Archive for the ‘Martin Luther King’ Category

Md. man named Martin Luther King receives 20 years for attacking … – WJLA

Judge’s gavel (ABC7 file photo)

Martin Luther King Jr., 27, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for viciously assaulting and shooting at his girlfriend during an argument in Oct. 2016 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

In May 2017, King Jr. pled guilty to first-degree assault and use of a firearm in a crime of violence, according to a release from the Office of the State’s Attorney for Anne Arundel County.

King Jr. will serve the first five years of his 20 year sentence without the possibility of parole for first-degree assault.

The release states King Jr. knocked his girlfriend to the floor, grabbed her by the sweatshirt and “picked her up over his head and threw her” during an argument at a home.

Following the attack, the woman left in her car and was followed by King Jr. in his vehicle. According to the release, he drove into oncoming traffic, pulled up beside her, and fired multiple gunshots at her car.

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Md. man named Martin Luther King receives 20 years for attacking … – WJLA

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How Martin Luther King Persuaded John Kennedy to Support the Civil Rights Cause – New York Times

Kennedy was amused. Imagine Martin Luther King having a bigot for a father, he said. Then: Well, we all have our fathers, dont we?

That story has been around at least since 1965, when Arthur Schlesinger Jr. published A Thousand Days. So too the stories Levingston goes on to tell in Kennedy and King about the sit-ins, the Freedom Rides; the Albany, Ga., and Birmingham campaigns; the integration of the universities of Mississippi and Alabama; the march on Washington and much more, including several memorable conversations between King and Kennedy. Levingston thanks his wife and numerous archivists for their help with the research, but his greatest debt, fully acknowledged, is to books available in most public libraries: oral histories, memoirs, biographies and narrative histories, including Parting the Waters, the first volume of Taylor Branchs monumental trilogy of America in the King years.

Yet people who think the past is important should be the last to make a fetish of the new. As long as racial equality and justice elude us, writers, artists and filmmakers will return to the climactic years of our Second Reconstruction, when African-Americans and their white allies forced the nation to begin to make good on the promise of freedom, equality under the law and voting rights embedded 100 years earlier in the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments. Thats a good thing, all the more so as the present generation, which was born in an era of mass incarceration of black men and which has come of age at marches and rallies protesting police killings, tries to figure out where we should go from here. Levingston, the nonfiction book editor of The Washington Post and the author of Little Demon in the City of Light and The Kennedy Baby, writes with passion and flair. If these pages dont rouse you, call your doctor.

There are places where Levingston the writer (displaying the occupational weaknesses for stark contrasts and sudden twists of drama) gets the better of Levingston the historian. It is wrong to say even with King as a source that in 1955, at the time of Kings arrival in Montgomery, the Southern black was hunched in fear, cringing and passive, broken by the white man. As far back as Howell Rainess My Soul Is Rested (1977), authors have shown that everywhere King went, the stage for confrontation was set by community leaders and grass-roots organizers, including, as Levingston notes, Kings own father. In Montgomery in 1955, one of those organizers was Rosa Parks, whom Levingston describes as an efficient volunteer secretary of the N.A.A.C.P.s local chapter (in whose heart lay a well of quiet activism). Parks may have been good with the carbon paper and coffee machine, but by the time of the bus boycott, her rsum also featured decades of not-so-quiet resistance. She had been fighting Jim Crow injustice, including violence against black women, since the Scottsboro trials in the 1930s.

Levingston frames his book as a study in leadership, and it is, but not the kind he suggests in his introduction, when he evokes Thomas Carlyle and writes of great individuals, or heroes, shaping the worlds destiny. Kennedy was not a leader in civil rights. Until the last months of his life, he saw the struggle for equality as a righteous distraction from critical domestic issues (including taxes and steel prices) and Cold War foreign affairs. When he acted, he did so in response to the horrific violence peaceful protest made manifest: the clubbing of Freedom Riders; the bombing of black businesses, homes and churches; the attacks on demonstrators with jack boots, water cannons and dogs; the racist riots in Oxford, Miss. Only in June 1963, after the battle of Birmingham and the confrontation with George Wallace in Tuscaloosa, did Kennedy do what King had been urging him to do all along: call civil rights a moral issue and acknowledge that the country faced a crisis that could not be met by repressive police action or quieted by token moves or talk. Hours after Kennedys speech, Medgar Evers was assassinated. Kennedy sent legislation to Congress, but it was left to Lyndon Johnson to make the Civil Rights Act of 1964 law.

That leaves King, who was indeed a leader, as well as a teacher. Its a difficult thing, he said, to teach a president. Levingstons point is that King taught Kennedy to be a leader, and he did, but he did not do it alone, and Kings relationship with his own followers was always complicated. Homegrown heroes, old and young (the subject of books like John Dittmers Local People, Charles M. Paynes Ive Got the Light of Freedom and Danielle L. McGuires At the Dark End of the Street), taught King and his closest associates while they in turn taught the Kennedys. There go my people, King said, quoting Gandhi. I must catch up with them, for I am their leader.

Levingstons frame does not fit, but he is too good a writer to get in the way of his history for long. Kennedy and King will most likely leave readers thinking that what is needed today is not more leaders, a few men and women shaping our destiny, but more followers. What is needed are ordinary people: alert, informed, engaged, mobilized, idealistic but not nave, critical but not hopeless, confident about who they are and what they want but able and inclined to work with all sorts of others, exercising rights won at enormous cost, starting with the right to vote. What is needed, in short, are more citizens, prepared to lead our leaders toward a more promising land.

James Goodman, a professor of history and creative writing at Rutgers University, Newark, is the author of Stories of Scottsboro, Blackout and But Where Is the Lamb?

A version of this review appears in print on July 2, 2017, on Page BR9 of the Sunday Book Review with the headline: Profiles in Caution.

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How Martin Luther King Persuaded John Kennedy to Support the Civil Rights Cause – New York Times

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Aspen Ideas Festival: What you need to know about Martin Luther King – Minnesota Public Radio News

Jun 29, 2017

Originally, Clarence B. Jones didn’t want to work with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In February of 1960, Jones received a call from a prominent judge who asked if he would help King with some legal troubles. King was indicted on tax evasion.

