Archive for the ‘Martin Luther King’ Category

Trump ignores controversy over ‘s—hole’ remarks as he …

One day after President Donald Trump’s reported remark about immigrants from Haiti and other “s—hole countries” reignited talk of whether he harbors racist beliefs, the president signed a proclamation honoring civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr.

Neither Trump nor other dignitaries who spoke at the ceremony officially proclaiming Jan. 15, 2018, as the Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday addressed the controversy over the president’s reported comments on Thursday.

Flanked by Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson — the only African-American member of Trump’s cabinet — and Martin Luther King’s nephew, Isaac Newton Ferris Jr., Trump spoke about the late civil rights leader.

“Dr. King’s faith and his love for humanity led him and so many other heroes to courageously stand up for civil rights of African-Americans,” said Trump. “Through his bravery and sacrifice, Dr. King opened the eyes and lifted the conscience of our nation. He stirred in the hearts of our people to recognize the dignity written in every human soul.”

“Today, we celebrate Dr. King for standing up for the self-evident truth Americans hold so dear, that no matter what the color of our skin, or the place of our birth, we are all created equal by god,” he added.

After the president spoke, Carson and Farris took turns at the podium and Trump signed the proclamation. He then exited the room, ignoring shouted questions from reporters about his controversial comments on Thursday and whether he is a racist.

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Trump designates Martin Luther King Jr. birthplace a …

A week shy of the annual observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Kings birth home, Ebenezer Baptist Church and Kings burial site have all been upgraded from a national historic site to a national historic park.

The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park Act, signed into law by President Donald Trump Monday aboard Air Force One, is one of the highest designations within the National Park Service. Trump said in a Tweet Tuesday it was “my great honor” to sign the bill.

Georgia Democratic Rep. John Lewis, sponsored the bill and said he is so proud that we were able to work in a bipartisan, bicameral manner to establish Georgias first National Historical Park ahead of Kings birthday and the 50th anniversary of his assassination.

I hope that this moment will serve as a reminder of the constant work to realize Dr. Kings dream of building the Beloved Community — a community at peace with itself and our neighbors, Lewis said in a statement.

NBC News reached out to Bernice King and the King Center for comment but has not received a response.

The law also includes Prince Hall Masonic Temple. According to Lewis, the Temple donated land to the National Park Service in an effort to ensure Kings story and the legacy of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) could continue being told to future generations.

The Temple served as the initial headquarters of the SCLC, which King co-founded in 1957. Lewis, who marched with King during the Civil Rights Movement, represents the 5th Congressional district, which includes the King Historic site. Congress initially established the site in the fall of 1980.

While the law changes the designation of the site to a park, the benefits of the designation are significant, said Lewis last March in a release. Not only does it create the first national historic park in the state of Georgia, but it also improves the way the National Park Service preserves, shares, and presents the history of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

For many years, I worked with my congressional colleagues and the National Park Service to preserve these Atlanta landmarks and to enhance visitor experiences and services, Lewis said. In addition, the National Park Service wanted to improve the presentation of the historic landmarks, which are integral to Dr. Kings legacy and Atlantas role in the American Civil Rights Movement. These changes required an Act of Congress.

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site in …

Note: The Martin Luther King, Jr. Birth Home is temporarily closed for repairs.

Encompassing nearly 35 acres, the fun, family-friendly and free Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site is composed of landmarks, modern-day monuments and facilities. Take a journey through the underlying historical struggles of the South as well as the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Mailing Address: 450 Auburn Avenue NE Atlanta,GA30331 (404) 331-5190 x5046

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How Did Martin Luther King’s Vision Change the World?

Martin Luther King Jr’s vision changed the world in a major way. In fact, anyone whos been through elementary school in America has likely heard the name Martin Luther King. As we progress into high school and beyond, were taught about his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, and we gain a greater understanding of his impact on civil rights in America as a whole.

Martin Luther King had a vision of a society in which race was not an issue in how people were treated or in how they were allowed to live their lives. Its a sad fact of todays society that Kings vision is not a reality in America, or anywhere else in the world; but it is possible to say that his vision affected us.

While nothing is perfect or complete in the battle for civil rights, the efforts of King and those like him have, in fact, changed the country and the world, for the better, in noticeable ways. His vision has made the world a more equal place, if not an equal one, and it has helped to ensure that minorities have a voice.

Martin Luther King had a major impact on civil rights. King played a part in many well-known civil rights movements in the 1950s and 1960s.

