Archive for the ‘Martin Luther King’ Category

North Carolina NAACP leader William Barber is stepping down to channel MLK – USA TODAY

The Associated Press 7:25 a.m. ET May 11, 2017

In this photo taken Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, the Rev. William Barber speaks during a news conference after a second night of violence following the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.(Photo: Chuck Burton, AP)

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) The Rev. William Barber, who led the state NAACP in blocking North Carolinas attempts to limit voting rights and fiercely supported gay rights, said hes stepping down as state chapter president and will focus on a poor peoples campaign like the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was building when he was slain.

Barber gained prominence in launching Moral Monday protests in North Carolina this decade and trained others in more than 20 states in such peaceful civil disobedience. But he said Wednesday that after 12 years as an NAACP state leader, he wants to focus on the new campaign and a national call for a moral revival.

We need a moral narrative because somewhere along the line weve gotten trapped in this left vs. right conversation, said the 53-year-old NAACP leader in an interview via conference call.

Barber also leads a nonprofit called Repairers of the Breach and said that group, along with the Kairos Center, Union Theological Seminary and others will lead a movement that will concentrate on 25 states and the nations capital where voter suppression, poverty and other problems are prevalent. The groups plan major actions next summer, which would mark the 50th anniversary of the start of Kings campaign in 1968.

Barber said more details would be forthcoming at a news conference Monday.

Though Barbers term officially ends in October, he said he would step down in June. He will remain on the NAACPs national board of directors, whose chair, Leon Russell, said hell continue to be a voice for North Carolina, for the South and for issues he holds dear.

Barber took the national stage in the literal sense last July, when he addressed the Democratic National Convention, saying then that the heart of the countrys democracy was on the line in the November elections. He called on voters to be the moral defibrillator of our time and to shock the nation with the power of love, mercy and the fight for justice.

Barbers path to that stage began publicly when he was elected in 2005 to lead the state chapter of the NAACP, turning himself into a national leader fighting on progressive issues both on the streets and in the courts.

The minister of Greenleaf Christian Church in Goldsboro, Barber founded a movement called Moral Mondays during which more than 1,000 people were arrested for civil disobedience at North Carolinas Legislature, including Barber on several occasions. Typically, the protesters rallied outside the legislative building, then moved to the legislative building, singing and holding up signs. Police warned them to leave before arrests began.

The protests were part of the broader Forward Together movement led by the NAACP, which won several protracted battles over voter access in the state.

Under Barbers leadership, the NAACP fought the North Carolina law known as House Bill 2, the bathroom bill limiting rights for gay and transgender people that drew a national outcry, business boycotts and was subsequently modified under a political compromise.

The NAACP chapter also opposed North Carolinas constitutional ban on gay marriage, which passed in 2012.

It was clear that the same people who opposed gay rights also supported bills such as voter identification, Barber said. We refused to allow the extremists to isolate our position, he said.

The various causes are parts of Barbers vision for a country where like-minded people work together and not against each other.

We need a narrative shift thats … not just about the normal discussion of left vs. right and conservative vs. liberal, but really a reset of our deepest values, he said. Dr. King said in 1968 we needed a moral revolution of values, and we say we need a moral revival.

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Sculptures of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Eleanor Roosevelt unveiled at Keuka College – Penn Yan Chronicle-Express (blog)

Kevin Frisch

With the unveiling of two larger-than-life sculptures Friday, May 5, Keuka College commemorated historic visits to its campus by two larger-than-life social justice pioneers.

The busts depicting Civil Rights icons Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Eleanor Roosevelt were presented during a ceremony at the Colleges Lightner Library.

That their lights shined on and from the College campus is testament to the tenets of social justice and equal rights that Keuka College has always held dear, said College President Dr. Jorge L. Daz-Herrera.

King addressed the graduating Class of 1963, challenging graduates to go forth with eyes open to social and political injustice, and hearts open to the plight of their fellow man.

Roosevelt visited the College in 1938, extolling educational opportunities for women and sharing the experience in her My Day syndicated newspaper column. She later urged the College to launch a nursing program which, nearly 75 years later, is still going strong.

The works were commissioned by Keuka College Trustee Donald Wertman and his wife, Christine, and crafted by Professor Emeritus of Art Dr. Dexter Benedict.

The ceremony was part of the Colleges Fribolin Fest activities, a daylong series of events that included the 29th annual Carl and Fany Fribolin Lecture. This years lecture was delivered Friday evening at Norton Chapel by Eboo Patel, founder and president of Interfaith Youth Core, which seeks to build the global interfaith youth movement.

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Martin Luther King’s lessons on negotiation from the successful Birmingham campaign – Waging Nonviolence

The anti-Trump resistance movement has been effective in its nascent stage, utilizing public protests to signal opposition to the presidents plans. In taking to the streets, airports and congressional town hall meetings, the resistance has had a decisive impact on blocking the discriminatory travel ban on individuals from Muslim-majority countries, and on rendering the first iteration of the Republican health care replacement plan dead in the water.

The current resistance represents a collective no in the face of Trumps proposals. In order to bring about positive changes (i.e. those things movements are for rather than simply against) organizers and activists will need to employ a different tool: negotiation.

Some may question whether negotiating with an administration as problematic as Trumps is even possible, especially given the contentious political environment that is pervasive in the United States today. History provides a good answer in the example of Birmingham, Alabama, and in a situation that was perhaps even more extreme than our own. Fifty-four years ago this week, after a sustained and strategic direct action campaign, black leaders within the civil rights movement sat down with white business leaders and hammered out an agreement to desegregate Birmingham.

In 1963, Birmingham was widely known as the most segregated place in America, a place where Jim Crow was in full force. In January of that year, Alabama Gov. George Wallace a fierce segregationist delivered his segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever speech at his inaugural address.