As Jones told journalist Michele Norris at the 2017 Aspen Ideas Festival, he didn’t want to leave his home in California to work in Montgomery, Alabama.

Jones was a lawyer who specialized in entertainment law.

“Just because some preacher got his hand caught in the cookie jar stealing that ain’t my problem,” he said.

As luck would have it, King was on his way to California to perform a sermon and paid Jones a visit the next day. During that visit he tried to persuade Jones to help him.

Jones was unmoved.

It took that sermon from King, which he talked about “the role and responsibility of the negro professional” to convince the young lawyer to drop what he was doing and join the fight for Civil Rights.

Jones sat down with Norris to talk about his work with King, and how he helped write some of King’s most famous speeches and letters, such as “I Have a Dream” and “The Letter from Birmingham Jail.”

That letter was written piecemeal, with Jones sneaking scraps of paper to King while he was in jail.

“I was too busy dealing with other things. I never read the letter,” Jones admitted.

When he finally did, he was struck by King’s words.

The web audio for this segment will be available later today.

Norman Lear and Khizr Khan on American values and the Constitution

Spotlight on health

Correction (June 29, 2017): An earlier version of this story was incorrect in identifying the person who asked Clarence B. Jones to work with Martin Luther King Jr. It was a prominent judge. The story has been updated.

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Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Center to become emergency shelter by the 2018 hurricane season – The Independent Florida Alligator

Gainesvilles Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Center will serve as a hurricane shelter in 2018.

The shelter will be available to all Alachua County residents and will be renovated with a $200k grant from the Florida Division of Emergency Management.

District 1 City Commissioner Charles Goston reached out to Alachua County and the City of Gainesville about a year ago to discuss his concerns about the hurricane shelter on the east side of Gainesville, said Chip Skinner, an assistant public information officer for Gainesville.

Residents of the east side of Gainesville have been limited in the number of shelters that are available during an emergency, Goston said.

The ease of use and location were the main concerns for finding a new hurricane shelter, Skinner said.

He said the county usually has to wait for approval from the school board to open shelters because nine out of the 11 current shelters are schools. With the center, they dont need approval.

With it not being involved with the school board, its much easier for us to open that as a shelter, Skinner said. If we need to shelter additional people, its not affecting a school, for instance.

He said Alachua County and Gainesville do not have a contractor for renovations yet because they have to do an engineering study first.

He said the engineering study will help Gainesville and Alachua County determine if the renovations theyve proposed are needed. These include window screens, hardened doorways, electrical work and minor structural improvements.

The final cost of the project will not be determined until an engineering study is complete, with work to begin shortly after, Skinner said.

He said once renovations are complete, the facility will be available for wind-related emergencies and as a post-storm shelter.

Alachua County determines when the shelters open, Skinner said. The changes will bring the building into compliance with FDEM and Federal Emergency Management Agency standards.

He said Alachua County and Gainesville do not currently have plans to open more hurricane shelters.

I am happy that my advocacy on behalf of our citizens contributed to the city receiving this state award to harden the Martin Luther King Jr. center for use in emergencies, so that citizens in District 1 will have another close-by option for a safe haven, Goston said.

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Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Center to become emergency shelter by the 2018 hurricane season – The Independent Florida Alligator

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Martin Luther King Jr. play coming to Lindsey theatre – Flor-Ala (subscription)

The assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is a well-known event that took place the evening of April 4, 1968.

However, most people do not know what happened the night before.

UNA Summer Theatre will present The Mountaintop, a fictional account of the night before Dr. Kings final day.

Performances will take place at the George S. Lindsey Theatre June 29, 30, and July 1 at 7:30 p.m., and July 2 at 2 p.m.

Playwright Katori Halls Olivier Award-winning drama takes place in room 306 of the Lorraine Motel and shows Dr. King and his visit by a maid after delivering his well-known Ive Been to the Mountaintop speech.

Senior Kelley Riddle, assistant director and stage manager, said she decided to work on the play after reading the script.

As soon as I read it, I was moved and really motivated to work on it because of the message it sends to the audience, Riddle said.

UNA theatre alumnus Michael David Baldwin will portray Dr. King, while sophomore Destini Croom, a current theatre student, will play the role of the young maid, Camae.

Baldwin said the play will bring up some of the controversial parts of Dr. Kings life.

A lot of people think of him as this holy figure that is unstained, and this play challenges that idea of him, Baldwin said.

Croom said she fell in love with her character after reading the script.

This is a heavy play, and she brings the funny aspect to it and the lightheartedness to it, but at the same time, she has her own backstory, Croom said.

Croom said while Camae is an entirely fictional character, she got her name from Halls mother.

Charlton James, associate professor of theatre, said he chose to direct the play because of its relation to current issues.

The real running theme in the play is that the work is not done, (and) that we have to pass on the baton to the next generation, James said. Theres a lot of work that we have to do in order to live a peaceful, happy life with each other.

Croom said she believes the issues the play relates to are not just race-related, but instead relate to everyone.

Baldwin said while some may see the play as controversial, everyone who sees it will be thinking about it after it ends.

I think no matter whether you like it or not, this is the type of play that sits with you, Baldwin said. Youre going to be thinking about it afterwards.

Croom said she believes the play can get the attention of people who are not working to solve the issues people are facing today.

I feel like a lot of people, especially nowadays, they sit around and wait (for issues to be resolved), Croom said. They speak about the issues, but they dont want to actually help with the issues. I feel like with this (play), a lot of people will probably get a wake-up call.

James said there will be a discussion after Sundays show, where attendees can ask cast and crew questions about the production.

Tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for UNA faculty, staff, students and alumni.

Tickets are available at the Department of Entertainment Industry Office (open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.), online at https://www.una.edu/theatre/productions.htmlor at the door.

For more information, contact Wanda Dixon, events coordinator, at 256-765-4342.

