Archive for the ‘Martin Luther King’ Category

How Did Martin Luther King’s Vision Change the World?

Martin Luther King Jr’s vision changed the world in a major way. In fact, anyone whos been through elementary school in America has likely heard the name Martin Luther King. As we progress into high school and beyond, were taught about his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, and we gain a greater understanding of his impact on civil rights in America as a whole.

Martin Luther King had a vision of a society in which race was not an issue in how people were treated or in how they were allowed to live their lives. Its a sad fact of todays society that Kings vision is not a reality in America, or anywhere else in the world; but it is possible to say that his vision affected us.

While nothing is perfect or complete in the battle for civil rights, the efforts of King and those like him have, in fact, changed the country and the world, for the better, in noticeable ways. His vision has made the world a more equal place, if not an equal one, and it has helped to ensure that minorities have a voice.

Martin Luther King had a major impact on civil rights. King played a part in many well-known civil rights movements in the 1950s and 1960s.

In 1955, he became heavily involved in the Montgomery, Alabama boycott of the city buses, which was spurred by the bus companys insistence that African Americans only ride in the back seats. Kings support drew much attention to the cause and rallied many supporters even outside of the Montgomery area, which put pressure on bus companies all over the South to examine their own rules, and eventually, to change them.

Kings prominence in the civil rights movement gained the respect of many political leaders, and gave him the potential power to enact major change.

The bus boycott was just one example of many situations where, under Kings influence, the civil rights movement gained attention and respect.

A key part of Kings vision, aside from a quest for racial equality, was the idea of non-violence; he refused to use violent actions in any of his protests, and taught his followers to do the same. Based on the principles of Gandhi, this factor of Kings beliefs and behavior was a major influence on society at the time. Police forces didnt hesitate to use violence against demonstrators and protesters, but in the face of their quiet civil resistance, the overblown physical techniques of force and brutality lost their power.

Martin Luther King was greatly responsible for the passing of the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act for African Americans, both in the mid 1960s. Both of these acts literally changed American law so that African Americans could not be treated separately from whites. His victories in these two areas had a major impact on the United States and the world.

Martin Luther King did not make overt efforts to fight international civil rights inequalities; however, his U.S. civil rights victories and speeches were inspiration for those who were involved in international racial injustice. By 1964 the United Nations’ membership had doubled from its 1945 levels. Almost 75% of these new members were from developing countries who were committed to combating racial injustice based on the struggles of Martin Luther King in the U.S. and the racial persecution in South Africa.

King was assassinated in 1968. With his death, the country lost not only a great leader, but a prominent person who had carried the power to change society for the better. The loss of King was a loss for people of all races.

For a time perspective of the details of Martin Luther King Jr.’s life, check out the Martin Luther King Jr. Timeline on YourDictionary.

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How Did Martin Luther King’s Vision Change the World?

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Martin Luther King High School (Philadelphia) – Wikipedia

Martin Luther King High School is a neighborhood public high school located in the West Oaklane section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, at the intersection of Stenton Avenue and Haines Street. It is a neighborhood school, meaning no application is necessary for those students who live in the West Oak Lane and Germantown sections of Philadelphia.

The school opened on February 8, 1972. Originally it housed grades 9-10, while nearby Germantown High School housed grades 11-12, as the school district intended to keep students in Northwest Philadelphia economically integrated. Multiple students were stabbed and hit with metal pipes during a December 5, 1972 altercation between gangs. Some neighborhoods in proximity to King, such as East Mount Airy and West Oak Lane, wanted King to become a 9-12 school because Germantown High was located near poorer areas. Eventually Germantown and King became separate 9-12 schools.[2] The campuses are about 1 mile (1.6km) apart.[3]

Programs at King High include JROTC and Business and Computers Technology.

Their team mascot is the cougar.[citation needed]

As of the 2005-2006 school year, the school had a population of 1,780 students, mostly African-American. In the 2012-2013 school year King had 750 students. Germantown closed in 2013 and was merged into Martin Luther King High School, causing King’s student body to increase to 1,178 for the 2013-2014 school year.[4] A school district $304 million budget shortfall caused the schools to merge.[5]

Germantown students later attended King High and the merger was the subject of the 2014 documentary We Could Be King, directed by Judd Ehrlich.[6]

King has an on-campus athletic field and two weight rooms.[5]