It was in this context that Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, or SCLC, wrote the blueprint for effective nonviolent direct action and with the help of many others executed it adeptly with great success. At the core of his strategy were the twin tools of nonviolence and negotiation, and he understood that lasting change was contingent on using both in tandem. As he explained, The purpose of our direct action program is to create a situation so crisis-packed that it will inevitably open the door to negotiation.

King and the SCLC were invited to Birmingham by Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, or ACMHR. Not long before, King had led the SCLC in a direct action campaign to desegregate the city of Albany, Georgia with very limited success. He was eager to improve on his strategy and produce results, and Shuttlesworth assured him that there was no better place to do so than Birmingham, stating, If you come to Birmingham, you will not only gain prestige, but really shake the country. If you win in Birmingham, as Birmingham goes, so goes the nation.

King took him up on it, and on April 3 the SCLC joined the local ACMHR to begin what would turn out to be a historic campaign. The direct action program was comprised of a number of different tactics, including marches, a boycott of downtown stores, lunch counter sit-ins, and kneel-ins at churches. As a result of these actions, hundreds were arrested, but the campaign continued.

On April 10, the city government obtained a state circuit court injunction against the demonstrations. Running low on funds used to bail protesters out of jail and facing certain arrest if the injunction were to be defied, King had to make the difficult decision about how to proceed. After silently sitting through a meeting with movement leaders, King took a leap of faith.

Knowing the power of symbolic acts, King sacrificially led others in defying the injunction on Good Friday, April 12. In doing so, he also defied the advice of some black business leaders, as well as white clergymen who published a public statement calling the demonstrations unwise and untimely, and suggesting that negotiation would be a better route.

King read the statement in his jail cell, and on the margins of the paper began his Letter from Birmingham Jail. He did not disagree when it came to the utility of negotiation, but he understood that without direct action, power asymmetry would favor the established and unjust power structure, making negotiation for tangible gains impossible. This was one of the major takeaways from his letter, that nonviolent direct action at its best serves as leverage in getting a movements representatives to the negotiating table, and in a place where they have the power to make and win demands.

Parallel to the direct action campaign, a confidant of Kings by the name of Andrew Young who would later become the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations began preliminary negotiations with white business leaders, individuals he was connected to through a contact at the Episcopal Church. He explained what the campaign would entail and the motivations behind their plans. This was strategic, as local and state government officials were unwilling to speak with members of the movement, and because the campaign was largely focused on the business community as a starting point and proxy for wider desegregation.

These leaders had a pragmatic reason for sitting down with Young and his associates: to protect their businesses and bottom lines. Reflecting a Gandhian point of view and seeing the bigger picture, Young said, I did not view the white business leaders in Birmingham as bad people; they were people in a bad situation.

This underscores a key lesson for those engaged in a nonviolent campaign, namely that when an opponent wont deal, costs can be imposed by targeting its pillars of support, convincing them through nonviolent force and negotiation to redirect their support to the movement itself.

Shortly after King was released from jail, SCLC organizer James Bevel suggested employing an untapped resource in order to sustain the campaign. On May 2, children and youth who did not face the same work and life constraints as the adults became the primary protagonists in the direct action campaign.

The next day, Commissioner of Public Safety Eugene Bull Connor led law enforcement in turning the fire hoses and police dogs on these young protesters as they marched downtown. The images that were broadcast shocked the nation and the world. With Birmingham now on the national stage, and tensions at a fever pitch, Attorney Gen. Robert Kennedy sent his chief civil rights assistant, Burke Marshall, to Alabama to facilitate negotiations between black leaders and the white business establishment, building on the foundation Young had cultivated.

In the days that followed the integration of young people into the Birmingham campaign, and with negotiations underway, the Senior Citizens Committee the formal group representing the citys white business leadership in negotiations sought an end to the demonstrations as an act of good faith. King agreed, but noted that they would resume if the situation wasnt resolved quickly through negotiation.

On May 10, after negotiations that lasted through the night, King, Shuttlesworth, and Ralph Abernathy publicly announced that they had reached a compromise, outlined in what was called the Birmingham Truce Agreement. It included the removal of Whites Only and Blacks Only signs from restrooms and drinking fountains, a plan for the desegregation of lunch counters, a program of upgrading employment for the black community, a biracial committee to monitor the progress of the agreement, and the release of those who had been arrested during the protests.

Direct action had opened the door to negotiation, and through negotiation the movement had brought about concrete gains.

Though progress was made in Birmingham, the response was not universally positive. Segregationists carried out a string of violent attacks, culminating in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church, which resulted in the death of four young girls. Additionally, the Senior Citizens Committee, after having played an instrumental role in the negotiations, tried to distance themselves somewhat from the agreement to appease angered whites and segregationist state and local government officials. An article in the New York Times published on May 16, 1963 stated that The agreement that resulted was worked out by private citizens. It involves only private action. It violates no law. It binds no one in the white community except the business involved.

Still, others almost immediately recognized the importance of the Birmingham campaign. As the New York Times put it, The agreement is not one that pleased extremists on either side. But it is one that moderate leaders of both the Negro and white communities of Birmingham have said can bring a new era to a troubled city, and perhaps provide a pattern for the whole South.

The events that took place in Birmingham in 1963 even prompted President Kennedy to deliver a speech on civil rights, which followed Kings cues in framing it as a moral issue that the United States had to get right. The Birmingham campaign and Kennedys response to it indeed laid the groundwork for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

When nonviolent direct action is used strategically alongside negotiation, the results will often be anything but inconsequential. There is a tendency, however, to see nonviolence and negotiation as mutually exclusive, with activists embracing the former and scholar-practitioners propounding the latter. As King and the Birmingham movement show, far from being opposed to each other, these tools are in fact complementary.

An article from Harvards Program on Negotiation puts it this way: Nonviolent action forces the issues, and negotiation takes the space that is created and gives people a process and tools for discussing the issues in a productive and nonviolent way.