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MARTIN LUTHER KING III HONORED WITH 2017 LIFETIME LEGACY AWARD – The Chicago Citizen

MARTIN LUTHER KING III HONORED WITH 2017 LIFETIME LEGACY AWARD

WASHINGTON/NNPA Newswire/The National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) honored Martin Luther King, III with

the 2017 Lifetime Legacy Award during the groups annual conference held on June 20-24 at the Gaylord Convention Center at the National Harbor in Prince Georges County, Md.

As the oldest son of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Mrs. Coretta

Scott King, Martin Luther King III serves as an ambassador of his

parents legacy of nonviolent social change. In 1997, King was elected as the fourth president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) where he co-sponsored the 40th Anniversary of the historic March on Washington.

Following his service with SCLC, King founded Realizing

the Dream, which focused on redressing poverty by strategizing

with community organizers to ignite investment in the local

neighborhoods and foster peaceful coexistence within the U.S.

and internationally.

For decades, more than anyone else, Martin Luther King III has continued to personify and represent the living legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for freedom, justice and equality, said Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., the president and CEO of the NNPA. King accepted the Lifetime Legacy Award on Friday evening (June 23).

On Tuesday, June 20, the NNPA kicked o the conference with the

National Black Parents Town Hall Meeting on Educational Excellence

featuring radio personality and community activist DJ EZ Street; Hilary Shelton, the director of the NAACPs Washington Bureau; Dr. Marietta English, the president of the National Alliance of Black School Educators; and Lynn Jennings of Education Trust.

The conference also featured a panel discussion about the documentary Pardons of Innocence: The Wilmington Ten; a conversation with NNPA members who operate publications

that are more than 100 years old; and a presentation by the Nissan Foundation on 25 years of community service.

Dr. Chavis said that support of the NNPAs partners, sponsors and advertisers is critically important and appreciated. NNPA partners include: General Motors, Ford Motor Company, Reynolds America Incorporated, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The conference was sponsored by Volkswagen, Toyota, Nissan, Comcast, AT&T, Facebook, Macys, Koch Industries, New York Life, Northrop Grumman, Coca Cola, AARP, Goldman Sacs, and Prince Georges County.

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MARTIN LUTHER KING III HONORED WITH 2017 LIFETIME LEGACY AWARD – The Chicago Citizen

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MLK motorcade founder George Burney Sr. dies – WHAS 11.com

WHAS 6:18 PM. EDT June 28, 2017

George Burney Sr. (Photo: WHAS11)

LOUISVILLE (WHAS11) A longtime voice in the Civil Rights movement passed away.

George Burney Senior founded the annual motorcade and parade honoring Dr. Martin Luther King. He was a fixture on WHAS11 when it came to our MLK Coverage.

In 2016, he won the MLK Freedom Award from the Mayor.

Burney actually began his career as a dancer before becoming so entrenched in the Civil Rights movement.

Burney was also the founder of the community activist group known as PRIDE, People’s Rights in Demanding Equality.

The mayor called him a trailblazer. Burney passed away after an illness, he was 89-years-old.

Jefferson County Circuit Court Clerk David L. Nicholson released the following statement:

We are saddened to learn of the passing of George Burney, and we join the community and his many friends in mourning his death.

George was a tireless proponent for civil rights and a steadfast advocate for peace in this community for six decades. He truly lived his life based on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s message of equality and peace. He loved his hometown of Louisville, especially the children of this community, and leaves behind a lasting legacy for all of us to follow. He will be greatly missed.”

Mayor Fischers statement:

George was a trailblazer, first on the stage and TV screen as a dancer, and then on the streets, as a tireless advocate for civil rights. Like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Georges fight for civil and human rights extended far beyond his hometown, into places like Seattle, Vancouver and Alaska. George was a man of great optimism and energy who willingly shared his time and his talents long past the age when others might have moved off stage. I was blessed to have known him as a friend and mentor. I grieve with his wife, Barbara, even as I celebrate a life so well lived.

2017 WHAS-TV

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NNPA Honors Martin Luther King III with Lifetime Legacy Award – Black Press USA

By Stacy M. Brown (NNPA Newswire Contributor)

The National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) honored Martin Luther King III with the 2017 Lifetime Legacy Award, as the group wrapped up its annual summer conference, at the Gaylord Convention Center at the National Harbor in Maryland.

King, the oldest son of the iconic civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., said that the tribute tops all others hes received, because the Black Press has meant a lot to his family, especially his father, as he fought for freedom, justice and equality.

The NNPA is one of the most impactful institutions our community has and every week the newspapers of the Black Press reach at least 22 million people in our communities, said King. And every week the Black Press tackles issues that we deal with, that we cannot find in the mainstream newspapers.

King continued: The Black Press provides the information thats needed for African-Americans and if not for the Black Press, I would say that, during the Civil Rights era, my father would not have been successful. The African-American [journalists] had their ears to the ground to what was important in our community.

King, who attended the awards ceremony with family members, graduated from his fathers alma mater, Morehouse College, with a degree in political science. While at Morehouse, King was selected by former President Jimmy Carter to serve in the United States delegation to the Republic of Congo for participation in their centennial celebration ceremonies.

Like his father, King participated in many protests for civil rights and one of the more notable acts of civil disobedience came in 1985 when he was arrested at the South African Embassy in Washington, D.C. protesting against Apartheid and for the release of freedom fighter Nelson Mandela.

This is a special time, King said, as he spoke to NNPA members, friends and industry leaders in attendance at the award ceremony.

Showing a lighter side, King quipped, I like the word legacy, but it means youre getting older.

King also talked about the impact of social media and how it can be difficult to understand the shorthand that some young people use to communicate via text and social platforms like Twitter.

I have to ask the kids to tell me what these things mean, because I dont do Twitter or Facebook, he said.

Striking a more serious tone, King, the former president of the legendary Southern Christian Leadership Conference, said that the Black community must do better.

King continued: We have to educate our community. We, as a community, have the ability to do much more.