In 1955, he became heavily involved in the Montgomery, Alabama boycott of the city buses, which was spurred by the bus companys insistence that African Americans only ride in the back seats. Kings support drew much attention to the cause and rallied many supporters even outside of the Montgomery area, which put pressure on bus companies all over the South to examine their own rules, and eventually, to change them.

Kings prominence in the civil rights movement gained the respect of many political leaders, and gave him the potential power to enact major change.

The bus boycott was just one example of many situations where, under Kings influence, the civil rights movement gained attention and respect.

A key part of Kings vision, aside from a quest for racial equality, was the idea of non-violence; he refused to use violent actions in any of his protests, and taught his followers to do the same. Based on the principles of Gandhi, this factor of Kings beliefs and behavior was a major influence on society at the time. Police forces didnt hesitate to use violence against demonstrators and protesters, but in the face of their quiet civil resistance, the overblown physical techniques of force and brutality lost their power.

Martin Luther King was greatly responsible for the passing of the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act for African Americans, both in the mid 1960s. Both of these acts literally changed American law so that African Americans could not be treated separately from whites. His victories in these two areas had a major impact on the United States and the world.

Martin Luther King did not make overt efforts to fight international civil rights inequalities; however, his U.S. civil rights victories and speeches were inspiration for those who were involved in international racial injustice. By 1964 the United Nations’ membership had doubled from its 1945 levels. Almost 75% of these new members were from developing countries who were committed to combating racial injustice based on the struggles of Martin Luther King in the U.S. and the racial persecution in South Africa.

King was assassinated in 1968. With his death, the country lost not only a great leader, but a prominent person who had carried the power to change society for the better. The loss of King was a loss for people of all races.

For a time perspective of the details of Martin Luther King Jr.’s life, check out the Martin Luther King Jr. Timeline on YourDictionary.

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How Did Martin Luther King’s Vision Change the World?

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Martin Luther King High School (Philadelphia) – Wikipedia

Martin Luther King High School is a neighborhood public high school located in the West Oaklane section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, at the intersection of Stenton Avenue and Haines Street. It is a neighborhood school, meaning no application is necessary for those students who live in the West Oak Lane and Germantown sections of Philadelphia.

The school opened on February 8, 1972. Originally it housed grades 9-10, while nearby Germantown High School housed grades 11-12, as the school district intended to keep students in Northwest Philadelphia economically integrated. Multiple students were stabbed and hit with metal pipes during a December 5, 1972 altercation between gangs. Some neighborhoods in proximity to King, such as East Mount Airy and West Oak Lane, wanted King to become a 9-12 school because Germantown High was located near poorer areas. Eventually Germantown and King became separate 9-12 schools.[2] The campuses are about 1 mile (1.6km) apart.[3]

Programs at King High include JROTC and Business and Computers Technology.

Their team mascot is the cougar.[citation needed]

As of the 2005-2006 school year, the school had a population of 1,780 students, mostly African-American. In the 2012-2013 school year King had 750 students. Germantown closed in 2013 and was merged into Martin Luther King High School, causing King’s student body to increase to 1,178 for the 2013-2014 school year.[4] A school district $304 million budget shortfall caused the schools to merge.[5]

Germantown students later attended King High and the merger was the subject of the 2014 documentary We Could Be King, directed by Judd Ehrlich.[6]

King has an on-campus athletic field and two weight rooms.[5]

King was previously the athletic rival of Germantown high in football.[5] King’s football team won one game in 2012; this was after the other team forfeited.[4] After Germantown closed in 2013 much of its athletic roster joined King’s football team.[5] Ed Dunn served as the volunteer head coach of the post-2013 King football team. He had previously worked as a mathematics teacher but had been laid off.[6] In its first year as a merged team, the King football team won its first Philadelphia Public League championship after having nine straight wins.[4]

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Martin Luther King High School (Philadelphia) – Wikipedia

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Martin Luther King High School – The School District of …

Our VisionThe teachers, administrators, and staff of The Promise Academy at Martin Luther King High School, in collaboration with parents, guardians, community members and others, are committed to ensuring that all MLK students are respected for who they are and are empowered to grow both academically and personally. We are a student-centered school where everything we do is directly aligned with student success. We absolutely believe in the worth, intelligence, special gifts and dignity of each and every student. We passionately and with a sense of urgency are devoted to constantly creating and maintaining a safe, orderly and secure environment where high levels of teaching and learning occur and where our students understand that they are royal scholars whom we expect to represent the great legacy of Dr. King.Our MissionOur mission is to provide all students with the academic, technological, and social skills needed to be productive and contributing citizens in our society.