As todays resistance movement grows and continues to organize, seeking to address the moral issues of our time and bring about positive gains, individuals within it would do well to remember the powerful lesson from Birmingham. Nonviolent direct action is perhaps the most effective way to stand up against the regressive and discriminatory plans of the Trump administration; but lasting change and progress will require holding the negotiation tool in the other hand, and knowing when and where to employ it.

This story was made possible by our members. Become one today.

Brandon Jacobsen is a Master’s candidate in Ethics, Peace and Global Affairs at American University’s School of International Service. Follow him on Twitter at @jacobsen253.

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MLK Jr Blvd. Traffic Problems: Will they Ever go Away? – KNWA

Some of you may remember when it was called Sixth Street. It’s a seven-mile stretch of road running through south Fayetteville from Huntsville road on the east side of town, to the city limits on the west. It’s now more commonly known as Martin Luther King,Jr. Boulevard, and it’s traveled daily by more than 30,000 people.

With all the growth in Northwest Arkansas, streets aren’t getting bigger, but the traffic is getting worse.

We see constantly all day people in and out, in and out.. screeching tries, brakes and honking horns. So it’s a on and off thing all day,” said GarryKingrey, an employee at College Shoe Shop.

It’s one of the busiest streets in Fayetteville, and all for good reason.

Sgt. Craig Stout, Fayetteville Police Department said, “Things that you have on Martin Luther King that you don’t have on the others is the University of Arkansas campus. The other is the Fayetteville High School campus. So you have a lot more pedestrian traffic on Martin Luther King than you would these other streets.”

Which gives some businesses, like the College Shoe Shop which has been around since 1976, some anxiety.

“It’s always been a busy place, since it’s been this part of town but it’s never really been to the point where it is now,” said Kingrey, College Shoe Shop. “One of the things that kind of worries me I think for customers is that we have our parking lot as well as the road right next to it.”

And he has a right to be worried. Starting onFutrallDrive — just off I-49 — and ending at South School Ave– less than 2 miles down the road. In that stretch of space, there were more than 1400 car and pedestrian accidents between 2011 to 2016. Razorback Road is one of the most accident prone areas with over 260 accidents in the past 5 years.

“Beechwoodjust within the past couple years,the dynamics have completely changed.Beechwoodwas mainly an industrial area. Prior to a few years ago it was only one business. It was a way you could access Baum stadium and the track,” saidSgt. Stout. “Now that you have you have a lot of apartments in that area..you’re starting to see a lot more traffic.”

We wanted to know what, if anything, is being done to put the brakes on traffic congestion.

JasonHughey, Construction Engineer withASHTDexplained,”Fayetteville, and all of Northwest Arkansas, has experienced tremendous growth for the last several decades. And our highway system is working to catch up in areas that we can. But areas, such asMLK, has already been built out pretty much to full compactly. So, there’s not a lot we can do for capacity improvements. So we’re working with the things we can.”

But there is a little light at the end of the tunnel for drivers.

“Currently we’re looking at the end of 2021, there’s a project coming up for the I-49/LKinterchange. There will be some substantialchanges coming along,” saidHughey.

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Boca man wins auction for Martin Luther King’s ‘we shall overcome … – Sun Sentinel

The original transcript of the Martin Luther King Jr. speech containing the resonant phrase we shall overcome has been acquired by a former owner of the Kansas City Royals baseball team.

Avron B. Fogelman, a philanthropist, real estate developer and Boca Raton resident, paid $382,000 for the 20-page document, which is mostly typewritten. The first 19 pages contain numerous handwritten notes by the late civil rights leader. The final page, where the famous phrase resides, is almost entirely in his handwriting.

“There are not many more significant artifacts from the 20th century than the 20-page, personally owned speech by Martin Luther King Jr. written in his own handwriting, Fogelman said in an email to the Sun Sentinel. “I am fortunate to own it and I am sure it will end up some day in a museum for others to enjoy and learn from it.”

“We Shall Overcome” a phrase from a gospel song concluded the speech King delivered on July 6, 1965, to the General Synod of the United Church of Christ in Chicago. He included the famous phrase in several speeches, including his final sermon on March 31, 1968, days before he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis.

Ken Goldin, founder and CEO of Goldin Auctions, said he could not disclose the seller’s name. But he said he believed the previous owner possessed the document for more than 30 years. The speech had been on display in a museum, Goldin said.

Fogelman, who also owns a home in Memphis, was among five bidders for the speech. It fetched the largest sum for a historical item sold by Goldin Auctions, of New Jersey. According to the auction house, other original speeches delivered by King have been appraised in the millions of dollars. The current owner of Kings I Have A Dream speech has turned down $5 million for that historic document.

Other items sold at the auction that ended in late April, included a white robe worn by boxer Muhammad Ali who fought as Cassius Clay at the time. The robe, bearing the words “The Greatest” embroidered in red letters across the back, was the one Ali donned before his famous Miami Beach fight against Sonny Liston in 1964.

The robe attracted nine bids before closing at a final price of $255,000.

While Goldin did not have permission to reveal the robes buyer, he said he anticipates the terry cloth garment will be on display in a museum in the “not too distant future.”

Goldin said he believed the robe was obtained through an auction held by Drew Bundini Brown Ali’s assistant trainer and corner man more than 20 years ago.

The sales of the King speech and the Ali robe were part of the auction company’s 70th anniversary Jackie Robinson Auction to benefit the Jackie Robinson Foundation. The nonprofit foundation preserves the legacy of the baseball player who broke Major League Baseballs color barrier in the late 1940s.

We raised over $125,000 for the Jackie Robinson Foundation, Goldin said. Several key items in the auction were donated to the Jackie Robinson Museum being built now.

The museum, which is expected to open in 2019 in New York, has raised $23 million toward its construction goal of $24 million, according to the foundations website.

