Archive for the ‘Mark Potok’ Category

DC gunman might have targeted second anti-gay hate group – Wisconsin Gazette

The head of a second Christian conservative organization said authorities found a note containing her groups contact information in the pocket of a man charged with opening fire at the Washington offices of the Family Research Council, wounding a security guard.

Traditional Values Coalition President Andrea Lafferty said FBI agents visited her groups Capitol Hill offices hours after the shooting as part of their investigation. The next day, she said, members of the Joint Terrorism Task Force came by and confirmed that our information was in his pocket, including the location of the groups offices.

I was stunned, Lafferty told The Associated Press, adding that she believes her group may have been targeted.

It wasnt immediately clear if that was the case.

An FBI representative could not be immediately reached for comment.

The head of a second Christian conservative organization said authorities found a note containing her groups contact information in the pocket of a man charged with opening fire at the Washington offices of the Family Research Council, wounding a security guard.

Traditional Values Coalition President Andrea Lafferty said FBI agents visited her groups Capitol Hill offices hours after the shooting as part of their investigation. The next day, she said, members of the Joint Terrorism Task Force came by and confirmed that our information was in his pocket, including the location of the groups offices.

I was stunned, Lafferty told The Associated Press, adding that she believes her group may have been targeted.

It wasnt immediately clear if that was the case.

An FBI representative could not be immediately reached for comment.

The accused shooter, Floyd Lee Corkins II, of Herndon, Va., was ordered held without bond on charges he opened fire in the lobby of the Family Research Council in downtown Washington.

Corkins, whose parents said he strongly supported gay rights, had a backpack full of Chick-fil-A sandwiches and a box of ammunition when he said words to the effect of I dont like your politics and shot a security guard, authorities said.

The guard was shot in the left arm but nonetheless managed to help take down the gunman, preventing what the police said could have been a deadly attack.

It wasnt immediately clear why Corkins, 28, had the chicken sandwiches.

Like the FRC, the Traditional Values Coalition has supported the president of Chick-Fil-A and his staunch opposition to same-sex marriage.

Tony Perkins, who heads the Family Research Council, hinted at a news conference that the FRC was not the only group targeted, although he did not elaborate.

While blaming Corkins for the shooting, Perkins also faulted the Southern Poverty Law Center, an Alabama-based civil rights organization that tracks and litigates against hate groups. On its website, the law center labels both Washington conservative organizations as active anti-gay groups.

Lafferty also was critical of the law center. We have been on their hit list longer than any other group, she said.

Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the SPLC, had called Perkins accusation outrageous. He said the council earned the designation for spreading false propaganda about the gay community, not for its opposition to same-sex marriage.

Lafferty said she has written Attorney General Eric Holder seeking protection for her group, but that authorities have not been responsive.

Under this Justice Department, Christians are a very low priority on their lists of concerns, she said

Corkins had recently been volunteering at a D.C. community center for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. He lived with his parents in northern Virginia.

Prosecutors requested a mental health evaluation, and Corkins public defender did not address the allegations in court.

Corkins faces charges of assault with intent to kill and bringing firearms across state. The judge ordered him held pending a hearing next week.

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DC gunman might have targeted second anti-gay hate group – Wisconsin Gazette

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The Trickle-Up Theory Of White Nationalist Thought – 90.3 KAZU

Jared Taylor was not in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. But Taylor, one of the leading voices for white rights in the country, says it was clear what really happened at that rally.

“Anyone who wishes to speak in the name of whites is subject to the heckler’s veto,” said Taylor, founder of the white advocacy website American Renaissance. “There would have been no violence, no problems of any kind if people had not shown up as counterdemonstrators, many of them wearing helmets, wielding batons, wearing shields, shouting for the death of the demonstrators. … This is not something that was provoked by the presence of racially conscious whites. It was something that was provoked by people who hate any white person who has a racial consciousness.”

Two days later, President Trump, in one of his most controversial press conferences to date, described the events at which hundreds of white protesters gathered for the so-called “Unite the Right” rally and after which a white nationalist sympathizer drove his car into a crowd, killing a counterdemonstrator in a similar way.

“Let me ask you this,” Trump told reporters Tuesday. “What about the fact that [counterdemonstrators] came charging, with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs? Do they have any problem? I think they do. … You had a group on one side that was bad and you had a group on another side that was also very violent. And nobody wants to say that. But I’ll say it right now.”

Taylor is among a group of educated, white-identity advocates who, critics say, normalize the ideas of white supremacy by couching them in language that doesn’t sound overtly racist. In doing so, those critics say, people like Taylor, authors Kevin MacDonald and Peter Brimelow, and “Unite the Right” organizers Jason Kessler and Richard Spencer sanitize racist tropes to make them palatable to a broad audience, including the upper reaches of the political mainstream.

“I think that it’s true that ultimately a lot of these ideas travel all the way from the farthest fringe of the political world, ultimately to the very top in some kind of form,” said Mark Potok, former editor of Intelligence Report, the Southern Poverty Law Center’s journal monitoring extremism.

The white protesters in Charlottesville came, among other things, to contest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. They were there, Taylor said, “to pursue their destiny free of the unwanted influence of others. This is not a hateful thing.”

Some wore swastikas. Others carried torches and Confederate flags. David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, made a speech. Videos from Friday and Saturday show marchers chanting: “Jews will not replace us!” and “blood and soil,” a Nazi slogan. Later, 20-year-old James Alex Fields Jr. allegedly drove a car into a crowd, killing counterdemonstrator Heather Heyer.

Taylor called Heyer’s death “a terrible, murderous act” that “no one would defend.” He said he is not associated with “Unite the Right” and didn’t agree with the decision some people made to wear swastikas. As founder of American Renaissance, which he says is among the “many websites and organizations that speak in the name of whites,” Taylor claims that there is no place for bigotry or hate in his ideology.

But the ideas that people gathered to defend over the weekend that the United States was founded as a white, Christian nation and should remain so; that white people face an existential threat by becoming a racial minority; that there are biological differences among racial groups that make some more intelligent and others more prone to criminality those are ideas that Taylor has been working to legitimize for decades.

“All of these characters, Peter Brimelow, Kevin MacDonald, Jared Taylor, say they’re terribly opposed to violence and, of course, would never engage in that kind of a thing,” says Potok. “Well, that’s very nice and very fine and the words are very pretty. But the reality is that these people provide the ideological foundation for people who are not so careful in what they say and do. People who are actual terrorists.”

Potok and others say that Brimelow offers such an ideological foundation with his book, Alien Nation: Common Sense About America’s Immigration Disaster, and his website, VDARE, where he says he’ll publish “anyone who has anything critical to say about immigration, environmentalists, progressives, etc.”

On Saturday, Brimelow published his own take on the events in Charlottesville, calling it a “remarkable torchlight procession.” He has published articles by fellow white-rights advocates Spencer, Kessler and MacDonald.

Marilyn Mayo of the Anti-Defamation League once described MacDonald as the country’s “foremost anti-Semite, next to David Duke.”

MacDonald is the editor-in-chief of The Occidental Observer and a former professor who left California State University, Long Beach, after coming under fire for his controversial writings. He is also one of the directors of the American Freedom Party an anti-gay, anti-feminist political party that supports deporting any American who became a citizen after 1965.

MacDonald is celebrated among neo-Nazis for a trilogy of books he published in the 1990s that trade in some of the most pernicious stereotypes about Jewish people, all under the guise of researching their evolutionary biology.

