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The Trump Effect | Southern Poverty Law Center

In August 2015, two Boston men returning home late after a Red Sox game happened upon a homeless Mexican immigrant sleeping outside a commuter rail station. They beat him with a metal pipe, punched him repeatedly, urinated on him and called him a wetback. Then they high-fived each other as they walked away, leaving Guillermo Rodriguez with broken ribs and fingers and other injuries.

When they were arrested a short time later, one of them, 38-year-old Scott Leader, told arresting officers, Donald Trump was right. All these illegals need to be deported. Later, but long before they were sentenced to terms of two and three years, they whined that authorities only arrested whites, never the minorities.

To these men, Donald Trump was a hero and an inspiration.

Photo credit: Lincoln Agnew

After all, Trump had kicked off his presidential bid two months earlier with a speech describing Mexican immigrants as rapists and drug smugglers. He later called the Mexican government totally corrupt. He promised to build a wall along the 2,000-mile Mexico-U.S. border. He told an audience in New Hampshire that a plane overhead could be a Mexican plane up there, theyre getting ready to attack. And he insisted that an Indiana-born federal judge could not preside fairly over a civil racketeering case against his Trump University because hes a Mexican.

And that was just Trumps talk about Mexicans.

By the time he won the election, Trump had called for a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the country. He had lied about personally witnessing thousands of Muslims in New Jersey cheering as the World Trade Center collapsed on 9/11. He had attacked a Muslim Gold Star family, insinuating that Khizr Khan, whose son died in Iraq, was a terrorist sympathizer. He had retweeted utterly bogus claims that black people were responsible for 80% of the murders of whites. He had cozied up to some of the countrys hardest line gay-bashers. He had retweeted anti-Semitic memes and called many immigrants not well. He had attacked a debate moderator by insinuating that her tough questions were the result of her menstrual cycle. And his earlier boasts about grabbing women by the genitals had been revealed.

Trump also had repeatedly encouraged violence.

After a Black Lives Matter activist was beaten at a Trump rally in Birmingham, Ala., he told Fox News that maybe he should have been roughed up. In Cedar Rapids, Iowa, he urged supporters to knock the crap out of protesters, adding, I promise you, I will pay your legal fees. When a backer at a Fayetteville, N.C., rally sucker-punched a black protester being led away by police an act described by the local sheriff as a cowardly, unprovoked attack Trump told two national news outlets that he was looking into paying the mans legal fees.

Through it all, Trump was heedless, rejecting calls from left and right to tamp down the insults and the violence they were spawning. His reaction to the beating of Guillermo Rodriguez was typical. While the attack was a shame, Trumps main conclusion was that people who are following me are very passionate.

In the immediate aftermath of the election, the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) noticed a dramatic jump in hate violence and incidents of harassment and intimidation around the country. At the same time, a wave of incidents of bullying and other kinds of harassment washed over the nations K-12 schools. The SPLC decided to make an effort to document all of this in real time.

The ugly evidence of hatred unleashed had already become apparent before Election Day. An earlier SPLC study of the impact in K-12 schools of Trumps bigoted rhetoric and encouragement of violence during his campaign had found massive anecdotal evidence of a rise in bullying and anxiety in classrooms.

There was even evidence that Trumps attacks on Muslims during 2015 when he called for a ban on Muslims entering the U.S., suggested a registry for Muslims already here, and proposed to surveil mosques had had an effect that early. The FBI reported that anti-Muslim hate crimes went up by 67% in 2015, while other categories rose only slightly. It seemed obvious that Trumps rhetoric, along with Islamic State atrocities, had driven anti-Muslim hatred to new highs, with the 2015 anti-Muslim hate crime count registering the highest number since 2001.

These trends only worsened after the election.

In its post-election first study, looking at harassment and intimidation in the first 10 days after Trumps election, the SPLC counted 867 hate incidents, some of them amounting to hate crimes, around the country. It collected information from media reports, social media, and through a #ReportHate page set up on the SPLC website, excluding incidents found to be hoaxes.

The results were disheartening.

I have experienced discrimination in my life, but never in such a public and unashamed manner, an Asian-American woman reported after a man told her to go home as she left a train station in Oakland, Calif. A black man whose apartment was vandalized with the phrase 911 nigger said that he had never witnessed anything like this. A Los Angeles woman, who encountered a man who told her he was [g]onna beat [her] pussy, said she had been in the neighborhood all the time and never experienced this type of language before. Not far away, in Sunnyvale, Calif., a transgender person reported being targeted with slurs at a bar where Ive been a regular customer for three years never had any issues.

