trump has handled the fallout from the Virginia rally. Rabbi Yaakov Menken of the Coalition for Jewish Values, an Orthodox Jewish public policy organization based in Baltimore, said the president was right to call out bigotry on “many sides.” Menken said he sees anti-Jewish bigotry coming from the right and the left, including from parts of the Black Lives Matter movement. “Why this apparent desire of some to mask hatred coming from left-wing groups? David Duke is worse than Louis Farrakhan?” Menken said of the Nation of Islam leader who has blamed Israel and Jews for the Sept. 11 attacks and accused Jews of controlling the American government. “We were not looking for him to single out the hate groups on the right.” Rabbi Marvin Hier, founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, a Holocaust education institution that fights anti-Semitism and other prejudice, said Trump failed when he didn’t single out the white nationalist marchers as “haters and bigots.” Still, Hier said Trump has had some strong accomplishments in office, pointing to the president’s handling of North Korea and Saudi Arabia. Hier had offered a prayer at Trump’s inauguration and joined faith leaders who cheered Trump at a Rose Garden ceremony in May when the president signed an executive order pledging to expand religious liberty protections. The rabbi lamented that Trump’s remarks on the violence in Virginia “interferes with the good things I think he has done.” – (AP)

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August 18, 2017   Posted in: Louis Farrakhan  Comments Closed


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