King was previously the athletic rival of Germantown high in football.[5] King’s football team won one game in 2012; this was after the other team forfeited.[4] After Germantown closed in 2013 much of its athletic roster joined King’s football team.[5] Ed Dunn served as the volunteer head coach of the post-2013 King football team. He had previously worked as a mathematics teacher but had been laid off.[6] In its first year as a merged team, the King football team won its first Philadelphia Public League championship after having nine straight wins.[4]

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Martin Luther King High School (Philadelphia) – Wikipedia

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Martin Luther King High School – The School District of …

Our VisionThe teachers, administrators, and staff of The Promise Academy at Martin Luther King High School, in collaboration with parents, guardians, community members and others, are committed to ensuring that all MLK students are respected for who they are and are empowered to grow both academically and personally. We are a student-centered school where everything we do is directly aligned with student success. We absolutely believe in the worth, intelligence, special gifts and dignity of each and every student. We passionately and with a sense of urgency are devoted to constantly creating and maintaining a safe, orderly and secure environment where high levels of teaching and learning occur and where our students understand that they are royal scholars whom we expect to represent the great legacy of Dr. King.Our MissionOur mission is to provide all students with the academic, technological, and social skills needed to be productive and contributing citizens in our society.

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Then & Now: Major Taylor and Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards, Worcester – Worcester Telegram

Once upon a time the intersection of Central and Union streets, this corner is now part of the property belonging to St. Vincent Hospital, across the street from what is now the DCU Center (called the Worcester Centrum in 1982 when it was built).

When this corner was home to R&R Plumbing (whose address was 135 Union St.) and Jenkins & Robinson Automotive Distributors at 69-75 Central St., the downtown landscape was very different. The high brick buildings in the rear of our Then photo are now gone, replaced by much newer buildings.

While those streets still exist on Worcesters map, they dont quite follow the same path, and Major Taylor Boulevard (formerly Worcester Center Boulevard) and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard were carved out. St. Vincent Hospital and its parking garage now cover the corner where many businesses used to crowd around the railroad tracks.

R&R Plumbing, shown in the 1940s photo, had opened elsewhere in 1905 and moved here later. For many years it has been under the management of the Ritz family, though it is no longer located on the railroad tracks in Worcester.

St. Vincent Hospital was established in 1893 and for many years was a fixture at the top of Vernon Hill. In 1997, the newly merged St. Vincent Hospital-Fallon Healthcare System broke ground for a new hospital on this lot. In 2000 the hospital moved in.

– Melissa McKeon, Correspondent

THEN & NOW ARCHIVES

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Then & Now: Major Taylor and Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards, Worcester – Worcester Telegram

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Martin Luther King Jr. warned us about spending too much on war … – Los Angeles Times

To the editor: Bravo to Adam H. Johnson for reminding us of the human cost when our countrys leaders spend big bucks for military adventurism while they complain that America is running out of money when it comes to helping the poor, people of color, the disabled and elderly. He notes also the failure of the media to report the true cost of our wars. (Why don’t deficit hawks care about the cost of military adventurism? Opinion, June 26)

The rationale of national security to justify out-of-control military spending overlooks the most important source of true national security: human security. Martin Luther King, Jr.s warning at the time of the Vietnam War rings true today: A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death.

Cecil Hoffman, Pasadena

..

To the editor: The last time the accumulated national debt decreased was in fiscal years 1956 and 57, when Dwight D. Eisenhower was president.

Many times during Ikes presidency, his advisers urged him to dispatch the Marines to numerous places, but he resolutely resisted in his hunt for a better way. In retirement, he wrote about his resistance to taking military action:

Please fill in your full name, mailing address, city of residence, phone number and e-mail address below. Submissions that do not include this information cannot be published. This information is seen only by the letters editors and is not used for any commercial purpose. We generally do not publish…

Please fill in your full name, mailing address, city of residence, phone number and e-mail address below. Submissions that do not include this information cannot be published. This information is seen only by the letters editors and is not used for any commercial purpose. We generally do not publish…

The United States never lost a soldier or a foot of ground in my administration. We kept the peace. People asked how it happened. By God, it didnt just happen, Ill tell you that.

Writing after the Korean War, Ike stated there must be a balance between minimum requirements in the costly implements of war and the health of economy.

Norman G. Axe, Santa Monica

..

To the editor: Weapons of war and their capabilities are keeping some of our influential leaders starry-eyed and willing to spend billions on them with a disregard similar to that of purchasing 4th of July fireworks.

Meanwhile, the parts of government that serve the poor and the middle class are effectively shut down. This should break the hearts of everyone and compel us to revolt at the ballot box.