Incidents were reported in nearly every state. The largest portion (323 incidents) occurred on university campuses or in K-12 schools. The incidents were dominated by anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim incidents (together, 329), but included ones that were anti-black (187), anti-Semitic (100), anti-LGBT (95), anti-woman (40) and white nationalist (32). A small sliver of them (23) were anti-Trump, but the vast majority appeared to be celebrating his election victory.

When the SPLC first released these findings, right-wing media outlets claimed that there was no evidence that they were related to Trump or the election. But that is false. For one thing, the largest number of incidents occurred on the day after the election, and they declined fairly steadily for the nine days after that.

Later, when the SPLC updated its findings to cover the first 34 days after the election, it counted a total of 1,094 bias incidents around the nation. Importantly, it also calculated that 37% of them directly referenced either President-elect Trump, his campaign slogans, or his infamous remarks about sexual assault. Just 26 were anti-Trump, with six of those explicitly anti-white.

Particularly noteworthy in this longer period was a string of letters, describing Muslims as Children of Satan and a vile and filthy people, sent to 15 mosques and Islamic centers around the country between Nov. 23 and Dec. 2. Also during that period, there were 57 incidents of extremist posters and fliers appearing, about three-quarters of them at university campuses, where emboldened white nationalists have been hard at work since the election. Thirty-four campuses were hit.

The SPLCs first, pre-election look at bias incidents in K-12 schools was based on responses from about 2,000 educators. In its post-election survey, however, the SPLC got responses to its online survey from more than 10,000 teachers, counselors, administrators and others who work in schools. Although the survey was not scientific, with such a large response it was hard to dismiss the findings.

Ninety percent of the respondents said that the climate of their schools had been affected negatively by the election. A full 80% described heightened anxiety on the part of students worried about the impact on them and their families. There were reports of slurs, derogatory language, and incidents involving extremist symbols.

Eight in 10 educators reported fears on the part of marginalized students including immigrants, Muslims, African Americans and LGBT people. Four in 10 heard derogatory language directed at minority students. More than 2,500 described instances of bigotry and harassment directly related to election rhetoric. Two out of 10 had heard derogatory comments about white students, although few of them were made directly to those students. Most were remarks about whites voting for Trump.

An Arizona high school counselor reported white students holding up a Confederate flag in a school assembly. A middle school teacher in Washington told of a student blurting out in class, I hate Muslims. A Georgia high school teacher said many students were making jokes about Hispanic students going back to Mexico. Another teacher in Oregon described a black girl running out of a classroom in tears after being racially harassed in two classes. A Massachusetts middle school teacher described how a white student, on the day after the election, went around asking each non-white student he passed, Are you legal?

This is my 21st year of teaching, a Georgia elementary school teacher reported. This is the first time Ive had a student call another student the n word. This incident occurred the day after a conference with the offenders mother. During the conference, the mother made her support of Trump known and expressed her hope that the blacks would soon know their place again.

Four days after the election, Donald Trump was interviewed on 60 Minutes, where he was asked about the hate. He said he was surprised to hear about it, and, looking into the camera, told the perpetrators to stop it. In another interview, he promised to bind the wounds of division that were afflicting our country.

His comments were a day late and a dollar short. The hatred, and the new energy of the white nationalist movement, were predictable results of the campaign Trump waged a campaign marked by incendiary racial statements, the stoking of white racial resentment, and attacks on so-called political correctness.

A few weeks later, Trump acknowledged what he had not earlier. In a post-election speech in Orlando, Fla., part of his thank you tour, he responded to the crowd chanting Lock her up with this: Four weeks ago, you people were vicious, violent, screaming, Wheres the wall? We want the wall! Prison! Prison! Lock her up! I mean, you were going crazy. I mean, you were nasty and mean and vicious and you wanted to win, right? Now, same crowds but its much different. Youre laid back, youre cool, youre mellow. Youre basking in the glory of victory.

Donald Trump is not legally responsible for any of this, of course. The people who engaged in legally punishable hate violence, if they are caught, are the ones who will have to actually pay for their crimes. But it seems undeniable that Trumps reckless, populist campaign has left a legacy of hatred, violence and division.