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Then & Now: Major Taylor and Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards, Worcester – Worcester Telegram

Once upon a time the intersection of Central and Union streets, this corner is now part of the property belonging to St. Vincent Hospital, across the street from what is now the DCU Center (called the Worcester Centrum in 1982 when it was built).

When this corner was home to R&R Plumbing (whose address was 135 Union St.) and Jenkins & Robinson Automotive Distributors at 69-75 Central St., the downtown landscape was very different. The high brick buildings in the rear of our Then photo are now gone, replaced by much newer buildings.

While those streets still exist on Worcesters map, they dont quite follow the same path, and Major Taylor Boulevard (formerly Worcester Center Boulevard) and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard were carved out. St. Vincent Hospital and its parking garage now cover the corner where many businesses used to crowd around the railroad tracks.

R&R Plumbing, shown in the 1940s photo, had opened elsewhere in 1905 and moved here later. For many years it has been under the management of the Ritz family, though it is no longer located on the railroad tracks in Worcester.

St. Vincent Hospital was established in 1893 and for many years was a fixture at the top of Vernon Hill. In 1997, the newly merged St. Vincent Hospital-Fallon Healthcare System broke ground for a new hospital on this lot. In 2000 the hospital moved in.

– Melissa McKeon, Correspondent

THEN & NOW ARCHIVES

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Then & Now: Major Taylor and Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards, Worcester – Worcester Telegram

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Martin Luther King Jr. warned us about spending too much on war … – Los Angeles Times

To the editor: Bravo to Adam H. Johnson for reminding us of the human cost when our countrys leaders spend big bucks for military adventurism while they complain that America is running out of money when it comes to helping the poor, people of color, the disabled and elderly. He notes also the failure of the media to report the true cost of our wars. (Why don’t deficit hawks care about the cost of military adventurism? Opinion, June 26)

The rationale of national security to justify out-of-control military spending overlooks the most important source of true national security: human security. Martin Luther King, Jr.s warning at the time of the Vietnam War rings true today: A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death.

Cecil Hoffman, Pasadena

..

To the editor: The last time the accumulated national debt decreased was in fiscal years 1956 and 57, when Dwight D. Eisenhower was president.

Many times during Ikes presidency, his advisers urged him to dispatch the Marines to numerous places, but he resolutely resisted in his hunt for a better way. In retirement, he wrote about his resistance to taking military action:

Please fill in your full name, mailing address, city of residence, phone number and e-mail address below. Submissions that do not include this information cannot be published. This information is seen only by the letters editors and is not used for any commercial purpose. We generally do not publish…

Please fill in your full name, mailing address, city of residence, phone number and e-mail address below. Submissions that do not include this information cannot be published. This information is seen only by the letters editors and is not used for any commercial purpose. We generally do not publish…

The United States never lost a soldier or a foot of ground in my administration. We kept the peace. People asked how it happened. By God, it didnt just happen, Ill tell you that.

Writing after the Korean War, Ike stated there must be a balance between minimum requirements in the costly implements of war and the health of economy.

Norman G. Axe, Santa Monica

..

To the editor: Weapons of war and their capabilities are keeping some of our influential leaders starry-eyed and willing to spend billions on them with a disregard similar to that of purchasing 4th of July fireworks.

Meanwhile, the parts of government that serve the poor and the middle class are effectively shut down. This should break the hearts of everyone and compel us to revolt at the ballot box.

Mary Leah Plante, Los Angeles

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Martin Luther King Jr. warned us about spending too much on war … – Los Angeles Times

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Md. man named Martin Luther King receives 20 years for attacking … – WJLA

Judge’s gavel (ABC7 file photo)

Martin Luther King Jr., 27, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for viciously assaulting and shooting at his girlfriend during an argument in Oct. 2016 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

In May 2017, King Jr. pled guilty to first-degree assault and use of a firearm in a crime of violence, according to a release from the Office of the State’s Attorney for Anne Arundel County.

King Jr. will serve the first five years of his 20 year sentence without the possibility of parole for first-degree assault.

The release states King Jr. knocked his girlfriend to the floor, grabbed her by the sweatshirt and “picked her up over his head and threw her” during an argument at a home.