In an effort to help African-Americans realize and capitalize on the vast spending power in the community, King founded Realizing the Dream, a foundation that is focused on helping community-based organizers to ignite investment in local neighborhoods and to foster peaceful coexistence within America and abroad.

If we decide to divest, or even talk about [boycotting] some of the companies where we are spending billions of our dollarswe wont see insensitivity, King said.

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., the president and CEO of the NNPA, said that the organization was especially proud and delighted to present the prestigious award to King.

For decades, more than anyone else, Martin Luther King III has continued to personify and represent the living legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for freedom, justice and equality, Chavis said. He has carried on his fathers legacy quite honorably, quite admirable, and quite successfully.

In 2008, as former president and CEO of the King Center, King spoke on behalf of then-Democratic Presidential Nominee Barack Obama at the Democratic National Convention, where he highlighted the need for improved health care, quality education, housing, technology and equal justice.

King also served on the Board of Directors for the Drum Major Institute for Public Policy and co-founded Bounce TV, the first independently-owned, digital multicast network featuring around-the-clock programming geared towards African-Americans.

I remember going to my mothers alma matter in Ohio and seeing the statue of Horace Mann which was inscribed with the words be ashamed to die until you have won some kind of victory for humanity, King said.

As a child, those are words that are very powerful. As an adult, I say we can win victory at schools, we can win victory in our places of worship, we can win victory in our cities, our counties, our states, our country and some may win in our world.

King continued: I say, be ashamed to die until you have done something to make your community better.

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Martin Luther King Jr. – Biography – Nobel Prize

Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968) was born Michael Luther King, Jr., but later had his name changed to Martin. His grandfather began the family’s long tenure as pastors of the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, serving from 1914 to 1931; his father has served from then until the present, and from 1960 until his death Martin Luther acted as co-pastor. Martin Luther attended segregated public schools in Georgia, graduating from high school at the age of fifteen; he received the B. A. degree in 1948 from Morehouse College, a distinguished Negro institution of Atlanta from which both his father and grandfather had graduated. After three years of theological study at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania where he was elected president of a predominantly white senior class, he was awarded the B.D. in 1951. With a fellowship won at Crozer, he enrolled in graduate studies at Boston University, completing his residence for the doctorate in 1953 and receiving the degree in 1955. In Boston he met and married Coretta Scott, a young woman of uncommon intellectual and artistic attainments. Two sons and two daughters were born into the family.

In 1954, Martin Luther King became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. Always a strong worker for civil rights for members of his race, King was, by this time, a member of the executive committee of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the leading organization of its kind in the nation. He was ready, then, early in December, 1955, to accept the leadership of the first great Negro nonviolent demonstration of contemporary times in the United States, the bus boycott described by Gunnar Jahn in his presentation speech in honor of the laureate. The boycott lasted 382 days. On December 21, 1956, after the Supreme Court of the United States had declared unconstitutional the laws requiring segregation on buses, Negroes and whites rode the buses as equals. During these days of boycott, King was arrested, his home was bombed, he was subjected to personal abuse, but at the same time he emerged as a Negro leader of the first rank.

In 1957 he was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization formed to provide new leadership for the now burgeoning civil rights movement. The ideals for this organization he took from Christianity; its operational techniques from Gandhi. In the eleven-year period between 1957 and 1968, King traveled over six million miles and spoke over twenty-five hundred times, appearing wherever there was injustice, protest, and action; and meanwhile he wrote five books as well as numerous articles. In these years, he led a massive protest in Birmingham, Alabama, that caught the attention of the entire world, providing what he called a coalition of conscience. and inspiring his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”, a manifesto of the Negro revolution; he planned the drives in Alabama for the registration of Negroes as voters; he directed the peaceful march on Washington, D.C., of 250,000 people to whom he delivered his address, “l Have a Dream”, he conferred with President John F. Kennedy and campaigned for President Lyndon B. Johnson; he was arrested upwards of twenty times and assaulted at least four times; he was awarded five honorary degrees; was named Man of the Year by Time magazine in 1963; and became not only the symbolic leader of American blacks but also a world figure.

At the age of thirty-five, Martin Luther King, Jr., was the youngest man to have received the Nobel Peace Prize. When notified of his selection, he announced that he would turn over the prize money of $54,123 to the furtherance of the civil rights movement.

On the evening of April 4, 1968, while standing on the balcony of his motel room in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a protest march in sympathy with striking garbage workers of that city, he was assassinated.

Selected Bibliography

Adams, Russell, Great Negroes Past and Present, pp. 106-107. Chicago, Afro-Am Publishing Co., 1963.

Bennett, Lerone, Jr., What Manner of Man: A Biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. Chicago, Johnson, 1964.

I Have a Dream: The Story of Martin Luther King in Text and Pictures. New York, Time Life Books, 1968.

King, Martin Luther, Jr., The Measure of a Man. Philadelphia. The Christian Education Press, 1959. Two devotional addresses.

King, Martin Luther, Jr., Strength to Love. New York, Harper & Row, 1963. Sixteen sermons and one essay entitled “Pilgrimage to Nonviolence.”

King, Martin Luther, Jr., Stride toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story. New York, Harper, 1958.

King, Martin Luther, Jr., The Trumpet of Conscience. New York, Harper & Row, 1968.

King, Martin Luther, Jr., Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? New York, Harper & Row, 1967.

King, Martin Luther, Jr., Why We Can’t Wait. New York, Harper & Row, 1963.

“Man of the Year”, Time, 83 (January 3, 1964) 13-16; 25-27.

“Martin Luther King, Jr.”, in Current Biography Yearbook 1965, ed. by Charles Moritz, pp. 220-223. New York, H.W. Wilson.

Reddick, Lawrence D., Crusader without Violence: A Biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. New York, Harper, 1959.

From Nobel Lectures, Peace 1951-1970, Editor Frederick W. Haberman, Elsevier Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1972

This autobiography/biography was written at the time of the award and first published in the book series Les Prix Nobel. It was later edited and republished in Nobel Lectures. To cite this document, always state the source as shown above.