Mary Leah Plante, Los Angeles

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Md. man named Martin Luther King receives 20 years for attacking … – WJLA

Judge’s gavel (ABC7 file photo)

Martin Luther King Jr., 27, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for viciously assaulting and shooting at his girlfriend during an argument in Oct. 2016 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

In May 2017, King Jr. pled guilty to first-degree assault and use of a firearm in a crime of violence, according to a release from the Office of the State’s Attorney for Anne Arundel County.

King Jr. will serve the first five years of his 20 year sentence without the possibility of parole for first-degree assault.

The release states King Jr. knocked his girlfriend to the floor, grabbed her by the sweatshirt and “picked her up over his head and threw her” during an argument at a home.

Following the attack, the woman left in her car and was followed by King Jr. in his vehicle. According to the release, he drove into oncoming traffic, pulled up beside her, and fired multiple gunshots at her car.

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How Martin Luther King Persuaded John Kennedy to Support the Civil Rights Cause – New York Times

Kennedy was amused. Imagine Martin Luther King having a bigot for a father, he said. Then: Well, we all have our fathers, dont we?

That story has been around at least since 1965, when Arthur Schlesinger Jr. published A Thousand Days. So too the stories Levingston goes on to tell in Kennedy and King about the sit-ins, the Freedom Rides; the Albany, Ga., and Birmingham campaigns; the integration of the universities of Mississippi and Alabama; the march on Washington and much more, including several memorable conversations between King and Kennedy. Levingston thanks his wife and numerous archivists for their help with the research, but his greatest debt, fully acknowledged, is to books available in most public libraries: oral histories, memoirs, biographies and narrative histories, including Parting the Waters, the first volume of Taylor Branchs monumental trilogy of America in the King years.

Yet people who think the past is important should be the last to make a fetish of the new. As long as racial equality and justice elude us, writers, artists and filmmakers will return to the climactic years of our Second Reconstruction, when African-Americans and their white allies forced the nation to begin to make good on the promise of freedom, equality under the law and voting rights embedded 100 years earlier in the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments. Thats a good thing, all the more so as the present generation, which was born in an era of mass incarceration of black men and which has come of age at marches and rallies protesting police killings, tries to figure out where we should go from here. Levingston, the nonfiction book editor of The Washington Post and the author of Little Demon in the City of Light and The Kennedy Baby, writes with passion and flair. If these pages dont rouse you, call your doctor.

There are places where Levingston the writer (displaying the occupational weaknesses for stark contrasts and sudden twists of drama) gets the better of Levingston the historian. It is wrong to say even with King as a source that in 1955, at the time of Kings arrival in Montgomery, the Southern black was hunched in fear, cringing and passive, broken by the white man. As far back as Howell Rainess My Soul Is Rested (1977), authors have shown that everywhere King went, the stage for confrontation was set by community leaders and grass-roots organizers, including, as Levingston notes, Kings own father. In Montgomery in 1955, one of those organizers was Rosa Parks, whom Levingston describes as an efficient volunteer secretary of the N.A.A.C.P.s local chapter (in whose heart lay a well of quiet activism). Parks may have been good with the carbon paper and coffee machine, but by the time of the bus boycott, her rsum also featured decades of not-so-quiet resistance. She had been fighting Jim Crow injustice, including violence against black women, since the Scottsboro trials in the 1930s.

Levingston frames his book as a study in leadership, and it is, but not the kind he suggests in his introduction, when he evokes Thomas Carlyle and writes of great individuals, or heroes, shaping the worlds destiny. Kennedy was not a leader in civil rights. Until the last months of his life, he saw the struggle for equality as a righteous distraction from critical domestic issues (including taxes and steel prices) and Cold War foreign affairs. When he acted, he did so in response to the horrific violence peaceful protest made manifest: the clubbing of Freedom Riders; the bombing of black businesses, homes and churches; the attacks on demonstrators with jack boots, water cannons and dogs; the racist riots in Oxford, Miss. Only in June 1963, after the battle of Birmingham and the confrontation with George Wallace in Tuscaloosa, did Kennedy do what King had been urging him to do all along: call civil rights a moral issue and acknowledge that the country faced a crisis that could not be met by repressive police action or quieted by token moves or talk. Hours after Kennedys speech, Medgar Evers was assassinated. Kennedy sent legislation to Congress, but it was left to Lyndon Johnson to make the Civil Rights Act of 1964 law.