The difference between Duke and MacDonald, Mayo said, is that Duke was largely ostracized from mainstream society for his public racism, whereas MacDonald’s work was bolstered by the credibility of his university position.

MacDonald, she says, “couches his anti-Semitic views as legitimate intellectual inquiry. That’s something that might make him more acceptable to people.”

It’s hard to put numbers on how many people Taylor, Brimelow, MacDonald and others like them reach. The Internet provides a degree of anonymity to those who visit their websites. Membership in hate groups, Potok estimates, numbers around half a million people. But include those who believe that “the United States, as well as a lot of European countries, were created ‘by and for whites and ought to return to being that,’ ” he adds, and “you’re looking at a group of several million people, if not more.”

MacDonald said the organizers of Saturday’s rally had misstepped; that the swastikas and other Nazi symbols should have been banned. “Because that stuff is never going to appeal to a wide swath of white Americans,” he said. “It’s simply not. And you’re in a political arena. You have to do what’s possible and what sells. And so you have to be very cautious about that kind of thing. And I don’t think the organizers were.”

But as for the basic message from “Unite the Right,” MacDonald was on board. The marchers on Saturday were trying to convey “that whites should be able to have their own identity and a sense of their own interests like anybody else,” he says. White people in the U.S. may not be ready to accept that message now, he adds, but they will be in the future “as whites become more and more of a minority in the coming years. So I think we’re ahead of the curve.”

On that last point, MacDonald and Potok meet.

“We’re seeing the continuing normalization of these ideas,” Potok said. “I think there is a real kind of conveyor belt we have seen develop over the last few years, and even the last few decades.”

Ideas start in a tiny radical fringe group somewhere, he explains. And then they travel to larger and more moderate groups but still outside the political mainstream.

“And then they are picked up by the Drudges of the world, by the Breitbarts of the world, by those kinds of websites and ‘news organizations.’ And within, it seems, minutes, they will then be picked up and exploited by certain politicians … It is terribly important not only to have people like Jared Taylor and Peter Brimelow providing a kind of ideological foundation, but also critically important, I think, to have people like Donald Trump, who are essentially helping to mainstream and normalize these ideas.”

Accusations that Trump has been flirting with far right ideology have dogged him since before he was elected. During the campaign, Trump repeatedly distanced himself from people espousing white nationalism. He said multiple times that he disavowed the support of Duke and other white supremacists who endorsed his presidency.

But the president has been widely criticized since Saturday by both detractors and supporters for his responses to the events in Charlottesville. He first condemned the violence “on many sides,” then gave a more direct rejection of racists, “including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups,” but then followed that with even more controversy.

At Tuesday’s press conference, Trump clarified what he meant by “all sides.” And it sounded remarkably similar to something MacDonald said over the phone on Monday afternoon.

Here’s MacDonald on Monday:

“I’m not from the South. I understand they have a history and a heritage, and they don’t want to just throw it all out. But that’s what we’re going to see. And it’s not going to stop with General Robert E. Lee statues. It’s going to continue with Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, all those people, because they owned slaves, they will eventually be removed, I think. It’s just the beginning.”

And here is Trump on Tuesday:

“Not all of those people were white supremacists by any stretch. Those people were also there because they wanted to protest the taking down of a statue of Robert E. Lee. … So this week it’s Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jackson’s coming down. I wonder, is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?”

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The Trickle-Up Theory Of White Nationalist Thought – 90.3 KAZU

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How Did The Confederate Flag Come North? – WNPR News

Christina Hunt Wood lives upstate, in Delaware County. In 2015, soon after the mass shootings at a church in Charleston, SC, she started noticing Confederate flags everywhere.

“You’d find them popping up on homes around town,” she said.

Delaware County is almost entirely white. Christina is biracial; her dadis black. And to her, the flag is a symbol of hatred.

“I just felt like I was surrounded by really frightening people,” she said.

Now she’s helping leadan effortto ban Confederate flag sales at the Delaware County fair. Sherenewed her effort thispast weekend in the wake of the violence in Charlottesville that left one woman dead and many others injured.

How did the flag cross the Mason-Dixon line into other parts of the country, including rural New York?

“It ‘jumped’ in part because of the 1948 ‘Dixiecrat’ campaign of Strom Thurmond, which gave the Confederate Battle flag greater prominence than it had had for decades,” said Fitzhugh Brundage, a historian at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

In the 1950s and ’60s, the flag united those who opposed desegregation, particularly in the wake of the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision.

“And then the flag was embraced in popular culture as a symbol of rebellion,” through the image of countless bad-ass bikers, bands like Lynyrd Skynyrd and TV shows like The Dukes of Hazard, Brundage said.

In 2015, after the Confederate flag was takendown from the state capitol in Charleston, hundreds of pro-flag rallies were organized across the country, many of themin non-Southern states like Washington, Oregon, Michigan and Ohio.

Mark Potok, an expert on the radical right who formerly worked at the Southern Poverty Law Center, argued that many working-class whites in New York or the Midwest don’t care about the Confederacy.

But Potok said asthe country pays increased attention to the rights of the LGBT community and peopleof color, “many of them feel, quite strongly, that they’re being left behind. That the society and the culture doesn’t give a damn about them. And that somehow white people who ‘founded’ this nation are being forgotten,” he said.

Brian Levin, who runsthe Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, said the flag is “being used as a stick to say ‘This is where we’re drawing the line.'”

Levin thinks many people can easily relate to the pain or suffering of an individual.

“But when the harms are genocidal, or centuries-long, the ability for people to process it becomes much more limited,” he said.

Levinhopes the violence in Charlottesville will prompt a sustained pushback against white supremacists and an accurate understanding of American history, in all its complexity.

“But it’s going to get worse before it gets better,” he said.

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A Closer Look At One Hate Group In West Palm Beach | WLRN – WLRN

Florida ranks No. 2 in the list of U.S. states with the most active hate groups. The most recent Hate Map, put out regularly by the Southern Poverty Law Center, shows 63 hate groups operating from Pensacola to Miami.

In South Florida, specifically West Palm Beach, the group Stormfront has been particularly influential in spreading white supremacist ideas. WLRN talked to MarkPotok, writer and expert on the radical right, about Storm Front’s role in spreading hate in our state and elsewhere.

Mark Potok, formerly of the Southern Poverty Law Center, and an expert on the radical right, talks about one group in West Palm Beach that has been a big player in spreading hate.

POTOK: I think what is unquestionably happening is that the radical right as a whole is growing. That does not necessarily mean that the number of groups, Klan groups, neo-Nazi groups, and so on is growing. I think what we are noticing more and more is that an awful lot of people who are essentially unaffiliated are coming into this movement as individuals; they’re not actually joining groups in many cases.

WLRN: Florida is now ranked second in the country in the number of hate groups being tracked by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Why is Florida so attractive, or is it just that we’re a very populous state?

Florida has some of its own unique contributing factors. I think one of the important things about Florida is how very divided it is.

If you really think about the state of Florida, South Florida is really quite a different world from Central and Northern Florida. I mean, if you go to places like Tallahassee or Jacksonville essentially you are in the Deep South. And certainly that is even more true as you get into more rural areas, not just the urban areas.

In South Florida, we have very large groups of people who are not white who are often foreign born, who are Jewish and in other ways minority. There’s also a much more out LGBT population in South Florida; so all of these things set up a kind of internal conflict within the state. And I think it is where we see those kinds of up close conflicts and clashes and collisions that these groups tend to form.