* Note from Nobelprize.org: This biography uses the word “Negro”. Even though this word today is considered inappropriate, the biography is published in its original version in view of keeping it as a historical document.

To cite this page MLA style: “Martin Luther King Jr. – Biography”. Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 25 Jun 2017.

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Md. man named Martin Luther King receives 20 years for attacking … – WJLA

Judge’s gavel (ABC7 file photo) Martin Luther King Jr., 27, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for viciously assaulting and shooting at his girlfriend during an argument in Oct. 2016 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. In May 2017, King Jr. pled guilty to first-degree assault and use of a firearm in a crime of violence, according to a release from the Office of the State’s Attorney for Anne Arundel County. King Jr. will serve the first five years of his 20 year sentence without the possibility of parole for first-degree assault. The release states King Jr. knocked his girlfriend to the floor, grabbed her by the sweatshirt and “picked her up over his head and threw her” during an argument at a home. Following the attack, the woman left in her car and was followed by King Jr. in his vehicle. According to the release, he drove into oncoming traffic, pulled up beside her, and fired multiple gunshots at her car. To stay up to date with crime in your area, click here to subscribe to our Fighting Back Against Crime newsletter.

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How Martin Luther King Persuaded John Kennedy to Support the Civil Rights Cause – New York Times

Kennedy was amused. Imagine Martin Luther King having a bigot for a father, he said. Then: Well, we all have our fathers, dont we? That story has been around at least since 1965, when Arthur Schlesinger Jr. published A Thousand Days. So too the stories Levingston goes on to tell in Kennedy and King about the sit-ins, the Freedom Rides; the Albany, Ga., and Birmingham campaigns; the integration of the universities of Mississippi and Alabama; the march on Washington and much more, including several memorable conversations between King and Kennedy. Levingston thanks his wife and numerous archivists for their help with the research, but his greatest debt, fully acknowledged, is to books available in most public libraries: oral histories, memoirs, biographies and narrative histories, including Parting the Waters, the first volume of Taylor Branchs monumental trilogy of America in the King years. Yet people who think the past is important should be the last to make a fetish of the new. As long as racial equality and justice elude us, writers, artists and filmmakers will return to the climactic years of our Second Reconstruction, when African-Americans and their white allies forced the nation to begin to make good on the promise of freedom, equality under the law and voting rights embedded 100 years earlier in the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments. Thats a good thing, all the more so as the present generation, which was born in an era of mass incarceration of black men and which has come of age at marches and rallies protesting police killings, tries to figure out where we should go from here. Levingston, the nonfiction book editor of The Washington Post and the author of Little Demon in the City of Light and The Kennedy Baby, writes with passion and flair. If these pages dont rouse you, call your doctor. There are places where Levingston the writer (displaying the occupational weaknesses for stark contrasts and sudden twists of drama) gets the better of Levingston the historian. It is wrong to say even with King as a source that in 1955, at the time of Kings arrival in Montgomery, the Southern black was hunched in fear, cringing and passive, broken by the white man. As far back as Howell Rainess My Soul Is Rested (1977), authors have shown that everywhere King went, the stage for confrontation was set by community leaders and grass-roots organizers, including, as Levingston notes, Kings own father. In Montgomery in 1955, one of those organizers was Rosa Parks, whom Levingston describes as an efficient volunteer secretary of the N.A.A.C.P.s local chapter (in whose heart lay a well of quiet activism). Parks may have been good with the carbon paper and coffee machine, but by the time of the bus boycott, her rsum also featured decades of not-so-quiet resistance. She had been fighting Jim Crow injustice, including violence against black women, since the Scottsboro trials in the 1930s. Levingston frames his book as a study in leadership, and it is, but not the kind he suggests in his introduction, when he evokes Thomas Carlyle and writes of great individuals, or heroes, shaping the worlds destiny. Kennedy was not a leader in civil rights. Until the last months of his life, he saw the struggle for equality as a righteous distraction from critical domestic issues (including taxes and steel prices) and Cold War foreign affairs. When he acted, he did so in response to the horrific violence peaceful protest made manifest: the clubbing of Freedom Riders; the bombing of black businesses, homes and churches; the attacks on demonstrators with jack boots, water cannons and dogs; the racist riots in Oxford, Miss. Only in June 1963, after the battle of Birmingham and the confrontation with George Wallace in Tuscaloosa, did Kennedy do what King had been urging him to do all along: call civil rights a moral issue and acknowledge that the country faced a crisis that could not be met by repressive police action or quieted by token moves or talk. Hours after Kennedys speech, Medgar Evers was assassinated. Kennedy sent legislation to Congress, but it was left to Lyndon Johnson to make the Civil Rights Act of 1964 law. That leaves King, who was indeed a leader, as well as a teacher. Its a difficult thing, he said, to teach a president. Levingstons point is that King taught Kennedy to be a leader, and he did, but he did not do it alone, and Kings relationship with his own followers was always complicated. Homegrown heroes, old and young (the subject of books like John Dittmers Local People, Charles M. Paynes Ive Got the Light of Freedom and Danielle L. McGuires At the Dark End of the Street), taught King and his closest associates while they in turn taught the Kennedys. There go my people, King said, quoting Gandhi. I must catch up with them, for I am their leader. Levingstons frame does not fit, but he is too good a writer to get in the way of his history for long. Kennedy and King will most likely leave readers thinking that what is needed today is not more leaders, a few men and women shaping our destiny, but more followers. What is needed are ordinary people: alert, informed, engaged, mobilized, idealistic but not nave, critical but not hopeless, confident about who they are and what they want but able and inclined to work with all sorts of others, exercising rights won at enormous cost, starting with the right to vote. What is needed, in short, are more citizens, prepared to lead our leaders toward a more promising land. James Goodman, a professor of history and creative writing at Rutgers University, Newark, is the author of Stories of Scottsboro, Blackout and But Where Is the Lamb? A version of this review appears in print on July 2, 2017, on Page BR9 of the Sunday Book Review with the headline: Profiles in Caution.