Overall, the museums campaign goal is $42 million, which stems from the No. 42 that Robinson wore with the Brooklyn Dodgers and is now retired by all 30 major league clubs.

Stephen Ross, owner of the Miami Dolphins and majority owner of Related Companies, is a founding donor of the foundation.

jboehm@sun-sentinel.com, 954-356-4527

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Martin Luther King Jr. handwritten ‘we shall overcome’ speech draws $382K – USA TODAY

USA Today Network Kevin McKenzie, The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal Published 9:35 p.m. ET May 3, 2017 | Updated 10:02 p.m. ET May 3, 2017

Who are the people in the iconic photo shot moments after Dr. Martin Luther King was killed by an assassin’s bullet? This video explores the unknown people in Joseph Louw’s photo on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel. Jason Viera/The Commercial Appeal

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote “we shall overcome” to end a 1965 speech delivered in Chicago, according to New Jersey-based Goldin Auctions.(Photo: Handout)

MEMPHIS Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote the iconic civil rights movement phrase “we shall overcome” to end a 20-page speech purchased by Memphis philanthropist Avron B. Fogelman, according to a New Jersey auction company.

The original speech King deliveredJuly 6, 1965, in Chicago at the General Synod of the United Church of Christsold for $382,000, Goldin Auctions reported Wednesday.

The speech had been estimated to bring $500,000 or more and its previous owner had turned down $5 million for it, theauction company said. It drew five bids at the firm’s 70th anniversary Jackie Robinson auction raising funds for the Jackie Robinson Foundation.

Related:

Hundreds join day of ‘consecration’ on 49th anniversary of King’s death

On anniversary of MLK’s death, the sax, story behind his last words

While typewritten, most of the final page of the speech, on the church’s role in the civil rights movement, washandwritten by King.

A news release by Goldin Auctions said the speech “marked the first time Dr. King uttered those famous words that inspired the civil rights movement.” However, on Feb. 26, 1965, King used the phrase in Los Angeles a sermon at Temple Israel in Hollywood.

May 3, 2017–Memphis philanthropist Avron B. Fogelman purchased this 1965 speech by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.(Photo: Handout)

The Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tenn., played an important role in making the song We Shall Overcomea standard for the civil rights movement, according toUSA TodayandNational Public Radio.

Fogelman, a retired Memphis real estate developer and former owner of the Kansas City Royals, is a resident of Memphis and Boca Raton, Fla., the auction company reported.

King was assassinated in Memphis at the Lorraine Motel, now theNational Civil Rights Museum, on April 4, 1968.

Follow Kevin McKenzie on Twitter: @KMcknz

Dr. Martin Luther King delivered his “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, on April 3, 1968, the night before his assassination. Associated Press

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MPD: 1 person taken to hospital following shooting near MLK and Locust – fox6now.com


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MPD: 1 person taken to hospital following shooting near MLK and Locust
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MILWAUKEE Milwaukee police say one person was shot near Martin Luther King Drive and Locust Street Friday evening, May 5th. Police responded to the scene around 9:20 p.m.. According to police, the person was transported by paramedics to Froedtert …

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Keller @ Large: Turn Boston Racism Debate Over To Words Of MLK – CBS Boston / WBZ


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Keller @ Large: Turn Boston Racism Debate Over To Words Of MLK
CBS Boston / WBZ
I suggest we all take a deep breath, summon some humility, and turn the debate over to someone far more eloquent than any voice we heard this week, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whose famous words at the Lincoln Memorial 54 years ago still ring true.

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MLK football star Kasean Patterson to play in all-star game – The Philadelphia Tribune

Martin Luther King defensive back Kasean Patterson is one of the top football players in the city. Patterson, an All-Public League selection, will have an opportunity to compete against the best players in the Philadelphia All-Star Football Game.

This all-star game featuring outstanding players from the Public League, Catholic League and Inter-Ac League will be played on Saturday, May 20 at Northeast High School, Cottman and Algon avenues. The game will begin at 5 p.m. Patterson, a 6-foot-1, 195-pounder, will be playing for the Public League stars as they battle the Non-Public Stars from the Catholic and Inter-Ac Leagues. Hes looking forward to the matchup.

I really like to play against the competition, Patterson said. It opens your eyes and let you know what you have to work on as a player. I want to get better every step that I can. You cant get to be the best if you dont play the best.

Its just exciting playing with a different vibe and a different group of guys who all come from their own teams. We all come together and learn from each other. You may know something that they dont know. You may have a different look on the game.

Theres a lot of talent on both sides of the ledger. The Public League stars have some great players like Nasir Boykin (Imhotep Charter), Jonathan Hodges (Overbrook), Collin Washington (Central) and Sheir-Ron Whittaker (Delaware Valley Charter). The Non-Public Stars have some magnificent players such as Mark Webb (Archbishop Wood), Calil Wortham (West Catholic), Sy Madden (La Salle) and Terrance Greene (St. Josephs Prep).

Patterson feels practicing against some of the top wide receivers from the Public League will prepare him for the all-star game.

I play defensive back, Patterson said. Im going against a lot of receivers who are really quick. That helps you. It teaches you to be patient because theyre going to make you bite and go the other way. Theyre really quick, really fast and precise in their route running. They can beat you if you let them. You have to be on your toes all the time.

Patterson has done extremely well on and off the field. He will attend Bloomsburg University in the fall. Patterson, an outstanding student-athlete, he will be playing his last high school football game in the upcoming all-star classic. He knows what he has to do moving forward to be successful.

Im going to give it my all, Patterson said. I know playing for Bloomsburg Ive got to have attention to details. The fundamentals and techniques are really important on how to play the game. Im going to major in engineering. I took physics. Ive had pre-calculus. Ive also taken chemistry I and II.

Patterson is headed in the right direction.