Let’s look at South Florida specifically and one group in Palm Beach County – Stormfront. What is this group?

Stormfront is really a huge web forum. It was started in 1995 by a man named Don Black in West Palm, where he still lives.

Don Black was a former Alabama Klan leader who went to prison in the early 1980’s for attempting to invade a small Caribbean island by the name of Dominica, which he intended to turn into a white state.

Stormfront today is quite gigantic. It has more than 300,000 registered members so it’s been very important over the years. It’s been a real source of ideology that has helped to promote certain radical right wing leaders.

One other important thing to say about Stormfront is that it is not merely a Web site. Stormfront also organizes gatherings of people in real life, so it’s not simply one of these places on the Internet where people with extreme ideas go to vent. It actually has a real world impact and helps to bring various sectors of this movement together.

I’ve read that there are people on the Stormfront site who are linked to murders. What else can you tell us about what this site is really doing?

I think Stormfront remains a very important fixture on the white supremacist scene. It’s a part of the kind of white supremacist institutional superstructure.

At the Southern Poverty Law Center, work was done which showed that there were actually 100 murders linked to people who were registered users of Stormfront. So, while certainly the vast majority of people who go there are not murderers and probably not criminals, many of the principal players there really have been incredibly violent.

The site tries to avoid open talk of violence or blowing up federal buildings or killing black or gay people or whatever it may be. They’ve got a sort of pattern of respectability. They’ve tried to ban racial slurs and Nazi symbols in recent years. So there’s this kind of very thin cover of respectability. But the fact is that it attracts some of the most violent people in the world.

The Southern Poverty Law created the Hate Map so people can see where these different groups are located. But really how are authorities using that information?

I do think that law enforcement, especially federal agencies but also state and local agencies, use the information in part simply to get a sense of how big the scene is, where the groups are located, which of the groups appear to be producing the most violence. I don’t think there’s any doubt, for instance, that analysts at the Department of Homeland Security look regularly at Stormfront and that is why in part organizations like Stormfront try very hard to get their followers to not discuss things like criminal activity. They don’t want to be implicated for obvious reasons.

Why are organizations like the KKK or the Neo-Nazi groups not labeled as terrorists along the lines of say an ISIS or al Qaeda?

Thats because by and large it is not the groups themselves that are engaged in terrorism. Stormfront is a perfectly good example. You won’t find people advocating assassinating officials or carrying out murders or that kind of thing on Stormfront. And that is true pretty much across the board in the United States.

It is very rare these days to have groups that plan criminal or terrorist actions. That was true back in the 1960’s and 70’s during the civil rights movement. You actually had large groups of white men, Klansmen generally, gathering in smoky rooms and planning the murder of this person or that person. Today it is typical of these hate groups that they say, quite disingenuously, [that they] are opposed to violence and so we’re just here to discuss these ideas. But what happens is that people within that world at some point decide that they are sick and tired of what they often call the ‘meet, eat, and retreat crowd’ and decide that today is the day to begin shooting?

Find Hate Groups across the US on the Southern Poverty Law Center Hate Map.

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A Closer Look At One Hate Group In West Palm Beach | WLRN – WLRN

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Trump and the rise of hate groups – Richmond Free Press

By Reginald Stuart

President Trumps tepid initial comments about the civil disruption last weekend in Charlottesville, followed by his declaration Tuesday that the alt-left was as responsible for the violence, has stirred a hornets nest of exchanges from a wide range of religious, political and social figures with no end of the bitter rhetoric in sight.

The ranks of congressional leaders, business executives, educators and social and civil rights advocates have risen day by day since last weekend, all sounding united in their criticism of President Trump and his sentiment supporting white supremacists. They say his response to and assessments of the violent clashes are adding kerosene to a fire started by a small, loosely knit but growing band of white nationalists.

President Trump just cant bring himself to unequivocally condemn and repudiate white supremacy and its modern-day equivalent, the alt-right, said Richard Cohen, president of the Montgomery, Ala., based Southern Poverty Law Center, echoing a wide range of people across the social and political spectrum.

He cant bring himself to acknowledge that terrorism committed by white supremacists is, indeed, terrorism, Mr. Cohen said. The presidents tepid response … to the deadly violence in Charlottesville was telling. He denounced the hate and violence but spread the blame to many sides.

The president reasserted his position Tuesday in a contentious exchange with news reporters in New York. During the gathering, he rejected the bipartisan criticism about his initial responses to the Charlottesville incident and claimed alt-left counterprotesters were very, very, very violent when they confronted white nationalists, Ku Klux Klan sympathizers and neo-Nazi groups that had gathered in Charlottesville ostensibly to protest the citys planned removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

So this week, its Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jacksons coming down, President Trump told reporters about the Confederate statues marked for removal. I wonder, is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? he commented. You know, you really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?

The SPLC has been flooded with calls since last weekends sudden outburst of violence, the kind that stirred memories of violence across the South in the days of racial segregation, said a spokesperson for the SPLC. The spokesperson said such violence and President Trumps response only energizes white supremacists and their cohorts.

The violence in Charlottesville may have stirred many frightening memories of the Old South. Yet it also helped reinforce claims by hate fighters like the SPLC that President Trumps victory has given an added spark to the right wing white nationalist movement.

The presence on President Trumps top staff of alt-right political activist and Richmond native Steve Bannon and others gives the critics claims more validity, according to Trump critics of all political persuasions.

The radical right was more successful in entering the political mainstream last year than in half a century, said Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the SPLC.

Trumps run for office electrified the radical right, which saw in him a champion of the idea that America is fundamentally a white mans country, Mr. Potok said in a detailed statement issued earlier this year characterizing 2016 as the Year in Hate and Extremism.

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Spotify has removed white power music from its platform. But it’s still available on dozens of other sites – PBS NewsHour

Demonstrators march downtown in Chicago, Illinois on August 13, 2017 to protest the white nationalist rally and violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

In the wake of the white nationalist rally and ensuing violence in Charlottesville last weekend, Spotify announced it would remove music that promotes white nationalism from its libraries, as Apple had done several years before.

Before the move, Digital Music News had found that 37 bands associated with neo-Nazi and other hate groups, as defined by the Southern Poverty Law Center, were available on the streaming platform.

A spokesperson for Spotify told Billboard after the removal that material that favors hatred or incites violence against race, religion and sexuality or the like is not tolerated by us.

But, much like the white nationalist site Daily Stormers move to the dark web this week after GoDaddy and Google denied its domain registration, removing white power bands from Spotify may be a little like playing whack-a-mole, with these bands simply popping up on different platforms. And white power bands themselves as well as those who study them say that music was never really found on Spotify and Apple to begin with.

We never used their services, Cybernazi, an instrumental electronic band thats part of a new fash wave genre of music favored by the next generation of white nationalists, wrote in an emailed statement. The band said we realized that our surveillance depends on building our own virtual infrastructure.

Cybernazis music, much of which adulates Adolf Hitler, was previously available on Bandcamp, but has since been removed there; it is still available on SoundCloud and YouTube, where the bands songs have hundreds of thousands of views.

A YouTube spokeswoman told the New York Times that the service has clear policies that prohibit content like hate speech and that it removes content flagged by users.

Freedom of speech advocates have criticized moves like these after Charlottesville, saying that tactics used to clamp down on speech by neo-Nazis could later be used against others.

But C. Richard King, a culture, a gender and race professor at Washington State University who studies white supremacist movements, said the removals do not and cannot stop the circulation of the music, stop its use for recruitment, community building, and financing of the movement, or eradicate the ideology, anymore than it can snuff out the desire of some to produce and consume it.