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The Trump Effect | Southern Poverty Law Center

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Mark Potok | Freedom Riders

Posted: August 8, 2010 in Mark Potok, PeopleTags: markpotok, montgomery, splc

Mark Potok is a career investigative reporter who serves as Director of the Intelligence Project, a unique project which supports the legal work of the SPLC and its fight against hate groups, individuals and entities that foster or sponsor white supremacy and racism. In 1981, the Southern Poverty Law Center began investigating hate activity in response to a resurgence of groups like the Ku Klux Klan. Today the Intelligence Project monitors hate groups and tracks extremist activity throughout the U.S. It provides comprehensive updates to law enforcement, the media and the public through its quarterly magazine Intelligence Report. Staff members, who include investigators, research analysts and writers, regularly conduct training sessions for police, schools, and civil rights and community groups, and they often serve as experts at hearings and conferences.

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Nancy Potok Named Chief Statistician of the United States

Nancy Potok, formerly deputy director and chief operating officer of the U.S. Census Bureau, has been appointed chief statistician of the United States. Located within the Office of Management and Budget, Potoks new position is responsible for providing coordination, guidance, and oversight for U.S. federal statistical agencies and activities. This marks the first time in 24 years that the position has been vacant after most recently being occupied by Katherine Wallman, who retired.

The ASA extended congratulatory greetings in a letter to Potok, vowing to support her efforts and work together to expand the countrys federal statistical system.

A former member of the ASA, Potok is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. Her government service also includes stints as deputy undersecretary for economic affairs in the Department of Commerce; the Census Bureau’s associate director for demographic programs; and the principal associate director and chief financial officer in charge of field operations, information technology, and administration during the 2000 Census. Her career of more than 30 years also includes time spent as senior vice president and director of the economic, labor, and population studies department at The University of Chicagos famed National Opinion Research Center.

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Mark Twains Tom Quartz | Mirror with Clouds

Whenever he was out of luck and a little downhearted, he would fall to mourning over the loss of a wonderful cat

Tom Quartz is another of Mark Twains stories that is actually a story within a story. It reminds me a little of The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County because of the way the story is told in dialect and accent. The story involves a cat, dynamite and miners who only half know what they are doing.

The Looney Tunes antics that ensue are funny only because nobody (or no animal) truly gets hurt. I know that the quotation Ive used above may imply otherwise but the cat isnt really harmed. I mean, hes able to walk away.

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Literature Study Guides – SparkNotes

Be Book-Smarter.

SparkNotes is brought to you by B&N. Visit B&N to buy and rent textbooks, and check out our award-winning tablets and ereaders, including NOOK Tablet 7″ and NOOK GlowLight Plus.

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Literature Study Guides – SparkNotes

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OdNowa w Szczyrku – Szczyrk – Poland – YouTube

OdNowa w Szczyrku hotel city: Szczyrk – Country: Poland Address: Willowa 26; zip code: 43-370

Offering a barbecue and sun terrace, OdNowa w Szczyrku is set in Szczyrk in the Silesia Region, 100 metres from Beskidek Ski Lift. COS Skrzyczne Ski Centre is 1.2 km away. Free private parking is available on site. All units feature a flat-screen…– Obiekt OdNowa w Szczyrku jest pooony 100 metrw od wycigu narciarskiego Beskidek i 1,2 km od orodka narciarskiego COS Skrzyczne. Do dyspozycji Goci jest sprzt do grillowania i taras soneczny. Na miejscu dostpny jest bezpatny parking…–

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OdNowa w Szczyrku – Szczyrk – Poland – YouTube

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Clark Gregg – Wikipedia

Robert Clark Gregg (born April 2, 1962), known professionally as Clark Gregg, is an American actor, director, screenwriter and voice actor. He is best known for the role of Agent Phil Coulson in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. He has appeared in Iron Man (2008), Iron Man 2 (2010), Thor (2011), The Avengers (2012), and the television series Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., being the actor with the longest screen time in the MCU. He also voices the character on the animated television series Ultimate Spider-Man and in the video games Lego Marvel Super Heroes, Lego Marvel Avengers and Marvel Heroes.

Gregg has also co-starred as Christine Campbell’s ex-husband Richard in the CBS sitcom The New Adventures of Old Christine, which debuted in March 2006 and concluded in May 2010. He also played FBI Special Agent Mike Casper on the NBC series The West Wing and Cam, the on-and-off boyfriend of Jack (and client of Grace) on the NBC series Will & Grace.