Following the attack, the woman left in her car and was followed by King Jr. in his vehicle. According to the release, he drove into oncoming traffic, pulled up beside her, and fired multiple gunshots at her car.

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Md. man named Martin Luther King receives 20 years for attacking … – WJLA

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Trump ignores controversy over ‘s—hole’ remarks as he …

One day after President Donald Trump’s reported remark about immigrants from Haiti and other “s—hole countries” reignited talk of whether he harbors racist beliefs, the president signed a proclamation honoring civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. Neither Trump nor other dignitaries who spoke at the ceremony officially proclaiming Jan. 15, 2018, as the Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday addressed the controversy over the president’s reported comments on Thursday. Flanked by Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson — the only African-American member of Trump’s cabinet — and Martin Luther King’s nephew, Isaac Newton Ferris Jr., Trump spoke about the late civil rights leader. “Dr. King’s faith and his love for humanity led him and so many other heroes to courageously stand up for civil rights of African-Americans,” said Trump. “Through his bravery and sacrifice, Dr. King opened the eyes and lifted the conscience of our nation. He stirred in the hearts of our people to recognize the dignity written in every human soul.” “Today, we celebrate Dr. King for standing up for the self-evident truth Americans hold so dear, that no matter what the color of our skin, or the place of our birth, we are all created equal by god,” he added. After the president spoke, Carson and Farris took turns at the podium and Trump signed the proclamation. He then exited the room, ignoring shouted questions from reporters about his controversial comments on Thursday and whether he is a racist.

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Trump designates Martin Luther King Jr. birthplace a …

A week shy of the annual observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Kings birth home, Ebenezer Baptist Church and Kings burial site have all been upgraded from a national historic site to a national historic park. The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park Act, signed into law by President Donald Trump Monday aboard Air Force One, is one of the highest designations within the National Park Service. Trump said in a Tweet Tuesday it was “my great honor” to sign the bill. Georgia Democratic Rep. John Lewis, sponsored the bill and said he is so proud that we were able to work in a bipartisan, bicameral manner to establish Georgias first National Historical Park ahead of Kings birthday and the 50th anniversary of his assassination. I hope that this moment will serve as a reminder of the constant work to realize Dr. Kings dream of building the Beloved Community — a community at peace with itself and our neighbors, Lewis said in a statement. NBC News reached out to Bernice King and the King Center for comment but has not received a response. The law also includes Prince Hall Masonic Temple. According to Lewis, the Temple donated land to the National Park Service in an effort to ensure Kings story and the legacy of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) could continue being told to future generations. The Temple served as the initial headquarters of the SCLC, which King co-founded in 1957. Lewis, who marched with King during the Civil Rights Movement, represents the 5th Congressional district, which includes the King Historic site. Congress initially established the site in the fall of 1980. While the law changes the designation of the site to a park, the benefits of the designation are significant, said Lewis last March in a release. Not only does it create the first national historic park in the state of Georgia, but it also improves the way the National Park Service preserves, shares, and presents the history of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. For many years, I worked with my congressional colleagues and the National Park Service to preserve these Atlanta landmarks and to enhance visitor experiences and services, Lewis said. In addition, the National Park Service wanted to improve the presentation of the historic landmarks, which are integral to Dr. Kings legacy and Atlantas role in the American Civil Rights Movement. These changes required an Act of Congress. Follow NBCBLK on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site in …

Note: The Martin Luther King, Jr. Birth Home is temporarily closed for repairs. Encompassing nearly 35 acres, the fun, family-friendly and free Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site is composed of landmarks, modern-day monuments and facilities. Take a journey through the underlying historical struggles of the South as well as the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Mailing Address: 450 Auburn Avenue NE Atlanta,GA30331 (404) 331-5190 x5046

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How Did Martin Luther King’s Vision Change the World?