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Aspen Ideas Festival: What you need to know about Martin Luther King – Minnesota Public Radio News

Jun 29, 2017 Originally, Clarence B. Jones didn’t want to work with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. In February of 1960, Jones received a call from a prominent judge who asked if he would help King with some legal troubles. King was indicted on tax evasion. As Jones told journalist Michele Norris at the 2017 Aspen Ideas Festival, he didn’t want to leave his home in California to work in Montgomery, Alabama. Jones was a lawyer who specialized in entertainment law. “Just because some preacher got his hand caught in the cookie jar stealing that ain’t my problem,” he said. As luck would have it, King was on his way to California to perform a sermon and paid Jones a visit the next day. During that visit he tried to persuade Jones to help him. Jones was unmoved. It took that sermon from King, which he talked about “the role and responsibility of the negro professional” to convince the young lawyer to drop what he was doing and join the fight for Civil Rights. Jones sat down with Norris to talk about his work with King, and how he helped write some of King’s most famous speeches and letters, such as “I Have a Dream” and “The Letter from Birmingham Jail.” That letter was written piecemeal, with Jones sneaking scraps of paper to King while he was in jail. “I was too busy dealing with other things. I never read the letter,” Jones admitted. When he finally did, he was struck by King’s words. The web audio for this segment will be available later today. Norman Lear and Khizr Khan on American values and the Constitution Spotlight on health Correction (June 29, 2017): An earlier version of this story was incorrect in identifying the person who asked Clarence B. Jones to work with Martin Luther King Jr. It was a prominent judge. The story has been updated.

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Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Center to become emergency shelter by the 2018 hurricane season – The Independent Florida Alligator

Gainesvilles Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Center will serve as a hurricane shelter in 2018. The shelter will be available to all Alachua County residents and will be renovated with a $200k grant from the Florida Division of Emergency Management. District 1 City Commissioner Charles Goston reached out to Alachua County and the City of Gainesville about a year ago to discuss his concerns about the hurricane shelter on the east side of Gainesville, said Chip Skinner, an assistant public information officer for Gainesville. Residents of the east side of Gainesville have been limited in the number of shelters that are available during an emergency, Goston said. The ease of use and location were the main concerns for finding a new hurricane shelter, Skinner said. He said the county usually has to wait for approval from the school board to open shelters because nine out of the 11 current shelters are schools. With the center, they dont need approval. With it not being involved with the school board, its much easier for us to open that as a shelter, Skinner said. If we need to shelter additional people, its not affecting a school, for instance. He said Alachua County and Gainesville do not have a contractor for renovations yet because they have to do an engineering study first. He said the engineering study will help Gainesville and Alachua County determine if the renovations theyve proposed are needed. These include window screens, hardened doorways, electrical work and minor structural improvements. The final cost of the project will not be determined until an engineering study is complete, with work to begin shortly after, Skinner said. He said once renovations are complete, the facility will be available for wind-related emergencies and as a post-storm shelter. Alachua County determines when the shelters open, Skinner said. The changes will bring the building into compliance with FDEM and Federal Emergency Management Agency standards. He said Alachua County and Gainesville do not currently have plans to open more hurricane shelters. I am happy that my advocacy on behalf of our citizens contributed to the city receiving this state award to harden the Martin Luther King Jr. center for use in emergencies, so that citizens in District 1 will have another close-by option for a safe haven, Goston said.

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Martin Luther King Jr. play coming to Lindsey theatre – Flor-Ala (subscription)

The assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is a well-known event that took place the evening of April 4, 1968. However, most people do not know what happened the night before. UNA Summer Theatre will present The Mountaintop, a fictional account of the night before Dr. Kings final day. Performances will take place at the George S. Lindsey Theatre June 29, 30, and July 1 at 7:30 p.m., and July 2 at 2 p.m. Playwright Katori Halls Olivier Award-winning drama takes place in room 306 of the Lorraine Motel and shows Dr. King and his visit by a maid after delivering his well-known Ive Been to the Mountaintop speech. Senior Kelley Riddle, assistant director and stage manager, said she decided to work on the play after reading the script. As soon as I read it, I was moved and really motivated to work on it because of the message it sends to the audience, Riddle said. UNA theatre alumnus Michael David Baldwin will portray Dr. King, while sophomore Destini Croom, a current theatre student, will play the role of the young maid, Camae. Baldwin said the play will bring up some of the controversial parts of Dr. Kings life. A lot of people think of him as this holy figure that is unstained, and this play challenges that idea of him, Baldwin said. Croom said she fell in love with her character after reading the script. This is a heavy play, and she brings the funny aspect to it and the lightheartedness to it, but at the same time, she has her own backstory, Croom said. Croom said while Camae is an entirely fictional character, she got her name from Halls mother. Charlton James, associate professor of theatre, said he chose to direct the play because of its relation to current issues. The real running theme in the play is that the work is not done, (and) that we have to pass on the baton to the next generation, James said. Theres a lot of work that we have to do in order to live a peaceful, happy life with each other. Croom said she believes the issues the play relates to are not just race-related, but instead relate to everyone. Baldwin said while some may see the play as controversial, everyone who sees it will be thinking about it after it ends. I think no matter whether you like it or not, this is the type of play that sits with you, Baldwin said. Youre going to be thinking about it afterwards. Croom said she believes the play can get the attention of people who are not working to solve the issues people are facing today. I feel like a lot of people, especially nowadays, they sit around and wait (for issues to be resolved), Croom said. They speak about the issues, but they dont want to actually help with the issues. I feel like with this (play), a lot of people will probably get a wake-up call. James said there will be a discussion after Sundays show, where attendees can ask cast and crew questions about the production. Tickets are $15 for adults and $5 for UNA faculty, staff, students and alumni. Tickets are available at the Department of Entertainment Industry Office (open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m.), online at https://www.una.edu/theatre/productions.htmlor at the door. For more information, contact Wanda Dixon, events coordinator, at 256-765-4342.