He added, however, that the moves by Spotify and Apple may make [the music] harder to find, driving it to other sites.

The removals do not and cannot stop the circulation of the music, stop its use for recruitment, community building, and financing of the movement, or eradicate the ideology, anymore than it can snuff out the desire of some to produce and consume it.

In addition to SoundCloud and YouTube, white power music can be bought from independent music labels like the Maryland-based Label56, which sells a wide range of white nationalist music, including Oi! and RAC (Rock Against Communism), two punk rock genres that have historically attracted skinhead fans.

Label56 also reportedly signed Wade Michael Page, the gunman who killed six people at a Sikh Temple in Wisconsin in 2012, to a music contract before the attack. Label56 did not respond to NewsHours request for comment.

Label56 has a mobile app that was previously available on the Google Play store, but it was taken down from the store earlier this year after a complaint from the Anti-Defamation League. That app, which includes not only white power music but also messaging about a supposed war on whites, is now available instead on apps.appmakr.com, where it can be downloaded for iPhone, Android and Blackberry.

And white power music can also be bought from independent music distributions stores such as the New Jersey-based MiceTrap Distribution LLC, which sells Angry Aryan T-shirts and MP3s from the white power bands Aggravated Assault and Chaos 88, whose music is regularly shared on Stormfront and the website of the National Socialist Movement, an American neo-Nazi party.

When contacted by the NewsHour in February, a representative from MiceTrap said that after seeing declining sales for more than a decade, the company had seen a dramatic uptick in interest over the last four years.

The representative, James, who asked that the NewsHour not use his last name for fear of personal attacks, wrote that along with fewer competitors, the biggest driving force for the sales increases seem to be the constant leftist media propaganda and liberal attacks on free speech that drive people to become more extreme than they normally would be like to be.

When people are told they arent allow to have access to music (or any content for that matter), human nature drives them to seek it out, he wrote.

NewsHour could not independently verify that MiceTrap sales had increased.

Most of the music available on MiceTrap is made by older white power bands, James said, in large part because there are few new or active bands on the scene. The top-selling item at MiceTrap in February was the German neo-Nazi singer Hassgesangs B.Z.L.T.B. album, which was recorded in 2003. (That album is also currently available on Amazon.)

In a follow-up conversation Thursday, James wrote that he was appalled by the violence in Charlottesville and that MiceTrap was a business, nothing more.

Im not a white supremacist or a racist, he added. The business has merchandise that is 100% legal.

Available items on the site as of Thursday included the CD Blood and Honour by Skrewdriver, once the most prominent white nationalist rock band in the world, along with MP3s of the song Triumph of the Will by RAC band Das Reich, whose name is presumably taken from the Das Reich armed division of the Nazi party.

But two other people who track hate groups said that keeping white power music off Spotify and Apple does make a difference. Oren Segal, director of the Center on Extremism at the Anti-Defamation League, which filed the complaint to Google Play against Label56s app, said removing the music from streaming platforms could make it less convenient to accidentally come across it, and potentially get turned on to it, especially younger audiences.

Mark Potok, a fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center, echoed that sentiment, stressing that it could prevent naive listeners from getting interested.

The flip side, of course, he said, is that prohibition can make it seem more sexy and appealing to many.

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Spotify has removed white power music from its platform. But it’s still available on dozens of other sites – PBS NewsHour

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MSNBC’s Jansing Lets Lefty Potok Loose; Says Trump Is ‘An Unvarnished Racist’ – NewsBusters (press release) (blog)


NewsBusters (press release) (blog)
MSNBC's Jansing Lets Lefty Potok Loose; Says Trump Is 'An Unvarnished Racist'
NewsBusters (press release) (blog)
Journalistic integrity took another Monday afternoon on MSNBC, with another casualty in the liberal plot to paint President Trump as a closet neo-Nazi Klansman. Piling in on the liberal media frenzy following Saturday's sad events at Charlottesville

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Online map tracks active hate groups – WCNC

If you thought groups like the KKK, neo-Confederates and even black separatists are ancient history, think again.

WCNC 12:10 AM. EDT August 15, 2017

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — If you think groups like the KKK, Neo-Confederates and even slack separatists are ancient history, think again.

Evidently, there are hundreds of hate groups across the country, including dozens here in the Carolinas. The Southern Poverty Law Center is putting what it deems hate groups on the map.

Its map currently includes 917 so-called hate groups from every corner of the country.

“Our purpose is to educate Americans. Many of whom think groups like the Ku Klux Klan as being something in the history books, as to the reality that these groups really do still exist today,” said Mark Potok of Southern Poverty Law Center.

According to the law center, 43 hate groups operate in North and South Carolina. Three of the hate groups were listed in the Charlotte area, including a Neo-Nazi organization called the Daily Stormer.

The Nation of Islam and Israel United in Christ were listed as black separatist groups.

Corine Mack, President Of Charlotte’s NAACP chapter, was surprised to see how much hate has spread.

“I’m sad, she said. I was actually shocked initially when I saw it because I didn’t know it was such a vast amount of groups.”

You can check out the law center’s interactive map here.

2017 WCNC.COM

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Alex Jones says Jewish actors posed as KKK followers in Charlottesville – The Times of Israel

Radio host, conspiracy theorist and Donald Trump supporter Alex Jones who earlier this year ranted about a Jewish mafia run by billionaire George Soros was at it again Sunday with a theory that leftist Jews may have impersonated Nazis to discredit white supremacist protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Speaking on The Alex Jones Show, Jones recalled his own experience, he said, protesting the Ku Klux Klan:

I mean, quite frankly, Ive been to these events, a lot of the KKK guys with their hats off look like theyre from the cast of Seinfeld. Literally theyre just Jewish actors. Nothing against Jews in general, but they are leftists Jews that want to create this clash and they go dress up as Nazis. I have footage in Austin were going to find it somewhere here at the office where it literally looks like cast of Seinfeld or like Howard Stern in a Nazi outfit. They all look like Howard Stern. They almost got like little curly hair down, and theyre just up there heiling Hitler. You can tell they are totally uncomfortable, they are totally scared, and its all just meant to create the clash.

As Jones explained in a video of his remarks video posted Saturday titled Virginia Riots Staged To Bring In Martial Law, Ban Conservative Gatherings.

Media Matters first reported Jones comments about the rally goers.

White nationalists gathered Saturday for a Unite the Right march in Charlottesville, ostensibly to protest a plan by local officials to remove a statue of Robert E. Lee. There were clashes between the white nationalists and counter-protesters, and a 32-year-old woman was killed when a car driven by a man who espoused neo-Nazi views plowed into a group of counter-protesters.

In the past, Jones has denied that he is anti-Semitic, saying he reserves his attacks for Jewish liberals. In March, Jones said that the Jewish mafia was supporting efforts by moderate Republicans to derail the Trump presidency.

Well there is undoubtedly a Jewish mafia and the [Anti-Defamation League] will say youre anti-Semitic, Jones said on his program. No, theres an Italian mafia, Irish mafia, Jewish mafia, Jamaican mafia, and theres mafias, theres Dixie mafia. And absolutely, the Jewish mafia, then, if you criticize it says youre anti-Semitic, but the Jewish mafia is a very powerful mafia.

In December 2015, Trump appeared on The Alex Jones Show, where the then-candidate for the Republican presidential nomination told the host that your reputation is amazing and promised he would not let you down.