Gregg was born April 2, 1962 in Boston, Massachusetts,[1] the son of Mary Layne (ne Shine) and Robert Clark Gregg, an Episcopal priest and Stanford University professor.[2][3][4] Because his family relocated frequently, he had lived in seven cities by the time he was 17. He attended high school in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where his father was a professor at nearby Duke University.[5][6] He attended Ohio Wesleyan University for two years before dropping out and moving to Manhattan. He worked various jobs, such as being a bar back, a security guard at the Guggenheim Museum, and a parking valet at a restaurant.[7] He later enrolled at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, where he studied drama and English, and graduated in 1986.[8]

Gregg was a founding member, and later artistic director, of the off-Broadway Atlantic Theater Company, which formed in 1983. Gregg has been featured in a number of supporting roles in films, such as Lovely & Amazing, The Human Stain, and In Good Company, and a number of guest spots on TV series, such as Will & Grace, Sports Night, Sex and the City and The West Wing. He also wrote the screenplay for the 2000 thriller What Lies Beneath.[8]

He is the director and screenwriter of the 2008 film Choke, based on the Chuck Palahniuk novel of the same name, starring Sam Rockwell.[9] Gregg consulted his father, a retired religion professor at Stanford, for the quotation from Saint Paul’s letter to the Galatians which Gregg used in Choke.[10] Gregg’s father is also the former chaplain at Stanford Memorial Church.

In 2008, Gregg appeared in the film Iron Man as S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Phil Coulson.[11] In 2010, Gregg reprised his role as Agent Coulson for Iron Man 2. Gregg had since signed up for a multiple film deal as the character with Marvel Studios. In 2011, he returned again as Coulson for Thor.[12] Gregg noted his being a part of the expanding Marvel Cinematic Universe as being very exciting, “Agent Coulson was one of the guys who wasn’t really in the comic books, and he was a very kind of small role in Iron Man,” he said, “and I was just very lucky that they chose to expand that character and chose to put him more into the universe of it. It’s really a blast!”[13] Following on from his appearance in Thor, he again reprised his role in The Avengers. Gregg also stars in a series of Marvel short films that center around his character and can be seen on the Blu-ray releases of the films.

In October 2010, Gregg was part of the cast of a staged reading of Larry Kramer’s The Normal Heart alongside Dylan Walsh, Lisa Kudrow, and Tate Donovan, presented in Los Angeles on the occasion of the play’s 25th anniversary (and preceding the play’s 2011 Broadway premiere, which retained elements of this staged reading); the reading was directed by his father-in-law, Joel Grey.[14]

In late October 2012, Joss Whedon, Kevin Feige, and Gregg announced that he would be reprising his role as agent Phil Coulson in the Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. series’ pilot.[15] On April 20, 2013, Trust Me, a film written and directed by Gregg, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival.[16] The film found limited release in the United States in June 2014.

Gregg has been married since July 21, 2001 to actress Jennifer Grey; the couple co-starred in the Lifetime TV movie Road to Christmas. They have a daughter Stella, born December 3, 2001.[17] He is a sober alcoholic, and describes himself as a member of a Jewish family (his wife is Jewish).[18][19] He has a black belt in Brazilian jiu-jitsu.[20][21] Gregg and his wife Jennifer Grey were two of the demonstrators at the 2017 Women’s March held on January 21, 2017 in Washington, D.C..[22]

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The Spanish Prisoner (1997) – IMDb

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Joe Ross is a rising star. He’s designed a process that will make his company millions. He wants a bonus for this work, but fears his boss will stiff him. He meets a wealthy stranger, Jimmy Dell, and they strike up an off-kilter friendship. When the boss seems to set Ross up to get nothing, he seeks Dell’s help. Then he learns Dell is not what he seems, so he contacts an FBI agent through his tightly-wound assistant, Susan Ricci. The FBI asks him to help entrap Dell. He accepts, a sting is arranged, but suddenly it’s he who’s been conned out of the process and framed for murder. Bewildered and desperate, he enlists Susan’s aid to prove his innocence. Written by

Budget: $10,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend: $124,011 (USA) (5 April 1998)

Gross: $10,200,000 (USA)

Runtime: 110 min

Aspect Ratio: 1.85 : 1

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The Spanish Prisoner (1997) – IMDb

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Professors Argue Viewpoint Intolerance on Campus at All-Time High

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Professors from several institutions spoke about the growth of viewpoint intolerance in a panel event at New York University on Tuesday evening.