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MARTIN LUTHER KING III HONORED WITH 2017 LIFETIME LEGACY AWARD – The Chicago Citizen

MARTIN LUTHER KING III HONORED WITH 2017 LIFETIME LEGACY AWARD WASHINGTON/NNPA Newswire/The National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) honored Martin Luther King, III with the 2017 Lifetime Legacy Award during the groups annual conference held on June 20-24 at the Gaylord Convention Center at the National Harbor in Prince Georges County, Md. As the oldest son of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Mrs. Coretta Scott King, Martin Luther King III serves as an ambassador of his parents legacy of nonviolent social change. In 1997, King was elected as the fourth president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) where he co-sponsored the 40th Anniversary of the historic March on Washington. Following his service with SCLC, King founded Realizing the Dream, which focused on redressing poverty by strategizing with community organizers to ignite investment in the local neighborhoods and foster peaceful coexistence within the U.S. and internationally. For decades, more than anyone else, Martin Luther King III has continued to personify and represent the living legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for freedom, justice and equality, said Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., the president and CEO of the NNPA. King accepted the Lifetime Legacy Award on Friday evening (June 23). On Tuesday, June 20, the NNPA kicked o the conference with the National Black Parents Town Hall Meeting on Educational Excellence featuring radio personality and community activist DJ EZ Street; Hilary Shelton, the director of the NAACPs Washington Bureau; Dr. Marietta English, the president of the National Alliance of Black School Educators; and Lynn Jennings of Education Trust. The conference also featured a panel discussion about the documentary Pardons of Innocence: The Wilmington Ten; a conversation with NNPA members who operate publications that are more than 100 years old; and a presentation by the Nissan Foundation on 25 years of community service. Dr. Chavis said that support of the NNPAs partners, sponsors and advertisers is critically important and appreciated. NNPA partners include: General Motors, Ford Motor Company, Reynolds America Incorporated, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The conference was sponsored by Volkswagen, Toyota, Nissan, Comcast, AT&T, Facebook, Macys, Koch Industries, New York Life, Northrop Grumman, Coca Cola, AARP, Goldman Sacs, and Prince Georges County.

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MLK motorcade founder George Burney Sr. dies – WHAS 11.com

WHAS 6:18 PM. EDT June 28, 2017 George Burney Sr. (Photo: WHAS11) LOUISVILLE (WHAS11) A longtime voice in the Civil Rights movement passed away. George Burney Senior founded the annual motorcade and parade honoring Dr. Martin Luther King. He was a fixture on WHAS11 when it came to our MLK Coverage. In 2016, he won the MLK Freedom Award from the Mayor. Burney actually began his career as a dancer before becoming so entrenched in the Civil Rights movement. Burney was also the founder of the community activist group known as PRIDE, People’s Rights in Demanding Equality. The mayor called him a trailblazer. Burney passed away after an illness, he was 89-years-old. Jefferson County Circuit Court Clerk David L. Nicholson released the following statement: We are saddened to learn of the passing of George Burney, and we join the community and his many friends in mourning his death. George was a tireless proponent for civil rights and a steadfast advocate for peace in this community for six decades. He truly lived his life based on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.s message of equality and peace. He loved his hometown of Louisville, especially the children of this community, and leaves behind a lasting legacy for all of us to follow. He will be greatly missed.” Mayor Fischers statement: George was a trailblazer, first on the stage and TV screen as a dancer, and then on the streets, as a tireless advocate for civil rights. Like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Georges fight for civil and human rights extended far beyond his hometown, into places like Seattle, Vancouver and Alaska. George was a man of great optimism and energy who willingly shared his time and his talents long past the age when others might have moved off stage. I was blessed to have known him as a friend and mentor. I grieve with his wife, Barbara, even as I celebrate a life so well lived. 2017 WHAS-TV

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NNPA Honors Martin Luther King III with Lifetime Legacy Award – Black Press USA

By Stacy M. Brown (NNPA Newswire Contributor) The National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) honored Martin Luther King III with the 2017 Lifetime Legacy Award, as the group wrapped up its annual summer conference, at the Gaylord Convention Center at the National Harbor in Maryland. King, the oldest son of the iconic civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., said that the tribute tops all others hes received, because the Black Press has meant a lot to his family, especially his father, as he fought for freedom, justice and equality. The NNPA is one of the most impactful institutions our community has and every week the newspapers of the Black Press reach at least 22 million people in our communities, said King. And every week the Black Press tackles issues that we deal with, that we cannot find in the mainstream newspapers. King continued: The Black Press provides the information thats needed for African-Americans and if not for the Black Press, I would say that, during the Civil Rights era, my father would not have been successful. The African-American [journalists] had their ears to the ground to what was important in our community. King, who attended the awards ceremony with family members, graduated from his fathers alma mater, Morehouse College, with a degree in political science. While at Morehouse, King was selected by former President Jimmy Carter to serve in the United States delegation to the Republic of Congo for participation in their centennial celebration ceremonies. Like his father, King participated in many protests for civil rights and one of the more notable acts of civil disobedience came in 1985 when he was arrested at the South African Embassy in Washington, D.C. protesting against Apartheid and for the release of freedom fighter Nelson Mandela. This is a special time, King said, as he spoke to NNPA members, friends and industry leaders in attendance at the award ceremony. Showing a lighter side, King quipped, I like the word legacy, but it means youre getting older. King also talked about the impact of social media and how it can be difficult to understand the shorthand that some young people use to communicate via text and social platforms like Twitter. I have to ask the kids to tell me what these things mean, because I dont do Twitter or Facebook, he said. Striking a more serious tone, King, the former president of the legendary Southern Christian Leadership Conference, said that the Black community must do better. King continued: We have to educate our community. We, as a community, have the ability to do much more. In an effort to help African-Americans realize and capitalize on the vast spending power in the community, King founded Realizing the Dream, a foundation that is focused on helping community-based organizers to ignite investment in local neighborhoods and to foster peaceful coexistence within America and abroad. If we decide to divest, or even talk about [boycotting] some of the companies where we are spending billions of our dollarswe wont see insensitivity, King said. Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., the president and CEO of the NNPA, said that the organization was especially proud and delighted to present the prestigious award to King. For decades, more than anyone else, Martin Luther King III has continued to personify and represent the living legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for freedom, justice and equality, Chavis said. He has carried on his fathers legacy quite honorably, quite admirable, and quite successfully. In 2008, as former president and CEO of the King Center, King spoke on behalf of then-Democratic Presidential Nominee Barack Obama at the Democratic National Convention, where he highlighted the need for improved health care, quality education, housing, technology and equal justice. King also served on the Board of Directors for the Drum Major Institute for Public Policy and co-founded Bounce TV, the first independently-owned, digital multicast network featuring around-the-clock programming geared towards African-Americans. I remember going to my mothers alma matter in Ohio and seeing the statue of Horace Mann which was inscribed with the words be ashamed to die until you have won some kind of victory for humanity, King said. As a child, those are words that are very powerful. As an adult, I say we can win victory at schools, we can win victory in our places of worship, we can win victory in our cities, our counties, our states, our country and some may win in our world. King continued: I say, be ashamed to die until you have done something to make your community better.