Martin Luther King Jr’s vision changed the world in a major way. In fact, anyone whos been through elementary school in America has likely heard the name Martin Luther King. As we progress into high school and beyond, were taught about his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, and we gain a greater understanding of his impact on civil rights in America as a whole. Martin Luther King had a vision of a society in which race was not an issue in how people were treated or in how they were allowed to live their lives. Its a sad fact of todays society that Kings vision is not a reality in America, or anywhere else in the world; but it is possible to say that his vision affected us. While nothing is perfect or complete in the battle for civil rights, the efforts of King and those like him have, in fact, changed the country and the world, for the better, in noticeable ways. His vision has made the world a more equal place, if not an equal one, and it has helped to ensure that minorities have a voice. Martin Luther King had a major impact on civil rights. King played a part in many well-known civil rights movements in the 1950s and 1960s. In 1955, he became heavily involved in the Montgomery, Alabama boycott of the city buses, which was spurred by the bus companys insistence that African Americans only ride in the back seats. Kings support drew much attention to the cause and rallied many supporters even outside of the Montgomery area, which put pressure on bus companies all over the South to examine their own rules, and eventually, to change them. Kings prominence in the civil rights movement gained the respect of many political leaders, and gave him the potential power to enact major change. The bus boycott was just one example of many situations where, under Kings influence, the civil rights movement gained attention and respect. A key part of Kings vision, aside from a quest for racial equality, was the idea of non-violence; he refused to use violent actions in any of his protests, and taught his followers to do the same. Based on the principles of Gandhi, this factor of Kings beliefs and behavior was a major influence on society at the time. Police forces didnt hesitate to use violence against demonstrators and protesters, but in the face of their quiet civil resistance, the overblown physical techniques of force and brutality lost their power. Martin Luther King was greatly responsible for the passing of the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act for African Americans, both in the mid 1960s. Both of these acts literally changed American law so that African Americans could not be treated separately from whites. His victories in these two areas had a major impact on the United States and the world. Martin Luther King did not make overt efforts to fight international civil rights inequalities; however, his U.S. civil rights victories and speeches were inspiration for those who were involved in international racial injustice. By 1964 the United Nations’ membership had doubled from its 1945 levels. Almost 75% of these new members were from developing countries who were committed to combating racial injustice based on the struggles of Martin Luther King in the U.S. and the racial persecution in South Africa. King was assassinated in 1968. With his death, the country lost not only a great leader, but a prominent person who had carried the power to change society for the better. The loss of King was a loss for people of all races. For a time perspective of the details of Martin Luther King Jr.’s life, check out the Martin Luther King Jr. Timeline on YourDictionary.

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Martin Luther King High School (Philadelphia) – Wikipedia

Martin Luther King High School is a neighborhood public high school located in the West Oaklane section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, at the intersection of Stenton Avenue and Haines Street. It is a neighborhood school, meaning no application is necessary for those students who live in the West Oak Lane and Germantown sections of Philadelphia. The school opened on February 8, 1972. Originally it housed grades 9-10, while nearby Germantown High School housed grades 11-12, as the school district intended to keep students in Northwest Philadelphia economically integrated. Multiple students were stabbed and hit with metal pipes during a December 5, 1972 altercation between gangs. Some neighborhoods in proximity to King, such as East Mount Airy and West Oak Lane, wanted King to become a 9-12 school because Germantown High was located near poorer areas. Eventually Germantown and King became separate 9-12 schools.[2] The campuses are about 1 mile (1.6km) apart.[3] Programs at King High include JROTC and Business and Computers Technology. Their team mascot is the cougar.[citation needed] As of the 2005-2006 school year, the school had a population of 1,780 students, mostly African-American. In the 2012-2013 school year King had 750 students. Germantown closed in 2013 and was merged into Martin Luther King High School, causing King’s student body to increase to 1,178 for the 2013-2014 school year.[4] A school district $304 million budget shortfall caused the schools to merge.[5] Germantown students later attended King High and the merger was the subject of the 2014 documentary We Could Be King, directed by Judd Ehrlich.[6] King has an on-campus athletic field and two weight rooms.[5] King was previously the athletic rival of Germantown high in football.[5] King’s football team won one game in 2012; this was after the other team forfeited.[4] After Germantown closed in 2013 much of its athletic roster joined King’s football team.[5] Ed Dunn served as the volunteer head coach of the post-2013 King football team. He had previously worked as a mathematics teacher but had been laid off.[6] In its first year as a merged team, the King football team won its first Philadelphia Public League championship after having nine straight wins.[4]

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Martin Luther King High School – The School District of …

Our VisionThe teachers, administrators, and staff of The Promise Academy at Martin Luther King High School, in collaboration with parents, guardians, community members and others, are committed to ensuring that all MLK students are respected for who they are and are empowered to grow both academically and personally. We are a student-centered school where everything we do is directly aligned with student success. We absolutely believe in the worth, intelligence, special gifts and dignity of each and every student. We passionately and with a sense of urgency are devoted to constantly creating and maintaining a safe, orderly and secure environment where high levels of teaching and learning occur and where our students understand that they are royal scholars whom we expect to represent the great legacy of Dr. King.Our MissionOur mission is to provide all students with the academic, technological, and social skills needed to be productive and contributing citizens in our society.