Jones has been called out for spreading other conspiracy theories, including one claiming that FEMA wanted to put Americans in concentration camps, Vox noted. Southern Poverty Law Center fellow Mark Potok told Vox that Jones is the primary producer of conspiracy theories in America today.

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Alex Jones says Jewish actors posed as KKK followers in Charlottesville – The Times of Israel

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DC gunman might have targeted second anti-gay hate group – Wisconsin Gazette

The head of a second Christian conservative organization said authorities found a note containing her groups contact information in the pocket of a man charged with opening fire at the Washington offices of the Family Research Council, wounding a security guard. Traditional Values Coalition President Andrea Lafferty said FBI agents visited her groups Capitol Hill offices hours after the shooting as part of their investigation. The next day, she said, members of the Joint Terrorism Task Force came by and confirmed that our information was in his pocket, including the location of the groups offices. I was stunned, Lafferty told The Associated Press, adding that she believes her group may have been targeted. It wasnt immediately clear if that was the case. An FBI representative could not be immediately reached for comment. The head of a second Christian conservative organization said authorities found a note containing her groups contact information in the pocket of a man charged with opening fire at the Washington offices of the Family Research Council, wounding a security guard. Traditional Values Coalition President Andrea Lafferty said FBI agents visited her groups Capitol Hill offices hours after the shooting as part of their investigation. The next day, she said, members of the Joint Terrorism Task Force came by and confirmed that our information was in his pocket, including the location of the groups offices. I was stunned, Lafferty told The Associated Press, adding that she believes her group may have been targeted. It wasnt immediately clear if that was the case. An FBI representative could not be immediately reached for comment. The accused shooter, Floyd Lee Corkins II, of Herndon, Va., was ordered held without bond on charges he opened fire in the lobby of the Family Research Council in downtown Washington. Corkins, whose parents said he strongly supported gay rights, had a backpack full of Chick-fil-A sandwiches and a box of ammunition when he said words to the effect of I dont like your politics and shot a security guard, authorities said. The guard was shot in the left arm but nonetheless managed to help take down the gunman, preventing what the police said could have been a deadly attack. It wasnt immediately clear why Corkins, 28, had the chicken sandwiches. Like the FRC, the Traditional Values Coalition has supported the president of Chick-Fil-A and his staunch opposition to same-sex marriage. Tony Perkins, who heads the Family Research Council, hinted at a news conference that the FRC was not the only group targeted, although he did not elaborate. While blaming Corkins for the shooting, Perkins also faulted the Southern Poverty Law Center, an Alabama-based civil rights organization that tracks and litigates against hate groups. On its website, the law center labels both Washington conservative organizations as active anti-gay groups. Lafferty also was critical of the law center. We have been on their hit list longer than any other group, she said. Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the SPLC, had called Perkins accusation outrageous. He said the council earned the designation for spreading false propaganda about the gay community, not for its opposition to same-sex marriage. Lafferty said she has written Attorney General Eric Holder seeking protection for her group, but that authorities have not been responsive. Under this Justice Department, Christians are a very low priority on their lists of concerns, she said Corkins had recently been volunteering at a D.C. community center for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. He lived with his parents in northern Virginia. Prosecutors requested a mental health evaluation, and Corkins public defender did not address the allegations in court. Corkins faces charges of assault with intent to kill and bringing firearms across state. The judge ordered him held pending a hearing next week.

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The Trickle-Up Theory Of White Nationalist Thought – 90.3 KAZU

Jared Taylor was not in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. But Taylor, one of the leading voices for white rights in the country, says it was clear what really happened at that rally. “Anyone who wishes to speak in the name of whites is subject to the heckler’s veto,” said Taylor, founder of the white advocacy website American Renaissance. “There would have been no violence, no problems of any kind if people had not shown up as counterdemonstrators, many of them wearing helmets, wielding batons, wearing shields, shouting for the death of the demonstrators. … This is not something that was provoked by the presence of racially conscious whites. It was something that was provoked by people who hate any white person who has a racial consciousness.” Two days later, President Trump, in one of his most controversial press conferences to date, described the events at which hundreds of white protesters gathered for the so-called “Unite the Right” rally and after which a white nationalist sympathizer drove his car into a crowd, killing a counterdemonstrator in a similar way. “Let me ask you this,” Trump told reporters Tuesday. “What about the fact that [counterdemonstrators] came charging, with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs? Do they have any problem? I think they do. … You had a group on one side that was bad and you had a group on another side that was also very violent. And nobody wants to say that. But I’ll say it right now.” Taylor is among a group of educated, white-identity advocates who, critics say, normalize the ideas of white supremacy by couching them in language that doesn’t sound overtly racist. In doing so, those critics say, people like Taylor, authors Kevin MacDonald and Peter Brimelow, and “Unite the Right” organizers Jason Kessler and Richard Spencer sanitize racist tropes to make them palatable to a broad audience, including the upper reaches of the political mainstream. “I think that it’s true that ultimately a lot of these ideas travel all the way from the farthest fringe of the political world, ultimately to the very top in some kind of form,” said Mark Potok, former editor of Intelligence Report, the Southern Poverty Law Center’s journal monitoring extremism. The white protesters in Charlottesville came, among other things, to contest the removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. They were there, Taylor said, “to pursue their destiny free of the unwanted influence of others. This is not a hateful thing.” Some wore swastikas. Others carried torches and Confederate flags. David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, made a speech. Videos from Friday and Saturday show marchers chanting: “Jews will not replace us!” and “blood and soil,” a Nazi slogan. Later, 20-year-old James Alex Fields Jr. allegedly drove a car into a crowd, killing counterdemonstrator Heather Heyer. Taylor called Heyer’s death “a terrible, murderous act” that “no one would defend.” He said he is not associated with “Unite the Right” and didn’t agree with the decision some people made to wear swastikas. As founder of American Renaissance, which he says is among the “many websites and organizations that speak in the name of whites,” Taylor claims that there is no place for bigotry or hate in his ideology. But the ideas that people gathered to defend over the weekend that the United States was founded as a white, Christian nation and should remain so; that white people face an existential threat by becoming a racial minority; that there are biological differences among racial groups that make some more intelligent and others more prone to criminality those are ideas that Taylor has been working to legitimize for decades. “All of these characters, Peter Brimelow, Kevin MacDonald, Jared Taylor, say they’re terribly opposed to violence and, of course, would never engage in that kind of a thing,” says Potok. “Well, that’s very nice and very fine and the words are very pretty. But the reality is that these people provide the ideological foundation for people who are not so careful in what they say and do. People who are actual terrorists.” Potok and others say that Brimelow offers such an ideological foundation with his book, Alien Nation: Common Sense About America’s Immigration Disaster, and his website, VDARE, where he says he’ll publish “anyone who has anything critical to say about immigration, environmentalists, progressives, etc.” On Saturday, Brimelow published his own take on the events in Charlottesville, calling it a “remarkable torchlight procession.” He has published articles by fellow white-rights advocates Spencer, Kessler and MacDonald. Marilyn Mayo of the Anti-Defamation League once described MacDonald as the country’s “foremost anti-Semite, next to David Duke.” MacDonald is the editor-in-chief of The Occidental Observer and a former professor who left California State University, Long Beach, after coming under fire for his controversial writings. He is also one of the directors of the American Freedom Party an anti-gay, anti-feminist political party that supports deporting any American who became a citizen after 1965. MacDonald is celebrated among neo-Nazis for a trilogy of books he published in the 1990s that trade in some of the most pernicious stereotypes about Jewish people, all under the guise of researching their evolutionary biology. The difference between Duke and MacDonald, Mayo said, is that Duke was largely ostracized from mainstream society for his public racism, whereas MacDonald’s work was bolstered by the credibility of his university position. MacDonald, she says, “couches his anti-Semitic views as legitimate intellectual inquiry. That’s something that might make him more acceptable to people.” It’s hard to put numbers on how many people Taylor, Brimelow, MacDonald and others like them reach. The Internet provides a degree of anonymity to those who visit their websites. Membership in hate groups, Potok estimates, numbers around half a million people. But include those who believe that “the United States, as well as a lot of European countries, were created ‘by and for whites and ought to return to being that,’ ” he adds, and “you’re looking at a group of several million people, if not more.” MacDonald said the organizers of Saturday’s rally had misstepped; that the swastikas and other Nazi symbols should have been banned. “Because that stuff is never going to appeal to a wide swath of white Americans,” he said. “It’s simply not. And you’re in a political arena. You have to do what’s possible and what sells. And so you have to be very cautious about that kind of thing. And I don’t think the organizers were.” But as for the basic message from “Unite the Right,” MacDonald was on board. The marchers on Saturday were trying to convey “that whites should be able to have their own identity and a sense of their own interests like anybody else,” he says. White people in the U.S. may not be ready to accept that message now, he adds, but they will be in the future “as whites become more and more of a minority in the coming years. So I think we’re ahead of the curve.” On that last point, MacDonald and Potok meet. “We’re seeing the continuing normalization of these ideas,” Potok said. “I think there is a real kind of conveyor belt we have seen develop over the last few years, and even the last few decades.” Ideas start in a tiny radical fringe group somewhere, he explains. And then they travel to larger and more moderate groups but still outside the political mainstream. “And then they are picked up by the Drudges of the world, by the Breitbarts of the world, by those kinds of websites and ‘news organizations.’ And within, it seems, minutes, they will then be picked up and exploited by certain politicians … It is terribly important not only to have people like Jared Taylor and Peter Brimelow providing a kind of ideological foundation, but also critically important, I think, to have people like Donald Trump, who are essentially helping to mainstream and normalize these ideas.” Accusations that Trump has been flirting with far right ideology have dogged him since before he was elected. During the campaign, Trump repeatedly distanced himself from people espousing white nationalism. He said multiple times that he disavowed the support of Duke and other white supremacists who endorsed his presidency. But the president has been widely criticized since Saturday by both detractors and supporters for his responses to the events in Charlottesville. He first condemned the violence “on many sides,” then gave a more direct rejection of racists, “including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups,” but then followed that with even more controversy. At Tuesday’s press conference, Trump clarified what he meant by “all sides.” And it sounded remarkably similar to something MacDonald said over the phone on Monday afternoon. Here’s MacDonald on Monday: “I’m not from the South. I understand they have a history and a heritage, and they don’t want to just throw it all out. But that’s what we’re going to see. And it’s not going to stop with General Robert E. Lee statues. It’s going to continue with Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, all those people, because they owned slaves, they will eventually be removed, I think. It’s just the beginning.” And here is Trump on Tuesday: “Not all of those people were white supremacists by any stretch. Those people were also there because they wanted to protest the taking down of a statue of Robert E. Lee. … So this week it’s Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jackson’s coming down. I wonder, is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?”