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North Carolina NAACP leader William Barber is stepping down to channel MLK – USA TODAY

The Associated Press 7:25 a.m. ET May 11, 2017 In this photo taken Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, the Rev. William Barber speaks during a news conference after a second night of violence following the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.(Photo: Chuck Burton, AP) RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) The Rev. William Barber, who led the state NAACP in blocking North Carolinas attempts to limit voting rights and fiercely supported gay rights, said hes stepping down as state chapter president and will focus on a poor peoples campaign like the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was building when he was slain. Barber gained prominence in launching Moral Monday protests in North Carolina this decade and trained others in more than 20 states in such peaceful civil disobedience. But he said Wednesday that after 12 years as an NAACP state leader, he wants to focus on the new campaign and a national call for a moral revival. We need a moral narrative because somewhere along the line weve gotten trapped in this left vs. right conversation, said the 53-year-old NAACP leader in an interview via conference call. Barber also leads a nonprofit called Repairers of the Breach and said that group, along with the Kairos Center, Union Theological Seminary and others will lead a movement that will concentrate on 25 states and the nations capital where voter suppression, poverty and other problems are prevalent. The groups plan major actions next summer, which would mark the 50th anniversary of the start of Kings campaign in 1968. Barber said more details would be forthcoming at a news conference Monday. Though Barbers term officially ends in October, he said he would step down in June. He will remain on the NAACPs national board of directors, whose chair, Leon Russell, said hell continue to be a voice for North Carolina, for the South and for issues he holds dear. Barber took the national stage in the literal sense last July, when he addressed the Democratic National Convention, saying then that the heart of the countrys democracy was on the line in the November elections. He called on voters to be the moral defibrillator of our time and to shock the nation with the power of love, mercy and the fight for justice. Barbers path to that stage began publicly when he was elected in 2005 to lead the state chapter of the NAACP, turning himself into a national leader fighting on progressive issues both on the streets and in the courts. The minister of Greenleaf Christian Church in Goldsboro, Barber founded a movement called Moral Mondays during which more than 1,000 people were arrested for civil disobedience at North Carolinas Legislature, including Barber on several occasions. Typically, the protesters rallied outside the legislative building, then moved to the legislative building, singing and holding up signs. Police warned them to leave before arrests began. The protests were part of the broader Forward Together movement led by the NAACP, which won several protracted battles over voter access in the state. Under Barbers leadership, the NAACP fought the North Carolina law known as House Bill 2, the bathroom bill limiting rights for gay and transgender people that drew a national outcry, business boycotts and was subsequently modified under a political compromise. The NAACP chapter also opposed North Carolinas constitutional ban on gay marriage, which passed in 2012. It was clear that the same people who opposed gay rights also supported bills such as voter identification, Barber said. We refused to allow the extremists to isolate our position, he said. The various causes are parts of Barbers vision for a country where like-minded people work together and not against each other. We need a narrative shift thats … not just about the normal discussion of left vs. right and conservative vs. liberal, but really a reset of our deepest values, he said. Dr. King said in 1968 we needed a moral revolution of values, and we say we need a moral revival. Read or Share this story: https://usat.ly/2q5pbWN

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Sculptures of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Eleanor Roosevelt unveiled at Keuka College – Penn Yan Chronicle-Express (blog)

Kevin Frisch With the unveiling of two larger-than-life sculptures Friday, May 5, Keuka College commemorated historic visits to its campus by two larger-than-life social justice pioneers. The busts depicting Civil Rights icons Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Eleanor Roosevelt were presented during a ceremony at the Colleges Lightner Library. That their lights shined on and from the College campus is testament to the tenets of social justice and equal rights that Keuka College has always held dear, said College President Dr. Jorge L. Daz-Herrera. King addressed the graduating Class of 1963, challenging graduates to go forth with eyes open to social and political injustice, and hearts open to the plight of their fellow man. Roosevelt visited the College in 1938, extolling educational opportunities for women and sharing the experience in her My Day syndicated newspaper column. She later urged the College to launch a nursing program which, nearly 75 years later, is still going strong. The works were commissioned by Keuka College Trustee Donald Wertman and his wife, Christine, and crafted by Professor Emeritus of Art Dr. Dexter Benedict. The ceremony was part of the Colleges Fribolin Fest activities, a daylong series of events that included the 29th annual Carl and Fany Fribolin Lecture. This years lecture was delivered Friday evening at Norton Chapel by Eboo Patel, founder and president of Interfaith Youth Core, which seeks to build the global interfaith youth movement.

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May 10, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed

Martin Luther King’s lessons on negotiation from the successful Birmingham campaign – Waging Nonviolence