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Then & Now: Major Taylor and Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards, Worcester – Worcester Telegram

Once upon a time the intersection of Central and Union streets, this corner is now part of the property belonging to St. Vincent Hospital, across the street from what is now the DCU Center (called the Worcester Centrum in 1982 when it was built). When this corner was home to R&R Plumbing (whose address was 135 Union St.) and Jenkins & Robinson Automotive Distributors at 69-75 Central St., the downtown landscape was very different. The high brick buildings in the rear of our Then photo are now gone, replaced by much newer buildings. While those streets still exist on Worcesters map, they dont quite follow the same path, and Major Taylor Boulevard (formerly Worcester Center Boulevard) and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard were carved out. St. Vincent Hospital and its parking garage now cover the corner where many businesses used to crowd around the railroad tracks. R&R Plumbing, shown in the 1940s photo, had opened elsewhere in 1905 and moved here later. For many years it has been under the management of the Ritz family, though it is no longer located on the railroad tracks in Worcester. St. Vincent Hospital was established in 1893 and for many years was a fixture at the top of Vernon Hill. In 1997, the newly merged St. Vincent Hospital-Fallon Healthcare System broke ground for a new hospital on this lot. In 2000 the hospital moved in. – Melissa McKeon, Correspondent THEN & NOW ARCHIVES

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Martin Luther King Jr. warned us about spending too much on war … – Los Angeles Times

To the editor: Bravo to Adam H. Johnson for reminding us of the human cost when our countrys leaders spend big bucks for military adventurism while they complain that America is running out of money when it comes to helping the poor, people of color, the disabled and elderly. He notes also the failure of the media to report the true cost of our wars. (Why don’t deficit hawks care about the cost of military adventurism? Opinion, June 26) The rationale of national security to justify out-of-control military spending overlooks the most important source of true national security: human security. Martin Luther King, Jr.s warning at the time of the Vietnam War rings true today: A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death. Cecil Hoffman, Pasadena .. To the editor: The last time the accumulated national debt decreased was in fiscal years 1956 and 57, when Dwight D. Eisenhower was president. Many times during Ikes presidency, his advisers urged him to dispatch the Marines to numerous places, but he resolutely resisted in his hunt for a better way. In retirement, he wrote about his resistance to taking military action: Please fill in your full name, mailing address, city of residence, phone number and e-mail address below. Submissions that do not include this information cannot be published. This information is seen only by the letters editors and is not used for any commercial purpose. We generally do not publish… Please fill in your full name, mailing address, city of residence, phone number and e-mail address below. Submissions that do not include this information cannot be published. This information is seen only by the letters editors and is not used for any commercial purpose. We generally do not publish… The United States never lost a soldier or a foot of ground in my administration. We kept the peace. People asked how it happened. By God, it didnt just happen, Ill tell you that. Writing after the Korean War, Ike stated there must be a balance between minimum requirements in the costly implements of war and the health of economy. Norman G. Axe, Santa Monica .. To the editor: Weapons of war and their capabilities are keeping some of our influential leaders starry-eyed and willing to spend billions on them with a disregard similar to that of purchasing 4th of July fireworks. Meanwhile, the parts of government that serve the poor and the middle class are effectively shut down. This should break the hearts of everyone and compel us to revolt at the ballot box. Mary Leah Plante, Los Angeles Follow the Opinion section on Twitter @latimesopinion and Facebook

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Md. man named Martin Luther King receives 20 years for attacking … – WJLA

Judge’s gavel (ABC7 file photo) Martin Luther King Jr., 27, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for viciously assaulting and shooting at his girlfriend during an argument in Oct. 2016 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. In May 2017, King Jr. pled guilty to first-degree assault and use of a firearm in a crime of violence, according to a release from the Office of the State’s Attorney for Anne Arundel County. King Jr. will serve the first five years of his 20 year sentence without the possibility of parole for first-degree assault. The release states King Jr. knocked his girlfriend to the floor, grabbed her by the sweatshirt and “picked her up over his head and threw her” during an argument at a home. Following the attack, the woman left in her car and was followed by King Jr. in his vehicle. According to the release, he drove into oncoming traffic, pulled up beside her, and fired multiple gunshots at her car. To stay up to date with crime in your area, click here to subscribe to our Fighting Back Against Crime newsletter.

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