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The Trump Effect | Southern Poverty Law Center

In August 2015, two Boston men returning home late after a Red Sox game happened upon a homeless Mexican immigrant sleeping outside a commuter rail station. They beat him with a metal pipe, punched him repeatedly, urinated on him and called him a wetback. Then they high-fived each other as they walked away, leaving Guillermo Rodriguez with broken ribs and fingers and other injuries. When they were arrested a short time later, one of them, 38-year-old Scott Leader, told arresting officers, Donald Trump was right. All these illegals need to be deported. Later, but long before they were sentenced to terms of two and three years, they whined that authorities only arrested whites, never the minorities. To these men, Donald Trump was a hero and an inspiration. Photo credit: Lincoln Agnew After all, Trump had kicked off his presidential bid two months earlier with a speech describing Mexican immigrants as rapists and drug smugglers. He later called the Mexican government totally corrupt. He promised to build a wall along the 2,000-mile Mexico-U.S. border. He told an audience in New Hampshire that a plane overhead could be a Mexican plane up there, theyre getting ready to attack. And he insisted that an Indiana-born federal judge could not preside fairly over a civil racketeering case against his Trump University because hes a Mexican. And that was just Trumps talk about Mexicans. By the time he won the election, Trump had called for a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the country. He had lied about personally witnessing thousands of Muslims in New Jersey cheering as the World Trade Center collapsed on 9/11. He had attacked a Muslim Gold Star family, insinuating that Khizr Khan, whose son died in Iraq, was a terrorist sympathizer. He had retweeted utterly bogus claims that black people were responsible for 80% of the murders of whites. He had cozied up to some of the countrys hardest line gay-bashers. He had retweeted anti-Semitic memes and called many immigrants not well. He had attacked a debate moderator by insinuating that her tough questions were the result of her menstrual cycle. And his earlier boasts about grabbing women by the genitals had been revealed. Trump also had repeatedly encouraged violence. After a Black Lives Matter activist was beaten at a Trump rally in Birmingham, Ala., he told Fox News that maybe he should have been roughed up. In Cedar Rapids, Iowa, he urged supporters to knock the crap out of protesters, adding, I promise you, I will pay your legal fees. When a backer at a Fayetteville, N.C., rally sucker-punched a black protester being led away by police an act described by the local sheriff as a cowardly, unprovoked attack Trump told two national news outlets that he was looking into paying the mans legal fees. Through it all, Trump was heedless, rejecting calls from left and right to tamp down the insults and the violence they were spawning. His reaction to the beating of Guillermo Rodriguez was typical. While the attack was a shame, Trumps main conclusion was that people who are following me are very passionate. In the immediate aftermath of the election, the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) noticed a dramatic jump in hate violence and incidents of harassment and intimidation around the country. At the same time, a wave of incidents of bullying and other kinds of harassment washed over the nations K-12 schools. The SPLC decided to make an effort to document all of this in real time. The ugly evidence of hatred unleashed had already become apparent before Election Day. An earlier SPLC study of the impact in K-12 schools of Trumps bigoted rhetoric and encouragement of violence during his campaign had found massive anecdotal evidence of a rise in bullying and anxiety in classrooms. There was even evidence that Trumps attacks on Muslims during 2015 when he called for a ban on Muslims entering the U.S., suggested a registry for Muslims already here, and proposed to surveil mosques had had an effect that early. The FBI reported that anti-Muslim hate crimes went up by 67% in 2015, while other categories rose only slightly. It seemed obvious that Trumps rhetoric, along with Islamic State atrocities, had driven anti-Muslim hatred to new highs, with the 2015 anti-Muslim hate crime count registering the highest number since 2001. These trends only worsened after the election. In its post-election first study, looking at harassment and intimidation in the first 10 days after Trumps election, the SPLC counted 867 hate incidents, some of them amounting to hate crimes, around the country. It collected information from media reports, social media, and through a #ReportHate page set up on the SPLC website, excluding incidents found to be hoaxes. The results were disheartening. I have experienced discrimination in my life, but never in such a public and unashamed manner, an Asian-American woman reported after a man told her to go home as she left a train station in Oakland, Calif. A black man whose apartment was vandalized with the phrase 911 nigger said that he had never witnessed anything like this. A Los Angeles woman, who encountered a man who told her he was [g]onna beat [her] pussy, said she had been in the neighborhood all the time and never experienced this type of language before. Not far away, in Sunnyvale, Calif., a transgender person