The anti-Trump resistance movement has been effective in its nascent stage, utilizing public protests to signal opposition to the presidents plans. In taking to the streets, airports and congressional town hall meetings, the resistance has had a decisive impact on blocking the discriminatory travel ban on individuals from Muslim-majority countries, and on rendering the first iteration of the Republican health care replacement plan dead in the water. The current resistance represents a collective no in the face of Trumps proposals. In order to bring about positive changes (i.e. those things movements are for rather than simply against) organizers and activists will need to employ a different tool: negotiation. Some may question whether negotiating with an administration as problematic as Trumps is even possible, especially given the contentious political environment that is pervasive in the United States today. History provides a good answer in the example of Birmingham, Alabama, and in a situation that was perhaps even more extreme than our own. Fifty-four years ago this week, after a sustained and strategic direct action campaign, black leaders within the civil rights movement sat down with white business leaders and hammered out an agreement to desegregate Birmingham. In 1963, Birmingham was widely known as the most segregated place in America, a place where Jim Crow was in full force. In January of that year, Alabama Gov. George Wallace a fierce segregationist delivered his segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever speech at his inaugural address. It was in this context that Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, or SCLC, wrote the blueprint for effective nonviolent direct action and with the help of many others executed it adeptly with great success. At the core of his strategy were the twin tools of nonviolence and negotiation, and he understood that lasting change was contingent on using both in tandem. As he explained, The purpose of our direct action program is to create a situation so crisis-packed that it will inevitably open the door to negotiation. King and the SCLC were invited to Birmingham by Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, or ACMHR. Not long before, King had led the SCLC in a direct action campaign to desegregate the city of Albany, Georgia with very limited success. He was eager to improve on his strategy and produce results, and Shuttlesworth assured him that there was no better place to do so than Birmingham, stating, If you come to Birmingham, you will not only gain prestige, but really shake the country. If you win in Birmingham, as Birmingham goes, so goes the nation. King took him up on it, and on April 3 the SCLC joined the local ACMHR to begin what would turn out to be a historic campaign. The direct action program was comprised of a number of different tactics, including marches, a boycott of downtown stores, lunch counter sit-ins, and kneel-ins at churches. As a result of these actions, hundreds were arrested, but the campaign continued. On April 10, the city government obtained a state circuit court injunction against the demonstrations. Running low on funds used to bail protesters out of jail and facing certain arrest if the injunction were to be defied, King had to make the difficult decision about how to proceed. After silently sitting through a meeting with movement leaders, King took a leap of faith. Knowing the power of symbolic acts, King sacrificially led others in defying the injunction on Good Friday, April 12. In doing so, he also defied the advice of some black business leaders, as well as white clergymen who published a public statement calling the demonstrations unwise and untimely, and suggesting that negotiation would be a better route. King read the statement in his jail cell, and on the margins of the paper began his Letter from Birmingham Jail. He did not disagree when it came to the utility of negotiation, but he understood that without direct action, power asymmetry would favor the established and unjust power structure, making negotiation for tangible gains impossible. This was one of the major takeaways from his letter, that nonviolent direct action at its best serves as leverage in getting a movements representatives to the negotiating table, and in a place where they have the power to make and win demands. Parallel to the direct action campaign, a confidant of Kings by the name of Andrew Young who would later become the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations began preliminary negotiations with white business leaders, individuals he was connected to through a contact at the Episcopal Church. He explained what the campaign would entail and the motivations behind their plans. This was strategic, as local and state government officials were unwilling to speak with members of the movement, and because the campaign was largely focused on the business community as a starting point and proxy for wider desegregation. These leaders had a pragmatic reason for sitting down with Young and his associates: to protect their businesses and bottom lines. Reflecting a Gandhian point of view and seeing the bigger picture, Young said, I did not view the white business leaders in Birmingham as bad people; they were people in a bad situation. This underscores a key lesson for those engaged in a nonviolent campaign, namely that when an opponent wont deal, costs can be imposed by targeting its pillars of support, convincing them through nonviolent force and negotiation to redirect their support to the movement itself. Shortly after King was released from jail, SCLC organizer James Bevel suggested employing an untapped resource in order to sustain the campaign. On May 2, children and youth who did not face the same work and life constraints as the adults became the primary protagonists in the direct action campaign. The next day, Commissioner of Public Safety Eugene Bull Connor led law enforcement in turning the fire hoses and police dogs on these young protesters as they marched downtown. The images that were broadcast shocked the nation and the world. With Birmingham now on the national stage, and tensions at a fever pitch, Attorney Gen. Robert Kennedy sent his chief civil rights assistant, Burke Marshall, to Alabama to facilitate negotiations between black leaders and the white business establishment, building on the foundation Young had cultivated. In the days that followed the integration of young people into the Birmingham campaign, and with negotiations underway, the Senior Citizens Committee the formal group representing the citys white business leadership in negotiations sought an end to the demonstrations as an act of good faith. King agreed, but noted that they would resume if the situation wasnt resolved quickly through negotiation. On May 10, after negotiations that lasted through the night, King, Shuttlesworth, and Ralph Abernathy publicly announced that they had reached a compromise, outlined in what was called the Birmingham Truce Agreement. It included the removal of Whites Only and Blacks Only signs from restrooms and drinking fountains, a plan for the desegregation of lunch counters, a program of upgrading employment for the black community, a biracial committee to monitor the progress of the agreement, and the release of those who had been arrested during the protests. Direct action had opened the door to negotiation, and through negotiation the movement had brought about concrete gains. Though progress was made in Birmingham, the response was not universally positive. Segregationists carried out a string of violent attacks, culminating in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church, which resulted in the death of four young girls. Additionally, the Senior Citizens Committee, after having played an instrumental role in the negotiations, tried to distance themselves somewhat from the agreement to appease angered whites and segregationist state and local government officials. An article in the New York Times published on May 16, 1963 stated that The agreement that resulted was worked out by private citizens. It involves only private action. It violates no law. It binds no one in the white community except the business involved. Still, others almost immediately recognized the importance of the Birmingham campaign. As the New York Times put it, The agreement is not one that pleased extremists on either side. But it is one that moderate leaders of both the Negro and white communities of Birmingham have said can bring a new era to a troubled city, and perhaps provide a pattern for the whole South. The events that took place in Birmingham in 1963 even prompted President Kennedy to deliver a speech on civil rights, which followed Kings cues in framing it as a moral issue that the United States had to get right. The Birmingham campaign and Kennedys response to it indeed laid the groundwork for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. When nonviolent direct action is used strategically alongside negotiation, the results will often be anything but inconsequential. There is a tendency, however, to see nonviolence and negotiation as mutually exclusive, with activists embracing the former and scholar-practitioners propounding the latter. As King and the Birmingham movement show, far from being opposed to each other, these tools are in fact complementary. An article from Harvards Program on Negotiation puts it this way: Nonviolent action forces the issues, and negotiation takes the space that is created and gives people a process and tools for discussing the issues in a productive and nonviolent way. As todays resistance movement grows and continues to organize, seeking to address the moral issues of our time and bring about positive gains, individuals within it would do well to remember the powerful lesson from Birmingham. Nonviolent direct action is perhaps the most effective way to stand up against the regressive and discriminatory plans of the Trump administration; but lasting change and progress will require holding the negotiation tool in the other hand, and knowing when and where to employ it. This story was made possible by our members. Become one today. Brandon Jacobsen is a Master’s candidate in Ethics, Peace and Global Affairs at American University’s School of International Service. Follow him on Twitter at @jacobsen253.