That leaves King, who was indeed a leader, as well as a teacher. Its a difficult thing, he said, to teach a president. Levingstons point is that King taught Kennedy to be a leader, and he did, but he did not do it alone, and Kings relationship with his own followers was always complicated. Homegrown heroes, old and young (the subject of books like John Dittmers Local People, Charles M. Paynes Ive Got the Light of Freedom and Danielle L. McGuires At the Dark End of the Street), taught King and his closest associates while they in turn taught the Kennedys. There go my people, King said, quoting Gandhi. I must catch up with them, for I am their leader.

Levingstons frame does not fit, but he is too good a writer to get in the way of his history for long. Kennedy and King will most likely leave readers thinking that what is needed today is not more leaders, a few men and women shaping our destiny, but more followers. What is needed are ordinary people: alert, informed, engaged, mobilized, idealistic but not nave, critical but not hopeless, confident about who they are and what they want but able and inclined to work with all sorts of others, exercising rights won at enormous cost, starting with the right to vote. What is needed, in short, are more citizens, prepared to lead our leaders toward a more promising land.

James Goodman, a professor of history and creative writing at Rutgers University, Newark, is the author of Stories of Scottsboro, Blackout and But Where Is the Lamb?

A version of this review appears in print on July 2, 2017, on Page BR9 of the Sunday Book Review with the headline: Profiles in Caution.

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Aspen Ideas Festival: What you need to know about Martin Luther King – Minnesota Public Radio News

Jun 29, 2017

Originally, Clarence B. Jones didn’t want to work with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In February of 1960, Jones received a call from a prominent judge who asked if he would help King with some legal troubles. King was indicted on tax evasion.

As Jones told journalist Michele Norris at the 2017 Aspen Ideas Festival, he didn’t want to leave his home in California to work in Montgomery, Alabama.

Jones was a lawyer who specialized in entertainment law.

“Just because some preacher got his hand caught in the cookie jar stealing that ain’t my problem,” he said.

As luck would have it, King was on his way to California to perform a sermon and paid Jones a visit the next day. During that visit he tried to persuade Jones to help him.

Jones was unmoved.

It took that sermon from King, which he talked about “the role and responsibility of the negro professional” to convince the young lawyer to drop what he was doing and join the fight for Civil Rights.

Jones sat down with Norris to talk about his work with King, and how he helped write some of King’s most famous speeches and letters, such as “I Have a Dream” and “The Letter from Birmingham Jail.”

That letter was written piecemeal, with Jones sneaking scraps of paper to King while he was in jail.

“I was too busy dealing with other things. I never read the letter,” Jones admitted.

When he finally did, he was struck by King’s words.

The web audio for this segment will be available later today.

Norman Lear and Khizr Khan on American values and the Constitution

Spotlight on health

Correction (June 29, 2017): An earlier version of this story was incorrect in identifying the person who asked Clarence B. Jones to work with Martin Luther King Jr. It was a prominent judge. The story has been updated.

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Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Center to become emergency shelter by the 2018 hurricane season – The Independent Florida Alligator

Gainesvilles Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Center will serve as a hurricane shelter in 2018.

The shelter will be available to all Alachua County residents and will be renovated with a $200k grant from the Florida Division of Emergency Management.

District 1 City Commissioner Charles Goston reached out to Alachua County and the City of Gainesville about a year ago to discuss his concerns about the hurricane shelter on the east side of Gainesville, said Chip Skinner, an assistant public information officer for Gainesville.

Residents of the east side of Gainesville have been limited in the number of shelters that are available during an emergency, Goston said.

The ease of use and location were the main concerns for finding a new hurricane shelter, Skinner said.

He said the county usually has to wait for approval from the school board to open shelters because nine out of the 11 current shelters are schools. With the center, they dont need approval.

With it not being involved with the school board, its much easier for us to open that as a shelter, Skinner said. If we need to shelter additional people, its not affecting a school, for instance.

He said Alachua County and Gainesville do not have a contractor for renovations yet because they have to do an engineering study first.

He said the engineering study will help Gainesville and Alachua County determine if the renovations theyve proposed are needed. These include window screens, hardened doorways, electrical work and minor structural improvements.

The final cost of the project will not be determined until an engineering study is complete, with work to begin shortly after, Skinner said.

He said once renovations are complete, the facility will be available for wind-related emergencies and as a post-storm shelter.

Alachua County determines when the shelters open, Skinner said. The changes will bring the building into compliance with FDEM and Federal Emergency Management Agency standards.

He said Alachua County and Gainesville do not currently have plans to open more hurricane shelters.

I am happy that my advocacy on behalf of our citizens contributed to the city receiving this state award to harden the Martin Luther King Jr. center for use in emergencies, so that citizens in District 1 will have another close-by option for a safe haven, Goston said.