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How Did The Confederate Flag Come North? – WNPR News

Christina Hunt Wood lives upstate, in Delaware County. In 2015, soon after the mass shootings at a church in Charleston, SC, she started noticing Confederate flags everywhere. “You’d find them popping up on homes around town,” she said. Delaware County is almost entirely white. Christina is biracial; her dadis black. And to her, the flag is a symbol of hatred. “I just felt like I was surrounded by really frightening people,” she said. Now she’s helping leadan effortto ban Confederate flag sales at the Delaware County fair. Sherenewed her effort thispast weekend in the wake of the violence in Charlottesville that left one woman dead and many others injured. How did the flag cross the Mason-Dixon line into other parts of the country, including rural New York? “It ‘jumped’ in part because of the 1948 ‘Dixiecrat’ campaign of Strom Thurmond, which gave the Confederate Battle flag greater prominence than it had had for decades,” said Fitzhugh Brundage, a historian at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In the 1950s and ’60s, the flag united those who opposed desegregation, particularly in the wake of the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision. “And then the flag was embraced in popular culture as a symbol of rebellion,” through the image of countless bad-ass bikers, bands like Lynyrd Skynyrd and TV shows like The Dukes of Hazard, Brundage said. In 2015, after the Confederate flag was takendown from the state capitol in Charleston, hundreds of pro-flag rallies were organized across the country, many of themin non-Southern states like Washington, Oregon, Michigan and Ohio. Mark Potok, an expert on the radical right who formerly worked at the Southern Poverty Law Center, argued that many working-class whites in New York or the Midwest don’t care about the Confederacy. But Potok said asthe country pays increased attention to the rights of the LGBT community and peopleof color, “many of them feel, quite strongly, that they’re being left behind. That the society and the culture doesn’t give a damn about them. And that somehow white people who ‘founded’ this nation are being forgotten,” he said. Brian Levin, who runsthe Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, said the flag is “being used as a stick to say ‘This is where we’re drawing the line.'” Levin thinks many people can easily relate to the pain or suffering of an individual. “But when the harms are genocidal, or centuries-long, the ability for people to process it becomes much more limited,” he said. Levinhopes the violence in Charlottesville will prompt a sustained pushback against white supremacists and an accurate understanding of American history, in all its complexity. “But it’s going to get worse before it gets better,” he said.

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A Closer Look At One Hate Group In West Palm Beach | WLRN – WLRN