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May 9, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed

MLK Jr Blvd. Traffic Problems: Will they Ever go Away? – KNWA

Some of you may remember when it was called Sixth Street. It’s a seven-mile stretch of road running through south Fayetteville from Huntsville road on the east side of town, to the city limits on the west. It’s now more commonly known as Martin Luther King,Jr. Boulevard, and it’s traveled daily by more than 30,000 people. With all the growth in Northwest Arkansas, streets aren’t getting bigger, but the traffic is getting worse. We see constantly all day people in and out, in and out.. screeching tries, brakes and honking horns. So it’s a on and off thing all day,” said GarryKingrey, an employee at College Shoe Shop. It’s one of the busiest streets in Fayetteville, and all for good reason. Sgt. Craig Stout, Fayetteville Police Department said, “Things that you have on Martin Luther King that you don’t have on the others is the University of Arkansas campus. The other is the Fayetteville High School campus. So you have a lot more pedestrian traffic on Martin Luther King than you would these other streets.” Which gives some businesses, like the College Shoe Shop which has been around since 1976, some anxiety. “It’s always been a busy place, since it’s been this part of town but it’s never really been to the point where it is now,” said Kingrey, College Shoe Shop. “One of the things that kind of worries me I think for customers is that we have our parking lot as well as the road right next to it.” And he has a right to be worried. Starting onFutrallDrive — just off I-49 — and ending at South School Ave– less than 2 miles down the road. In that stretch of space, there were more than 1400 car and pedestrian accidents between 2011 to 2016. Razorback Road is one of the most accident prone areas with over 260 accidents in the past 5 years. “Beechwoodjust within the past couple years,the dynamics have completely changed.Beechwoodwas mainly an industrial area. Prior to a few years ago it was only one business. It was a way you could access Baum stadium and the track,” saidSgt. Stout. “Now that you have you have a lot of apartments in that area..you’re starting to see a lot more traffic.” We wanted to know what, if anything, is being done to put the brakes on traffic congestion. JasonHughey, Construction Engineer withASHTDexplained,”Fayetteville, and all of Northwest Arkansas, has experienced tremendous growth for the last several decades. And our highway system is working to catch up in areas that we can. But areas, such asMLK, has already been built out pretty much to full compactly. So, there’s not a lot we can do for capacity improvements. So we’re working with the things we can.” But there is a little light at the end of the tunnel for drivers. “Currently we’re looking at the end of 2021, there’s a project coming up for the I-49/LKinterchange. There will be some substantialchanges coming along,” saidHughey.

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May 9, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed

Boca man wins auction for Martin Luther King’s ‘we shall overcome … – Sun Sentinel

The original transcript of the Martin Luther King Jr. speech containing the resonant phrase we shall overcome has been acquired by a former owner of the Kansas City Royals baseball team. Avron B. Fogelman, a philanthropist, real estate developer and Boca Raton resident, paid $382,000 for the 20-page document, which is mostly typewritten. The first 19 pages contain numerous handwritten notes by the late civil rights leader. The final page, where the famous phrase resides, is almost entirely in his handwriting. “There are not many more significant artifacts from the 20th century than the 20-page, personally owned speech by Martin Luther King Jr. written in his own handwriting, Fogelman said in an email to the Sun Sentinel. “I am fortunate to own it and I am sure it will end up some day in a museum for others to enjoy and learn from it.” “We Shall Overcome” a phrase from a gospel song concluded the speech King delivered on July 6, 1965, to the General Synod of the United Church of Christ in Chicago. He included the famous phrase in several speeches, including his final sermon on March 31, 1968, days before he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis. Ken Goldin, founder and CEO of Goldin Auctions, said he could not disclose the seller’s name. But he said he believed the previous owner possessed the document for more than 30 years. The speech had been on display in a museum, Goldin said. Fogelman, who also owns a home in Memphis, was among five bidders for the speech. It fetched the largest sum for a historical item sold by Goldin Auctions, of New Jersey. According to the auction house, other original speeches delivered by King have been appraised in the millions of dollars. The current owner of Kings I Have A Dream speech has turned down $5 million for that historic document. Other items sold at the auction that ended in late April, included a white robe worn by boxer Muhammad Ali who fought as Cassius Clay at the time. The robe, bearing the words “The Greatest” embroidered in red letters across the back, was the one Ali donned before his famous Miami Beach fight against Sonny Liston in 1964. The robe attracted nine bids before closing at a final price of $255,000. While Goldin did not have permission to reveal the robes buyer, he said he anticipates the terry cloth garment will be on display in a museum in the “not too distant future.” Goldin said he believed the robe was obtained through an auction held by Drew Bundini Brown Ali’s assistant trainer and corner man more than 20 years ago. The sales of the King speech and the Ali robe were part of the auction company’s 70th anniversary Jackie Robinson Auction to benefit the Jackie Robinson Foundation. The nonprofit foundation preserves the legacy of the baseball player who broke Major League Baseballs color barrier in the late 1940s. We raised over $125,000 for the Jackie Robinson Foundation, Goldin said. Several key items in the auction were donated to the Jackie Robinson Museum being built now. The museum, which is expected to open in 2019 in New York, has raised $23 million toward its construction goal of $24 million, according to the foundations website. Overall, the museums campaign goal is $42 million, which stems from the No. 42 that Robinson wore with the Brooklyn Dodgers and is now retired by all 30 major league clubs. Stephen Ross, owner of the Miami Dolphins and majority owner of Related Companies, is a founding donor of the foundation. jboehm@sun-sentinel.com, 954-356-4527