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Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Center to become emergency shelter by the 2018 hurricane season – The Independent Florida Alligator

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How Did Martin Luther King’s Vision Change the World?

Martin Luther King Jr’s vision changed the world in a major way. In fact, anyone whos been through elementary school in America has likely heard the name Martin Luther King. As we progress into high school and beyond, were taught about his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, and we gain a greater understanding of his impact on civil rights in America as a whole. Martin Luther King had a vision of a society in which race was not an issue in how people were treated or in how they were allowed to live their lives. Its a sad fact of todays society that Kings vision is not a reality in America, or anywhere else in the world; but it is possible to say that his vision affected us. While nothing is perfect or complete in the battle for civil rights, the efforts of King and those like him have, in fact, changed the country and the world, for the better, in noticeable ways. His vision has made the world a more equal place, if not an equal one, and it has helped to ensure that minorities have a voice. Martin Luther King had a major impact on civil rights. King played a part in many well-known civil rights movements in the 1950s and 1960s. In 1955, he became heavily involved in the Montgomery, Alabama boycott of the city buses, which was spurred by the bus companys insistence that African Americans only ride in the back seats. Kings support drew much attention to the cause and rallied many supporters even outside of the Montgomery area, which put pressure on bus companies all over the South to examine their own rules, and eventually, to change them. Kings prominence in the civil rights movement gained the respect of many political leaders, and gave him the potential power to enact major change. The bus boycott was just one example of many situations where, under Kings influence, the civil rights movement gained attention and respect. A key part of Kings vision, aside from a quest for racial equality, was the idea of non-violence; he refused to use violent actions in any of his protests, and taught his followers to do the same. Based on the principles of Gandhi, this factor of Kings beliefs and behavior was a major influence on society at the time. Police forces didnt hesitate to use violence against demonstrators and protesters, but in the face of their quiet civil resistance, the overblown physical techniques of force and brutality lost their power. Martin Luther King was greatly responsible for the passing of the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act for African Americans, both in the mid 1960s. Both of these acts literally changed American law so that African Americans could not be treated separately from whites. His victories in these two areas had a major impact on the United States and the world. Martin Luther King did not make overt efforts to fight international civil rights inequalities; however, his U.S. civil rights victories and speeches were inspiration for those who were involved in international racial injustice. By 1964 the United Nations’ membership had doubled from its 1945 levels. Almost 75% of these new members were from developing countries who were committed to combating racial injustice based on the struggles of Martin Luther King in the U.S. and the racial persecution in South Africa. King was assassinated in 1968. With his death, the country lost not only a great leader, but a prominent person who had carried the power to change society for the better. The loss of King was a loss for people of all races. For a time perspective of the details of Martin Luther King Jr.’s life, check out the Martin Luther King Jr. Timeline on YourDictionary.

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Martin Luther King High School (Philadelphia) – Wikipedia

Martin Luther King High School is a neighborhood public high school located in the West Oaklane section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, at the intersection of Stenton Avenue and Haines Street. It is a neighborhood school, meaning no application is necessary for those students who live in the West Oak Lane and Germantown sections of Philadelphia. The school opened on February 8, 1972. Originally it housed grades 9-10, while nearby Germantown High School housed grades 11-12, as the school district intended to keep students in Northwest Philadelphia economically integrated. Multiple students were stabbed and hit with metal pipes during a December 5, 1972 altercation between gangs. Some neighborhoods in proximity to King, such as East Mount Airy and West Oak Lane, wanted King to become a 9-12 school because Germantown High was located near poorer areas. Eventually Germantown and King became separate 9-12 schools.[2] The campuses are about 1 mile (1.6km) apart.[3] Programs at King High include JROTC and Business and Computers Technology. Their team mascot is the cougar.[citation needed] As of the 2005-2006 school year, the school had a population of 1,780 students, mostly African-American. In the 2012-2013 school year King had 750 students. Germantown closed in 2013 and was merged into Martin Luther King High School, causing King’s student body to increase to 1,178 for the 2013-2014 school year.[4] A school district $304 million budget shortfall caused the schools to merge.[5] Germantown students later attended King High and the merger was the subject of the 2014 documentary We Could Be King, directed by Judd Ehrlich.[6] King has an on-campus athletic field and two weight rooms.[5] King was previously the athletic rival of Germantown high in football.[5] King’s football team won one game in 2012; this was after the other team forfeited.[4] After Germantown closed in 2013 much of its athletic roster joined King’s football team.[5] Ed Dunn served as the volunteer head coach of the post-2013 King football team. He had previously worked as a mathematics teacher but had been laid off.[6] In its first year as a merged team, the King football team won its first Philadelphia Public League championship after having nine straight wins.[4]