Florida ranks No. 2 in the list of U.S. states with the most active hate groups. The most recent Hate Map, put out regularly by the Southern Poverty Law Center, shows 63 hate groups operating from Pensacola to Miami. In South Florida, specifically West Palm Beach, the group Stormfront has been particularly influential in spreading white supremacist ideas. WLRN talked to MarkPotok, writer and expert on the radical right, about Storm Front’s role in spreading hate in our state and elsewhere. Mark Potok, formerly of the Southern Poverty Law Center, and an expert on the radical right, talks about one group in West Palm Beach that has been a big player in spreading hate. POTOK: I think what is unquestionably happening is that the radical right as a whole is growing. That does not necessarily mean that the number of groups, Klan groups, neo-Nazi groups, and so on is growing. I think what we are noticing more and more is that an awful lot of people who are essentially unaffiliated are coming into this movement as individuals; they’re not actually joining groups in many cases. WLRN: Florida is now ranked second in the country in the number of hate groups being tracked by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Why is Florida so attractive, or is it just that we’re a very populous state? Florida has some of its own unique contributing factors. I think one of the important things about Florida is how very divided it is. If you really think about the state of Florida, South Florida is really quite a different world from Central and Northern Florida. I mean, if you go to places like Tallahassee or Jacksonville essentially you are in the Deep South. And certainly that is even more true as you get into more rural areas, not just the urban areas. In South Florida, we have very large groups of people who are not white who are often foreign born, who are Jewish and in other ways minority. There’s also a much more out LGBT population in South Florida; so all of these things set up a kind of internal conflict within the state. And I think it is where we see those kinds of up close conflicts and clashes and collisions that these groups tend to form. Let’s look at South Florida specifically and one group in Palm Beach County – Stormfront. What is this group? Stormfront is really a huge web forum. It was started in 1995 by a man named Don Black in West Palm, where he still lives. Don Black was a former Alabama Klan leader who went to prison in the early 1980’s for attempting to invade a small Caribbean island by the name of Dominica, which he intended to turn into a white state. Stormfront today is quite gigantic. It has more than 300,000 registered members so it’s been very important over the years. It’s been a real source of ideology that has helped to promote certain radical right wing leaders. One other important thing to say about Stormfront is that it is not merely a Web site. Stormfront also organizes gatherings of people in real life, so it’s not simply one of these places on the Internet where people with extreme ideas go to vent. It actually has a real world impact and helps to bring various sectors of this movement together. I’ve read that there are people on the Stormfront site who are linked to murders. What else can you tell us about what this site is really doing? I think Stormfront remains a very important fixture on the white supremacist scene. It’s a part of the kind of white supremacist institutional superstructure. At the Southern Poverty Law Center, work was done which showed that there were actually 100 murders linked to people who were registered users of Stormfront. So, while certainly the vast majority of people who go there are not murderers and probably not criminals, many of the principal players there really have been incredibly violent. The site tries to avoid open talk of violence or blowing up federal buildings or killing black or gay people or whatever it may be. They’ve got a sort of pattern of respectability. They’ve tried to ban racial slurs and Nazi symbols in recent years. So there’s this kind of very thin cover of respectability. But the fact is that it attracts some of the most violent people in the world. The Southern Poverty Law created the Hate Map so people can see where these different groups are located. But really how are authorities using that information? I do think that law enforcement, especially federal agencies but also state and local agencies, use the information in part simply to get a sense of how big the scene is, where the groups are located, which of the groups appear to be producing the most violence. I don’t think there’s any doubt, for instance, that analysts at the Department of Homeland Security look regularly at Stormfront and that is why in part organizations like Stormfront try very hard to get their followers to not discuss things like criminal activity. They don’t want to be implicated for obvious reasons. Why are organizations like the KKK or the Neo-Nazi groups not labeled as terrorists along the lines of say an ISIS or al Qaeda? Thats because by and large it is not the groups themselves that are engaged in terrorism. Stormfront is a perfectly good example. You won’t find people advocating assassinating officials or carrying out murders or that kind of thing on Stormfront. And that is true pretty much across the board in the United States. It is very rare these days to have groups that plan criminal or terrorist actions. That was true back in the 1960’s and 70’s during the civil rights movement. You actually had large groups of white men, Klansmen generally, gathering in smoky rooms and planning the murder of this person or that person. Today it is typical of these hate groups that they say, quite disingenuously, [that they] are opposed to violence and so we’re just here to discuss these ideas. But what happens is that people within that world at some point decide that they are sick and tired of what they often call the ‘meet, eat, and retreat crowd’ and decide that today is the day to begin shooting? Find Hate Groups across the US on the Southern Poverty Law Center Hate Map.

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Trump and the rise of hate groups – Richmond Free Press

By Reginald Stuart President Trumps tepid initial comments about the civil disruption last weekend in Charlottesville, followed by his declaration Tuesday that the alt-left was as responsible for the violence, has stirred a hornets nest of exchanges from a wide range of religious, political and social figures with no end of the bitter rhetoric in sight. The ranks of congressional leaders, business executives, educators and social and civil rights advocates have risen day by day since last weekend, all sounding united in their criticism of President Trump and his sentiment supporting white supremacists. They say his response to and assessments of the violent clashes are adding kerosene to a fire started by a small, loosely knit but growing band of white nationalists. President Trump just cant bring himself to unequivocally condemn and repudiate white supremacy and its modern-day equivalent, the alt-right, said Richard Cohen, president of the Montgomery, Ala., based Southern Poverty Law Center, echoing a wide range of people across the social and political spectrum. He cant bring himself to acknowledge that terrorism committed by white supremacists is, indeed, terrorism, Mr. Cohen said. The presidents tepid response … to the deadly violence in Charlottesville was telling. He denounced the hate and violence but spread the blame to many sides. The president reasserted his position Tuesday in a contentious exchange with news reporters in New York. During the gathering, he rejected the bipartisan criticism about his initial responses to the Charlottesville incident and claimed alt-left counterprotesters were very, very, very violent when they confronted white nationalists, Ku Klux Klan sympathizers and neo-Nazi groups that had gathered in Charlottesville ostensibly to protest the citys planned removal of a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. So this week, its Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jacksons coming down, President Trump told reporters about the Confederate statues marked for removal. I wonder, is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? he commented. You know, you really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop? The SPLC has been flooded with calls since last weekends sudden outburst of violence, the kind that stirred memories of violence across the South in the days of racial segregation, said a spokesperson for the SPLC. The spokesperson said such violence and President Trumps response only energizes white supremacists and their cohorts. The violence in Charlottesville may have stirred many frightening memories of the Old South. Yet it also helped reinforce claims by hate fighters like the SPLC that President Trumps victory has given an added spark to the right wing white nationalist movement. The presence on President Trumps top staff of alt-right political activist and Richmond native Steve Bannon and others gives the critics claims more validity, according to Trump critics of all political persuasions. The radical right was more successful in entering the political mainstream last year than in half a century, said Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the SPLC. Trumps run for office electrified the radical right, which saw in him a champion of the idea that America is fundamentally a white mans country, Mr. Potok said in a detailed statement issued earlier this year characterizing 2016 as the Year in Hate and Extremism.

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Spotify has removed white power music from its platform. But it’s still available on dozens of other sites – PBS NewsHour