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Martin Luther King Jr. – Biography – Nobel Prize

Martin Luther King, Jr., (January 15, 1929-April 4, 1968) was born Michael Luther King, Jr., but later had his name changed to Martin. His grandfather began the family’s long tenure as pastors of the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, serving from 1914 to 1931; his father has served from then until the present, and from 1960 until his death Martin Luther acted as co-pastor. Martin Luther attended segregated public schools in Georgia, graduating from high school at the age of fifteen; he received the B. A. degree in 1948 from Morehouse College, a distinguished Negro institution of Atlanta from which both his father and grandfather had graduated. After three years of theological study at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania where he was elected president of a predominantly white senior class, he was awarded the B.D. in 1951. With a fellowship won at Crozer, he enrolled in graduate studies at Boston University, completing his residence for the doctorate in 1953 and receiving the degree in 1955. In Boston he met and married Coretta Scott, a young woman of uncommon intellectual and artistic attainments. Two sons and two daughters were born into the family. In 1954, Martin Luther King became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. Always a strong worker for civil rights for members of his race, King was, by this time, a member of the executive committee of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the leading organization of its kind in the nation. He was ready, then, early in December, 1955, to accept the leadership of the first great Negro nonviolent demonstration of contemporary times in the United States, the bus boycott described by Gunnar Jahn in his presentation speech in honor of the laureate. The boycott lasted 382 days. On December 21, 1956, after the Supreme Court of the United States had declared unconstitutional the laws requiring segregation on buses, Negroes and whites rode the buses as equals. During these days of boycott, King was arrested, his home was bombed, he was subjected to personal abuse, but at the same time he emerged as a Negro leader of the first rank. In 1957 he was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization formed to provide new leadership for the now burgeoning civil rights movement. The ideals for this organization he took from Christianity; its operational techniques from Gandhi. In the eleven-year period between 1957 and 1968, King traveled over six million miles and spoke over twenty-five hundred times, appearing wherever there was injustice, protest, and action; and meanwhile he wrote five books as well as numerous articles. In these years, he led a massive protest in Birmingham, Alabama, that caught the attention of the entire world, providing what he called a coalition of conscience. and inspiring his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”, a manifesto of the Negro revolution; he planned the drives in Alabama for the registration of Negroes as voters; he directed the peaceful march on Washington, D.C., of 250,000 people to whom he delivered his address, “l Have a Dream”, he conferred with President John F. Kennedy and campaigned for President Lyndon B. Johnson; he was arrested upwards of twenty times and assaulted at least four times; he was awarded five honorary degrees; was named Man of the Year by Time magazine in 1963; and became not only the symbolic leader of American blacks but also a world figure. At the age of thirty-five, Martin Luther King, Jr., was the youngest man to have received the Nobel Peace Prize. When notified of his selection, he announced that he would turn over the prize money of $54,123 to the furtherance of the civil rights movement. On the evening of April 4, 1968, while standing on the balcony of his motel room in Memphis, Tennessee, where he was to lead a protest march in sympathy with striking garbage workers of that city, he was assassinated. Selected Bibliography Adams, Russell, Great Negroes Past and Present, pp. 106-107. Chicago, Afro-Am Publishing Co., 1963. Bennett, Lerone, Jr., What Manner of Man: A Biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. Chicago, Johnson, 1964. I Have a Dream: The Story of Martin Luther King in Text and Pictures. New York, Time Life Books, 1968. King, Martin Luther, Jr., The Measure of a Man. Philadelphia. The Christian Education Press, 1959. Two devotional addresses. King, Martin Luther, Jr., Strength to Love. New York, Harper & Row, 1963. Sixteen sermons and one essay entitled “Pilgrimage to Nonviolence.” King, Martin Luther, Jr., Stride toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story. New York, Harper, 1958. King, Martin Luther, Jr., The Trumpet of Conscience. New York, Harper & Row, 1968. King, Martin Luther, Jr., Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? New York, Harper & Row, 1967. King, Martin Luther, Jr., Why We Can’t Wait. New York, Harper & Row, 1963. “Man of the Year”, Time, 83 (January 3, 1964) 13-16; 25-27. “Martin Luther King, Jr.”, in Current Biography Yearbook 1965, ed. by Charles Moritz, pp. 220-223. New York, H.W. Wilson. Reddick, Lawrence D., Crusader without Violence: A Biography of Martin Luther King, Jr. New York, Harper, 1959. From Nobel Lectures, Peace 1951-1970, Editor Frederick W. Haberman, Elsevier Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1972 This autobiography/biography was written at the time of the award and first published in the book series Les Prix Nobel. It was later edited and republished in Nobel Lectures. To cite this document, always state the source as shown above. * Note from Nobelprize.org: This biography uses the word “Negro”. Even though this word today is considered inappropriate, the biography is published in its original version in view of keeping it as a historical document. To cite this page MLA style: “Martin Luther King Jr. – Biography”. Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 25 Jun 2017.

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