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Martin Luther King High School – The School District of …

Our VisionThe teachers, administrators, and staff of The Promise Academy at Martin Luther King High School, in collaboration with parents, guardians, community members and others, are committed to ensuring that all MLK students are respected for who they are and are empowered to grow both academically and personally. We are a student-centered school where everything we do is directly aligned with student success. We absolutely believe in the worth, intelligence, special gifts and dignity of each and every student. We passionately and with a sense of urgency are devoted to constantly creating and maintaining a safe, orderly and secure environment where high levels of teaching and learning occur and where our students understand that they are royal scholars whom we expect to represent the great legacy of Dr. King.Our MissionOur mission is to provide all students with the academic, technological, and social skills needed to be productive and contributing citizens in our society.

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Then & Now: Major Taylor and Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards, Worcester – Worcester Telegram

Once upon a time the intersection of Central and Union streets, this corner is now part of the property belonging to St. Vincent Hospital, across the street from what is now the DCU Center (called the Worcester Centrum in 1982 when it was built). When this corner was home to R&R Plumbing (whose address was 135 Union St.) and Jenkins & Robinson Automotive Distributors at 69-75 Central St., the downtown landscape was very different. The high brick buildings in the rear of our Then photo are now gone, replaced by much newer buildings. While those streets still exist on Worcesters map, they dont quite follow the same path, and Major Taylor Boulevard (formerly Worcester Center Boulevard) and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard were carved out. St. Vincent Hospital and its parking garage now cover the corner where many businesses used to crowd around the railroad tracks. R&R Plumbing, shown in the 1940s photo, had opened elsewhere in 1905 and moved here later. For many years it has been under the management of the Ritz family, though it is no longer located on the railroad tracks in Worcester. St. Vincent Hospital was established in 1893 and for many years was a fixture at the top of Vernon Hill. In 1997, the newly merged St. Vincent Hospital-Fallon Healthcare System broke ground for a new hospital on this lot. In 2000 the hospital moved in. – Melissa McKeon, Correspondent THEN & NOW ARCHIVES

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Martin Luther King Jr. warned us about spending too much on war … – Los Angeles Times

To the editor: Bravo to Adam H. Johnson for reminding us of the human cost when our countrys leaders spend big bucks for military adventurism while they complain that America is running out of money when it comes to helping the poor, people of color, the disabled and elderly. He notes also the failure of the media to report the true cost of our wars. (Why don’t deficit hawks care about the cost of military adventurism? Opinion, June 26) The rationale of national security to justify out-of-control military spending overlooks the most important source of true national security: human security. Martin Luther King, Jr.s warning at the time of the Vietnam War rings true today: A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death. Cecil Hoffman, Pasadena .. To the editor: The last time the accumulated national debt decreased was in fiscal years 1956 and 57, when Dwight D. Eisenhower was president. Many times during Ikes presidency, his advisers urged him to dispatch the Marines to numerous places, but he resolutely resisted in his hunt for a better way. In retirement, he wrote about his resistance to taking military action: Please fill in your full name, mailing address, city of residence, phone number and e-mail address below. Submissions that do not include this information cannot be published. This information is seen only by the letters editors and is not used for any commercial purpose. We generally do not publish… Please fill in your full name, mailing address, city of residence, phone number and e-mail address below. Submissions that do not include this information cannot be published. This information is seen only by the letters editors and is not used for any commercial purpose. We generally do not publish… The United States never lost a soldier or a foot of ground in my administration. We kept the peace. People asked how it happened. By God, it didnt just happen, Ill tell you that. Writing after the Korean War, Ike stated there must be a balance between minimum requirements in the costly implements of war and the health of economy. Norman G. Axe, Santa Monica .. To the editor: Weapons of war and their capabilities are keeping some of our influential leaders starry-eyed and willing to spend billions on them with a disregard similar to that of purchasing 4th of July fireworks. Meanwhile, the parts of government that serve the poor and the middle class are effectively shut down. This should break the hearts of everyone and compel us to revolt at the ballot box. Mary Leah Plante, Los Angeles Follow the Opinion section on Twitter @latimesopinion and Facebook

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Md. man named Martin Luther King receives 20 years for attacking … – WJLA