reported being targeted with slurs at a bar where Ive been a regular customer for three years never had any issues. Incidents were reported in nearly every state. The largest portion (323 incidents) occurred on university campuses or in K-12 schools. The incidents were dominated by anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim incidents (together, 329), but included ones that were anti-black (187), anti-Semitic (100), anti-LGBT (95), anti-woman (40) and white nationalist (32). A small sliver of them (23) were anti-Trump, but the vast majority appeared to be celebrating his election victory. When the SPLC first released these findings, right-wing media outlets claimed that there was no evidence that they were related to Trump or the election. But that is false. For one thing, the largest number of incidents occurred on the day after the election, and they declined fairly steadily for the nine days after that. Later, when the SPLC updated its findings to cover the first 34 days after the election, it counted a total of 1,094 bias incidents around the nation. Importantly, it also calculated that 37% of them directly referenced either President-elect Trump, his campaign slogans, or his infamous remarks about sexual assault. Just 26 were anti-Trump, with six of those explicitly anti-white. Particularly noteworthy in this longer period was a string of letters, describing Muslims as Children of Satan and a vile and filthy people, sent to 15 mosques and Islamic centers around the country between Nov. 23 and Dec. 2. Also during that period, there were 57 incidents of extremist posters and fliers appearing, about three-quarters of them at university campuses, where emboldened white nationalists have been hard at work since the election. Thirty-four campuses were hit. The SPLCs first, pre-election look at bias incidents in K-12 schools was based on responses from about 2,000 educators. In its post-election survey, however, the SPLC got responses to its online survey from more than 10,000 teachers, counselors, administrators and others who work in schools. Although the survey was not scientific, with such a large response it was hard to dismiss the findings. Ninety percent of the respondents said that the climate of their schools had been affected negatively by the election. A full 80% described heightened anxiety on the part of students worried about the impact on them and their families. There were reports of slurs, derogatory language, and incidents involving extremist symbols. Eight in 10 educators reported fears on the part of marginalized students including immigrants, Muslims, African Americans and LGBT people. Four in 10 heard derogatory language directed at minority students. More than 2,500 described instances of bigotry and harassment directly related to election rhetoric. Two out of 10 had heard derogatory comments about white students, although few of them were made directly to those students. Most were remarks about whites voting for Trump. An Arizona high school counselor reported white students holding up a Confederate flag in a school assembly. A middle school teacher in Washington told of a student blurting out in class, I hate Muslims. A Georgia high school teacher said many students were making jokes about Hispanic students going back to Mexico. Another teacher in Oregon described a black girl running out of a classroom in tears after being racially harassed in two classes. A Massachusetts middle school teacher described how a white student, on the day after the election, went around asking each non-white student he passed, Are you legal? This is my 21st year of teaching, a Georgia elementary school teacher reported. This is the first time Ive had a student call another student the n word. This incident occurred the day after a conference with the offenders mother. During the conference, the mother made her support of Trump known and expressed her hope that the blacks would soon know their place again. Four days after the election, Donald Trump was interviewed on 60 Minutes, where he was asked about the hate. He said he was surprised to hear about it, and, looking into the camera, told the perpetrators to stop it. In another interview, he promised to bind the wounds of division that were afflicting our country. His comments were a day late and a dollar short. The hatred, and the new energy of the white nationalist movement, were predictable results of the campaign Trump waged a campaign marked by incendiary racial statements, the stoking of white racial resentment, and attacks on so-called political correctness. A few weeks later, Trump acknowledged what he had not earlier. In a post-election speech in Orlando, Fla., part of his thank you tour, he responded to the crowd chanting Lock her up with this: Four weeks ago, you people were vicious, violent, screaming, Wheres the wall? We want the wall! Prison! Prison! Lock her up! I mean, you were going crazy. I mean, you were nasty and mean and vicious and you wanted to win, right? Now, same crowds but its much different. Youre laid back, youre cool, youre mellow. Youre basking in the glory of victory. Donald Trump is not legally responsible for any of this, of course. The people who engaged in legally punishable hate violence, if they are caught, are the ones who will have to actually pay for their crimes. But it seems undeniable that Trumps reckless, populist campaign has left a legacy of hatred, violence and division.