Demonstrators march downtown in Chicago, Illinois on August 13, 2017 to protest the white nationalist rally and violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images In the wake of the white nationalist rally and ensuing violence in Charlottesville last weekend, Spotify announced it would remove music that promotes white nationalism from its libraries, as Apple had done several years before. Before the move, Digital Music News had found that 37 bands associated with neo-Nazi and other hate groups, as defined by the Southern Poverty Law Center, were available on the streaming platform. A spokesperson for Spotify told Billboard after the removal that material that favors hatred or incites violence against race, religion and sexuality or the like is not tolerated by us. But, much like the white nationalist site Daily Stormers move to the dark web this week after GoDaddy and Google denied its domain registration, removing white power bands from Spotify may be a little like playing whack-a-mole, with these bands simply popping up on different platforms. And white power bands themselves as well as those who study them say that music was never really found on Spotify and Apple to begin with. We never used their services, Cybernazi, an instrumental electronic band thats part of a new fash wave genre of music favored by the next generation of white nationalists, wrote in an emailed statement. The band said we realized that our surveillance depends on building our own virtual infrastructure. Cybernazis music, much of which adulates Adolf Hitler, was previously available on Bandcamp, but has since been removed there; it is still available on SoundCloud and YouTube, where the bands songs have hundreds of thousands of views. A YouTube spokeswoman told the New York Times that the service has clear policies that prohibit content like hate speech and that it removes content flagged by users. Freedom of speech advocates have criticized moves like these after Charlottesville, saying that tactics used to clamp down on speech by neo-Nazis could later be used against others. But C. Richard King, a culture, a gender and race professor at Washington State University who studies white supremacist movements, said the removals do not and cannot stop the circulation of the music, stop its use for recruitment, community building, and financing of the movement, or eradicate the ideology, anymore than it can snuff out the desire of some to produce and consume it. He added, however, that the moves by Spotify and Apple may make [the music] harder to find, driving it to other sites. The removals do not and cannot stop the circulation of the music, stop its use for recruitment, community building, and financing of the movement, or eradicate the ideology, anymore than it can snuff out the desire of some to produce and consume it. In addition to SoundCloud and YouTube, white power music can be bought from independent music labels like the Maryland-based Label56, which sells a wide range of white nationalist music, including Oi! and RAC (Rock Against Communism), two punk rock genres that have historically attracted skinhead fans. Label56 also reportedly signed Wade Michael Page, the gunman who killed six people at a Sikh Temple in Wisconsin in 2012, to a music contract before the attack. Label56 did not respond to NewsHours request for comment. Label56 has a mobile app that was previously available on the Google Play store, but it was taken down from the store earlier this year after a complaint from the Anti-Defamation League. That app, which includes not only white power music but also messaging about a supposed war on whites, is now available instead on apps.appmakr.com, where it can be downloaded for iPhone, Android and Blackberry. And white power music can also be bought from independent music distributions stores such as the New Jersey-based MiceTrap Distribution LLC, which sells Angry Aryan T-shirts and MP3s from the white power bands Aggravated Assault and Chaos 88, whose music is regularly shared on Stormfront and the website of the National Socialist Movement, an American neo-Nazi party. When contacted by the NewsHour in February, a representative from MiceTrap said that after seeing declining sales for more than a decade, the company had seen a dramatic uptick in interest over the last four years. The representative, James, who asked that the NewsHour not use his last name for fear of personal attacks, wrote that along with fewer competitors, the biggest driving force for the sales increases seem to be the constant leftist media propaganda and liberal attacks on free speech that drive people to become more extreme than they normally would be like to be. When people are told they arent allow to have access to music (or any content for that matter), human nature drives them to seek it out, he wrote. NewsHour could not independently verify that MiceTrap sales had increased. Most of the music available on MiceTrap is made by older white power bands, James said, in large part because there are few new or active bands on the scene. The top-selling item at MiceTrap in February was the German neo-Nazi singer Hassgesangs B.Z.L.T.B. album, which was recorded in 2003. (That album is also currently available on Amazon.) In a follow-up conversation Thursday, James wrote that he was appalled by the violence in Charlottesville and that MiceTrap was a business, nothing more. Im not a white supremacist or a racist, he added. The business has merchandise that is 100% legal. Available items on the site as of Thursday included the CD Blood and Honour by Skrewdriver, once the most prominent white nationalist rock band in the world, along with MP3s of the song Triumph of the Will by RAC band Das Reich, whose name is presumably taken from the Das Reich armed division of the Nazi party. But two other people who track hate groups said that keeping white power music off Spotify and Apple does make a difference. Oren Segal, director of the Center on Extremism at the Anti-Defamation League, which filed the complaint to Google Play against Label56s app, said removing the music from streaming platforms could make it less convenient to accidentally come across it, and potentially get turned on to it, especially younger audiences. Mark Potok, a fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center, echoed that sentiment, stressing that it could prevent naive listeners from getting interested. The flip side, of course, he said, is that prohibition can make it seem more sexy and appealing to many.

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MSNBC’s Jansing Lets Lefty Potok Loose; Says Trump Is ‘An Unvarnished Racist’ – NewsBusters (press release) (blog)

NewsBusters (press release) (blog) MSNBC's Jansing Lets Lefty Potok Loose; Says Trump Is 'An Unvarnished Racist' NewsBusters (press release) (blog) Journalistic integrity took another Monday afternoon on MSNBC, with another casualty in the liberal plot to paint President Trump as a closet neo-Nazi Klansman. Piling in on the liberal media frenzy following Saturday's sad events at Charlottesville …

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August 15, 2017   Posted in: Mark Potok  Comments Closed

Online map tracks active hate groups – WCNC

If you thought groups like the KKK, neo-Confederates and even black separatists are ancient history, think again. WCNC 12:10 AM. EDT August 15, 2017 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — If you think groups like the KKK, Neo-Confederates and even slack separatists are ancient history, think again. Evidently, there are hundreds of hate groups across the country, including dozens here in the Carolinas. The Southern Poverty Law Center is putting what it deems hate groups on the map. Its map currently includes 917 so-called hate groups from every corner of the country. “Our purpose is to educate Americans. Many of whom think groups like the Ku Klux Klan as being something in the history books, as to the reality that these groups really do still exist today,” said Mark Potok of Southern Poverty Law Center. According to the law center, 43 hate groups operate in North and South Carolina. Three of the hate groups were listed in the Charlotte area, including a Neo-Nazi organization called the Daily Stormer. The Nation of Islam and Israel United in Christ were listed as black separatist groups. Corine Mack, President Of Charlotte’s NAACP chapter, was surprised to see how much hate has spread. “I’m sad, she said. I was actually shocked initially when I saw it because I didn’t know it was such a vast amount of groups.” You can check out the law center’s interactive map here. 2017 WCNC.COM

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August 15, 2017   Posted in: Mark Potok  Comments Closed

Alex Jones says Jewish actors posed as KKK followers in Charlottesville – The Times of Israel

Radio host, conspiracy theorist and Donald Trump supporter Alex Jones who earlier this year ranted about a Jewish mafia run by billionaire George Soros was at it again Sunday with a theory that leftist Jews may have impersonated Nazis to discredit white supremacist protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia. Speaking on The Alex Jones Show, Jones recalled his own experience, he said, protesting the Ku Klux Klan: I mean, quite frankly, Ive been to these events, a lot of the KKK guys with their hats off look like theyre from the cast of Seinfeld. Literally theyre just Jewish actors. Nothing against Jews in general, but they are leftists Jews that want to create this clash and they go dress up as Nazis. I have footage in Austin were going to find it somewhere here at the office where it literally looks like cast of Seinfeld or like Howard Stern in a Nazi outfit. They all look like Howard Stern. They almost got like little curly hair down, and theyre just up there heiling Hitler. You can tell they are totally uncomfortable, they are totally scared, and its all just meant to create the clash. As Jones explained in a video of his remarks video posted Saturday titled Virginia Riots Staged To Bring In Martial Law, Ban Conservative Gatherings. Media Matters first reported Jones comments about the rally goers. White nationalists gathered Saturday for a Unite the Right march in Charlottesville, ostensibly to protest a plan by local officials to remove a statue of Robert E. Lee. There were clashes between the white nationalists and counter-protesters, and a 32-year-old woman was killed when a car driven by a man who espoused neo-Nazi views plowed into a group of counter-protesters. In the past, Jones has denied that he is anti-Semitic, saying he reserves his attacks for Jewish liberals. In March, Jones said that the Jewish mafia was supporting efforts by moderate Republicans to derail the Trump presidency. Well there is undoubtedly a Jewish mafia and the [Anti-Defamation League] will say youre anti-Semitic, Jones said on his program. No, theres an Italian mafia, Irish mafia, Jewish mafia, Jamaican mafia, and theres mafias, theres Dixie mafia. And absolutely, the Jewish mafia, then, if you criticize it says youre anti-Semitic, but the Jewish mafia is a very powerful mafia. In December 2015, Trump appeared on The Alex Jones Show, where the then-candidate for the Republican presidential nomination told the host that your reputation is amazing and promised he would not let you down. Jones has been called out for spreading other conspiracy theories, including one claiming that FEMA wanted to put Americans in concentration camps, Vox noted. Southern Poverty Law Center fellow Mark Potok told Vox that Jones is the primary producer of conspiracy theories in America today.

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August 15, 2017   Posted in: Mark Potok  Comments Closed


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