Judge’s gavel (ABC7 file photo) Martin Luther King Jr., 27, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for viciously assaulting and shooting at his girlfriend during an argument in Oct. 2016 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. In May 2017, King Jr. pled guilty to first-degree assault and use of a firearm in a crime of violence, according to a release from the Office of the State’s Attorney for Anne Arundel County. King Jr. will serve the first five years of his 20 year sentence without the possibility of parole for first-degree assault. The release states King Jr. knocked his girlfriend to the floor, grabbed her by the sweatshirt and “picked her up over his head and threw her” during an argument at a home. Following the attack, the woman left in her car and was followed by King Jr. in his vehicle. According to the release, he drove into oncoming traffic, pulled up beside her, and fired multiple gunshots at her car. To stay up to date with crime in your area, click here to subscribe to our Fighting Back Against Crime newsletter.

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July 2, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed

How Martin Luther King Persuaded John Kennedy to Support the Civil Rights Cause – New York Times

Kennedy was amused. Imagine Martin Luther King having a bigot for a father, he said. Then: Well, we all have our fathers, dont we? That story has been around at least since 1965, when Arthur Schlesinger Jr. published A Thousand Days. So too the stories Levingston goes on to tell in Kennedy and King about the sit-ins, the Freedom Rides; the Albany, Ga., and Birmingham campaigns; the integration of the universities of Mississippi and Alabama; the march on Washington and much more, including several memorable conversations between King and Kennedy. Levingston thanks his wife and numerous archivists for their help with the research, but his greatest debt, fully acknowledged, is to books available in most public libraries: oral histories, memoirs, biographies and narrative histories, including Parting the Waters, the first volume of Taylor Branchs monumental trilogy of America in the King years. Yet people who think the past is important should be the last to make a fetish of the new. As long as racial equality and justice elude us, writers, artists and filmmakers will return to the climactic years of our Second Reconstruction, when African-Americans and their white allies forced the nation to begin to make good on the promise of freedom, equality under the law and voting rights embedded 100 years earlier in the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments. Thats a good thing, all the more so as the present generation, which was born in an era of mass incarceration of black men and which has come of age at marches and rallies protesting police killings, tries to figure out where we should go from here. Levingston, the nonfiction book editor of The Washington Post and the author of Little Demon in the City of Light and The Kennedy Baby, writes with passion and flair. If these pages dont rouse you, call your doctor. There are places where Levingston the writer (displaying the occupational weaknesses for stark contrasts and sudden twists of drama) gets the better of Levingston the historian. It is wrong to say even with King as a source that in 1955, at the time of Kings arrival in Montgomery, the Southern black was hunched in fear, cringing and passive, broken by the white man. As far back as Howell Rainess My Soul Is Rested (1977), authors have shown that everywhere King went, the stage for confrontation was set by community leaders and grass-roots organizers, including, as Levingston notes, Kings own father. In Montgomery in 1955, one of those organizers was Rosa Parks, whom Levingston describes as an efficient volunteer secretary of the N.A.A.C.P.s local chapter (in whose heart lay a well of quiet activism). Parks may have been good with the carbon paper and coffee machine, but by the time of the bus boycott, her rsum also featured decades of not-so-quiet resistance. She had been fighting Jim Crow injustice, including violence against black women, since the Scottsboro trials in the 1930s. Levingston frames his book as a study in leadership, and it is, but not the kind he suggests in his introduction, when he evokes Thomas Carlyle and writes of great individuals, or heroes, shaping the worlds destiny. Kennedy was not a leader in civil rights. Until the last months of his life, he saw the struggle for equality as a righteous distraction from critical domestic issues (including taxes and steel prices) and Cold War foreign affairs. When he acted, he did so in response to the horrific violence peaceful protest made manifest: the clubbing of Freedom Riders; the bombing of black businesses, homes and churches; the attacks on demonstrators with jack boots, water cannons and dogs; the racist riots in Oxford, Miss. Only in June 1963, after the battle of Birmingham and the confrontation with George Wallace in Tuscaloosa, did Kennedy do what King had been urging him to do all along: call civil rights a moral issue and acknowledge that the country faced a crisis that could not be met by repressive police action or quieted by token moves or talk. Hours after Kennedys speech, Medgar Evers was assassinated. Kennedy sent legislation to Congress, but it was left to Lyndon Johnson to make the Civil Rights Act of 1964 law. That leaves King, who was indeed a leader, as well as a teacher. Its a difficult thing, he said, to teach a president. Levingstons point is that King taught Kennedy to be a leader, and he did, but he did not do it alone, and Kings relationship with his own followers was always complicated. Homegrown heroes, old and young (the subject of books like John Dittmers Local People, Charles M. Paynes Ive Got the Light of Freedom and Danielle L. McGuires At the Dark End of the Street), taught King and his closest associates while they in turn taught the Kennedys. There go my people, King said, quoting Gandhi. I must catch up with them, for I am their leader. Levingstons frame does not fit, but he is too good a writer to get in the way of his history for long. Kennedy and King will most likely leave readers thinking that what is needed today is not more leaders, a few men and women shaping our destiny, but more followers. What is needed are ordinary people: alert, informed, engaged, mobilized, idealistic but not nave, critical but not hopeless, confident about who they are and what they want but able and inclined to work with all sorts of others, exercising rights won at enormous cost, starting with the right to vote. What is needed, in short, are more citizens, prepared to lead our leaders toward a more promising land. James Goodman, a professor of history and creative writing at Rutgers University, Newark, is the author of Stories of Scottsboro, Blackout and But Where Is the Lamb? A version of this review appears in print on July 2, 2017, on Page BR9 of the Sunday Book Review with the headline: Profiles in Caution.