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Mark Potok | Freedom Riders

Posted: August 8, 2010 in Mark Potok, PeopleTags: markpotok, montgomery, splc Mark Potok is a career investigative reporter who serves as Director of the Intelligence Project, a unique project which supports the legal work of the SPLC and its fight against hate groups, individuals and entities that foster or sponsor white supremacy and racism. In 1981, the Southern Poverty Law Center began investigating hate activity in response to a resurgence of groups like the Ku Klux Klan. Today the Intelligence Project monitors hate groups and tracks extremist activity throughout the U.S. It provides comprehensive updates to law enforcement, the media and the public through its quarterly magazine Intelligence Report. Staff members, who include investigators, research analysts and writers, regularly conduct training sessions for police, schools, and civil rights and community groups, and they often serve as experts at hearings and conferences. Like Loading… Related

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Nancy Potok Named Chief Statistician of the United States

Nancy Potok, formerly deputy director and chief operating officer of the U.S. Census Bureau, has been appointed chief statistician of the United States. Located within the Office of Management and Budget, Potoks new position is responsible for providing coordination, guidance, and oversight for U.S. federal statistical agencies and activities. This marks the first time in 24 years that the position has been vacant after most recently being occupied by Katherine Wallman, who retired. The ASA extended congratulatory greetings in a letter to Potok, vowing to support her efforts and work together to expand the countrys federal statistical system. A former member of the ASA, Potok is an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. Her government service also includes stints as deputy undersecretary for economic affairs in the Department of Commerce; the Census Bureau’s associate director for demographic programs; and the principal associate director and chief financial officer in charge of field operations, information technology, and administration during the 2000 Census. Her career of more than 30 years also includes time spent as senior vice president and director of the economic, labor, and population studies department at The University of Chicagos famed National Opinion Research Center.

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Mark Twains Tom Quartz | Mirror with Clouds

Whenever he was out of luck and a little downhearted, he would fall to mourning over the loss of a wonderful cat Tom Quartz is another of Mark Twains stories that is actually a story within a story. It reminds me a little of The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County because of the way the story is told in dialect and accent. The story involves a cat, dynamite and miners who only half know what they are doing. The Looney Tunes antics that ensue are funny only because nobody (or no animal) truly gets hurt. I know that the quotation Ive used above may imply otherwise but the cat isnt really harmed. I mean, hes able to walk away. Like Loading… Related

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February 28, 2018  Tags:   Posted in: Mark Potok  Comments Closed

Literature Study Guides – SparkNotes

Be Book-Smarter. SparkNotes is brought to you by B&N. Visit B&N to buy and rent textbooks, and check out our award-winning tablets and ereaders, including NOOK Tablet 7″ and NOOK GlowLight Plus. 2017 SparkNotes LLC, All Rights Reserved

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January 7, 2018   Posted in: Mark Potok  Comments Closed

OdNowa w Szczyrku – Szczyrk – Poland – YouTube

OdNowa w Szczyrku hotel city: Szczyrk – Country: Poland Address: Willowa 26; zip code: 43-370 Offering a barbecue and sun terrace, OdNowa w Szczyrku is set in Szczyrk in the Silesia Region, 100 metres from Beskidek Ski Lift. COS Skrzyczne Ski Centre is 1.2 km away. Free private parking is available on site. All units feature a flat-screen…– Obiekt OdNowa w Szczyrku jest pooony 100 metrw od wycigu narciarskiego Beskidek i 1,2 km od orodka narciarskiego COS Skrzyczne. Do dyspozycji Goci jest sprzt do grillowania i taras soneczny. Na miejscu dostpny jest bezpatny parking…–

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December 26, 2017   Posted in: Mark Potok  Comments Closed