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May 7, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed

Martin Luther King Jr. handwritten ‘we shall overcome’ speech draws $382K – USA TODAY

USA Today Network Kevin McKenzie, The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal Published 9:35 p.m. ET May 3, 2017 | Updated 10:02 p.m. ET May 3, 2017 Who are the people in the iconic photo shot moments after Dr. Martin Luther King was killed by an assassin’s bullet? This video explores the unknown people in Joseph Louw’s photo on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel. Jason Viera/The Commercial Appeal Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote “we shall overcome” to end a 1965 speech delivered in Chicago, according to New Jersey-based Goldin Auctions.(Photo: Handout) MEMPHIS Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote the iconic civil rights movement phrase “we shall overcome” to end a 20-page speech purchased by Memphis philanthropist Avron B. Fogelman, according to a New Jersey auction company. The original speech King deliveredJuly 6, 1965, in Chicago at the General Synod of the United Church of Christsold for $382,000, Goldin Auctions reported Wednesday. The speech had been estimated to bring $500,000 or more and its previous owner had turned down $5 million for it, theauction company said. It drew five bids at the firm’s 70th anniversary Jackie Robinson auction raising funds for the Jackie Robinson Foundation. Related: Hundreds join day of ‘consecration’ on 49th anniversary of King’s death On anniversary of MLK’s death, the sax, story behind his last words While typewritten, most of the final page of the speech, on the church’s role in the civil rights movement, washandwritten by King. A news release by Goldin Auctions said the speech “marked the first time Dr. King uttered those famous words that inspired the civil rights movement.” However, on Feb. 26, 1965, King used the phrase in Los Angeles a sermon at Temple Israel in Hollywood. May 3, 2017–Memphis philanthropist Avron B. Fogelman purchased this 1965 speech by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.(Photo: Handout) The Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tenn., played an important role in making the song We Shall Overcomea standard for the civil rights movement, according toUSA TodayandNational Public Radio. Fogelman, a retired Memphis real estate developer and former owner of the Kansas City Royals, is a resident of Memphis and Boca Raton, Fla., the auction company reported. King was assassinated in Memphis at the Lorraine Motel, now theNational Civil Rights Museum, on April 4, 1968. Follow Kevin McKenzie on Twitter: @KMcknz Dr. Martin Luther King delivered his “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, on April 3, 1968, the night before his assassination. Associated Press Read or Share this story: https://usat.ly/2pJBAiS

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May 7, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed

MPD: 1 person taken to hospital following shooting near MLK and Locust – fox6now.com

fox6now.com MPD: 1 person taken to hospital following shooting near MLK and Locust fox6now.com MILWAUKEE Milwaukee police say one person was shot near Martin Luther King Drive and Locust Street Friday evening, May 5th. Police responded to the scene around 9:20 p.m.. According to police, the person was transported by paramedics to Froedtert …

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May 7, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed

Keller @ Large: Turn Boston Racism Debate Over To Words Of MLK – CBS Boston / WBZ

CBS Boston / WBZ Keller @ Large: Turn Boston Racism Debate Over To Words Of MLK CBS Boston / WBZ I suggest we all take a deep breath, summon some humility, and turn the debate over to someone far more eloquent than any voice we heard this week, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whose famous words at the Lincoln Memorial 54 years ago still ring true. and more »

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May 5, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed

MLK football star Kasean Patterson to play in all-star game – The Philadelphia Tribune

Martin Luther King defensive back Kasean Patterson is one of the top football players in the city. Patterson, an All-Public League selection, will have an opportunity to compete against the best players in the Philadelphia All-Star Football Game. This all-star game featuring outstanding players from the Public League, Catholic League and Inter-Ac League will be played on Saturday, May 20 at Northeast High School, Cottman and Algon avenues. The game will begin at 5 p.m. Patterson, a 6-foot-1, 195-pounder, will be playing for the Public League stars as they battle the Non-Public Stars from the Catholic and Inter-Ac Leagues. Hes looking forward to the matchup. I really like to play against the competition, Patterson said. It opens your eyes and let you know what you have to work on as a player. I want to get better every step that I can. You cant get to be the best if you dont play the best. Its just exciting playing with a different vibe and a different group of guys who all come from their own teams. We all come together and learn from each other. You may know something that they dont know. You may have a different look on the game. Theres a lot of talent on both sides of the ledger. The Public League stars have some great players like Nasir Boykin (Imhotep Charter), Jonathan Hodges (Overbrook), Collin Washington (Central) and Sheir-Ron Whittaker (Delaware Valley Charter). The Non-Public Stars have some magnificent players such as Mark Webb (Archbishop Wood), Calil Wortham (West Catholic), Sy Madden (La Salle) and Terrance Greene (St. Josephs Prep). Patterson feels practicing against some of the top wide receivers from the Public League will prepare him for the all-star game. I play defensive back, Patterson said. Im going against a lot of receivers who are really quick. That helps you. It teaches you to be patient because theyre going to make you bite and go the other way. Theyre really quick, really fast and precise in their route running. They can beat you if you let them. You have to be on your toes all the time. Patterson has done extremely well on and off the field. He will attend Bloomsburg University in the fall. Patterson, an outstanding student-athlete, he will be playing his last high school football game in the upcoming all-star classic. He knows what he has to do moving forward to be successful. Im going to give it my all, Patterson said. I know playing for Bloomsburg Ive got to have attention to details. The fundamentals and techniques are really important on how to play the game. Im going to major in engineering. I took physics. Ive had pre-calculus. Ive also taken chemistry I and II. Patterson is headed in the right direction.

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May 5, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed


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