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed

Aspen Ideas Festival: What you need to know about Martin Luther King – Minnesota Public Radio News

Jun 29, 2017 Originally, Clarence B. Jones didn’t want to work with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In February of 1960, Jones received a call from a prominent judge who asked if he would help King with some legal troubles. King was indicted on tax evasion. As Jones told journalist Michele Norris at the 2017 Aspen Ideas Festival, he didn’t want to leave his home in California to work in Montgomery, Alabama. Jones was a lawyer who specialized in entertainment law. “Just because some preacher got his hand caught in the cookie jar stealing that ain’t my problem,” he said. As luck would have it, King was on his way to California to perform a sermon and paid Jones a visit the next day. During that visit he tried to persuade Jones to help him. Jones was unmoved. It took that sermon from King, which he talked about “the role and responsibility of the negro professional” to convince the young lawyer to drop what he was doing and join the fight for Civil Rights. Jones sat down with Norris to talk about his work with King, and how he helped write some of King’s most famous speeches and letters, such as “I Have a Dream” and “The Letter from Birmingham Jail.” That letter was written piecemeal, with Jones sneaking scraps of paper to King while he was in jail. “I was too busy dealing with other things. I never read the letter,” Jones admitted. When he finally did, he was struck by King’s words. The web audio for this segment will be available later today. Norman Lear and Khizr Khan on American values and the Constitution Spotlight on health Correction (June 29, 2017): An earlier version of this story was incorrect in identifying the person who asked Clarence B. Jones to work with Martin Luther King Jr. It was a prominent judge. The story has been updated.

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed

Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Center to become emergency shelter by the 2018 hurricane season – The Independent Florida Alligator

Gainesvilles Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Center will serve as a hurricane shelter in 2018. The shelter will be available to all Alachua County residents and will be renovated with a $200k grant from the Florida Division of Emergency Management. District 1 City Commissioner Charles Goston reached out to Alachua County and the City of Gainesville about a year ago to discuss his concerns about the hurricane shelter on the east side of Gainesville, said Chip Skinner, an assistant public information officer for Gainesville. Residents of the east side of Gainesville have been limited in the number of shelters that are available during an emergency, Goston said. The ease of use and location were the main concerns for finding a new hurricane shelter, Skinner said. He said the county usually has to wait for approval from the school board to open shelters because nine out of the 11 current shelters are schools. With the center, they dont need approval. With it not being involved with the school board, its much easier for us to open that as a shelter, Skinner said. If we need to shelter additional people, its not affecting a school, for instance. He said Alachua County and Gainesville do not have a contractor for renovations yet because they have to do an engineering study first. He said the engineering study will help Gainesville and Alachua County determine if the renovations theyve proposed are needed. These include window screens, hardened doorways, electrical work and minor structural improvements. The final cost of the project will not be determined until an engineering study is complete, with work to begin shortly after, Skinner said. He said once renovations are complete, the facility will be available for wind-related emergencies and as a post-storm shelter. Alachua County determines when the shelters open, Skinner said. The changes will bring the building into compliance with FDEM and Federal Emergency Management Agency standards. He said Alachua County and Gainesville do not currently have plans to open more hurricane shelters. I am happy that my advocacy on behalf of our citizens contributed to the city receiving this state award to harden the Martin Luther King Jr. center for use in emergencies, so that citizens in District 1 will have another close-by option for a safe haven, Goston said.

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June 29, 2017   Posted in: Martin Luther King  Comments Closed


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