Clark Gregg – Wikipedia

Robert Clark Gregg (born April 2, 1962), known professionally as Clark Gregg, is an American actor, director, screenwriter and voice actor. He is best known for the role of Agent Phil Coulson in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. He has appeared in Iron Man (2008), Iron Man 2 (2010), Thor (2011), The Avengers (2012), and the television series Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., being the actor with the longest screen time in the MCU. He also voices the character on the animated television series Ultimate Spider-Man and in the video games Lego Marvel Super Heroes, Lego Marvel Avengers and Marvel Heroes. Gregg has also co-starred as Christine Campbell’s ex-husband Richard in the CBS sitcom The New Adventures of Old Christine, which debuted in March 2006 and concluded in May 2010. He also played FBI Special Agent Mike Casper on the NBC series The West Wing and Cam, the on-and-off boyfriend of Jack (and client of Grace) on the NBC series Will & Grace. Gregg was born April 2, 1962 in Boston, Massachusetts,[1] the son of Mary Layne (ne Shine) and Robert Clark Gregg, an Episcopal priest and Stanford University professor.[2][3][4] Because his family relocated frequently, he had lived in seven cities by the time he was 17. He attended high school in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where his father was a professor at nearby Duke University.[5][6] He attended Ohio Wesleyan University for two years before dropping out and moving to Manhattan. He worked various jobs, such as being a bar back, a security guard at the Guggenheim Museum, and a parking valet at a restaurant.[7] He later enrolled at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, where he studied drama and English, and graduated in 1986.[8] Gregg was a founding member, and later artistic director, of the off-Broadway Atlantic Theater Company, which formed in 1983. Gregg has been featured in a number of supporting roles in films, such as Lovely & Amazing, The Human Stain, and In Good Company, and a number of guest spots on TV series, such as Will & Grace, Sports Night, Sex and the City and The West Wing. He also wrote the screenplay for the 2000 thriller What Lies Beneath.[8] He is the director and screenwriter of the 2008 film Choke, based on the Chuck Palahniuk novel of the same name, starring Sam Rockwell.[9] Gregg consulted his father, a retired religion professor at Stanford, for the quotation from Saint Paul’s letter to the Galatians which Gregg used in Choke.[10] Gregg’s father is also the former chaplain at Stanford Memorial Church. In 2008, Gregg appeared in the film Iron Man as S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Phil Coulson.[11] In 2010, Gregg reprised his role as Agent Coulson for Iron Man 2. Gregg had since signed up for a multiple film deal as the character with Marvel Studios. In 2011, he returned again as Coulson for Thor.[12] Gregg noted his being a part of the expanding Marvel Cinematic Universe as being very exciting, “Agent Coulson was one of the guys who wasn’t really in the comic books, and he was a very kind of small role in Iron Man,” he said, “and I was just very lucky that they chose to expand that character and chose to put him more into the universe of it. It’s really a blast!”[13] Following on from his appearance in Thor, he again reprised his role in The Avengers. Gregg also stars in a series of Marvel short films that center around his character and can be seen on the Blu-ray releases of the films. In October 2010, Gregg was part of the cast of a staged reading of Larry Kramer’s The Normal Heart alongside Dylan Walsh, Lisa Kudrow, and Tate Donovan, presented in Los Angeles on the occasion of the play’s 25th anniversary (and preceding the play’s 2011 Broadway premiere, which retained elements of this staged reading); the reading was directed by his father-in-law, Joel Grey.[14] In late October 2012, Joss Whedon, Kevin Feige, and Gregg announced that he would be reprising his role as agent Phil Coulson in the Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. series’ pilot.[15] On April 20, 2013, Trust Me, a film written and directed by Gregg, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival.[16] The film found limited release in the United States in June 2014. Gregg has been married since July 21, 2001 to actress Jennifer Grey; the couple co-starred in the Lifetime TV movie Road to Christmas. They have a daughter Stella, born December 3, 2001.[17] He is a sober alcoholic, and describes himself as a member of a Jewish family (his wife is Jewish).[18][19] He has a black belt in Brazilian jiu-jitsu.[20][21] Gregg and his wife Jennifer Grey were two of the demonstrators at the 2017 Women’s March held on January 21, 2017 in Washington, D.C..[22]

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November 27, 2017   Posted in: Mark Potok  Comments Closed

The Spanish Prisoner (1997) – IMDb

Edit Storyline Joe Ross is a rising star. He’s designed a process that will make his company millions. He wants a bonus for this work, but fears his boss will stiff him. He meets a wealthy stranger, Jimmy Dell, and they strike up an off-kilter friendship. When the boss seems to set Ross up to get nothing, he seeks Dell’s help. Then he learns Dell is not what he seems, so he contacts an FBI agent through his tightly-wound assistant, Susan Ricci. The FBI asks him to help entrap Dell. He accepts, a sting is arranged, but suddenly it’s he who’s been conned out of the process and framed for murder. Bewildered and desperate, he enlists Susan’s aid to prove his innocence. Written by Budget: $10,000,000 (estimated) Opening Weekend: $124,011 (USA) (5 April 1998) Gross: $10,200,000 (USA) Runtime: 110 min Aspect Ratio: 1.85 : 1

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November 23, 2017   Posted in: Mark Potok  Comments Closed

Professors Argue Viewpoint Intolerance on Campus at All-Time High

Professors from several institutions spoke about the growth of viewpoint intolerance in a panel event at New York University on Tuesday evening.

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October 13, 2017   Posted in: Mark Potok  Comments Closed


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